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Gulcrapek
June 16th, 2004, 09:01 PM
Broadway Arms

http://images.elliman.com/elliman_data/NewHomeDevelopment/nhd_home/53777b.jpg
(Yuck)

http://www.elliman.com/MainSite/NHD/NHDInfo.aspx?ID=69&SearchType=newdev&PageName=home


Williamsburg Gardens

http://images.elliman.com/elliman_data/NewHomeDevelopment/nhd_home/52477a.jpg

http://www.elliman.com/MainSite/NHD/NHDInfo.aspx?ID=61&SearchType=newdev&PageName=home


Withers Place

http://images.elliman.com/elliman_data/NewHomeDevelopment/nhd_home/54617A.jpg

http://www.elliman.com/MainSite/NHD/NHDInfo.aspx?ID=78&SearchType=newdev&PageName=home

Gulcrapek
June 16th, 2004, 09:13 PM
52 Ten Eyck St (2nd)

http://www.scaranoarchitects.com/multifamily1.html

395 South 2nd St (3rd)

http://www.scaranoarchitects.com/multifamily1.html

78 Ten Eyck St (2 row last)

http://www.scaranoarchitects.com/multifamily1.html

145 Borinquen Place (3 row third)

http://www.scaranoarchitects.com/multifamily1.html

418 Lorimer St (4th)

http://www.scaranoarchitects.com/multifamily2.html

80 Roebling St (2 row, third)

http://www.scaranoarchitects.com/multifamily2.html

130 Scholes St (3 row, first)

http://www.scaranoarchitects.com/multifamily2.html

168-172 Meserole St (third)

http://www.scaranoarchitects.com/multifamily3.html

171 North 7th St (2 row, first)

http://www.scaranoarchitects.com/multifamily3.html

320 Bedford Ave (2 row, second)

http://www.scaranoarchitects.com/multifamily3.html

92 Conslyea St (2 row last)

http://www.scaranoarchitects.com/multifamily3.html

Gulcrapek
June 16th, 2004, 09:26 PM
North 6th St Apartments

http://www.createworldwide.com/html/05/02-6.html



Williamsburg Mews

http://www.williamsburgmews.com/images/cover.jpg

http://www.williamsburgmews.com



The Kent (conversion)

http://www.thedevelopersgroup.com/images/apartment/1017/apt_10311_1_dt.jpg

http://www.thedevelopersgroup.com/images/apartment/1017/apt_10311_3_dt.jpg

http://www.thedevelopersgroup.com/buildings/building.aspx?buildingid=1017&



The Metropolitan

http://www.thedevelopersgroup.com/images/building/bld_1002_1_dt.jpg

http://www.thedevelopersgroup.com/buildings/building.aspx?buildingid=1002&

billyblancoNYC
June 17th, 2004, 12:06 AM
Nice job. That Scarano is doing some nice f'in work, I must say. Nice looking stuff.

Here's some more...

http://corcoran.com/property/nd/index.asp?BDD=Y

NewYorkYankee
June 17th, 2004, 11:36 AM
Are all these in Brooklyn?

billyblancoNYC
June 17th, 2004, 11:55 AM
Yessir...that's the point of the thread.

Gulcrapek
June 17th, 2004, 03:23 PM
Goodie Billy, there's not much from Wburg there but it's a great find and I'll put them somewhere...

The ones that are there:


307 Grand Avenue

http://corcoran.com/property/nd/photo/307GrandAve_lg.jpg
*vomit*

http://corcoran.com/property/nd/detail_fr_overview.asp?ndevid=55



The Gretsch Building (in another thread somewhere as well) (conversion)

http://corcoran.com/images/media/BldgPhotos/49733.1.jpg

http://corcoran.com/property/listing.aspx?Region=NYC&listingid=716312

Gulcrapek
June 21st, 2004, 11:56 PM
"North 3rd Berry"

http://www.kfarchitect.com/portfolio/residential/multifamily/multi-39.jpg

http://www.kfarchitect.com/portfolio/bot-1b6.html

billyblancoNYC
June 22nd, 2004, 02:10 AM
"North 3rd Berry"

http://www.kfarchitect.com/portfolio/residential/multifamily/multi-39.jpg

http://www.kfarchitect.com/portfolio/bot-1b6.html

Is this being built? Also, what's up with those highrises? Is that for the redevelopment by the waterfront? Looks like a lot are concepts, or are they really to be built? I hope so. There's so good BK projects in there!

Gulcrapek
June 22nd, 2004, 01:09 PM
I e-mailed Fischer last night, we'll see what happens when he responds.

krulltime
June 25th, 2004, 02:18 PM
Condo plan stirs fight on housing


http://www.nydailynews.com/ips_rich_content/745-condo.JPG
Architect's drawing of proposed $80 million luxury condominium development on Kent Ave. shows changes to factory building, including addition of four stories. Building's current tenants and others in neighborhood oppose plan.


BY HUGH SON
DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER
June 25, 2004

The affordable housing vs. luxury residential development tug of war in Williamsburg has spread to a new battleground: the waterfront.

The owner of a loft building at 184 Kent Ave. with striking vistas of lower Manhattan wants a zoning variance that would allow him to convert the former factory into luxury condominiums - a move that would likely force out most of its middle-income tenants.

The $80 million conversion planned by Moishe Kestenbaum includes building an additional four stories of apartments and an indoor parking facility, said Ken Fisher and Howard Hornstein, lawyers handling the deal.

In exchange, Kestenbaum offered to create a waterfront promenade near the building and contribute $355,000 to a fund for affordable housing in the neighborhood, Fisher said.

But current tenants at 184 Kent - most of whom are young professionals or artists - are up in arms because they thought they could live there for years to come and would probably be priced out of their homes.

"The larger issue is that the whole waterfront will be redeveloped, and this will set a bad precedent," said one angry tenant, Will Anderson, 31.

Tenants say that new leases in the building must be renewed every two months - a signal, they charge, that Kestenbaum is seeking to evict current occupants. Sources said about 250 people live in the building and pay rents that average less than $1,000 a month.

The situation at 184 Kent has galvanized the local community board and driven a wedge between two area politicians.

Assemblyman Vito Lopez (D-Williamsburg) - who demanded that all real estate projects in Williamsburg include at least 20% affordable housing - blasted Councilman David Yassky's support of the variance, which Yassky offered in exchange for the $355,000 affordable housing contribution.

Lopez said that the money Yassky secured "doesn't amount to anything."

Yassky (D-Downtown Brooklyn, Fort Greene) called Lopez's criticism "preposterous" and said that the funds are enough to subsidize a dozen apartments. "I think this is a path-breaking deal to link zoning with affordable housing," Yassky said.

Michael Schill, director of the Furman Center for Real Estate and Urban Policy at New York University, said there was a danger in requiring too much from developers in the way of affordable housing.

"You could be in a situation where you tax the housing so much that you make the development unfeasible." Schill said. "We need both market rate and affordable [housing]. It's not either-or."

However, last month Community Board 1 voted against recommending approval of the proposal by the city Board of Standards and Appeals. The board makes the final decision on the proposal. The next hearing is Aug. 10.


All contents © 2004 Daily News, L.P.

Gulcrapek
June 25th, 2004, 08:24 PM
It's a pretty average piece of classic postmodernism.

http://www.kfarchitect.com/portfolio/residential/multifamily/multi-45.jpg

Karl Fischer, architect

tmg
October 11th, 2004, 01:09 PM
The New York Times
Living in the New Suburbia, With Plans for Children
By PENELOPE GREEN

Published: October 10, 2004

ONE month ago today, Richard Oceguera, 35, and Thomas Koveleskie, 33, celebrated their Massachusetts wedding of last spring with a party on the roof of their home on South First Street in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. Sixty people attended this handmade ceremony, which sampled elements from early Christian services — both men are Catholic — blended with vows they had written themselves, followed by disco dancing to Duran Duran, Book of Love and late Blondie.

As the sun set, the lights honoring the Twin Towers were lighted, along with those of the Empire State Building, and a flock of pigeons tumbled skyward from the roof of a nearby tenement (a happy coincidence). John Gillespie, a neighbor, made a toast, which he recalled the other day. "I said that this was a transformative event both for the guests, and the building," Mr. Gillespie said. "It marked a new beginning for all of us, and it felt like a blessing on the building."

This celebration, its setting and the coincidental atmospherics — those lights, the pigeons — underscore Williamsburg's 21st-century incarnation as a bedroom community for Manhattan professionals. The residents of 150 South First Street, the luxurious new condominium development where Mr. Oceguera and Mr. Koveleskie bought their 900-square-foot two-bedroom for $440,000 in July 2003, are prototypical of the area's new citizens; many are couples looking to start a family.

"We've already had a naming ceremony on the roof, for one of the two babies born in the building," said Mr. Gillespie, who is president of the condo board at 150 South First (his day job is medical director at Pfizer in Manhattan). "And there's another wedding planned."

No longer a haven for artists — or even "artists" — Williamsburg feels more like Georgetown in Washington, than the East Village, to which it has been compared. At 8:45 on any given weekday morning, Bedford Avenue is a river of well-scrubbed young professionals pouring toward the L train and their city jobs across the river. (The Bedford Avenue gloss is so powerful that the developers of 150 South First Street, which is at the corner of South First and Bedford, marketed their property as 299 Bedford Avenue.) By 10 the strollers are out, careering along the same strip or parked at Fabiane's Cafe.

"I never thought of myself as a `Williamsburg kind of guy,' " said Mr. Oceguera, who is director of business development at Rent-Direct.com, an online-service that connects would-be renters with landlords; he and Mr. Koveleskie had been renting together in Brooklyn Heights for four years.

Mr. Oceguera was crisply dressed in a blinding white shirt and zippered chocolate brown Agnes B. sweater from Paris — he and Mr. Koveleskie had just returned from a honeymoon in Italy and France — and talking passionately about family and roots; he sees Williamsburg as fertile ground for both.

"Even though this is our starter home, our first purchase," Mr. Koveleski said, "we want to start a family here. We've hit all the milestones — home ownership, marriage — and the last one is children. Our neighbors expect it of us."

The men say their neighbors, mostly straight couples in their 30's, are sharing parenting and adoption group news. "We all seem to have a lot in common," Mr. Oceguera said.

It took one month for all 32 units here to sell, said Helene Luchnick, an executive vice president at Douglas Elliman who marketed the building.

"At that time there was absolutely nothing else for sale in Williamsburg," Ms. Luchnick said. Its developers had planned the building as a rental property, until they saw the state of the market. It was Ms. Luchnick who suggested they build the rooftop deck, fitness center and kitchen. Prices are about $500 a square foot, and rising. Mr. Oceguera and Mr. Koveleskie's apartment was just reappraised, they said, at about $550,000.

Patrice Mack, a broker at Elliman who sold the building with Ms. Luchnick, was surprised by the monolithic homogeneity of her clients. "It was weird, we thought it would be artists or people from the area," she said, "but instead it was this group from Manhattan. They even had the same stuff. Do you remember the Aerosole `Dollyanna' shoes from `Sex and the City?' " she continued. "All the girls were wearing those."

Old Williamsburg, the one with the Latin flavor, is still here: the vacant lot opposite Mr. Oceguera and Mr. Koveleskie's living room terrace is filled with pumpkin vines. The "artists" are represented too: a juice bar around the corner has a street sign with the words Haight-Ashbury painted on its galvanized steel walls (there's even a VW bus emblazoned with peace signs). But this couple mostly ignores such signage on their walks to emporiums like Uva's Wines and Bedford Cheese down the block; both men love to cook.

They met by chance six years ago in a Chelsea restaurant. A few nights later, Mr. Oceguera, new to the city from Chicago, was dialing around haphazardly for a dinner date. Mr. Koveleskie, vice president for equity and fixed income research at BBVA Securities, was the only one who answered his phone. It was 9 p.m. and he was working late. "We've been inseparable ever since," Mr. Oceguera said.

On May 24, Day 6 of legalized marriage in the commonwealth of Massachusetts, the men were the 350th same-sex couple to be married, they said. The state requires a three-day waiting period, but you can get a waiver, which they sought. The elderly male judge who granted it urged both to "ignore the small-minded folks out there," as Mr. Oceguera remembers it. Mr. Koveleskie's father told him, "I looked up the definition of love in the dictionary, and it didn't say it was only between a man and a woman."

Mr. Oceguera broke in. "Not to mention it's always good for the economy when two gay guys get married," he said.

Gulcrapek
December 11th, 2004, 01:15 AM
I forgot this thread was here. So consider the other 2 I posted to be part of this one. Anyhoo, go to www.scaranoarchitects.com > multifamily to see a trillion new constructions in Williamsburg and its surrounding areas.

NewYorkYankee
December 11th, 2004, 02:40 PM
Could you post pics please? I cant see them on my comp. :(

Gulcrapek
December 11th, 2004, 04:31 PM
They're in flash. Can't post them.

NoyokA
December 11th, 2004, 09:56 PM
The site doesnt work for me either. Gul, if the projects are exceptional you might want to use the print screen button, paste it in paint, save it, and host it.

Derek2k3
December 11th, 2004, 11:18 PM
http://www.pksb.com/home.html
Kedem Winery Development Plan
Brooklyn, NY

The development plan for the Kedem Winery site required complicated zoning changes to transform it from an industrial area into a residential district with a waterside park and promenade along the East River Waterfront. The plan includes design scenarios for three large interconnected residential buildings with a total of more than 400 units, a one-acre park, and more than 23,000 gross square feet of commercial space and parking. The park and promenade are part of a larger municipal program to renew and develop underutilized properties along the East River.

Renderings on the site, looks bleak.

Gulcrapek
December 12th, 2004, 12:50 AM
It looks like the Schaefer site. I think it is. Unless it's a block away.

Derek2k3
December 12th, 2004, 01:26 AM
Yea, this is right next to it.. The firm's proposal for the Schaefer site is on the web site too.

billyblancoNYC
December 13th, 2004, 03:18 PM
Very similar designs. At least the latest brewery renderings look a lot beter than on this site. Maybe the same will be true for the wine site. They love their alcohol.

Derek2k3
December 24th, 2004, 06:30 AM
heh..well they ended up not designing the Schaefer Brewery site, Gene Kaufman did.

New 22 story for Williamsburg. One of several 12+ story developments planned.
http://www.stopoursupersizing.com/

I think the rendering was altered though... to promote NIMBY issues.

NewYorkYankee
December 24th, 2004, 10:26 AM
Nonsense :roll:

Gulcrapek
December 24th, 2004, 11:24 AM
I can't see the picture.

Derek2k3
December 24th, 2004, 11:41 AM
You can see a black and white pic at curbed.com.
Scarano added a few more buildings to its site. The buildings on Classon are just one block away from Pratt. Jewish Williamsburg is continuing to expand into Clinton Hill.

ltjbukem73
February 27th, 2005, 12:56 PM
on the corner, huge multistory complex going up??

thanks

Derek2k3
February 27th, 2005, 02:27 PM
Project #1

70-80 Roebling Street
224-230 North 8th Street
4/6 stories 59 feet
Karl Fischer, Architect or Scarano & Associate Architects?
Dev-KSPG Realty
Residential Condominiums
8 units 10,236 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2005

Scarano has this project on their web site. However, the permits note that Karl Fischer is the architect and the photos seem to depict a change in design also.


Scarano & Associate Architects

http://www.scaranoarchitects.com/multifamily2.html

This new multi family residential development is located in the Brooklyn Neighborhood building of Williamsburg.

Tribeca–like, loft style 1-3 bedroom apartments consisting of penthouses, duplexes with private terraces or balconies, and ground-level town homes all having private street entrances create a variety of unit types sought out by discerning buyers.

Exterior finishes include two colors of red brick, structural glazing, metal panels and exposed steel lintels. Taller ceiling heights and open layouts help to create the loft style living common to the area. Other tenant and amenities include a health club, private parking, storage rooms, washer/dryer hookups in the apartments and a roof top garden.

As prices continue to rise in trendy Manhattan neighborhoods buyers will seek out neighborhood in the outer boroughs like Williamsburg that provide an eclectic cultural lifestyle with modern lifestyle convinces.

Derek2k3
February 27th, 2005, 02:46 PM
Project #2

171 North 7th Street
4 stories 55 feet
Scarano & Associate Architects
Dev-Issac Schwatz
Residential Condominium
8 units 8,760 Sq. Ft.
Completed 2003-2004

Many people find this ugly though I find it kind of refreshing. Notice the balconies.

http://thedevelopersgroup.com/images/building/bld_1016_2_dt.jpg
http://thedevelopersgroup.com

A beautiful design coupled with the best location in Williamsburg makes this property the building to see. Each unit has an all glass facade, luxury finishes, mezzanines, and soaring 14' ceiling heights. There are also private outdoor spaces and the use of the common roof deck with Manhattan skyline views. Scarano and Associates Architects. http://www.scaranoarchitects.com


Scarano & Associate Architects
http://www.scaranoarchitects.com/multifamily3.html

This project is an 8-family condominium complex, located in the trendy Brooklyn neighborhood of Williamsburg.

This area is considered to be Brooklyn's answer to Manhattan's SoHo, with small boutiques and multi-cultural restaurants lining Bedford Avenue.

The building consists of 2 duplex apartments on the first floor, and 2 apartments with mezzanines per floor on the remaining 3 floors.

The design concept for the facade was drawn from the industrial quality of the surrounding buildings, utilizing modern building technologies such as a glass curtain wall with massive steel beams.

When completed, the building will contribute to the local community by stretching the boundaries of typical brick buildings that surround it.

The glass components of the facade, as well as the apartment balconies, are treated with varying levels of opacity, which convey a sense of openness, while providing privacy for the spaces behind it.


Larger rendering attatched. Pictures taken in Early January.

Gulcrapek
February 27th, 2005, 03:46 PM
It's one of my favorites. I have a picture looking right in, the huge front rooms with half-stairs and mezzanines are awesome.

