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BigMac
June 5th, 2004, 05:00 PM
Yahoo! News
June 5, 2004

Former President Ronald Reagan Dies at 93

Associated Press

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Slide Show: Ronald Reagan (http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?p=news&g=events/pl/110403reagan&e=1&tmpl=sl)

WASHINGTON - Ronald Reagan, the cheerful crusader who devoted his presidency to winning the Cold War, trying to scale back government and making people believe it was "morning again in America," died Saturday after a long twilight struggle with Alzheimer's disease, a family friend said. He was 93.

He died at his home in California, according to the friend, who spoke on condition of anonymity.

The White House was told his health had taken a turn for the worse in the last several days.

Five years after leaving office, the nation's 40th president told the world in November 1994 that he had been diagnosed with the early stages of Alzheimer's, an incurable illness that destroys brain cells. He said he had begun "the journey that will lead me into the sunset of my life."

Reagan body was expected to be taken to his presidential library and museum in Simi Valley, Calif., and then flown to Washington to lie in state in the Capitol Rotunda. His funeral was expected to be at the National Cathedral, an event likely to draw world leaders. The body was to be returned to California for a sunset burial at his library.

Reagan lived longer than any U.S. president, spending his last decade in the shrouded seclusion wrought by his disease, tended by his wife, Nancy, whom he called Mommy, and the select few closest to him. Now, Gerald Ford, Jimmy Carter, George H.W. Bush and Bill Clinton are the surviving ex-presidents.

Although fiercely protective of Reagan's privacy, the former first lady let people know his mental condition had deteriorated terribly. Last month, she said: "Ronnie's long journey has finally taken him to a distant place where I can no longer reach him."
Reagan's oldest daughter, Maureen, from his first marriage, died in August 2001 at age 60 from cancer. Three other children survive: Michael, from his first marriage, and Patti Davis and Ron from his second.

Over two terms, from 1981 to 1989, Reagan reshaped the Republican Party in his conservative image, fixed his eye on the demise of the Soviet Union and Eastern European communism and tripled the national debt to $3 trillion in his singleminded competition with the other superpower.

Taking office at age 69, Reagan had already lived a career outside Washington, one that spanned work as a radio sports announcer, an actor, a television performer, a spokesman for the General Electric Co., and a two-term governor of California.

Copyright 2004 Yahoo! Inc.

Agglomeration
June 5th, 2004, 09:43 PM
Here's a second, longer article, with a detailed bio:
Former President Ronald Reagan Dies at 93

By JEFF WILSON and TERENCE HUNT, Associated Press Writers

LOS ANGELES - Ronald Reagan (news - web sites), the cheerful crusader who devoted his presidency to winning the Cold War, trying to scale back government and making people believe it was "morning again in America," died Saturday after a long twilight struggle with Alzheimer's disease (news - web sites).

"My family and I would like the world to know that President Ronald Reagan has passed away after 10 years of Alzheimer's disease at 93 years of age. We appreciate everyone's prayers," Nancy Reagan said in a statement.

Nancy Reagan, along with children Ron and Patti Davis, were at the couple's Los Angeles home when Reagan died at 1 p.m. PDT of pneumonia complicated by Alzheimer's disease, said Joanne Drake, who represents the family. Son Michael arrived a short time later, she said.

In Paris, President Bush (news - web sites) called Reagan's death "a sad day for America."

The U.S. flag over the White House along with flags elsewhere was lowered to half-staff. At ballparks and at the Belmont Stakes, there were moments of silence.

Five years after leaving office, the nation's 40th president told the world in November 1994 that he had been diagnosed with the early stages of Alzheimer's, an incurable illness that destroys brain cells. He said he had begun "the journey that will lead me into the sunset of my life."

Reagan's body was expected to be taken to his presidential library and museum in Simi Valley, Calif., and then flown to Washington to lie in state in the Capitol Rotunda. His funeral was expected to be at the National Cathedral, an event likely to draw world leaders. The body was to be returned to California for a sunset burial at his library.

Reagan began his life in a four-room apartment over the general store in Tampico, Ill. During his 93 years, he was a radio sports announcer, an actor, a two-term governor of California and a crusader for conservative politics.

Over two presidential terms, from 1981 to 1989, Reagan reshaped the Republican Party in his conservative image, fixed his eye on the demise of the Soviet Union and Eastern European communism and tripled the national debt to $3 trillion in his singleminded competition with the other superpower.

"Ronald Reagan had a higher claim than any other leader to have won the Cold War for liberty and he did it without a shot being fired," former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher said Saturday.

At the time of Reagan's retirement, his very name suggested a populist brand of conservative politics that still inspires the Republican Party.

He declared at the outset, "Government is not the solution, it's the problem," although reducing that government proved harder to do in reality than in his rhetoric.

Even so, he challenged the status quo on welfare and other programs that had put government on a growth spurt ever since Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal strengthened the federal presence in the lives of average Americans.

In foreign affairs, he built the arsenals of war while seeking and achieving arms control agreements with the Soviet Union.

In his second term, Reagan was dogged by revelations that he authorized secret arms sales to Iran while seeking Iranian aid to gain release of American hostages held in Lebanon. Some of the money was used to aid rebels fighting the leftist government of Nicaragua.

Despite the ensuing investigations, he left office in 1989 with the highest popularity rating of any retiring president in the history of modern-day public opinion polls.

That reflected, in part, his uncommon ability as a communicator and his way of connecting with ordinary Americans, even as his policies infuriated the left and as his simple verities made him the butt of jokes. "Morning again in America" became his re-election campaign mantra in 1984, but typified his appeal to patriotrism through both terms.

Reagan's presidency overlaid the spendthrift 1980s, tagged by some as the "Greed Decade." It was a time of conspicuous consumption, hostile takeovers, new billionaires. American power was ascendant after the angst of the 1970s over Vietnam and the release of the hostages in Iran at the start of his presidency.

In large ways and small from the president's tough talk against the Evil Empire and "welfare queens" to his wife's designer dresses and new china for the White House the Reagans seemed to embody the times.

And for all the glowing talk of Reagan's folksy appeal and infectious optimism, it was a time of growing division between rich and poor. Now, as then, critics point to Reaganomics in lamenting big defense spending at the expense of domestic needs and a growing national debt.

Reagan, a Democrat in his acting days, got a taste of politics when he served as president of the Screen Actors Guild (news - web sites) from 1947 to 1952.

He appeared in more than 50 films over two decades in Hollywood, with roles ranging from a college professor who raises a chimpanzee in "Bedtime for Bonzo" to doomed football star George Gipp in "Knute Rockne: All-American" in which he wanted his teammates to "win just one for the Gipper."

Reagan lived longer than any U.S. president, spending his last decade in the shrouded seclusion wrought by his disease, tended by his wife, Nancy, whom he called Mommy, and the select few closest to him. Now, Gerald Ford, Jimmy Carter, George H.W. Bush and Bill Clinton (news - web sites) are the surviving ex-presidents.

"Ronald Reagan was an excellent leader of our nation during challenging times at home and abroad. We extend our deepest condolences and prayers to Nancy and his family," Ford said.

Clinton called Reagan "a true American original."

Democratic presidential hopeful John Kerry (news - web sites) said that Reagan's "love of country was infectious. Even when he was breaking Democrats hearts, he did so with a smile and in the spirit of honest and open debate."

Although she was fiercely protective of Reagan's privacy, Nancy Reagan let people know the former president's mental condition had deteriorated terribly. Last month, she said: "Ronnie's long journey has finally taken him to a distant place where I can no longer reach him."

At 69, Reagan was the oldest man ever elected president when he was chosen in 1980, by an unexpectedly large margin over the incumbent Carter.

Near-tragedy struck on his 70th day as president. On March 30, 1981, Reagan was leaving a Washington hotel after addressing labor leaders when a young drifter, John Hinckley, fired six shots at him. A bullet lodged an inch from Reagan's heart, but he recovered.

Four years later he was re-elected by an even greater margin, carrying 49 of the 50 states in defeating Democrat Walter F. Mondale, Carter's vice president.

Reagan's oldest daughter, Maureen, from his first marriage, died in August 2001 at age 60 from cancer. Three other children survive: Michael, from his first marriage, and Patti Davis and Ron from his second.

___

On the Net: Reagan Library official Web site: http://www.reagan.utexas.edu

Kris
June 8th, 2004, 06:55 AM
June 8, 2004

NYC

Reality Check During Time of Mourning

By CLYDE HABERMAN

ALTHOUGH flags are at half-staff and heads are bowed in mourning, it does Ronald Reagan no dishonor to look back at his presidency with a clear eye. Even acolytes of the late president - Rudolph W. Giuliani comes to mind - often warn against romanticized views of the world.

In that spirit, it seems reasonable, and more than polite, to say that Mr. Reagan will not land on any list of New Yorkers' all-time best friends in the White House. His administration's policies on public housing, job training, welfare, mass transit, AIDS treatment - nearly all dealt severe blows not only to New York but also to cities across the country.