Derek2k3
March 4th, 2005, 12:12 AM
Project #3

The Metropolitan
209-211 North 5th Street
Karl Fischer Architects
5 stories 54 feet
Residential Condominiums
8 units 9,375 Sq. Ft.
Completed 2004

http://www.kiskaconstruction.com/frames/metropolitan/metro01.jpg

The Metropolitan
209-211 North 5th St North Williamsburg, NY

http://thedevelopersgroup.com/buildings/building.aspx?buildingid=1002&

The Metropolitan is the first stylish condo project to come to North Williamsburg, Brooklyn. The surrounding neighborhood features sensational restaurants, shops and galleries and is only minutes to Manhattan. The amazing building design features a dramatic wall of windows, with hidden balconies and a lovely roof deck. Great light and thoughtful apartment designs coupled with the amazing location make this the project to see.

NoyokA
March 4th, 2005, 09:37 AM
I like all the projects, especially the last one. Any idea why Scarano & Associates are so popular in Brooklyn?

Derek2k3
March 4th, 2005, 05:13 PM
I wonder the same thing. It seems like only 3 firms design all the new luxury buildings in Bk. Scarano (the good), Karl Fischer Architect (the bad), and Bricolage Designs (the ugly)

Derek2k3
March 4th, 2005, 06:13 PM
Project # 4

20 Bayard Street
16 stories 201 feet
Karl Fischer Architect
Dev-Bayard Development Group
Residential Condominiums
64 units 82,654 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2004-2006

http://www.kfarchitect.com/portfolio/residential/multifamily/multi-38.jpg http://www.kfarchitect.com/portfolio/residential/multifamily/multi-38b.jpg


Intelligencer

http://www.newyorkmetro.com/nymetro/news/people/columns/intelligencer/10902/

Air War
Brooklyn developers aim to build high before zoning-law shift; groundling locals in uproar.

By Will Doig

Future sites of a sixteen-story “finger building”? (Photo credit: Donald Bowers)

Developers are scrambling to Manhattanize Williamsburg’s and Greenpoint’s low-slung skyline before the city changes the local zoning laws. The new rules, which could go into effect as soon as May, will allow for high-rises by the river. But they would cap most inland buildings at four to six stories, says the Department of City Planning’s Howard Slatkin. That said, he adds that a foundation alone can grandfather a new building: “You can’t pull the rug out from someone who’s already developing.”

So architect Karl Fischer, whose firm converted an old factory into Williamsburg’s luxury blockbuster, the Gretsch (home to Busta Rhymes), says he wants to be sure his 200-foot tower at 20 Bayard Street has poured concrete. Down the block, thirteen stories of condos are rising. “It’s all views!” says developer Isaac Haager. And at 55 Eckford Street, a 154-foot residential tower is under way. Such projects have been dubbed “finger buildings” by locals (for what they’ll be giving the neighborhood), who are fighting back. At a recent community meeting, developer Mendel Brach unveiled a scale model of a sixteen-story tower to be built on a site next to the Bedford Avenue L-train stop. The room gasped.

A mobilized opposition soon sussed out that no one had obtained the MTA’s permission to build near the tunnel. A stop-work order was issued. And on January 4, the Buildings Department sent an intent-to-revoke-permits letter, citing fifteen objections. Brach’s architects have ten business days to present new plans.

“It reminds me of Iraq,” he says. “Are you trying to terrorize me? Just because you don’t like [a project], I think this is unacceptable.” But for now, the community’s efforts to keep this finger from extending seem to have paid off.

:::shakes head::::

NoyokA
March 5th, 2005, 08:35 PM
I wonder the same thing. It seems like only 3 firms design all the new luxury buildings in Bk. Scarano (the good), Karl Fischer Architect (the bad), and Bricolage Designs (the ugly)

I guess it's kind of like Manhattan with 3 firms designing all the new residential buildings; Kondylis (the mediocre), SCLE (the bad), and HTO (the bad). The fact that Brooklyn has three different architects designing all its buildings is further claim to it being a city of its own.

Gulcrapek
March 5th, 2005, 09:50 PM
HTO is not bad, he's unthinkable horrible. There's a difference.


Add Felix Pustylnik and Anno Mundi 2928 to the very active BK residential firms. The first mediocre, the second bad.

Gulcrapek
March 5th, 2005, 10:48 PM
90 Meserole Street
4 floors, 57 ft
13 units
Architect: Strange & Vella

Derek2k3
March 7th, 2005, 05:30 PM
Daily News
Condos are booming in Williamsburg
By Lore Croghan
March 7, 2005
The Real Thing

Among the many new condominium projects in the Williamsburg area of Brooklyn are buildings 61, 63 and 69 Stagg St.
Call it condo row. Seven new low-rise condominium buildings are shaping up on a single block in East Williamsburg.

The neighborhood is dominated by tidy three-family houses and small rental buildings. But that's starting to change - because just a few blocks west, in the hip part of Williamsburg, condos are in hot demand and construction sites are few.

"There's not much land to be had there - so this is the natural progression," said developer Alan Messner.

He decided the time was right to buy a vacant lot at 406 Lorimer St., on the corner of Stagg St., where he's now putting up a four-story building with eight apartments. The seller was a man who lived in a trailer that was parked on the lot.



Further down the street, Isaac Schwartz is putting the finishing touches on 61, 63 and 69 Stagg. He's also completing 52 Ten Eyck St., on the northern edge of the block.

The apartments at 63 and 69 Stagg and 52 Ten Eyck are on the market - and selling "extremely well," said broker Highlyann Krasnow of The Developers Group.

They're priced at $495,000 to $710,000 per apartment - or $500 per square foot. In the chic section of Williamsburg, condos are $650 to $700 per square foot.

"That's a difference of $200 per square foot for one more stop on the L train," Krasnow said.

The 11 apartments at 78 Ten Eyck go onto the market at the end of the month. The new building, by developer Lipe Gross, sits on the corner of Leonard St. The apartments have 16-to-25-foot ceilings, said broker David Maundrell of aptsandlofts.com.

The seventh project is on the other end of the block at 418 Lorimer St.

Developer Shea Lefkowitz plans to put up a four-story, eight-unit building there.

All four developers hired Robert Scarano's architecture firm, a Brooklyn-based shop, to design their projects.

"He's got a lock on the neighborhood," Messner said of the architect. "His designs have a modern look that's a hit with buyers."

Derek2k3
March 7th, 2005, 05:40 PM
Project #6

Tower 78
78 Ten Eyck Street
Scarano & Associate Architects
Dev-Lipe Gross
4 stories 55 feet
11 units 14,645 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2003-2005

http://www.aiany.org/eOCULUS/2004/2004images/1217/proj_scarano.jpg
http://www.tower78.com/


Scarano & Associate Architects

http://www.scaranoarchitects.com/multifamily1.html

This building lot is located on the corner of two prominent residential streets in an upcoming area on the Williamsburg border of Brooklyn. An L-shaped lot with one part on the public street and the other towards the private interior portion of the lot.

The building is four stories high with the first floor covering the entire lot to create a parking garage for the owners. The upper floors cover 80 % of the lot and a private terrace is created rear of the second floor. The building has a total of 14,000 gross square feet and there is a mix of different types of units including studios, one and two bedroom loft style apartments, each of them having a mezzanine and double height living/dining areas.

The exterior appearance makes an emphasis on the street corner, by forming a “tower”, which is separated from the rest of the buildings facade by a thin window strip.

The exterior is masonry with large openings of curtain wall type windows, exposing the loft-style interior to the outside. The upper portion of the building is capped by a mansard roof.
The color of the roof forest, green, is complementary to the brick red color of the masonry.


aptsandlofts.com
http://www.aptsandlofts.com/Sales_webid_Tower78.html

LOCATION
Ten Eyck & Leonard Streets
Williamsburg, Brooklyn

BUILDING DESCRIPTION
The aptly named Tower 78 literally “towers” the corner of Ten Eyck and Leonard Streets—at the core of the culturally-rich neighborhood of Williamsburg, just a few minutes from the Lorimer L train stop. The building’s exterior combines complementary green and red hues: the upper portion is capped by a forest green mansard roof, and the lower portion is a gorgeous red brick. The massive rectangular windows are the highlight—not only were they conceived for practicality, they were conceived architecturally as an integral part of exceptional design. Inside the residences, the windows also take center stage—the incredible curtain walls of windows allow in golden sunlight and glorious sky.

Interiors:
European Kitchens with a stunning combination of Dark Wood and White Laminated Steel-Framed Cabinets; Contemporary-Designed Stone Bathrooms

Within the mix of apartment layouts are two duplex apartments, six bi-level lofts and three penthouse tri-level lofts (ranging from studios to one- and two-bedrooms). Residences are crafted for total space optimization, allure and function. All apartments enjoy mezzanine levels, and many boast ceiling heights of nearly 25 soaring feet. Some feature decadent rooftop terraces with all-encompassing views of Manhattan—Downtown to Uptown.

CONTACT
718.384.5304
information@aptsandlofts.com

http://www.nofirecuts.com/html/still_fighting.html

Derek2k3
March 7th, 2005, 09:12 PM
Project #7 & 8

The Stagg I
63-69 Stagg
4 stories 55 feet
Scarano & Associate Architects
Dev-Isaac Schwartz
Residential Condominiums
8 units 10,849 Sq. Ft. (x3)
Completed 2003-2005

The Stagg II
52 Ten Eyck Street
4 stories 55 feet
Scarano & Associate Architects
Dev-Isaac Schwartz
Residential Condominiums
8 units 10,849 Sq. Ft.
Completed April 2004

http://www.thedevelopersgroup.com/images/building/bld_1019_th.jpg

Developers Group: The Stagg
http://www.thedevelopersgroup.com/buildings/building.aspx?buildingid=1019&

69 Stagg Street Brooklyn, NY 11206
A beautiful exterior that is only surpassed by the amazing interior design of the individual condominium units. A glass façade lets natural sunlight permeate every section of the units. No detail has been overlooked including giving every unit private outdoor space including the gardens and the private roof decks that offer astonishing NYC skyline views. Located right off the second stop on the L train surrounded by some of the best restaurants and shops. Scarano and Associates Architects. http://www.scaranoarchitects.com

Amenities
High Speed Internet
Roofdeck
washer & dryer hookups in every unit
central HVAC


Scarano & Associate Architects

http://www.scaranoarchitects.com/multifamily1.html

Finding the perfect mix of unit size and exterior style can make one project a successful seller over another. Constructed in an area of small multifamily mid rise masonry buildings this uniquely designed structure houses eight families in a condominium complex of three buildings.

With two apartments on each of four floors, including duplexes on the first floor, and multi height apartments with mezzanines on the second, third and fourth floors, each unit has front and rear exposures. The concept for the plan layout was achieved by interlocking and reversing a mirrored geometry, which helped maximize the square footage per room in each apartment.

This concept also fostered the undulating masonry façade pattern that is key to the clean look of the building. By expanding the height to the maximum limits permitted by the New York zoning resolution this small building makes a big statement.

Derek2k3
March 7th, 2005, 10:08 PM
Project #9

12th & Park
232-236 North 12th Street
4 stories 60 feet
Bricolage Designs
Residential Rental
12 units 8,106 Sq. Ft.
Completed 2003-2005

http://www.aptsandlofts.com/buttons/commercial_1.jpg
aptsandlofts.com

http://www.12thandpark.com/
http://www.aptsandlofts.com./featurebuilding.html

Brand-new loft residences with spaciousness galore, soaring ceilings and generous amounts of sunlight. Located steps to the Bedford Avenue L train and directly across from McCarren Park. Unit layouts include expansive open lofts, mini studio-like lofts, and incredible duplex lofts with tons of eye candy: spiral staircases, views of Manhattan and McCarren Park, massive terraces and walls of windows.

• 14' Ceilings
• Views of NYC
• Stainless Appliances
• Right on the Park
• Elevator
• Light-Filled
• Washer/Dryer

Derek2k3
March 8th, 2005, 02:36 AM
Project #10

26 Broadway
Kutnicki Bernstein Architects
7 stories 70 feet
Dev-Lois Silverman
Residential Condominium
30 units 59,254 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2006

http://www.kbanyc.com/images/26broadway.jpg
Photo Credit: Kutnicki Bernstein Architects
http://www.kbanyc.com


Project #11

Broadway Riverview
20 Broadway
Kutnicki Bernstein Architects
Dev-Broadway Riverview LLC/East Coast Construction Co.
5 stories 76 feet
Residential Condominiums
14 units 20,529 Sq. Ft.
Under Construcion 2005

http://www.kbanyc.com/images/20Broadway.jpg
Photo Credit: Kutnicki Bernstein Architects
http://www.kbanyc.com
http://www.broadwayriverview.com

New York Metro
http://newyorkmetro.com/nymetro/realestate/advertorial/10392/

Built in the 1920s as a hotel, the seven-story, 14-unit Broadway Riverview at 20 Broadway in Williamsburg has recently been converted to one- and two-bedroom five-star condo lofts, ranging in size from 950 to 1,300SF. The two duplex penthouses offer sprawling sunny-all-day rooftop terraces and outstanding vistas (most of the other homes have gardens or balconies). There’s immeasurable appeal everywhere—from the soaring ceilings to kitchens with custom Anigre wood cabinets, Costa Esmeralda green granite counter tops and Viking appliances. Bathrooms come with slate walls, limestone floors, glass mosaic tiles and custom-pear wood vanities topped with Cascais stone or Montauk black slate. When the sales office opens on Dec. 2, prices will range from the low $500,000s to just over $1 million. Occupancy is set for late winter 2005.

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/40565564.jpg
26 Broadway will rise in the center walled off lot and 20 Broadway is to to the right. Photo from December.

geyes999
March 8th, 2005, 11:18 AM
Anyone have any clue about what's in the works for the lot where the fish market on Broadway used to stand - next to Marlow & Sons?

Gulcrapek
March 8th, 2005, 04:03 PM
What are some nearby streets?

geyes999
March 8th, 2005, 06:18 PM
The lot is on Broadway between Berry and Wythe, on the north side of the street

Gulcrapek
March 8th, 2005, 06:35 PM
97 Broadway
5 floors, 60ft
Unknown use, app says community facility
Architect: Karl Fischer

http://a810-bisweb.nyc.gov/bisweb/PropertyProfileOverviewServlet?bin=3807657&requestid=2&s=2764E472656094405BCE4CFD7393E84A

geyes999
March 9th, 2005, 10:34 AM
Thanks for the response, but I think that 97 Bwy is one block further east than the block I am referring to - I'm talking about the vacant lot to the west of Marlow & Sons (which is at 81 Broadway) - so the address is probably somewhere in the 60s or 70s.

Gulcrapek
March 9th, 2005, 07:08 PM
Can't find anything :o

Derek2k3
March 10th, 2005, 11:13 PM
While we're still on Broadway.

Project #12

Broadway 170
170 Broadway
7 stories 60 feet
Sandor Weiss
Dev-George Roth/158 Broadway Realty Corp.
Residential Condominium
12 units 19,246 Sq. Ft.
Completed 2004

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/40662886.jpg

Over the river and under the bridge - Residential - Douglas Elliman's condominium - Brief Article
Real Estate Weekly, March 17, 2004

http://articles.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m3601/is_31_50/ai_114702583

Steak-loving apartment buyers beware! Williamsburg's newest condominium residence may prove too mouth-watering to resist.

Sales are officially underway at 170 Broadway, a new "ground-up" seven-story condominium located just steps away from the legendary Peter Luger's Steak House. The distinctive residence, which is expected to be ready for occupancy in late spring, contains a total of 12 two-bedroom apartments--just two per floor. All residences have a balcony or a terrace.

According to Helene Luchnick, executive vice president of Douglas Elliman and exclusive sales agent for the project, prices at 170 Broadway will range from $400,000 to $525,000.

"We've had a great response from first-time homebuyers who are attracted to this eclectic Williamsburg neighborhood," she said.

Residences at 170 Broadway feature solid oak strip flooring, recessed lighting, central heat and air conditioning, a stacked washer/dryer and a fully equipped kitchen with solid birch wood cabinets, granite counters and stainless steel appliances. Bathrooms feature marble floors and wails, wood vanity with stone counter and an oversized medicine cabinet.

Other building amenities include a stone lobby, state-of-the-art video intercom security system, smart wiring for high-speed internet access, cable TV and Andersen thermal windows.

For the Douglas Elliman Development Marketing Group, 170 Broadway marks its fourth assignment in Williamsburg.

COPYRIGHT 2004 Hagedorn Publication
COPYRIGHT 2004 Gale Group

Archit_K
March 10th, 2005, 11:31 PM
^ Project # 12, looks dissent. Thumbs up.

Derek2k3
March 11th, 2005, 12:15 AM
Project #13

192 Broadway
Bricolage Designs
Dev-Mendel Gutman
8 stories 59 feet
Residential
16 units 25,623 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2005

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/40664372.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/40664382.jpg

Derek2k3
March 11th, 2005, 10:44 AM
Project #14

LUXE226/LUXE 226
226 Richardson Street
5 stories 62 feet
Gene Kaufman Architect
Dev-Anthony Fernicola
Residential Condominiums
8 units
Under Construction 2005

http://thedevelopersgroup.com/images/building/bld_1025_2_dt.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/40678100.jpg

The Developers Group: Luxe226

http://thedevelopersgroup.com/buildings/building.aspx?buildingid=1025&

The apartments at Luxe226 strike the perfect balance between a sleek, contemporary design and an ultra-luxurious presentation and set of finishes, fixtures and appliances. A key controlled elevator opens direclty into the units, which come complete with designer open kitchens, gorgeous wide-plank hardwood floors, huge 5-piece master bathrooms, floor-to-ceiling windows and fully landscaped private gardens. Some units also have private terraces and amazing NYC skyline views. Sales will begin in the Spring of 2005. Call for more information.