Make no mistake, former Gov. Mario M. Cuomo said yesterday, "I was completely enamored of him." Mr. Cuomo, whose governorship overlapped Mr. Reagan's White House years, was among many who cited the president's sincerity, affability and optimism.

All the same, he said, Ronald Reagan was "the triumph of persona over policy." And that policy, described by some of the president's own lieutenants as a calculated attempt to dry up certain federal programs, inflicted disproportionate pain on New York and other cities.

"The result was less for health, less for welfare, less for job training, less for all the things that cities depended on the federal government for," Mr. Cuomo said. Federal taxes may have been cut, he said, but that only shifted the burden to states and municipalities. "Sales taxes, property taxes, payroll taxes - all are regressive and all went up dramatically," the former governor said.

He added: "Regrettably, President Reagan made the denial of compassion for the people who needed it most sound like a virtue."

Edward I. Koch, New York's mayor throughout the 1980's, the Reagan years, offered a more benign view yesterday. "I thought he was a terrific president," Mr. Koch said. "I wish we had more like him." Besides being a man of good cheer, he said, Mr. Reagan was always true to his word.

But while he may have been personally fond of the president, some of Mr. Koch's remarks two decades ago - in real time, as it were - were not kind. At the start of his third term in 1986, he delivered an inauguration speech that included a blistering assessment of Reagan policies on affordable housing, a Koch priority.

"Regrettably," he said then, "the Reagan administration has welshed on our nation's longstanding bipartisan obligation to provide low-income housing, and I call upon the president to reverse this heartless and shortsighted policy."

Asked yesterday about those remarks, Mr. Koch shrugged them off as "part of the political rhetoric of speakers."

Perhaps. But the 1986 speech was in line with what other mayors, generally Democrats like Mr. Koch, were saying about the Republican Mr. Reagan. Mayor Coleman A. Young of Detroit complained in 1987 that the administration's "anti-urban policy" had "pretty disastrous" consequences.

Some numbers speak for themselves. On Mr. Reagan's watch, federal spending for subsidized housing programs was sliced by about 75 percent, to $8 billion in 1988 from $33 billion in 1981.

Reductions in all kinds of assistance, especially early on, "were felt pretty sharply in New York," said Charles Brecher, research director of the Citizens Budget Commission, a business-supported policy group in the city. From 1981 to 1983, federal aid to New York City fell by $560 million, or 21 percent. More than 1.1 million New Yorkers had food stamp benefits reduced or eliminated. Rent increases affected 450,000 people living in public housing.

On the other hand, Mr. Brecher noted, New Yorkers' federal tax bill in the same two-year period declined by $699 million. Then as now, the main beneficiaries were the wealthy.

IT wasn't as if Washington's shifting political philosophy led to smaller government or to tinier federal deficits. Quite the opposite.

"Reagan changed the distribution a little," said William B. Eimicke, an official in both the Cuomo and Koch administrations who now teaches public administration at Columbia University. "The burden was shifted to those on the lower end of the scale."

On the Reagan legacy, Mr. Cuomo gets the last word here.

"I don't believe the man had any personal harshness," he said. "Regrettably, many of his programs - his denial of support for programs - had a harsh effect.

"The results made the denial of compassion respectable."

Copyright 2004 The New York Times Company

krulltime
June 10th, 2004, 06:29 PM
Reagan's body lies in state
'This is my opportunity to say good-bye'

June 10, 2004

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- A steady stream of mourners is moving through the Capitol Rotunda in Washington to pay respects to former President Ronald Reagan, who lies in state there until his national funeral service on Friday.

Ordinary Americans -- some dressed casually in shorts -- made their way quietly around the ornate Rotunda, along with international visitors and dignitaries.

Among the more prominent figures were the new interim president of Iraqi, Sheikh Ghazi al-Yawar, former Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev , former Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole, and Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor -- who became the first woman to sit on the nation's highest court when Reagan appointed her in 1981.

"I came to pay homage to President Reagan, who is my hero because he liberated my old country, so my nephews and nieces could live in freedom" said Frank Olah, a native of Hungary. "It's something that I am very happy that I could do."

Reagan, who as the nation's 40th president helped bring an end to the Cold War and revitalized the conservative wing of his Republican Party, died at age 93 Saturday, following a decade-long battle with Alzheimer's disease. (Special Report: Ronald Reagan)

"This is a very special day," said Blanche Anderson of Virginia. "I've been a fan of Ronald Reagan since he become president, and this is my opportunity to say good-bye."