Derek2k3
March 11th, 2005, 11:04 AM
Project # 15

The Casa
88-92 Conselyea Street/306-310 Leonard Street
3 stories 55 feet
Scarano & Associates Architects
Dev-Jacob Rubin/Skillman Plaza 2 LLC
Residential Condominiums
24 units 28,000 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2003-2005

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/40678642.jpg

http://www.thecasalofts.com/


aptsandlofts.com: The Casa

http://www.aptsandlofts.com./Sales_webid_Casa.html

LOCATION
Conselyea & Leonard Streets
Williamsburg, Brooklyn

BUILDING DESCRIPTION
The Casa is a 24-unit modern masterpiece of clean vertical lines: traditional brick artfully combined with contemporary aluminum and anchored by a natural gray-stone base.

Residences are designed true to loft ideals with wide-open floorplans that offer unlimited versatility. Oversized floor-to-ceiling windows, some of which extend to an incredible 25-feet high, allow amazing natural light in, but even more spectacular, allow the outside in. Views from these magnificent windows range from clear open sky, the Manhattan skyline, charming garden courtyards and lovely tree-lined streets. Some residences enjoy exclusive rooftop terraces and lush private gardens. Sumptuously appointed details set the tone for the ultimate in luxury living.

The Casa is located in a lovely part of Williamsburg, known to locals as the Second Stop because of its proximity to the 2nd stop on the L train (Lorimer Street) from Manhattan. Delightful neighborhood favorites can be found alongside hip new additions. It has always, since the early days, been an area with a strong community and neighborly charm.

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/40678640.jpg
photo from December so it's probably near completion now.

Derek2k3
March 11th, 2005, 11:41 AM
Project #16

Withers Place
246 Withers Street/134 Woodpoint Avenue
4 stories 54 feet
Karl Fischer Architects
Dev-Bluebell Assets/Isaac Schwartz
Residential Condominium
25 units 32,798 Sq. Ft.
Completed Late 2004

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/40679431.jpg

Prudential Douglas Elliman: Withers Place

http://www.elliman.com/MainSite/NHD/NHDInfo.aspx?ID=74&SearchType=newdev&PageName=home

The unique footprint of the building has inspired 25 residences in a variety of highly livable one and two bedroom layouts - from maisonette homes with private street entrances to penthouses featuring private roof decks - as well as convenient on-site parking nestled off the street. Sizes range from 593 sq ft to well over 2,300 sq ft, including duplex units with lower level recreation rooms plus 1, 2 and 3 bedrooms and 2 1/2 baths.

RESIDENCE FEATURES
The finishes are impeccable:
* maple floors throughtout
* stone and ceramic detailed baths
* maple kitchen cabinets
* rich granite counter tops
* washer/dryer in each residence
* lofty 10 ft ceiling heights
* oversized windows
* private balconies in many homes
* individually controlled heat & A/C


BUILDING AMENITIES

The features are ideal:
* convenient common storage rooms
* residents' common roof deck
* available on-premises parking

NEIGHBORHOOD

Deftly designed by noted architect Karl Fischer, this one-of-a-kind condominium is set in a well-established neighborhood, just 4 blocks from the L train service to Manhattan. The serene "settled in" feeling of this area, with local specialty shops, ethnic restaurants and major retailers, makes it the perfect place to call home.

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/40679427.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/40679429.jpg

Derek2k3
March 11th, 2005, 12:03 PM
Project #17

The Richardson
252-258 Richardson Street/83 Kingsland Avenue
4 stories 45 feet
Bricolage Designs
Dev-Simon Duchinsky
Residential Condominium
12 units 17,750 Sq. Ft
Completed Late 2004

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/40679817.jpg

The Developers Group: 252-258 Richardson

http://www.thedevelopersgroup.com/buildings/building.aspx?buildingid=1024&

The perfect condominium, generous layouts, a beautiful design and fantastic light. The elegant kitchens are dressed with cherry cabinetry and stainless steel backsplashes, complete with granite countertops and designer appliances that include a chef style oven hood. Not to be outdone the bathrooms are equally well planned and styled. Every unit has either a private patio, balcony or roof terrace.

Gulcrapek
March 11th, 2005, 02:19 PM
Good stuff, nice updates.

NewYorkYankee
March 11th, 2005, 05:26 PM
I like #'s 14, 15, and 16.

alex ballard
March 11th, 2005, 06:10 PM
Is any of this stuff affordable? Also, is Willamsburg undergoing a huge popualtion boom due to the new construction.


And something to chew on: Why did everyone move to Willamsburg before Alhapbet City?

Derek2k3
March 12th, 2005, 09:58 PM
Project #7

The Stagg I
63-69 Stagg
4 stories 55 feet
Scarano & Associate Architects
Dev-Isaac Schwartz
Residential Condominiums
8 units 10,849 Sq. Ft. (x3)
Completed 2003-2005

http://www.thedevelopersgroup.com/images/building/bld_1019_th.jpg

[b]Developers Group: The Stagg
http://www.thedevelopersgroup.com/buildings/building.aspx?buildingid=1019&

69 Stagg Street Brooklyn, NY 11206
A beautiful exterior that is only surpassed by the amazing interior design of the individual condominium units. A glass façade lets natural sunlight permeate every section of the units. No detail has been overlooked including giving every unit private outdoor space including the gardens and the private roof decks that offer astonishing NYC skyline views. Located right off the second stop on the L train surrounded by some of the best restaurants and shops. Scarano and Associates Architects. http://www.scaranoarchitects.com

Amenities
High Speed Internet
Roofdeck
washer & dryer hookups in every unit
central HVAC

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/40727401.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/40727357.jpg

3/12

Derek2k3
March 12th, 2005, 10:08 PM
Project #6

Tower 78
78 Ten Eyck Street
Scarano & Associate Architects
Dev-Lipe Gross
4 stories 55 feet
11 units 14,645 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2003-2005

http://www.aiany.org/eOCULUS/2004/2004images/1217/proj_scarano.jpg
http://www.tower78.com/


Scarano & Associate Architects

http://www.scaranoarchitects.com/multifamily1.html

This building lot is located on the corner of two prominent residential streets in an upcoming area on the Williamsburg border of Brooklyn. An L-shaped lot with one part on the public street and the other towards the private interior portion of the lot.

The building is four stories high with the first floor covering the entire lot to create a parking garage for the owners. The upper floors cover 80 % of the lot and a private terrace is created rear of the second floor. The building has a total of 14,000 gross square feet and there is a mix of different types of units including studios, one and two bedroom loft style apartments, each of them having a mezzanine and double height living/dining areas.

The exterior appearance makes an emphasis on the street corner, by forming a “tower”, which is separated from the rest of the buildings facade by a thin window strip.

The exterior is masonry with large openings of curtain wall type windows, exposing the loft-style interior to the outside. The upper portion of the building is capped by a mansard roof.
The color of the roof forest, green, is complementary to the brick red color of the masonry.


aptsandlofts.com
http://www.aptsandlofts.com/Sales_webid_Tower78.html

LOCATION
Ten Eyck & Leonard Streets
Williamsburg, Brooklyn

BUILDING DESCRIPTION
The aptly named Tower 78 literally “towers” the corner of Ten Eyck and Leonard Streets—at the core of the culturally-rich neighborhood of Williamsburg, just a few minutes from the Lorimer L train stop. The building’s exterior combines complementary green and red hues: the upper portion is capped by a forest green mansard roof, and the lower portion is a gorgeous red brick. The massive rectangular windows are the highlight—not only were they conceived for practicality, they were conceived architecturally as an integral part of exceptional design. Inside the residences, the windows also take center stage—the incredible curtain walls of windows allow in golden sunlight and glorious sky.

Interiors:
European Kitchens with a stunning combination of Dark Wood and White Laminated Steel-Framed Cabinets; Contemporary-Designed Stone Bathrooms

Within the mix of apartment layouts are two duplex apartments, six bi-level lofts and three penthouse tri-level lofts (ranging from studios to one- and two-bedrooms). Residences are crafted for total space optimization, allure and function. All apartments enjoy mezzanine levels, and many boast ceiling heights of nearly 25 soaring feet. Some feature decadent rooftop terraces with all-encompassing views of Manhattan—Downtown to Uptown.

CONTACT
718.384.5304
information@aptsandlofts.com

http://www.nofirecuts.com/html/still_fighting.html

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/40727673.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/40727674.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/40727676.jpg

Derek2k3
March 12th, 2005, 10:44 PM
Project #18

418 Lorimer Street
4 stories 55 feet
Scarano & Associates Architects
Dev-Shea Lefkowitz
Residential Condominiums
8 units 9,066 Sq. Ft.
Proposed 2005-2006

Scarano & Associates Architects

http://www.scaranoarchitects.com/multifamily2.html

Construction began on this project by a previous owner who with limited development experience and a general contractor’s license started the addition to the existing building to create a commercial development.

Neighborhood demographics and rising real estate prices changed this thinking and allowed the sale of the partially constructed building to another builder.

The wider width and shallower depth of the property was an opportunity to development loft style apartment units that were more desirable than the units typically being built on adjoining sites.

High ceilings, large rooms, ample closets and oversized windows drew buyers to this boutique building allowing this project to complete a streetscape in this Williamsburg Brooklyn neighborhood.

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/41073245.jpg


Project #19

406 Lorimer Street
4 stories 55 feet
Scarano & Associates Architects
Dev-Alan Messner
Residential Condominiums
8 units 9,862 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2004-2005

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/40728606.jpg

Article on both projects here again:
http://www.nydailynews.com/business/story/287408p-246073c.html

Archit_K
March 12th, 2005, 11:38 PM
Project #13

192 Broadway
Bricolage Designs
Dev-Mendel Gutman
8 stories 59 feet
Residential
16 units 25,623 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2005

Project # 13

I think this is an interesting design.

http://image.pbase.com/u25/archit_kderek2k3/large/40729815.IMG_5779.jpg

http://image.pbase.com/u25/archit_kderek2k3/large/40729671.IMG_5777.jpg

or maybe not I see balconies.

Derek2k3
March 13th, 2005, 11:21 AM
Project #19

97 Broadway
5 stories 50 feet
Karl Fischer Architect
Dev-Tziry Weiss
Community Facility?
18,984 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2005

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/40752586.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/40752588.jpg

Derek2k3
March 13th, 2005, 11:45 AM
Project #20

The Meserole Grand
168-172 Meserole Street
4 stories 52 feet
Scarano & Associates Architects
Dev-Aaron Green/The Meserole Grand LLC
24 units ~30,000 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2004-2005


http://loftfinders.com/images/East%20%20Williamsburg120_image1


Bushburg Properties:The Meserole Grand
http://loftfinders.com/listdetails.php?lid=20010239

Location: East Williamsburg

Listing details: $0, 1200 sq ft
"The Meserole Grand"
Luxury Loft-like condos.
Available Summer 2005
Bushburg Properties has not yet started the marketing and sales process for the Meserole Grand. Please call or email us to put your name, phone number and/or email on the waiting list, and we will keep you updated with any and all information concerning these condos as it becomes available. Thanks!

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/40753669.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/40753668.jpg

Derek2k3
March 13th, 2005, 12:39 PM
Project #21

Union Lofts
395 South 2nd Street
Scarano & Associates Architects
Dev-Jacob Rubin
4 stories 45 feet
Residential Condominiums
4units 4,800 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2005

www.theunionlofts.com

Scarano & Associates Architects

http://www.scaranoarchitects.com/multifamily1.html

This unique building is a pioneer in the South Williamsburg area in its bold design and delicate detailing.

Its triangular lot presented the challenge of maintaining a legal 30 foot rear yard. This provides an angled rear façade, which creates a pocket in which large balconies could be placed. As a result, the interiors become extremely dynamic, and the back of the building, which is usually less regarded, takes on a sculptural and original quality.

The design of the exterior utilizes the flexibility of design with stucco, aluminum and glass in an innovative way. The massing is sensitive in that it bridges the adjacent 6-story building with a 2-story building in a stepped fashion.

The second and third floor have two apartments each, with mezzanines, while the first and fourth floor are full-floor duplexes. The 14 foot high ceilings, when combined with the angled rear walls and generous fenestration, create an ideal living environment.

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/40756093.jpg

Derek2k3
March 14th, 2005, 11:55 AM
Project #22

610 Union Avenue
2-10 Bayard Street
5 stories 70 feet
Sandor Weiss
Residential
Dev-Sol Kohn
19 units 25,000 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2004-2005

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/40807668.jpg

Derek2k3
March 14th, 2005, 12:11 PM
Project #23

142-144 North 8th Street
139-141 North 7th Street
16 stories 222 feet
Scarano & Associates Architects
Dev-Scott Spector
Residential
42 units 122,657 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2005-2007

http://www.home.earthlink.net/~herron3/images/sosposterweb.jpg
http://www.stopoursupersizing.com/



That isn't the real building. The NIMBYs created a fake computer rendering which they made as ugly as possible to garner support for their (hopeless) cause. The developer has not released the design.

DAILY NEWS

Developers: Race you to the top
Scramble to build - up

By HUGH SON

Developers are scrambling to build a slew of supersized condo towers in Williamsburg and Greenpoint before the city's sweeping zoning changes - designed to block such buildings - take effect.

At least seven high-rise apartment buildings that will dwarf existing three and four-story rowhouses in the neighborhood are in the works, the Daily News has found.

"It's horrible," said Kate Schmitz, 37, part-owner of a Williamsburg kids' clothing shop. "It seems every single space here will be filled up with buildings just as tall as possible."

The Williamsburg-Greenpoint rezoning plan will transform 350 acres of northern Brooklyn by restricting heights in low-rise districts and encouraging development along the waterfront.

Height limitations could take effect after a City Council vote in May, said City Planning Commission spokesman Rachaele Raynoff.

"We've examined the outdated zoning that permits these tall buildings," Raynoff said.

But if a project's foundation is complete before the rezoning is approved, it is considered part of the existing neighborhood.

Buildings in development such as 144 N. Eighth St., set to be completed by 2007, will be as tall as 220 feet - more than five times higher than adjacent rowhouses.

It has been nicknamed the "Finger Building" by residents because they say it resembles a raised finger - the unkind gesture they feel developer Mendel Brach is giving to the neighborhood.

"It's going to be just hideous, like a huge NYU dormitory was dumped into the neighborhood," said Marisa Bow, who lives next to the N. Eighth St. site.

Another building that will likely stick out like a sore thumb is the 154-foot tall 55 Eckford St. project. It is directly across the street from a neat row of two-story clapboard houses.

Some of the construction sites have been plagued by safety problems.

At 20 Bayard St., where a 201-foot tall condo will rise, contractor Hudson Meridian Construction Corp. failed to hire a safety manager and continued work after being ordered to stop by the city Department of Buildings.

"These are very serious infractions that have to be addressed before they can continue work," Buildings Department spokeswoman Jennifer Givner said.

Plans for a 13-story apartment building on N. Sixth St. were flawed enough to be rejected outright by the department last month, but builders are likely to resubmit a proposal, she added.

"These buildings are obviously being built in a rush to avoid the new rules," said Councilman David Yassky (D-Brooklyn Heights), who is working on details of the rezoning with city officials.

"It's exactly in the places that need protection that developers are trying to wring every last square foot out of their property," Yassky said.

Similar development blitzes have happened in Staten Island and the Bronx when plans were announced to preserve neighborhoods, Givner said.

Williamsburg opponents believe the coming high-rise buildings will block light and views and irrevocably hurt the character of their neighborhood.

But developer Abraham Banda defended the dimensions of his eight-story building at 297 Driggs Ave., set to be finished by the end of the year.

"You know, there are buildings around here that will be 16 stories or more," Banda said.

Two-bedroom apartments in the 14-unit building will sell for $750,000, said a manager at Williamsburg-based Superior Construction.

"This is the beginning of high-rise buildings in Williamsburg," the manager declared.

The new luxury buildings cropping up in the former working-class, minority neighborhood also worry people who say rents are too high.

"I've seen the transformation of this community, and it does have its good parts," said resident Phil DePaolo. "But I see the diversity disappearing now."

Derek2k3
March 17th, 2005, 07:50 PM
Project #24

258 Bushwick Avenue
254-262 Bushwick Avenue
5 stories 58 feet(4 story addition)
Pinner Associates
Dev-Rutledge Realty LLC
Residential
20 units
Under Construction 2004-2005

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/40923885.jpg
??

Derek2k3
March 17th, 2005, 08:15 PM
Project #25

120 South 2nd Street
5 stories 54 feet
Bricolage Designs
Dev-K A I Construction
Residential Rental
17 units 35,950 Sq. Ft.
Completed Late 2003

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/40924436.jpg
ugh!

Derek2k3
March 17th, 2005, 08:31 PM
Project #26

The Dunham Condominium
40-44 South 6th Street/24 Dunham Place
5 stories 55 feet
Gene Kaufman Architect
Dev-South Development
Residential Condominium
15 units 18,846 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2004-2005

http://www.thedevelopersgroup.com/images/building/bld_1029_1_dt.jpg
The Developers Group:The Dunham Condominium

44 South 6th Street Brooklyn, NY 11211

http://www.thedevelopersgroup.com/buildings/building.aspx?buildingid=1029&

Industrial charm and modern design converge in The Dunham, Williamsburg's newest luxury condominium. Located on the fashionable Southside, where great restaurants, shops and galleries abound, The Dunham is defined by its dramatic glass and metal paneled facade and sleek, contemporary interior design. The Dunham's finishes are of the highest standard with no detail having been overlooked. Warmth and style are beautifully interwoven in the gorgeous open kitchens where finishes include glass, stainless steel and wood and stunning limestone bathrooms. Amenities in this 5-story corner elevator building include a common courtyard and parking. Call today for more information.

Amenities & Features
Common Courtyard
Parking
Washer & Dryer Hook-ups in Unit
Central HVAC


http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/40924801.jpg

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Derek2k3
March 19th, 2005, 11:44 AM
New York Times
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/03/20/realestate/20cov.html?

Williamsburg Reinvented
By ANNA BAHNEY
Published: March 20, 2005

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IN the last decade, Williamsburg in Brooklyn has been a first stop for young people new to the city, just out of college. As they have grown up, the neighborhood has too, evolving from dive bars and movie rental joints to chic sushi restaurants and designer furniture emporiums.

Most of these Williamsburg devotees are now young professionals, often working in creative fields. They tend to be in their 20's and 30's and earning $60,000 to $150,000 a year, according to David Maundrell, president of Aptsandlofts.com, a real estate company in Williamsburg.

"It is a small town of late 20- to 30-somethings," said Mr. Maundrell, who is 30 and grew up in East Williamsburg. "They recognize people on the train going to work in the morning. Saturday mornings you go to walk your dog and get your coffee at 8 in the morning and someone else has the same routine."

In an area with little real estate to buy, these renters have been hungering for some equity of their own in a neighborhood that has become home, and not just a stopping-off point.

They are about to get their wish.

This little hamlet is going to get bigger. Like a whole town bigger. Imagine all the owner-occupied housing stock of a town like Princeton, N.J., moved to this part of Brooklyn. Twice.

More than 130 buildings are currently planned in Williamsburg and Greenpoint, the neighboring area to the north. They are but a curtain raiser for the large-scale waterfront developments that are anticipated with the proposed rezoning along the East River that will transform 75 blocks from industrial to residential use. Last Monday, the plan was approved by the New York City Planning Commission and now makes the next and last stop in the City Council before an expected approval in May.

The buildings under construction now - some small, and tucked between low-slung neighbors, others rising above the rooftops with more than 200 apartments - are just the beginning of a transformation that will some day make the neighborhood look very little like Brooklyn, and more like parts of the far West Village, with sleek glass high-rise buildings and waterfront residences.

Elan Padeh, the president and chief executive of the Developers Group, a consulting and marketing firm with 30 projects currently planned in this area, estimates that in the next two years there will be 3,000 to 4,000 new units in Williamsburg and Greenpoint. "In the next four to five years," he said, "10,000 to 12,000."

For people who are not only priced out of Manhattan, but shut out of the brownstone neighborhoods of Brooklyn like Park Slope or Brooklyn Heights because of price creep, the idea of a deluge of new construction is seductive: it will sell for $500 to $700 a square foot, half the price of Manhattan, and the tax abatements of 15 to 25 years will lower monthly costs. With a 30-year fixed mortgage on a $399,000 two-bedroom apartment with a tax abatement, buyers will spend about $2,500 a month, about the same as they would spend on rent in the neighborhood.

But it isn't just economics. It is also aesthetics.

"I like to design and build my space," said Jennifer Chan, 30, an architect who recently signed a contract on a one-bedroom apartment with high ceilings and a mezzanine in the Union Lofts building on South Second Street, around the corner from where she has lived for four years. "It seemed like enough of a blank slate."

She said she had looked in Queens and other areas of Brooklyn for something that she could renovate, but after weighing the money and time decided that "it seemed a lot more affordable to buy new construction." And she wanted to stay in Williamsburg. "I'm very attached because my friends are there, the base of my social network," she said.

Mr. Maundrell said he sees it all the time in his buyers. "These people don't want to live in brownstone Brooklyn," he said. "They are individuals or young couples. They aren't going to have much in common with the 50-year-old couple in Brooklyn Heights. Park Slope is another world. They look in Dumbo a little. But Dumbo doesn't have the sense of community."

Other brokers agree. "Aesthetically, Park Slope is beautiful, but if you don't want to live in a house from 1860 and don't like gargoyles, it isn't for you," said Kara Kasper, an agent with the Corcoran Group who specializes in Williamsburg. "To people coming from the East Village, Williamsburg feels like home and Park Slope feels like the suburbs."

But with so many developers breaking ground across the 11222 and 11211 ZIP codes and hiring architects with typically contemporary notions, will that community and cultural sensibility be maintained? Or will it run out in a wash of construction?

They are building from Broadway in South Williamsburg, where the smoky aroma from the Peter Luger Steak House wafts, to the far northern reaches of Greenpoint and deep into East Williamsburg, where leafy streets like Ten Eyck and Scholes Streets recall "A Tree Grows in Brooklyn" by Betty Smith. With most of the vacant lots already built on, three-story vinyl-clad houses and two-story garages are being replaced by glass towers that mimic those sprouting in Manhattan.

Many developers are rushing to get foundations laid to take advantage of existing zoning. New height limitations will go into effect when the new zoning plan is approved. Others are simply trying to capitalize on the interest in the market.

The neighborhood has come a long way in the past five years. Developers were long dubious that anyone would do anything but rent in Williamsburg. Originally, the conversion of the Smith Gray Building at 138 Broadway in 2001 was conceived as rentals. Mr. Padeh, who was with the Corcoran Group at the time and worked on the project, said that when the owner decided to sell the units, the expected price was $375 a square foot. The building sold for an average of $455 a square foot. (A 1,997-square-foot, three-bedroom penthouse is now available for $1.55 million, or $776 a square foot.)

"Based off of that success, the Gretsch Building was developed," Mr. Padeh said. "No one would have taken a shot if 138 Broadway would have flopped."

The Gretsch Building, a 130-unit luxury building at 60 Broadway, was first offered for sale at the end of 2003 and sold for an average of $575 a square foot.

Many of the largest developments in Williamsburg have not been done in the neighborhood's prime areas, which Mr. Padeh describes as the area immediately surrounding the L line subway station at North Seventh Street and Bedford Avenue, the streets on the perimeter of McCarren Park and, of course, the waterfront.

Those who do sell apartments in the prime areas will get a premium. One building, an eight-unit building at 171 North Seventh Street, about 20 steps from the subway, recently sold for $735 a square foot.

Not long ago, North and South Williamsburg were areas where people could find deals. Now, they are just another option. The best bargains are in East Williamsburg, where buildings in territory better known as "second stop" and "third stop" on the L are selling out in a matter of days.

During an open house last week in East Williamsburg at a new condo building called the Nola, young buyers traipsed out into the cold and cooed at the view as the skyline of Manhattan turned pink on its jagged edges.

By the end of his first weekend of showings at the Nola, Mr. Maundrell, whose firm is selling the apartments, had accepted offers for seven of the eight units ranging from $399,000 to $650,000. Mr. Maundrell keeps a list of interested buyers and holds open houses for people to have an advance look at property coming to market. Next week he will have an open house for those on the reserve list for an 11-unit building on Ten Eyck Street with views of Manhattan called Tower 78. His list is already 200 people long.

East Williamsburg became a viable place to sell, he said, when Manhattan went "through the roof." And it helps, he said, that the new buildings have appealing design.

Robert M. Scarano Jr., an architect based in Dumbo whose 60-person firm is leading the way, is working on 100 buildings in East Williamsburg alone. With a following mainly gained through word of mouth and support from developers who have seen the firm's work, Mr. Scarano does not have an exclusive broker for the properties but works with Corcoran, Prudential Douglas Elliman, the Developers Group and Aptsandlofts.com. "We're like a Switzerland," he said.

But the firm is really more like a young United Nations with architects, whose average age is 29, pulled from around the world. Thumbing through a two-inch-high pile of papers on a file shelf he said: "This? This year's résumés." Moving to the shelf below it with a similarly intimidating pile, "Last year's résumés."

It is no surprise. Mr. Scarano bestows an incredible amount of responsibility on his young staff, whom he wisely dispatches to design for people like themselves.

When Carmen Larach, a 25-year-old Honduras-born architect at the firm who lives in Greenpoint, finished designing 171 North Seventh Street with double heights and mezzanines, she knew exactly which unit she would love to live in. The top level, east side. "The developers said, 'Let me make money on this one.' Maybe next time I can have one," she said.

In Mr. Scarano's office, one wall is all but covered with renderings. The mode for Scarano projects in Williamsburg and Greenpoint is a layered contemporary exterior with glass curtain walls. The quality of the finishes varies, based on the building, but stainless-steel appliances and granite countertops are practically standard issue. Buyers also want high ceilings, lots of light and outdoor space, he said.

Mr. Scarano is excited about the future of the waterfront and anticipates building in the rezoned area. He credits the likely changes to Amanda Burden, the chairwoman of the City Planning Commission. She "is doing for Williamsburg what C. Virginia Fields did for Frederick Douglass Boulevard" in Harlem, he said.

Of course, with so much building, everyone involved is wary of saturation.

Karl Fischer, the architect who designed the conversion of the Gretsch Building, has two of the most ambitious current projects: four buildings on Bayard Street, which runs along one side of McCarren Park, and a waterfront complex, Schaefer Landing, a joint venture with Gene Kaufman, an architect. He expects that the market will be flooded within a year or two after the rezoning takes effect.

"It will actually be very good for the buyer," Mr. Fischer said. "They will be able to shop around and have lots of product to choose from. Developers will have to try different things to compete."

For all its emulation of that island across the river, this northern knob of Brooklyn will remain the anti-Manhattan in at least one sense: it's a buyer's market.

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Check out some new buildings in the slideshow:
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alex ballard
March 19th, 2005, 11:56 AM
Something to ponder:

Like all neighborhoods, space in Willamsburg is finite. With that said, where are the artists and urban explorers gonna go? Everyone says Bushwick is next on the pipeline, but Bushwick has even less space to grow. Do you think Central Queens (Maspeth, Middle Village, Ridgewood, Glendale, Elmhurst) will become the next professional upper-class family enclave? Is there a chance someone is gonna really go for the gold and take the L to it's final few stops (which puts you in Remsen Village/Canarsie)?

Don't take this as saying I advocate working families being displaced, I hope someday, and area of the city will open up for people like myself as well. I hope Bushwick and Brownsville remain viable options for those who don't earn +60K a year. I just want to know where the people are going.

Derek2k3
March 20th, 2005, 08:56 PM
Project #27

58 Ten Eyck Street
4 stories 67 feet
Salvatore Marrese, R.A
Dev-Mario Avallone
Residential
14 units 12,000 Sq. Ft.
Completed 2004

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Project #28

The NOLA
31 Conselyea Street
4 stories 45 feet
PJM Architect, P.C.
Dev-Anthony DiRusso
Residential Condominium
8 units 6,875 Sq. Ft.
Completed 2004

http://www.thenola.com/

The NOLA

http://www.aptsandlofts.com/Sales_webid_Nola.html

LOCATION
31 Conselyea Street
Williamsburg, Brooklyn

BUILDING DESCRIPTION
Introducing NOLA…Contemporary condominiums in a Williamsburg neighborhood with burgeoning appeal.

NOLA residences include six 1-bedroom /convertible 2-bedroom apartments, one 1-bedroom duplex, and one 2-bedroom duplex—8 apartments in total. Quaint and Intimate, Just Like Home. Some boast exclusive outdoor havens—rooftop terraces with invigorating views and multipurpose yards for green-thumb planting or heavy-duty entertaining. Hot or cool? You decide. Each apartment has individual heating units, which allows you full control. A common laundry room is conveniently located in the basement. And low common charges, and a 15-year tax abatement add to the appeal.

Contemporary design graces the interiors. Kitchen highlights include: granite countertops, custom stainless steel appliances, cherry wood cabinets. Bathrooms are dressed in mosaic and subway tiles, and include full soaking tubs and natural cherry wood vanities. Living areas feature towering 10-foot ceilings, dark cherry wood floors and modern track lighting.

And all in an area of Williamsburg that puts you at the center of it all and embraces you with a refreshing neighborhood feel. Tree-lined, quiet, charming nostalgia reminiscent of small town living. Around the corner you will find the Lorimer L train—the second stop on the L line from Manhattan. And 2 blocks away you will find the Northside, which offers tons of variety on every imaginable level.

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NoyokA
March 20th, 2005, 09:12 PM
Something to ponder:

Like all neighborhoods, space in Willamsburg is finite. With that said, where are the artists and urban explorers gonna go? Everyone says Bushwick is next on the pipeline, but Bushwick has even less space to grow. Do you think Central Queens (Maspeth, Middle Village, Ridgewood, Glendale, Elmhurst) will become the next professional upper-class family enclave? Is there a chance someone is gonna really go for the gold and take the L to it's final few stops (which puts you in Remsen Village/Canarsie)?

Don't take this as saying I advocate working families being displaced, I hope someday, and area of the city will open up for people like myself as well. I hope Bushwick and Brownsville remain viable options for those who don't earn +60K a year. I just want to know where the people are going.

My guess would be near and around the Gowanus Canal.

NYTIMES:

March 20, 2005
GOWANUS CANAL
Ah, the Gowanus! Where You Can Walk on Water
By JAKE MOONEY

SOMETIME in 2000, a Brooklyn businessman named Alex Figliolia Sr. called his local community board to ask about the procedure for buying the strip of land behind his plumbing company, on the east bank of the Gowanus Canal.

Craig Hammerman, the Community Board 6 district manager who took the call, consulted his map and returned to the phone with puzzling news. "I said: 'What land in the back of your building? There's supposed to be a body of water there,' " Mr. Hammerman recalled last week. "And he said, 'There's only land here.' "

So began the latest chapter in the strange history of the First Street Basin, a blocklong stretch of canal that one day somehow ceased to be canal. The waterway, which was originally used so boats traveling on the canal's main section could turn around, was filled in at some point, as anyone who has seen it can agree. But who filled it, or, perhaps more important, what they filled it with, remains a mystery.

The question took on more relevance recently, when Mr. Figliolia's property and an adjacent parcel - that is, all the land surrounding the basin - were bought by the development firm Leviev Boymelgreen, which hopes to build a residential complex called Gowanus Village. The company is seeking state money to evaluate and clean up its property, but not the basin, which it says the city owns.

Even the basin's ownership is a little hard to determine exactly. When Mr. Hammerman inquired into the matter, he was referred to the city's Department of Citywide Administrative Services, which oversaw a cleanup of the land in 2003. But Marlene Donnelly, a canal neighbor who belongs to Friends and Residents of Greater Gowanus, says the basin should be considered part of the larger canal, and thus state property.

Mr. Hammerman, for his part, believes that the basin's condition is a symptom of its nebulous ownership. "This is a crack that things are falling between," he said, adding that he planned to contact the federal government to help sort things out.

Meanwhile, several of the involved parties are eyeing one another warily. Ms. Donnelly said she and other residents wanted the basin dredged, cleaned and reopened as a waterway. Mark Daly, the spokesman for the administrative services department, said there were no plans to do that, but noted that the developers had approached his office about using the land. Sara Mirski, the Boymelgreen staff member handling the project, told a community board subcommittee the basin was the city's responsibility, but did not return calls seeking comment.

All the while, the First Street Basin Canal remains a dusty patch of land, one of the oddest sections of a waterway with a notoriously checkered past. Some say the basin got to its present state when part of a nearby building was demolished and buried there; others say the fill is from the digging of the Brooklyn-Battery Tunnel. Some say the water became land in the 1970's and 80's; others say it was decades earlier.

At the very least, Mr. Hammerman said, whoever owns the stretch should find out what is in it and how it will affect the neighbors. And they should change the maps.

Derek2k3
March 20th, 2005, 09:46 PM
A few of the over 100 projects by Scarano in East Williamsburg.

Project #29

130 Scholes Street
4 stories 55 feet
Scarano & Associates Architects
Dev-Aaron Karpin
Residential
8 units 8,637 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2005-2006

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Scarano & Associates Architects

http://www.scaranoarchitects.com/multifamily2.html

A new residential development consisting of 8 apartments on four floors, with two duplex apartments on the cellar and first floors, and 6 high-ceiling apartments with loft-style mezzanines on the remaining floors.

A dormer with an operable skylight protrudes the fourth floor terrace, breaking up the geometry of the box, and affording maximum light and air to the top floor. Similarly corner windows are used throughout the building to expose sides of a living space to daylight, and bridge interior and exterior both environments.

The finishes used are applied stucco with varying shades of grey and aluminum accents.

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Project #30

42 Scholes Street
4 stories 55 feet
Scarano & Associates Architects
Dev-Aaron Karpin
Residential
8 units 7,847 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2004-2005

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Project #31

162 Scholes Street
160-166 Scholes Street
4 stories 55 feet
Scarano & Associates Architects
Dev-Jacob Rubin
Residential
7 units 6,542 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2004-2005

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/41042677.jpg


Project #32

199 Humboldt Street
4 stories 55 feet
Scarano & Associates Architects
Dev-199 Humboldt Street Towers LLC
Residential
8 units 8,849 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2004-2005

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/41042720.jpg


Project #33

160 Manhattan Avenue
4 stories 55 feet
Scarano & Associates Architects
Dev-N Group
Residential
8 units 9,368 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2004-2005

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/41042711.jpg


Project #34

174 Scholes Street
4 stories 55 feet
George Schwarz Architect
Dev-Spice Towers LLC
Residential
8 units 8,170 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2005-2006

Derek2k3
March 21st, 2005, 03:49 PM
Project #35

Bedford Court
293-299 Bedford Avenue/150/142-154 South 1st Street
5 stories 55 feet
Sears Tambasco Architects
Dev-South First Street Associates/Shiraz Sanjana
Residential Condominium
32 units 45,958 Sq. Ft.
Completed 2003

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/41075443.jpg

Prudential Douglas Elliman:Bedford Court

http://www.elliman.com

Introducing Bedford Court, the brand new condominium in the heart of Williamsburg. Ideally located in the eclectic “Northside”, Bedford Court is just a short distance from the “L” train station with its one-stop commute to Manhattan. This handsome 4-story brick building has been designed for luxury living, with stylish granite kitchens and marble baths with great attention to detail. Bedford Court represents an outstanding value opportunity for home ownership in one of New York’s newest, most exciting neighborhoods.

RESIDENCE FEATURES

5" oak plank floors
Custom moldings

Balcony or terrace in every home

Well-planned kitchens with maple Shaker style cabinetry, “Absolute Black”
granite counters and a full array of stainless steel appliances

Stylish master bath with marble floors and walls, wood vanity with chrome fixtures and custom medicine cabinet

Second baths feature white ceramic subway tile with black tile accents, wood vanity and custom medicine cabinet

Powder room in selected residences

Individually controlled air conditioning

Perimeter baseboard heating

Washer/dryer hook-ups in every home


Williamsburg condos now on the market.
Real Estate Weekly, July 30, 2003

http://www.findarticles.com/cf_dls/m3601/52_49/106653417/p1/article.jhtml

Sales have commenced at Williamsburg's Bedford Court at 299 Bedford Ave. The lure of upscale condominium living now beckons to home buyers attracted to the burgeoning and eclectic "Northside" of Williamsburg, a neighborhood that has seen a wave of new development over the past two years. Bedford Court offers a new level of luxury for sophisticated buyers.