The mourners came from all walks of life. Grandmothers guided young children along. One man in a native Indian headdress paused in front of the bier. One young Marine -- missing his hands from a grenade attack in Iraq -- saluted the casket.

An estimated 5,000 people per hour were passing through the Rotunda, officials said. Officials estimate that between 150,000 and 200,000 people will file past the casket -- resting on the catafalque built in 1865 for Abraham Lincoln's coffin -- before the public viewing ends on Friday morning.

Capitol Police Chief Terrance Gainer said the length of the wait to view Reagan's casket had fallen from five hours Wednesday night to an hour and 45 minutes Thursday morning.

Gainer said the line has been slowed by people trying to bring "inappropriate items," such as cameras, flowers, food and drinks and oversized bags.

The queue for congressional staff members waiting to view the casket was so long that it clogged the hallways on the first floor of the building.

Some staff members were sent away and told to come back in two hours.

His state funeral on Friday at Washington's National Cathedral will be the first such ceremony in more than three decades. The last state funeral was for President Lyndon Baines Johnson in 1973. (Funeral ceremonies)

Reagan will be eulogized by many of his contemporaries -- former President George Bush, who served as his vice president; former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, a conservative ally and a close friend; and former Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney.

The current President Bush, who on Wednesday opened formal meetings of the Group of Eight leaders at Sea Island, Georgia, will speak at the service as well. (Bush urges stronger NATO role in Iraq)

Friday has been designated a national day of mourning. The New York Stock Exchange will be closed, and only government offices necessary for national security will remain open. (Your thoughts)

Thursday's public viewing followed an elaborate cross-country journey Wednesday, when Reagan's body was moved from his adopted home state of California to Washington.

Constitution Avenue was lined with thousands of admirers as a horse-drawn caisson transported Reagan's casket toward the Capitol to the cadence of drums and accompanied by a riderless horse, which signifies a fallen leader.

A pair of Reagan's boots were turned backward in the stirrups to symbolize the loss of a rider.

When the casket reached the west steps of the Capitol, a military flyover of 21 planes paid tribute, the last four executing the "missing man" formation.

At an evening ceremony inside the Rotunda, Vice President Dick Cheney called Reagan a "graceful and a gallant man," and House Speaker Dennis Hastert hailed the late president's "optimism and ... Western can-do spirit."

At the close of the ceremony, Reagan's widow, Nancy, approached the coffin and gently caressed it with her hand.

Mrs. Reagan was spending Thursday at Blair House, the official guest residence across the street from the White House, where she was receiving some visitors. Among those calling on the former first lady were Thatcher and Mulroney.

Thatcher was the first person to sign Reagan's condolence book at Blair House. "To Ronnie, well done thou good and faithful servant," she wrote.


Tight security

Security is tight in the nation's capital, with checkpoints and bomb-sniffing dogs around some government buildings. Thousands of officers are on the streets, particularly around the Capitol.

The grounds of the Capitol and the Supreme Court were briefly evacuated late Wednesday afternoon because of radio problems with a small plane carrying Kentucky's governor, who is scheduled to attend the funeral.

The plane was authorized to enter Washington's restricted airspace but was having problems with a radio transponder, which prevented air traffic controllers from tracking the aircraft, an FAA official said.

Capitol police were working with the U.S. Park Police, FBI, ATF and the Secret Service, Gainer said, noting that between 3,000 and 4,000 officers would be on duty.

2004 Cable News Network LP, LLLP.

krulltime
June 10th, 2004, 06:33 PM
The grounds of the Capitol and the Supreme Court were briefly evacuated late Wednesday afternoon because of radio problems with a small plane carrying Kentucky's governor, who is scheduled to attend the funeral.

The Kentucky's governor must feel lucky. I can imagine what went through their minds when the radio didnt work.

False alarm! :roll:

Kris
June 15th, 2004, 06:39 AM
Urban suffering grew under Reagan

BY PETER DREIER

June 10, 2004

As some Americans mourn the death of Ronald Reagan as if they'd lost a friend, let us recall that the two-term president was no friend to America's cities.

Politically, Reagan owed little to urban voters, big-city mayors, black or Hispanic leaders, or labor unions - the major advocates for metropolitan concerns. His indifference to their problems was legendary. Early in his presidency, at a White House reception, he went up to the only black member of his cabinet, Housing and Urban Development Secretary Samuel Pierce, and said, "How are you, Mr. Mayor? I'm glad to meet you. How are things in your city?"