Bedford Court's 32 residences are sited in an attractive newly-constructed five-story building on a lot formerly occupied by a vacant commercial structure. South First Street Associates of Brooklyn is the sponsor; Denali Construction Corporation is the general contractor, and Mary Brennan, senior vice president of Community Preservation Corporation (CPC) approved the construction financing. Douglas Elliman's Development Marketing Group is marketing the $15 million project.

Bedford Court was designed to appeal to a wide range of purchasers, with a mix of studios, one-bedroom, two-bedroom/two-bath, garden duplexes and penthouse duplexes with spacious private terraces. Sizes range from 651 to 1,414 SE Prices will range from $299,900 to $409,900 for the one and two-bedrooms and from $509,900-$689,900 for the penthouses.

COPYRIGHT 2003 Hagedorn Publication
COPYRIGHT 2003 Gale Group


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Derek2k3
March 21st, 2005, 08:33 PM
My guess would be near and around the Gowanus Canal.


Do you mean Newton Creek Stern? Gowanus Canal is in Carroll Gardens.

Derek2k3
March 22nd, 2005, 12:08 PM
Project #36

184 Kent Avenue
184-198 Kent Avenue/1-41 North 3rd Street
10 stories (4 story addition)
Karl Fischer Architect
Dev-Moishe Kestenbaum
Residential Condominiums
184 units
Proposed

http://www.kfarchitect.com/portfolio/residential/multifamily/multi-45.jpg
Karl Fischer Architect
http://www.kfarchitect.com


Condo plan stirs fight on housing


http://www.nydailynews.com/ips_rich_content/745-condo.JPG
Architect's drawing of proposed $80 million luxury condominium development on Kent Ave. shows changes to factory building, including addition of four stories. Building's current tenants and others in neighborhood oppose plan.


BY HUGH SON
DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER
June 25, 2004

The affordable housing vs. luxury residential development tug of war in Williamsburg has spread to a new battleground: the waterfront.

The owner of a loft building at 184 Kent Ave. with striking vistas of lower Manhattan wants a zoning variance that would allow him to convert the former factory into luxury condominiums - a move that would likely force out most of its middle-income tenants.

The $80 million conversion planned by Moishe Kestenbaum includes building an additional four stories of apartments and an indoor parking facility, said Ken Fisher and Howard Hornstein, lawyers handling the deal.

In exchange, Kestenbaum offered to create a waterfront promenade near the building and contribute $355,000 to a fund for affordable housing in the neighborhood, Fisher said.

But current tenants at 184 Kent - most of whom are young professionals or artists - are up in arms because they thought they could live there for years to come and would probably be priced out of their homes.

"The larger issue is that the whole waterfront will be redeveloped, and this will set a bad precedent," said one angry tenant, Will Anderson, 31.

Tenants say that new leases in the building must be renewed every two months - a signal, they charge, that Kestenbaum is seeking to evict current occupants. Sources said about 250 people live in the building and pay rents that average less than $1,000 a month.

The situation at 184 Kent has galvanized the local community board and driven a wedge between two area politicians.

Assemblyman Vito Lopez (D-Williamsburg) - who demanded that all real estate projects in Williamsburg include at least 20% affordable housing - blasted Councilman David Yassky's support of the variance, which Yassky offered in exchange for the $355,000 affordable housing contribution.

Lopez said that the money Yassky secured "doesn't amount to anything."

Yassky (D-Downtown Brooklyn, Fort Greene) called Lopez's criticism "preposterous" and said that the funds are enough to subsidize a dozen apartments. "I think this is a path-breaking deal to link zoning with affordable housing," Yassky said.

Michael Schill, director of the Furman Center for Real Estate and Urban Policy at New York University, said there was a danger in requiring too much from developers in the way of affordable housing.

"You could be in a situation where you tax the housing so much that you make the development unfeasible." Schill said. "We need both market rate and affordable [housing]. It's not either-or."

However, last month Community Board 1 voted against recommending approval of the proposal by the city Board of Standards and Appeals. The board makes the final decision on the proposal. The next hearing is Aug. 10.


All contents © 2004 Daily News, L.P.
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Derek2k3
March 23rd, 2005, 12:31 PM
Project #37

The Smith Gray Building
138-144 Broadway/389-399 Bedford Avenue
6 stories 70 feet (Conversion)
Scarano & Associates Architects
Dev-138 Broadway Realty/The Kay Organization/Howard Klaus
Residential Condominium
40 units 56,832 Sq. Ft.
Completed Early 2004


http://www.corcoran.com/property/nd/photo/Smith_Gray_lg.jpg

Prudential Douglas Elliman
Williamsburg's first Luxury Lofts Condominiums. Sturdy, strong, well built - yet airy, light and inspirational.

http://www.elliman.com/MainSite/NHD/NHDInfo.aspx?ID=56&SearchType=newdev&PageName=home

Affectionately known to locals as "The Blue Building" the Smith Gray Building is a true work of art, with Corinthian columns, art deco detailing, and a subtle blue coloring unique as it is beautiful. Large windows on the gound floor progress to Roman arch-top windows on the upper floors. Window bays are repeated the same width horizontally and vertically each floor has its own unique ornamentation. The overall effect gives the building a feeling of solidity and grace. It's the perfect wrapping for what waits inside.

BUILDING AMENITIES

The Smith Gray Building is grounded with triplex residences and capped-off with duplex penthouses hosting some of the best views of Manhattan available in Brooklyn.

Step onto your own private balcony. Appreciate the quality and feel of fine fixtures. From the roof deck, take in sensational East River and Manhattan skyline views, including panoramic views of the Brooklyn, Manhattan, Williamsburg and 59th Street Bridges.

The Forty-two lofts of the Smith Gray Building are a showcase of historic renovation done right. You'll feel equally at home throwing a dinnner party on Saturday night or kicking your feet up with the newspaper and coffee on Sunday morning. Lounge in the expansive living/dining space and modern open kitchen. Soak in light from oversized windowns and marvel at dramatic ceiling heights.

RESIDENCE FEATURES

The lofts of the Smith Gray Building merge classic with contemporary: restored hardwood floors compliment new cherry wood cabinets; cleaned and sealed original brick sets off stainless steel appliances; classic columns harmonize with limestone and marfil marble baths. No detail is overlooked, from high-speed internet connections to video intercom security to rare wood-plank ceilings.

Inside is a mass preservation effort
# Majestic Blue Cast-Iron Facade
# Brick Archways
# Rare Wood Beaded Ceilings 9' to 17'
# Corinthian Marble Columns
# Roman
# Arched Windows
# Stainless Steel Appliances
# Granite Surfaces
# Cherry Wood Cabinetry
# Limestone Baths
# Marble Baths
# Large Picture Windows 8'
# Wood Floors
# Central A/C
# Private Balconies & Terraces
# Interior Brick Courtyard
# High-Speed Access
# Tin Lobby

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Links:
http://www.corcoran.com/property/nd/detail_fr_overview.asp?ndevid=25
http://www.thedevelopersgroup.com/apartments/apartmentprint.aspx?webid=10662
http://www.mybrooklynhomes.com/bin/web/real_estate/AR12859/NEW_CONSTRUCTION/1111020788.html?ZKEY=&acnt=AR12859&action=NEW_CONSTRUCTION&hs_action=VIEW_DETAIL&inwindow=&listing_id=REAJ1771767&start=0&grp=ALL

Derek2k3
March 23rd, 2005, 12:50 PM
New York Times
Developers Known for Residential Work Buy Domino Sugar Plant on Brooklyn Waterfront
By DIANE CARDWELL and ROSALIE R. RADOMSKY

Published: July 1, 2004

wo developers known for residential projects have bought the Domino Sugar refinery in Williamsburg, ending a rich chapter of Brooklyn's industrial waterfront history.

C.P.C. Resources, the development arm of the Community Preservation Corporation, a lending consortium of banks and insurance companies best known for financing rehabilitations of older apartments, and Isaac Katan, a Brooklyn developer who has helped gentrify Fourth Avenue in Park Slope, have bought the land and the buildings of the all-but-shuttered plant, said Lloyd Kaplan, a preservation corporation spokesman.

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The developers would not say how much they paid for the property or what they planned to do with it, instead releasing a statement saying that they "look forward to working with the community and the city as we develop our plans for the site."

The Domino plant, with its distinctive neon sign looming over the East River just north of the Williamsburg Bridge, had been operating since the 1880's and was acquired in 2001 by American Sugar Refining.

Donald Brainard, vice president for human resources at American Sugar, also declined to discuss the particulars of the sale, but he said the plant's operations were unprofitable. "We announced last August that we would close it ultimately and had no plans for the facility at the time of the initial announcement," he said.

American Sugar still has plants in Yonkers, Baltimore and Chalmette, La., but the Brooklyn refinery, once the world's largest, according to a company brochure, had been the most inefficient, Mr. Brainard said, adding that only about 25 employees work there now. "We made a decision to close the operation to increase our efficiency and lower our costs," he said, adding that there had been a partial shutdown of operations in January. "I would guess the rest will close later this year."

Although sugar processing ended at the plant last August, news of the sale of the mammoth brick factory and its uncertain future appeared to take neighbors and city officials by surprise. Joseph Markowitz, who had bought the company's office building and parking garage across the street from the refinery about two years ago, said he would like to see it rezoned for residential use, a designation he is seeking for his property. "We have a problem renting to commercial - it's very hard," he said.

But City Planning Department officials, who have been pushing forward with an enormous proposal to rezone the Williamsburg and Greenpoint waterfront to encourage residential and recreational uses, had drawn their plan to preserve the Domino site for manufacturing, a move applauded by several officials and labor advocates who would like to see the remnants of the borough's industrial legacy - and its blue-collar jobs - preserved.

In August, city officials said they were committed to finding an industrial reuse for the site. "We're not contemplating a rezoning for this site," Regina Myer, the Brooklyn director for the Planning Department, said yesterday. "We're focusing all of our efforts on the rezoning to the north."

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/41152048.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/41152051.jpg

Derek2k3
March 24th, 2005, 06:30 PM
Projects #38 & 39

143 Leonard Street
81 Scholes Street
4 stories 55 feet
George Schwarz Architect
Dev-Scholes Street Plaza LLC.
Residential
8 units 6,716 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2004-2005

71 Scholes Street
4 stories 55 feet
George Schwarz Architect
Dev-Scholes Street Plaza LLC.
Residential
8 units 8,755 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2004-2005

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/41195785.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/41195819.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/41195889.jpg

Any more info?

Derek2k3
March 25th, 2005, 11:42 PM
Projects #40

160-164 Grand Street
4 stories 55 feet
Scarano & Associates Architects
Dev-Grand Mgmt Associates/Chester Strulovitch
Residential
16 units 16,668 Sq.Ft.
Under Construction 2005

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/41238663.jpg

Scarano & Associates Architects

http://www.scaranoarchitects.com/contentManaged/popUp.html

The use of masonry and precast materials helps to further enhance the building's ability to be in context with its neighbors. Iron balcony railings and a distinctive pediment play upon the unique architectural character of the surrounding buildings.

Grand ceilings with lofts create apartments that are sought after by buyers. Custom cabinetry, top of the line appliances, wide plank floors and large expanses of glass are appealing elements.

Though it is a walk up building, the stairs are gracious and have custom designed railings and separations between flights to allow natural light to filter down from the bulkhead.

160 and 164 Grand Avenue are infill buildings that are both in context and in contrast with a building grouping that would otherwise look incomplete.

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/41238494.jpg
12/04

Derek2k3
March 29th, 2005, 02:36 AM
Projects #41-43

Kedem Winery Development Plan
Kent Avenue
450 uniits (3 buildings)
Proposed

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/41384391.jpg
Originally posted by Elfgam

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/41384393.jpg http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/41384394.jpg
PKSB

Kedem Winery Development Plan
Brooklyn, NY

http://www.pksb.com

The development plan for the Kedem Winery site required complicated zoning changes to transform it from an industrial area into a residential district with a waterside park and promenade along the East River Waterfront. The plan includes design scenarios for three large interconnected residential buildings with a total of more than 400 units, a one-acre park, and more than 23,000 gross square feet of commercial space and parking. The park and promenade are part of a larger municipal program to renew and develop underutilized properties along the East River.

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/41384389.jpg

Gulcrapek
March 29th, 2005, 02:25 PM
^Isn't that phase 1 of Schaefer?

Derek2k3
March 29th, 2005, 04:16 PM
The shorter buildings in the foreground should be demolished for this project though.

billyblancoNYC
March 29th, 2005, 05:01 PM
Yes, I think it's right next door. You can see Schaefer in the 1st aerial pic, and it's the red mass in the second. Now, just build on that vacant lot across the street and get the Domino going and you have a brand spanking new neighborhood just like that. I love it.

Gulcrapek
March 29th, 2005, 10:22 PM
I think the Schaefer sales office is in that red building... I wonder if Elliman will be marketing Kedem too?

Gulcrapek
April 5th, 2005, 05:07 PM
(Williamsburg/East Williamsburg/Bushwick/Wyckoff Heights)


WY 101 Lofts
4 floors, 32 units
Conversion


http://www.elliman.com/elliman_data/NewHomeDevelopment/nhd_home/58752a.jpg


"Smart buyers invest here first.


Don't miss out on this opportunity to be first in for these condo lofts in the ever-expanding neighborhood of East Williamsburg. A beautiful prewar factory building converted into luxury lofts with sleek, simple and elegant design. 8 stops outside of Manhattan and steps away from L train, Wy 101 Lofts set the standard for affordable fine living."

Gulcrapek
April 5th, 2005, 05:18 PM
The Aurora
30 Bayard Street
13 floors, 125 ft
51 units
Architect: Karl Fischer

http://www.thedevelopersgroup.com/images/building/bld_1032_1_dt.jpg

http://www.thedevelopersgroup.com/buildings/building.aspx?buildingid=1032&

ryan
April 5th, 2005, 05:40 PM
http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2005/03/18/realestate/20willi_slide4.jpg

I really don't think 20 Bayard gets along with 30 very well. They accentuate each other's tacky symmetry. This rendering from the NYT feature a few weeks back makes them seem more harmonious than the high-rise row houses I'm afraid they'll be, though I am happy to see they are converting the industrial building.

Derek2k3
April 8th, 2005, 04:33 PM
http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2005/03/18/realestate/20willi_slide4.jpg

I really don't think 20 Bayard gets along with 30 very well. They accentuate each other's tacky symmetry. This rendering from the NYT feature a few weeks back makes them seem more harmonious than the high-rise row houses I'm afraid they'll be, though I am happy to see they are converting the industrial building.

What's even more dumb is that they are being designed by the same architect. Though new buildings blatantly ignoring the existing cityscape goes on all the time in this city. I'd expect different in this case.

ryan
April 8th, 2005, 05:02 PM
What's even more dumb is that they are being designed by the same architect. Though new buildings blatantly ignoring the existing cityscape goes on all the time in this city. I'd expect different in this case.

I thought so, but I wasn't 100%. Why not just build one large building? I wonder if they will make an attempt to blend with the industrial building, doesn't look much like the rendering? Disappointing aesthetics aside, this block is going to be so radically improved that I'm not too upset. At least they don't have fedders boxes...

billyblancoNYC
April 10th, 2005, 01:15 AM
What's there now?

Kolbster
April 10th, 2005, 11:59 AM
http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2005/03/18/realestate/20willi_slide4.jpg

I really don't think 20 Bayard gets along with 30 very well. They accentuate each other's tacky symmetry. This rendering from the NYT feature a few weeks back makes them seem more harmonious than the high-rise row houses I'm afraid they'll be, though I am happy to see they are converting the industrial building.

Wow, i mean the first two are really not THAT bad, in fact i sort of like them, but the last one, it is disgusting, it's too bland, and on such a large parsel of land. I support nimby-ism on that last building

ryan
April 10th, 2005, 12:36 PM
What's there now?

The industrial building is old, and looks unused for some time, but nice details. 30 Bayard was an ugly addition to the industrial, and it looked like it was going to crumble before they tore it down to start construction. I don't remember what was at 20 Bayard, and a less-aesthetically-challenged low-rise loft building is going up at 10 Bayard (hope the buyers see these renderings before they buy).

All three are way too busy to be symmetrical.

Derek2k3
April 12th, 2005, 01:36 PM
Project #23

142-144 North 8th Street
139-141 North 7th Street
16 stories 222 feet
Scarano & Associates Architects
Dev-Scott Spector
Residential
42 units 122,657 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2005-2007

http://www.stopoursupersizing.com/

Foundation cracks spark W'burg development rift
BY HUGH SON
DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER

http://www.nydailynews.com/boroughs...8p-255596c.html

http://www.nydailynews.com/ips_rich_content/996-wburg.jpg
Larry Walczak stands atop his building, which has formed cracks from nearby construction, he claims.

Demolition work for a controversial Williamsburg condo high-rise has created cracks in a next-door building, residents have charged.

Residents at a North Seventh St. row house next to the site for a planned 222-foot-tall building at 144 North Eighth St. said the racket that caused the cracks happens several times a week.

"It's really intense; it knocked a picture off the wall and glasses off the table," said Larry Walczak, a freelancer who works from his apartment. "I refer to my place as the war zone."

Walczak showed a reporter several 4-foot-long cracks radiating from a wall in his apartment closest to the construction.

"I've lived in Los Angeles, and it reminds me of a little earthquake," said Sandra Cheng, who also claimed several new fissures appeared in her living room.