Reagan not only failed to recognize his own HUD secretary; he also failed to deal with the growing corruption scandal at the agency. Indeed, during the Reagan years, HUD became a feeding trough for Republican campaign contributors. Fortunately for Reagan, the media didn't uncover the "HUD Scandal" until he left office. It resulted in the indictment and conviction of top Reagan administration officials for illegally targeting housing subsidies to politically connected developers.

Reagan also presided over the dramatic deregulation of the nation's savings-and-loan industry, which allowed S&L's to end their reliance on home mortgages and engage in an orgy of commercial real estate speculation. This ultimately led to a federal taxpayer bailout that cost hundreds of billions of dollars.

Reagan's fans give him credit for restoring the nation's prosperity. But the income gap between the rich and everyone else in America widened. Wages for the average worker declined. The homeownership rate fell. Despite boom times for the rich, the poverty rate in cities grew.

Reagan is often lauded as "the great communicator," but he used his rhetorical skills to stigmatize poor people, which laid the groundwork for slashing the social safety net - despite the fact that Reagan's own family had been rescued by New Deal anti-poverty programs during the Depression.

During his stump speeches, Reagan often told the story of a so-called welfare queen in Chicago who drove a Cadillac and had ripped off $150,000 from the government using 80 aliases, 30 addresses, a dozen Social Security cards and four fictional dead husbands. Reagan dutifully promised to roll back welfare. Journalists searched for this welfare cheat and discovered that she didn't exist. Nevertheless, he kept using the anecdote.

Overall Reagan cut federal assistance to local governments by 60 percent. In 1980, federal dollars accounted for 22 percent of big-city budgets, but when he left office, it was down to 6 percent.

Reagan's most dramatic cut was for low-income housing subsidies. Soon after taking office, he appointed a housing task force dominated by developers, landlords and bankers. Its 1982 report called for "free and deregulated" markets as an alternative to government assistance. Reagan followed their advice. Between 1980 and 1989, HUD's budget authority was cut from $74 billion to $19 billion in constant dollars. The number of new subsidized housing starts fell from 175,000 to 20,000 a year.

One of Reagan's most enduring legacies is the steep increase in homeless people. By the late 1980s, the number of homeless had swollen to 600,000 on any given night and 1.2 million over the course of a year.

Defending himself against charges of callousness toward the poor, Reagan gave a classic blaming-the-victim statement. In 1984 on "Good Morning America" he said that people sleeping on the streets "are homeless, you might say, by choice."

President George W. Bush, who often claims Reagan's mantle, last month proposed cutting one-third of the Section 8 housing vouchers - a lifeline against homelessness for 2 million poor families. In this and many other ways, the Reagan revolution toward the cities continues.

We've already named a major airport and schools and streets after Ronald Reagan. But perhaps a more fitting tribute to his legacy would be for each American city to name a park bench - where at least one homeless person sleeps every night - in honor of our 40th president.

Peter Dreier is director of the urban and environmental policy program at Occidental College and co-author of "Place Matters: Metropolitics for the 21st Century."

Copyright 2004, Newsday, Inc.

lofter1
February 5th, 2011, 11:36 AM
Remembering Reagan at 100 ...

12088

TREPYE
March 8th, 2011, 07:10 PM
It can be said that Regan is the reason we do no yet have more advanced renewable energy technology; and has set us back 30 years. For all the credit he gets for being an effective president, I have had a hard time sweeping under the rug the fact that he removed the solar panels Jimmy Carter had placed in the White House as an iniciative for the US to use renewable energy.
Then....
US got used to cheap gasoline prices...
Then...
George H Bush jumped the gun and started a war against Iraq cuz they invaded Kuwait and thus they were going to increase oil prices...
Then...
We offended some religious extemists due to our presense in Saudi Arabia...
Then...
Muslim extemism got popular, Bin Laden got maniacally ambitious...
Then...
Dubya Bush wanted to finish what his Poppy didnt finish, under the veil of protector...
Then...
The excuse/gamble of weapons of mass destruction were not found...
Then...
Oil prices increased anyway...
Now....
We are now trying to optimize renewable energy technologies, so that we dont have to economically be at the mercy of Middle Eastern instability.

MidtownGuy
March 8th, 2011, 07:20 PM
it does make the brain go loopy....it's like we're in bizarro world.

Ninjahedge
March 9th, 2011, 07:59 AM
Me no understand.

BBMW
March 9th, 2011, 10:38 AM
I'd respond to this, but it probably belongs in an energy policy thread that I'm sure we have somewhere.