But developer Mendel Brach strongly denied his project - dubbed the Finger Building by area residents who say it resembles a raised middle finger - created the new cracks.

"There is no way that can happen," Brach told the Daily News. "We have our own engineers on site all day. If there was one crack in the surrounding property, I would have stopped work."

"Almost every day, inspectors from the Buildings Department, the MTA, every organization in the United States are there because people keep complaining," he added.

A Buildings Department agent found "cracks approximately 1/4-inch wide and other hairline cracks" in a December inspection of Walczak and Cheng's apartments, documents found.

But the cracks don't pose a serious threat to the building, Buildings spokeswoman Jennifer Givner said.

"If we felt that the damage was so severe that people shouldn't occupy it, we would vacate the apartments," Givner said.

Irate neighbors have demanded blueprints of the project, but the city hasn't received the latest building designs, Givner said.

In May, the City Council will vote on a rezoning plan that would block tall buildings such as the North Eighth St. project in low-rise parts of Williamsburg and Greenpoint.

In recent City Planning Commission presentations, the building has been cited as an example of out-of-scale development.

As for the noise, Brach said the worst was over now that several huge boulders buried in the site have been broken apart.

Originally published on April 11, 2005

Gulcrapek
April 13th, 2005, 07:01 PM
55 Berry (Street)
6 floors, 82 ft
42 units
Renovation Architect: Karl Fischer

http://www.elliman.com/elliman_data/NewHomeDevelopment/nhd_home/61733b.jpg

"Located on North 11th Street in trendy Williamsburg, 55 Berry Street bears the distinction of being the first loft building to be developed into condos on the “Northside.”


Located down the block from the lovely row of carriage houses out of which the “Brooklyn Brewery” operates, 55 Berry is also in short walking distance to all the trendy restaurants, shops & galleries plus the “L” train which takes you to Manhattan in just one stop!

55 Berry is a six story 60,000 Sq. Ft. brick and concrete former manufacturing building, dating back to 1910, that is now being converted into 35 luxury loft condominium residences. What makes Berry Street unique are its’ 12 foot concrete ceilings ceilings 12 to 13 foot concrete columns plus huge new windows allowing for river views from even the third floor! The lofts range in size from 1,092 Sq. Ft. to 1,361 Sq. Ft. with combinations possible for larger units. Besides a common garden on the second floor, the sixth floor penthouses have very large private terraces with awesome views of the river and Manhattan skyline. The interiors, designed by the well acclaimed Anders Escobar, include wide plank select maple flooring, an open kitchen with custom cherry cabinetry, stainless steel appliances including Sub-zero refrigerator, GE Profile range, wine cooler and Bosch dishwasher, plus a “floating” center island for eating or entertaining. The two baths in each unit are equally elaborate with porcelain tiles and sinks with stone countertops."

http://www.elliman.com/MainSite/NHD/NHDInfo.aspx?ID=99&SearchType=newdev&PageName=home

Derek2k3
April 13th, 2005, 09:43 PM
Project #31

162 Scholes Street
160-166 Scholes Street
4 stories 55 feet
Scarano & Associates Architects
Dev-Jacob Rubin
Residential
7 units 6,542 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2004-2005

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/41042677.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42042997.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42042998.jpg

Scarano & Associates Architects
160-166 Scholes Street

http://www.scaranoarchitects.com/

A quiet revolution is occurring on a sleepy East Williamsburg block. Within this mixed-use district, dozens of new buildings are being constructed.
Small walk up, multi-family residential buildings have been the rule in the area. Every vacant lot is ripe for development. Maintaining the individuality of this four building group by putting separate entries, stairs and utilities, meant that a parking lot (considered less crucial to sales), could be eliminated. This freed up the cellar and ground floor area to become garden duplex apartments.
Masonry was chosen as an exterior veneer system, complimentary to the finish of many of the surrounding structures. Exposed masonry continues on the interior walls of the living rooms, which in most cases are over 15 feet high
A simple palate of masonry, glass and pre-caste stone creates a modern fa e reminiscent of brick used in the early days of Louis Kahn. A strong building presence closes the gap in the street wall. The loft-style interiors create a style of living, which has become the norm in this burgeoning community.

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42043129.jpg
An older picture from November

Gulcrapek
April 13th, 2005, 09:46 PM
Oops.

Derek2k3
April 13th, 2005, 09:58 PM
It's cool, nice find either way.



Project #33

160 Manhattan Avenue
158-160 Manhattan Avenue
4 stories 55 feet
Scarano & Associates Architects
Dev-N Group
Residential
8 units 9,368 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2004-2005

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/41042711.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42043612.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42043609.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42043614.jpg

Scarano & Associates Architects
158-160 Manhattan Avenue

http://www.scaranoarchitects.com/

Over the last few years, residential development has pushed into areas that have historically been zoned as manufacturing or commercial. This growth has been spawned by buyers looking for affordable housing, and those searching for opportunities for new development. Aided by the lowest interest rate in years, the two groups have contributed to one of the largest real estate booms in recent memory. Pioneering tenants and buyers are now welcoming locations which never would have been considered previously. "Marginal" or "fringe" neighborhoods are being targeted as prime sites, and new buildings are springing up at every available location.
This 25 x100 ft. lot has helped push development forward, allowing a building type which is economical to build and thereby affordable for buyers. Each of the four floors typically house two units, for a total of eight families. There is no elevator and no parking, which allows a greater percentage of the gross building to be useable.
The metal grillage and stone facade style of the structure is taken from the monumental buildings surrounding it. Blending with the character of its industrial neighbors creates a unique style of residential building, complementary to the open loft-style apartments contained within.

Derek2k3
April 20th, 2005, 02:17 PM
Project #23

142-144 North 8th Street
139-141 North 7th Street
16 stories 222 feet
Scarano & Associates Architects
Dev-Scott Spector
Residential
42 units 122,657 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2005-2007

New fight over condo in W'burg
April 19, 2005
BY HUGH SON
DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER

http://www.nydailynews.com/boroughs/story/301107p-257785c.html

mental
April 23rd, 2005, 09:06 PM
Can someone please tell me more about Schaefer and the 450 Kent Ave Williamsburg project. If there are any more gfx of it and what are the dimensions of the condos and parking, commercial planning aswell as any construction right around there. thanks

Gulcrapek
April 24th, 2005, 11:07 AM
http://schaeferlanding.com/floorplans.html

http://schaeferlanding.com/location.html

mental
April 24th, 2005, 05:46 PM
Thanks Gulcrapek. I was wondering how the Affordable housing gonna affect the whole thing. If the floor plans for affordable housing are the same as regular condos they are gonna be selling. Thanks

Gulcrapek
April 26th, 2005, 08:54 PM
Don't know if this deserves a new thread or not.

"Certified Lumber"
25 floors
Architect: Gene Kaufman

Directly south of Scaefer Landing.

http://www.3d-win.com/html/new/image/java_gka_certified02.jpg

http://www.3d-win.com/html/new/image/java_gka_certified01.jpg

http://www.3d-win.com/html/new/image/java_gka_certified03.jpg

http://www.3d-win.com/html/new/image/java_gka_certified04.jpg

http://www.3d-win.com/html/new/image/java_gka_certified05.jpg

mental
April 26th, 2005, 09:22 PM
is this right adjacent to schaefer due south? Like 460 kent ave?

Gulcrapek
April 26th, 2005, 09:30 PM
Dunno. Looks pretty close in the first shot.

BrooklynRider
April 27th, 2005, 10:08 AM
I love it. Wish mass transportation was stronger in that area.

Kolbster
April 27th, 2005, 02:48 PM
I think with all this developement, there is going to be new transportation built

Kolbster
April 27th, 2005, 02:50 PM
I'm waiting for an all glass tower to rise along the water front..it would add to the area

ryan
April 27th, 2005, 03:03 PM
I love it. Wish mass transportation was stronger in that area.

A favorite pipe dream of mine is antique streetcars running along the imagined new waterfront park all the way from red hook to LIC. Like this guy. (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showpost.php?p=20686&postcount=7)

TLOZ Link5
April 27th, 2005, 05:54 PM
It's be nice to see some street-level retail/restaurants.

Gulcrapek
May 11th, 2005, 04:05 PM
Something on Skillman Avenue (257 Berry?) by Standard Architects

http://img222.echo.cx/img222/3539/257b27df.th.jpg (http://img222.echo.cx/my.php?image=257b27df.jpg)

http://img222.echo.cx/img222/3694/257berry6bi.th.jpg (http://img222.echo.cx/my.php?image=257berry6bi.jpg)

Something else on Skillman

http://img222.echo.cx/img222/3464/skillman8fz.th.jpg (http://img222.echo.cx/my.php?image=skillman8fz.jpg)

Yet another on Skillman

http://img222.echo.cx/img222/5592/skillman29gp.th.jpg (http://img222.echo.cx/my.php?image=skillman29gp.jpg)


297 Driggs Ave. a few months ago (these are all from around March)

http://img222.echo.cx/img222/2039/297d25om.th.jpg (http://img222.echo.cx/my.php?image=297d25om.jpg)


One building from Scarano's block-long, multiproject development on Maspeth Avenue

http://img222.echo.cx/img222/7701/maspeth20po.th.jpg (http://img222.echo.cx/my.php?image=maspeth20po.jpg)


80 Roebling St.

http://img222.echo.cx/img222/8012/80roeb7ct.th.jpg (http://img222.echo.cx/my.php?image=80roeb7ct.jpg)

Derek2k3
May 20th, 2005, 10:46 PM
Project #44

257 Berry Street
4 stories 55 feet
Standard Architects
Dev-Amanda Crandall
Residence & Commercial Studio
1 unit 3,599 Sq. Ft.
Completed 2005


http://www.standardarchitects.com/projects/art/0217-1.jpg http://www.standardarchitects.com/projects/art/0217-2.jpg

http://www.standardarchitects.com/projects/art/0217-6.jpg

Standard Architects

http://www.standardarchitects.com/projects/0217.html#

3400 square foot residence and commercial studio
Williamsburg - Brooklyn, NY

General Contractor:
Chester Contracting

Models and Renderings:
Standard Architects


http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/43630870.jpg
The 2 "spires" that they took down after construction.

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/43630871.jpg


http://www.mapquest.com/maps/map.adp?formtype=address&searchtype=address&country=US&addtohistory=&1ahXX=&address=257+Berry+Street&city=brooklyn&state=ny&zipcode=
Map

mental
May 21st, 2005, 02:45 AM
You guys know where to get a list of government apartments, lottery type of thing for brooklyn?

Derek2k3
May 21st, 2005, 09:51 AM
Projects #45-46

Certified Lumber Site Tower I
428 Kent Avenue
25 stories
Gene Kaufman Architect
Residential
Proposed

Certified Lumber Site Tower II
420 Kent Avenue
25 stories
Gene Kaufman Architect
Residential
Proposed



http://www.3d-win.com/html/new/image/java_gka_certified02.jpg

http://www.3d-win.com/html/new/image/java_gka_certified01.jpg

http://www.3d-win.com/html/new/image/java_gka_certified03.jpg

http://www.3d-win.com/html/new/image/java_gka_certified04.jpg

http://www.3d-win.com/html/new/image/java_gka_certified05.jpg

3D-WIN,Inc
http://www.3d-win.com



http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/43642711.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/43642726.jpg


http://www.mapquest.com/maps/map.adp?formtype=address&searchtype=address&country=US&addtohistory=&1ahXX=&address=420+Kent+Avenue+&city=brooklyn&state=ny&zipcode=
Map

NoyokA
May 21st, 2005, 10:05 AM
While I like the idea of the rezoning, I do not like the design of these buildings whatsoever.

Derek2k3
May 21st, 2005, 11:19 AM
Yea, me niether. But hey're better than I expected.

You guys know where to get a list of government apartments, lottery type of thing for brooklyn?

http://nychdc.com/apartments/
?

Derek2k3
May 21st, 2005, 12:14 PM
Projects #47-48

Schaefer Landing Tower I
446 Kent Avenue (Schaefer Brewery Site)
25 stories 234 feet
Karl Fischer Architect
Dev-L & M/BFC Development
Residential Condominium
210 Condominiums 140 Rentals (Total)
191,889 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2003-2005

Schaefer Landing Tower II
430 Kent Avenue (Schaefer Brewery Site)
14 stories 135 feet(DOB)
Karl Fischer Architect
Dev-L & M/BFC Development
Residential Condominium
210 Condominiums 140 Rentals (Total)
113,000 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2003-2005

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/43646595.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/43646594.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/43646589.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/43646590.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/43646591.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/43646593.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/43646596.jpg


Schaefer Landing
Cosmopolitan Luxury.

http://schaeferlanding.com

Once a bustling center of commerce, Williamsburg, Brooklyn is now home to a colorful array of intriguing galleries, eateries, boutiques, and shops. But only recently has what was once industrial become residential, evolving into a community that offers urban sophistication in a quieter, more affordable setting. Today, it is a uniquely vibrant, cosmopolitan neighborhood.

Now in the heart of this scintillating district, on the same location where the original Schaefer Brewing Company plant once stood, something new, distinctive, and unparalleled is brewing: the first waterfront luxury condominium in all of Williamsburg...Schaefer Landing.


http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/43644326.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/43644327.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/43644331.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/43644332.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/43644329.jpg

Links:
http://www.mapquest.com/maps/map.adp?formtype=address&searchtype=address&country=US&addtohistory=&1ahXX=&address=446+Kent+Avenue+&city=brooklyn&state=ny&zipcode=
Map

http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=5253
WNY Thread

http://www.elliman.com/MainSite/NHD/NHDInfo.aspx?ID=86&SearchType=newdev&PageName=home

http://www.gkarchitect.com/Residential01.html
Schaefer Development
Development of an entire city block with three residential buildings; including a 25 story tower and two 15-story buildings comprising 500,000 square feet, 350 market-rate condominiums and subsidized apartments, retail, parking garage, plaza, and waterfront esplanade.
Completion: 2004
Budget: $100,000,000

http://www.markkmorrison.com/news.htm
Schaefer Development, Brooklyn, NY

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9501E0DE1139F935A1575AC0A9629C8B 63
POSTINGS; At Old Brewery Site, Condos and Rentals
By JOSH BARBANEL
Published: September 26, 2004, Sunday

http://www.therealdeal.net/breaking_news/October/1097253964.php
First waterfront condo in Williamsburg

http://www.newyorkmetro.com/realestate/articles/04/041004/
WILLIAMSBURG'S FIRST WATERFRONT DEVELOPMENT

http://www.akrf.com/Projects/Private_Real_Estate_Dev/project_schaefer_brewery.html
Schaefer Brewery Redevelopment Plan and Environmental Assessment

http://www.citylimits.org/content/articles/articleView.cfm?articlenumber=802
WILLIAMSBURG BREWHAHA
A waterfront development revives rifts between two communities.
By Matt Pacenza

http://www.h2oweek.com/11-15/commboard.html
Discussion of Housing at Schaefer Brewery Site Continues

http://www.billburg.com/community/article.cfm?id=102
Schaefer Brewery Site to be Used for Housing
by Anya Szykitka

http://pksb.com/
Old Design

Derek2k3
May 22nd, 2005, 11:17 AM
Project #49

1.1 Broadway
11 Broadway
21 stories 240 feet
Karl Fischer Architect
Dev-Kent Realty LLC
Residential: 94 units
Commercial Hotel: ~50 units
274,845 Sq. Ft.
Proposed


http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/43692717.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/43692690.jpg
http://kfarchitect.com/
Karl Fischer Architect

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/43692649.jpg

http://www.mapquest.com/maps/map.adp?country=US&address=11+Broadway+&city=Brooklyn&state=NY
Map

Derek2k3
May 22nd, 2005, 09:22 PM
Project #19

97 Broadway
97-101 Broadway/90-94 South 6th Street
5 stories 50 feet
Karl Fischer Architect
Dev-Tziry Weiss
Community Facility
18,984 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2005


http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/43722668.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/43722669.jpg

Gulcrapek
May 24th, 2005, 05:46 PM
880 Bergen Street 5/22 - this could pass for a 70s housing project.

http://img201.echo.cx/img201/629/880berg4ws.th.jpg (http://img201.echo.cx/my.php?image=880berg4ws.jpg)

http://img201.echo.cx/img201/5052/880berg26lx.th.jpg (http://img201.echo.cx/my.php?image=880berg26lx.jpg)


364 St Marks Avenue
6 floors, 17 units
61 ft
Architect: Bricolage Designs

http://img201.echo.cx/img201/8136/364sm24ua.th.jpg (http://img201.echo.cx/my.php?image=364sm24ua.jpg)


735 Dean Street - addition
4 floors, 7 units
50 ft
Renovation architect: Mark Gould

http://img201.echo.cx/img201/7518/735dean28en.th.jpg (http://img201.echo.cx/my.php?image=735dean28en.jpg)

Derek2k3
June 3rd, 2005, 12:40 PM
Gul, those are all in Prospect Heights.

Project #50

Union Avenue Condominium
286 Union Avenue
5 stories 55 feet (2 story addition)
Scarano & Associates Architects
Dev-286 Union LLC
5 units 5,031 Sq. Ft.
Completed Spring 2004

http://www.thedevelopersgroup.com/images/building/bld_1037_th.jpg

Union Ave Condominium
286 Union Avenue Brooklyn, NY 11211
OPEN HOUSE: Sunday June 5, 2005 1pm-4pm

http://www.thedevelopersgroup.com/buildings/building.aspx?buildingid=1037&

The Union Avenue Condominiums is a newly constructed building that fits snuggly onto the corner of Stagg Street and Union Avenue, in one of the Brooklyn’s hippest neighborhoods. Apace with the style of Williamsburg, the brick and metal façade is simplicity and design at its best. The condominiums of Union Avenue contain five spacious two bed room, two bathroom homes, the penthouse level of which are duplexes, thoughtfully planned to maximize living space. Only two stops off the L train, and in the heart of a deeply artistic and exciting neighborhood, come home to Union Avenue.

Photos from March
http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44256923.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44256924.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44256925.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44256926.jpg
From '04

Map:
http://www.mapquest.com/maps/map.adp?country=US&countryid=250&addtohistory=&address=286%20Union%20Avenue&city=&state=&zipcode=11211&submit=Get+Map

Derek2k3
June 3rd, 2005, 01:25 PM
Project #11

Broadway Riverview
20 Broadway
Kutnicki Bernstein Architects
Dev-Broadway Riverview LLC/East Coast Construction Co.
5 stories 76 feet
Residential Condominiums
14 units 20,529 Sq. Ft.
Under Construcion 2005

http://www.kbanyc.com/images/20Broadway.jpg
Photo Credit: Kutnicki Bernstein Architects
http://www.kbanyc.com
http://www.broadwayriverview.com


http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44258400.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44258429.jpg

Fabrizio
June 3rd, 2005, 01:40 PM
Just dreadful. A beautiful old building with a trailor park on top.

The corner building shown at the top of the page is just as bad.

No matter how much the PR people want to give these eye-sores a hip spin... they both look like unsophisticated suburban home-improvement "let´s-add-a-rec-room" additions.

ryan
June 3rd, 2005, 02:20 PM
Just dreadful. A beautiful old building with a trailor park on top.

The corner building shown at the top of the page is just as bad.

No matter how much the PR people want to give these eye-sores a hip spin... they both look like unsophisticated suburban home-improvement "let´s-add-a-rec-room" additions.

Agreed, and the rendering (as usual) looked promising. I think the cheap materials have a lot to do with it. fake stucco never looks anything but tacky.

Fabrizio
June 3rd, 2005, 04:14 PM
Very North Jersey.

Derek2k3
June 4th, 2005, 01:38 AM
Project #51

the mccarren
49-63 Engert Avenue
4 stories 60 feet
IMA Engineering PC
Dev-Tahoe Contracting
Residential Condominium
~24 units ~40,000 Sq. Ft. (Total)
Under Construction 2004-2005

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44280627.jpg

The Developers Group:

the mccarren
49-63 Engert Avenue North Williamsburg/ Greenpoint, NY 11222
OPEN HOUSE: Sunday June 5, 2005: 1-4 PM

http://www.thedevelopersgroup.com/buildings/building.aspx?buildingid=1033&

Situated right on McCarren Park and at the intersection of Williamsburg’s cutting-edge Northside and Greenpoint’s charming low-rise landscape rests the mccarren (49, 51, 53, 55, 57, 59, 61 & 63 Engert Avenue), Brooklyn’s next destination for modern luxurious park-side living. the mccarren offers a truly refined take on a contemporary condominium lifestyle with stunning custom bathrooms featuring Italian Xilo porcelain tile, gourmet kitchens with truly high-end stainless steel appliances, soaring ceilings, spectacular Manhattan skyline views and private outdoor spaces. the mccarren’s rich offering and sophistication are reflective of a surrounding community where outstanding art galleries, restaurants and shops form the epicenter of Brooklyn’s cultural renaissance.


Amenities & Features

* Gourmet kitchens w/ Wenge and frosted glass cabinetry and high-end stainless appliances
* Stunning bathrooms featuring Italian Xilo porcelain tile and custom vanities
* 10.5 ft ceiling height
* Northern and southern exposures
* Private outdoor spaces
* Oak hardwood floors
* Central heating and cooling
* Manhattan skyline views (some units)
* Washer/ dryer hook-up
* Video intercom
* Located right on McCarren Park
* Easy access to Manhattan via the L train


http://www.mapquest.com/maps/map.adp?formtype=address&searchtype=address&country=US&addtohistory=&1ahXX=&address=49-63+Engert+Avenue&city=brooklyn&state=ny&zipcode=
Map

Fabrizio
June 4th, 2005, 08:06 AM
Barf.... it´s funny how they´re bringing McMansion taste to the city. Inappropriate "historical" details with the depth of wrapping paper ... proportions all wrong. I´d feel embarassed to live in a building like that.

Derek2k3
June 4th, 2005, 12:26 PM
Project #52

The Gretch Building
60/54-82 Broadway/69-77 South 8th Street
12 stories 140 feet (2 story addition)
Karl Fischer Architect
Dev-George Roth
Residential Condominium
130 units 228,000 Sq. Ft.
Completed 2003-Spring 2005


http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44295581.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44295582.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44295583.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44295584.jpg
http://www.thegretsch.com/


Gretsch Building
Karl Fischer Architect

http://www.gkarchitect.com/Residential-Gretsch.html

An existing 10 story manufacturing building of 200,000 SF to be converted to 120 loft condominiums. The building will feature spacious 1200 to 1900 SF lofts with 12 to 14 foot ceiling heights and spectacular views of Manhattan. The ground floor will feature commercial space for restaurant and a fitness center totalling 160,000 square feet. In addition there will be rooftop terraces and indoor parking. The new penthouse units will be built on the existing roof structure with panoramic views of the Manhattan skyline and the East River.

Completion: 2003
Budget: $32,000,000



Corcoran
60 Broadway
New York, NY11211

http://wwww.corcoran.com/property/nd/detail_fr_overview.asp?ndevid=51

Overview
For years, many of the world’s finest musical instruments* were crafted within these walls. Emerging from a dramatic transformation–like Williamsburg itself –this historic building now offers wonderful living spaces artfully in step with the 21st century lifestyle.

PRESENTING THE GRETSCH BUILDING
Luxury Condominium Residences right for today.

GATEWAY to Brooklyn—Overlooking the Williamsburg Bridge, the Gretsch Building is only steps from the best of Brooklyn and just moments from SoHo, TriBeCa, Chinatown, Little Italy and Greenwich Village. Whether your destination is Downtown Manhattan or Eastern Long Island, quick access to the BQE or the FDR Drive facilitates getting in and out of the City with ease.

TOWERING over Williamsburg, the Gretsch Building provides residences with the most astonishing perspectives, panoramic river and skyline views. The Gretsch Building is unmatched by many high-rises twice its size.

Amenities

Andres Escobar & Associates of Montreal have been retained as part of the Gretsch Building team and have created truly inspired interior spaces, restoring this historic building to a level of unparalleled style and design. The building’s lobby is clad in black granite, tempered glass, stainless steel, and a metallic curtain, with a serene reflective well soothing the senses of residents and visitors alike. The residents’ library offers an expansive double-height retreat for waiting guests or for relaxing on a rainy day. Glass-walled elevators ascend from this dramatic space, where a grand fireplace is flanked by floor-to-ceiling bookshelves.

Common corridors are designed to reflect an attitude of privacy, pride and privilege. Floors are finished with imported granite, limestone, and designer carpet, with walls clad in satin mirrors and rich cherry wood. Apartment doors are all inset from the common corridor, with tall silver doors flanked by distinctive fixtures lighting the way into each home.

Every home has been planned with a sleek, contemporary look that respects the building’s loft sensibilities. Exposed concrete beams line the ceilings while the floors have been finished with an exotic Australian Jarrah wood. Oversized windows bring in the open sky that surrounds the building, while select units enjoy free-floating fireplaces framed in Pietra Colombina limestone.

Kitchens have been planned to please the eye and the palate. Appliances have been selected to meet the standards of the discriminating gourmet buyer. Stainless steel Sub Zero refrigerators, Wolf ranges and Asko Dishwashers provide a striking contrast to the Nero Impala granite countertops and hand-crafted custom cabinetry.

The bathrooms' designs convey a sense of style and serenity throughout. From the soaking tubs in the master suite to the free-floating stainless basin in the powder room, no luxurious detail has been overlooked.


http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44295539.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44295540.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44295537.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44295541.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44295538.jpg


Links:
http://www.mapquest.com/maps/map.adp?formtype=address&searchtype=address&country=US&addtohistory=&1ahXX=&address=82+Broadway&city=brooklyn&state=NY&zipcode=
Map

http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=3309
May 16, 2003
More Condominiums Take Shape in Williamsburg
By RACHELLE GARBARINE

http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m3601/is_16_51/ai_n8573165
Now is the time for cutting-edge residential designs
Real Estate Weekly, Dec 1, 2004 by Andres Escobar
new

http://www.therealdeal.net/issues/May_2004/1084405834.php
The Gretsch Building
60 Broadway
10 story condominium with 130 apartments. Units range from studio to three bedrooms (620 to 2,500 square feet). Prices range from $309,000 to $1.27 million (and higher for two and three bedroom penthouses). Approximately 34 units in the building remain unsold. Set to open this fall. Contact: 1-888-GRETSCH.

http://www.elliman.com/Listing.aspx?ListingID=683743&SearchType=Broker_Current&BID=WCG

http://www.saranwarp.com/archives/2003_11.php

Derek2k3
June 4th, 2005, 06:21 PM
Projects #40

160-164 Grand Street
4 stories 55 feet
Scarano & Associates Architects
Dev-Grand Mgmt Associates/Chester Strulovitch
Residential
16 units 16,668 Sq.Ft.
Under Construction 2005


http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44309992.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44310006.jpg

Fabrizio
June 4th, 2005, 06:41 PM
LOL !! South Jersey "colonial" shopping mall architecture.

The Gretsch building looks good though.

czsz
June 4th, 2005, 06:53 PM
Each window = 2 stories. Is there a race of superhuman giant yuppies being bred in Williamsburg now?

Gulcrapek
June 4th, 2005, 08:24 PM
Not yet. If you find out when, don't disclose it to anyone. Or you might be shot.


Soon, the world will be a mass of sandals and strollers and lattes, and there is nothing that can stop the forces of yuppiedom. Except bullets and stuff.

The time is coming...

alex ballard
June 4th, 2005, 10:03 PM
Wow. This area isn't on fire, it's simply blown up. By 2010, are we talkin' 200,000 residents here (from the current 100-120 thousand?)

Derek2k3
June 5th, 2005, 02:25 PM
Project #53

Grand Terrace Condominiums/Grand Street Condos
287-289 Grand Street
5 stories 52 feet
Bricolage Designs
Dev-Nelson Cuesta
Residential Condominiums
5 units 10,000 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2004-Summer 2005


http://www.northsideplaza.net/current/photos/grand_st_ext3x.jpg

Grand Terrace Condominiums
Northside Plaza, Inc.

http://www.northsideplaza.net/current/grand_st_12_04.html

Location: Brooklyn, Williamsburg (Northside)
287 Grand St, Brooklyn N.Y,11211
Occupancy: June 15th - July 1st, 2005/ Condominium Plan Published/Approved 12/01/04


Amenities

* Imported Brazilian Cherry Hardwood Floors 3.25" Wide Boards
* Newly Constructed Brick 4 Story + Penthouse Building
* Kitchen Cabinets also Brazilian Cherry Hardwood
* Custom Black Granite Countertops (Or choice, pre-completion)
* Stainless Steel Range 30"
* Bathrooms: "Kohler" Fixtures, Vanity by Thomasville, Jacuzzi Bathtubs, (#2,4A,4B)
* Storage Rooms available for units (# 2, 4A, 4B)
* Duplex Units have 18-20' Ceilings w/ 2 full baths.
* "Pella" Architect Series windows and sliders
* State of the Art Video Intercom Security System in each unit.
* Two/Three Bedroom (Unit #2A) washer/dryer closet integrated in the unit.
* Terrific Views Of the Manhattan Skyline!

Common Charges:

* One Bedrooms: $103.30 to $109.25
* Two Bedroom Duplexes: $141.77 to $147.72
* Two/Three Bedroom w/Terrace: $237.56

Utilities:

* Gas/Electric Separate meters paid to Con Ed/Keyspan directly by Condo Owner
* Cable, Internet Access to be paid directly by Condo Owner

Taxes: 25 Years Tax Abatement:

* One Bedrooms : $15.49-$16.33
* Two Bedroom Duplexes: $21.26-$22.15
* Two/Three Bedroom w/Terrace: $37.47


Description:

* (2)One Bedroom Apartments w/balconies $389,900 to $399,900
SF from 581-608 with Balconies (33SF)

* (2)Two Bedroom Duplexes- with two private Balconies and Skylights (#4B) . $699,900
Unit #4A Has 2 private balconies and a private Terrace
SF from 792 to 836 (Terrace 375SF)

* (1)Very Large Two/Three Bedroom with huge Rear Terrace and 2 Balconies $899,900
SF 1,200, Rear Terrace (835SF)


http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44355389.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44355314.jpg


http://www.mapquest.com/maps/map.adp?formtype=address&searchtype=address&country=US&addtohistory=&1ahXX=&address=287-289+Grand+Street&city=brooklyn&state=NY&zipcode=
Map

ryan
June 6th, 2005, 02:09 PM
Barf.... it´s funny how they´re bringing McMansion taste to the city. Inappropriate "historical" details with the depth of wrapping paper ... proportions all wrong. I´d feel embarassed to live in a building like that.

I agree about the "historical" details that seem to be smeared on, but this is a big, big improvement over other recent fedders buildings in the area - not to mention the standard issue greenpoint vinyl siding. The actual brick in actual brick color is monumental. I hold to a shred of optimism that they're going to put some...thing on top of the building to make it look more finished.

The most offensive detail to my eyes is the commercial-grad glass doors to each unit. They belong on a suburban strip mall, and give a gynecologist-eye view of ugly drywall foyers.

Derek2k3
June 7th, 2005, 01:14 PM
Project #26

The Dunham Condominium
40-44 South 6th Street/24 Dunham Place
5 stories 55 feet
Gene Kaufman Architect
Dev-South Development
Residential Condominium
15 units 18,846 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2004-2005

http://www.thedevelopersgroup.com/buildings/building.aspx?buildingid=1029&
The Developers Group:The Dunham Condominium


http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44468596.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44468595.jpg

Derek2k3
June 8th, 2005, 12:26 PM
Project #22

610-612 Union Avenue
2-10 Bayard Street
5 stories 70 feet
Sandor Weiss
Residential
Dev-Sol Kohn
19 units 25,000 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2004-2005



http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44512330.jpg

Derek2k3
July 2nd, 2005, 12:49 AM
Project #54

The Edge
Between North 5th and 7th Streets and North 9th and 10th Streets
TEN Arquitectos
Dev-Douglaston Development/Louis and Allan Silverman
Mixed-Use
+1 Million Sq. Ft.
1,000 Residential Units
100,000 sf of Retail
Proposed Spring 2006-


http://www.ten-arquitectos.com/images/08b-projects_38.gif

http://www.ten-arquitectos.com/images/theedge.gif
TEN Arquitectos
http://www.ten-arquitectos.com



Levine Builders
http://www.levinebuilders.com/news/articles/developmentNY.pdf.

Douglaston Development is also currently in the predevelopment stage of "The Edge," the largest vacant development site (the former Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal) on the Williamsburg waterfront. Douglaston Development, in association with Louis and Allan Silverman, own three full city blocks on the waterfront, which is in the process of being rezoned for residential
and retail use. The rezoning will yield more than one million square feet of developable square footage on the site between North 5th and 7th Streets and North 9th and 10th Streets. This site’s master plan will include a mix of residential and retail, parking and substantial outdoor
space. Construction is scheduled to begin in mid-2005. "We will build what the zoning permits as well as substantial open spaces," says Michael Kaye, President of Douglaston Development. "This is the premier site on the Brooklyn waterfront today." Louis Silverman states that "it has been a
pleasure working with an organization with the experience of Levine Builders in connection with the rebirth of this incredible development site."



Cityfeet
Commercial Real Estate News
FAIR GAME FOR DOUGLASTON

http://www.cityfeet.com/News/NewsArticle.aspx?PartnerPath=&Id=13166

By Lois Weiss
Tuesday, June 28, 2005 - Douglaston Development, a Levine Builders Company, hired Jonathan Fair as vice president. He brings over 10 years of experience to his new position. Fair will report to Michael Kaye, president of Douglaston Development. Fair will oversee The Edge, a new 1msf mixed-used residential project in Williamsburg. More than 1,000 residential units will be developed over 100,000 sf of retail space along with parking for 1,000 cars. A waterfront esplanade will be created along the river, with a recreational and water taxi pier built into the river from North 6th Street. The project includes brownfield remediation, master planning, waterfront permitting and construction. Levine Builders will be providing construction management services for this project. Construction will commence by the spring of 2006.
Prior to joining Douglaston Development, Fair served as senior vice president of commercial and residential development for Forest City Ratner Companies. He was responsible for overseeing the residential development associated with Atlantic Yards Project, a $2 billion development consisting of 15 buildings and 6,000 residential units.
Previously, Fair was employed at New York City Economic Development Corporation as executive vice president of real estate. He oversaw and managed four departments, including Capital Programs, Property Management, Real Estate Development and Structuring, consisting of more than 100 employees.
Fair served as a sub-committee member for Senator Charles E. Schumer’s “Group of 35”, as well as chair of the American Museum of the Moving Image Rent Committee and officer of Industrial Development Agency. He is currently a member of the Real Estate Board of New York Housing Committee. He received his MBA from Baruch University and B.A. from Syracuse University.


Links:
http://www.mapquest.com/maps/map.adp?searchtype=address&country=US&formtype=address&addtohistory=&location=9Flm6%2f%2f36usQzcexRtiHFbll%2fvMSAHEvD%2 fDjOu0Lb1X4ABpVMuI7LrvHeek09l1iynDAWZmFoTbN70y8gKu xe8R%2b8iXZ50Ojl3WocE8y2r%2f1oRUlHoAShdAeNSHuqF7ML dIujnjpMIc%3d
Map

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/06/30/arts/design/30nort.html
NY Times
A Mexican Architect at Home in New York
By ROBIN POGREBIN
Published: June 30, 2005

The Edge is a three-block waterfront development in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, that consists of two residential and retail towers.

NewYorkYankee
July 2nd, 2005, 11:45 AM
How many stories will these be?I cant get a feel foir these yet, as the renderings are so low quality.

pianoman11686
July 2nd, 2005, 05:11 PM
From the looks of it, I'd say the shorter buildings are somewhere in the mid-20 story range; the taller buildings in the high 30's. I don't think the waterfront is zoned for anything taller than 40 stories. Someone please correct me if I'm wrong. http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/images/icons/icon7.gif

Gulcrapek
July 2nd, 2005, 05:14 PM
40 stories can be achieved with inclusionary housing and stuff.

billyblancoNYC
July 3rd, 2005, 12:18 AM
July 2005
North Williamsburg priming for buying
Brooklyn's hipster 'hood to see more new condos, rising prices
By Steve Cutler
http://therealdeal.net/issues/July_2005/1119901656.php

Williamsburg is Brooklyn's poster neighborhood for revitalization, particularly the northern section along Bedford Avenue around the L train subway station one stop from Manhattan. Yet there's never been much to buy.

Until recently developers stood on the sidelines waiting for prices to rise to the level of the clamor and for the city to rezone the decayed and unsightly waterfront.

From all appearances, those conditions have been met. The few condominiums currently on the market in North Williamsburg are going for up to $700 a square foot, with new units in the pipeline expected to go for up to $1,000 per square foot.

In May, the city announced a plan to rezone the formerly industrial Brooklyn northeast waterfront for high-rise residential development and construct a 27-acre riverfront park with esplanade. The plan could make North Williamsburg the fastest rising segment of the luxury housing market in all the five boroughs. The rest of Williamsburg and Greenpoint should follow closely behind.

Elan Padeh, president of the Developers Group, a marketing firm with several projects in the area, recently estimated there will be 3,000 to 4,000 new units in Williamsburg and Greenpoint in the next two years and 10,000 to 12,000 by 2010.

Just a handful are on the market now. One of the largest projects to date in North Williamsburg is 55 Berry Street, a conversion of a 1910 brick and concrete former manufacturing building into 35 luxury loft condominiums.

"We started marketing at the beginning of May," recalls Douglas Elliman executive vice president Helene Luchnick, "and we had two open houses with 60 to 70 people in each." Nine of the units were sold, at the asking prices, while only one model apartment was finished for viewing. The building was taken off the market until a full floor could be completed, which will allow buyers to see a model of each of the seven layouts.

A short walk to the heart of the Bedford Avenue action, the six-story, 60,000-square-foot building features a common garden on the second floor and loft apartments with 12-foot ceilings, concrete columns and oversized windows that provide river views from even the third floor – for now, at least.

The upscale interior finishes, designed by Andrés Escobar of Montreal, include wide plank maple flooring, open kitchens with cherry cabinetry and stainless steel appliances by Sub-Zero, Bosch and GE Profile. Prices range from $785,000 for a 1,200-square-foot loft to $1.38 million for a 1,300-square-foot penthouse with large rooftop terrace. The building is scheduled for completion at the end of 2005.

Several new projects are under construction around McCarren Park, the only sizable green acreage in Williamsburg. "This area is prettier than some parts of Williamsburg," says David Maundrell, president of Aptsandlofts.com. "You might be able to draw a clientele from parts of Brooklyn or Manhattan who don't care for Williamsburg."

One of those projects, The McCarren, on Engert Avenue, is open for sale, offering 24 luxury condominiums, from $649,000 for a 1,650-square-foot two-bedroom to $995,000 for a 1,650-square-foot-three-bedroom with terrace and balcony.

The imposing Aurora on Bayard Street will open in the fall. The 12-story, 51-unit condominium will contain several setbacks to provide terraces for several of the apartments and expansive windows to let in light and park views. The neighboring Ikon is a conversion of a warehouse building with four glass enclosed floors added at the top, offering 58 luxury condominium apartments.

One new McCarren Park building is a rental. The recently-constructed project, which goes by the name "12th & Park," has 12 open-plan lofts with 14-foot ceilings, renting from $2,200 per month for a 650-square-foot unit to $4,500 for a 2,200-square-foot duplex. All leased in short order.

Even with apartments projected to sell for $1,000 per square foot, Northern Williamsburg should have strong upside potential in view of the radical transformation planned for the waterfront. And it just might hold its own should the market finally turn soft in New York.

Zach
July 28th, 2005, 01:45 PM
Please help
I am about to start venturing development of a small project
and i would like to find the best comps in the area how would i find the prices and the Sq-Ft?

frustrated_buyer
October 24th, 2005, 04:41 PM
:(
Project #21

Union Lofts
395 South 2nd Street
Scarano & Associates Architects
Dev-Jacob Rubin
4 stories 45 feet
Residential Condominiums
4units 4,800 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2005

www.theunionlofts.com (http://www.theunionlofts.com)

Scarano & Associates Architects

http://www.scaranoarchitects.com/multifamily1.html

This unique building is a pioneer in the South Williamsburg area in its bold design and delicate detailing.

Its triangular lot presented the challenge of maintaining a legal 30 foot rear yard. This provides an angled rear façade, which creates a pocket in which large balconies could be placed. As a result, the interiors become extremely dynamic, and the back of the building, which is usually less regarded, takes on a sculptural and original quality.

The design of the exterior utilizes the flexibility of design with stucco, aluminum and glass in an innovative way. The massing is sensitive in that it bridges the adjacent 6-story building with a 2-story building in a stepped fashion.

The second and third floor have two apartments each, with mezzanines, while the first and fourth floor are full-floor duplexes. The 14 foot high ceilings, when combined with the angled rear walls and generous fenestration, create an ideal living environment.

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/40756093.jpg

lofter1
October 24th, 2005, 06:51 PM
this project is almost a year overdue. Does anyone really know why :(

Under Construction 2005


www.theunionlofts.com (http://www.theunionlofts.com/)

Scarano & Associates Architects


Check here: http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=7609&highlight=scarano

Derek2k3
October 25th, 2005, 10:23 AM
Project #21
The Dunham Condominium
40-44 South 6th Street/24 Dunham Place
5 stories 55 feet
Gene Kaufman Architect
Dev-South Development
Residential Condominium
15 units 18,846 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2004-2005



http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/51269240.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/51269338.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/51269339.jpg
10-21-2005

Thread here
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=6854

lofter1
December 1st, 2005, 10:00 AM
Curbed reports ( http://www.curbed.com/archives/2005/12/01/city_council_tells_lpc_to_shove_it_on_184_kent.php ) :

And just like that—well, and after a 43-6 vote—Williamsburg's 184 Kent Avenue was denied landmark status by the New York City Council (back-patting Post op-ed (http://www.curbed.com/archives/2005/10/03/184_kent_update_it_was_cheapness.php) TK). It was only the fifth time in the past 15 years that the council overturned the Landmarks Preservation Commission, which wanted to preserve the 1913 Cass Gilbert-designed building because of its Egyptian Revivalist blahblahblah. So what does this mean for the former Austin, Nichols & Co. warehouse? In case you forgot, developer Moishe Kestenbaum, who has been renting out apartments in the building, plans on modifying the facade, building a large rooftop addition, and converting the sucker to ... wait for it ... luxury condos. Note the rendering up top. Sadly, we don't know what will become of the models (http://www.curbed.com/archives/2005/10/05/184_kent_who_says_this_building_aint_attractive.ph p). Our hide-a-bed remains an option.

· City Council Stated Meeting - Nov. 30, 2005 (http://www.gothamgazette.com/article/searchlight/20051130/203/1667) [Gotham Gazette]
· 184 Kent Does the Landmark Shuffle (http://www.curbed.com/archives/2005/09/22/184_kent_does_the_landmark_shuffle.php) [Curbed]
· 184 Kent Street: Who's the Biggest Jackass? (http://www.curbed.com/archives/2004/07/02/184_kent_street_whos_the_biggest_jackass.php) [Curbed]

More here: http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=45474&highlight=kent+cass+gilbert#post45474

Here's what will happen on this site:

lofter1
December 7th, 2005, 09:28 AM
Mayor Uses Veto to Support Landmark Status

By ROBIN POGREBIN (http://query.nytimes.com/search/query?ppds=bylL&v1=ROBIN POGREBIN&fdq=19960101&td=sysdate&sort=newest&ac=ROBIN POGREBIN&inline=nyt-per)
December 7, 2005

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/12/07/nyregion/07veto.html?adxnnl=1&adxnnlx=1133965761-uBvbUFvQC0U0j1dqGJkDAQ


Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/b/michael_r_bloomberg/index.html?inline=nyt-per) on Monday vetoed the City Council's recent revocation of the landmark designation of the Austin, Nichols Warehouse, in Williamsburg, Brooklyn.

"The mayor vetoed the Council's disapproval of the designation because it's a highly significant building designed by a historically significant architect," Mr. Bloomberg said through a spokesman last night.

Last week, the Council voted to revoke the landmark status of the 1915 warehouse, which was designed by Cass Gilbert and won that designation from the Landmarks Preservation Commission in September. Several Council members characterized the building as undistinguished and unworthy of the designation.

The owner of the building, which has already been partly converted to apartments, plans to add six floors to the warehouse for condominiums and to alter the windows.

The Council's Land Use Committee has already voted to override the veto, said Councilman David Yassky of Brooklyn, adding that the full Council will take up the override vote tomorrow.

Mr. Yassky, who helped lead the effort to reverse the designation, said Mr. Bloomberg's veto was politically motivated. "The only reason they pursued this landmark in the first place was to curry favor with preservationists after refusing to landmark 2 Columbus Circle," Mr. Yassky said. "Now they'll milk it and really try to get political credit."

The preservation commission has refused to hold a hearing on giving landmark status to 2 Columbus Circle, the 1960's "lollipop" building designed by Edward Durell Stone.

Preservationists, who had called the Council vote on the Austin, Nichols Warehouse (43 to 6, with one abstention) a subversion of the landmark designation process, praised the mayor's action yesterday.

"He did the right thing," said Ward Dennis of the Waterfront Preservation Alliance of Greenpoint and Williamsburg. "He recognizes the issues involved and that it is important to stand up for the process itself."

The warehouse, at 184 Kent Avenue, was the headquarters for the largest grocery wholesaler in the United States at the time.



Copyright 2005 (http://www.nytimes.com/ref/membercenter/help/copyright.html)The New York Times Company (http://www.nytco.com/)

ryan
December 7th, 2005, 10:22 AM
Mr. Yassky, who helped lead the effort to reverse the designation, said Mr. Bloomberg's veto was politically motivated. "The only reason they pursued this landmark in the first place was to curry favor with preservationists after refusing to landmark 2 Columbus Circle," Mr. Yassky said. "Now they'll milk it and really try to get political credit."

Why would he waste his time after winning his election by a landslide a month ago? No one will care next time around. What's Yassky's motivation... aside from campaign contributions?

BrooklynRider
December 7th, 2005, 10:42 AM
Yassky is running for Major Owens House seat in the upcoming election. His motivations have always been questionable. If I remember correctly, his father is a developer (can anyone confirm that?)

lofter1
December 10th, 2005, 11:02 PM
More problems at 114 N. 8th St. in Williamsburg (it seems Mr. Brach spoke too soon) ..


Foundation cracks spark W'burg development rift

http://www.nydailynews.com/boroughs...8p-255596c.html

... the site for a planned 222-foot-tall building at 144 North Eighth St. said the racket that caused the cracks happens several times a week...

In May, the City Council will vote on a rezoning plan that would block tall buildings such as the North Eighth St. project in low-rise parts of Williamsburg and Greenpoint.

In recent City Planning Commission presentations, the building has been cited as an example of out-of-scale development.

As for the noise, Brach said the worst was over now that several huge boulders buried in the site have been broken apart.


A Challenge to a Brooklyn Condo Tower

New York Times
December 11, 2005

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/12/11/realestate/11deal.html


How much of a building do you have to tear down before it is not a building anymore? Half? Two-thirds? How about 39 percent? On the other hand, if you knock down a building but promise to rebuild it, did you really knock it down at all?

Those are some of the knotty philosophical questions facing the Department of Buildings, which has halted construction on a controversial condo tower in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, and is trying to determine if the partial demolition of an adjoining structure means it should permanently revoke the developers' right to put up a tall building on the site.

The tangled story began in 2004, when the developers, Mendel Brach and Moshe Oknin, paid $7 million to two property owners, Scott D. Spector and Richard S. Brand, for a small building on North Eighth Street, near Bedford Avenue, as well as air rights so that the condo tower the developers planned to build could extend over a 125-foot-wide, one-story commercial building that Mr. Spector and Mr. Brand owned on an adjoining lot on North Seventh Street.

The 42-unit condo tower was slated to be more than 220 feet high, the equivalent of about 22 stories, and the developers rushed to put in a foundation and have their plans approved before the enactment of a zoning change that limits the height of new buildings on the block to just five stories. The developers worked rapidly and, despite protest from local residents upset that the building was much taller than the surrounding homes, the city declared that the project was "vested," meaning it could proceed under the old zoning.

But that is when things began to get complicated. Their agreement with Mr. Spector and Mr. Brand allowed the developers to excavate a parking garage under their North Seventh Street building and to place support columns for the condo tower inside their building. To make the work possible, Mr. Spector contends the developers had permission to remove only a small part of the facade and roof.

Instead, as several stories of steel rose for the condo tower over the summer, the developers removed most of the roof and tore down most of the building's facade, while leaving intact a smaller portion of the structure that houses a restaurant called Planet Thailand.

In response, Mr. Spector and Mr. Brand filed a lawsuit last month, charging that the developers did not have the right to tear down their building. They also claimed that, because more than half of the building had been demolished, even if the space were rebuilt they would lose "grandfathered" zoning rights that would have allowed them to use it for commercial purposes.

But in an affidavit in the court case, Mr. Brach said that his agreement with Mr. Spector required him to completely reconstruct the facade of the North Seventh Street building, and that he could do that only if he tore it down first. He also said that changes to the plans for the condo tower required by the city forced him to remove the roof of Mr. Spector's building so that it could be strengthened and rebuilt to hold a deck for the condo tenants. Mr. Spector disagreed, saying the alterations to the facade did not require that it be destroyed. He also said he did not give permission for the demolition of the roof or for the changes in the plans.

But Mr. Brach said Mr. Spector was wrong to use the word "demolition." Mr. Brach said he has been working to "rebuild and improve" Mr. Spector's premises. "The truth is, the facade and the roof were removed so that they could be rebuilt," he said in the affidavit.

The debate takes a Pythagorean turn in a letter that Mr. Brach's zoning lawyer, Howard B. Hornstein, sent to the Buildings Department on Dec. 6. Mr. Hornstein said that a surveyor was hired to measure the changes to the building's walls, floor and roof, and that by one calculation, just 39 percent of the building had been removed. Using an alternate measure, he said, only 32 percent of what was there was gone.

Mr. Spector's legal papers contend that two-thirds of the original building is no more. The city, in ordering work halted on Nov. 18, estimated that "more than 50 percent" of the structure had been removed.

Ilyse Fink, the director of communications for the Department of Buildings, said the agency ordered the halt because the demolition of the North Seventh Street building had gone further than what was shown in plans submitted to the city. In an ordinary situation, that might require little more than an updating of the drawings on file, but because of the rezoning, Ms. Fink said, the city may view the violation differently. "The question is, if by doing something improper, did he negate his vesting?" Ms. Fink asked, referring to the developers' ability to build under the old zoning. "And if he did, then the site would have to comply with the new zoning."

Mr. Hornstein said that he had a brief discussion about that possibility with city officials and that he was confident the project would be allowed to proceed.



Copyright 2005 (http://www.nytimes.com/ref/membercenter/help/copyright.html)The New York Times Company (http://www.nytco.com/)

estherwilliamsburg
January 10th, 2006, 05:49 PM
I saw this posted on the Brownstoner not long ago with a link to the Scarano website in response to criticism and defense of the firm's architecture:

"FOR THE RECORD ALL AND THATS RIGHT ALL OF THE PROJECTS WE HAVE FILED AT THE LPC HAVE WON NUMEROUS AWARDS FOR PEOPLE AND ORGANIZATIONS THAT ACTUALLY KNOW ABOUT ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN NOT A BUNCH OF FRUSTRATED, ANTISOCIAL, MISFIT DO NOTHING INTERNET BLOGGERS. OOPS I SLIPPED AGAIN.

SCARANO" Posted by: ROBERT SCARANO at November 14, 2005 11:01 PM

I hope it is a joke because if it was truly posted by Scarano himself it's totally obnoxious. A lot of the people who dislike this work at least in Williamsburg are people with backgrounds in design, architecture and the visual arts. Never mind awards and LPC projects. The word is Overdesigned!! Will all of Brooklyn have new construction designed by the same person? (actually the same two or three firms). I'm not at all opposed to trying to do contemporary buildings but cheap quick construction practices do not serve severe architecture well. Are these buildings to become the slums of tomorrow? Apparantly, people who have bought units in many of the new "luxury" condos have had to put up with major delays on moving because of problems caused by poor construction. And what about the self-certifying issue. Anyone care to comment on the Williamsburg Finger Building?

Gulcrapek
January 11th, 2006, 08:44 PM
Ya, it's a joke. I don't think anyone with even a bit of a good reputation would do something like that.

infoshare
January 15th, 2006, 09:02 AM
Anyone know what the development plans for this bldg: it is one of my favorite WB buildings. It has recently sold, I hope to see a design that merges the old building with new construction. One to watch!
BTH - this "fotoUR" guy is veeeery interesting photographer - I just today found his (i think his) website, need to xpore more of the site: but, good find here I wanted to share.

There are some good photos (mostly interior) at -
http://urbanfoto.blogspot.com/2006/01/peek-inside-old-dutch-mustard-building.html

Jeffreyny
January 16th, 2006, 08:01 PM
Thanks for the response, but I think that 97 Bwy is one block further east than the block I am referring to - I'm talking about the vacant lot to the west of Marlow & Sons (which is at 81 Broadway) - so the address is probably somewhere in the 60s or 70s.


That is directly across from the Gretsch Building and they recently posted a for developement sign on the lot.
As far as I know nothing has been planned yet.

Mentch
January 18th, 2006, 01:58 PM
http://www.brooklyneagle.com/categories/category.php?category_id=5&id=4704

SOUTH WILLIAMSBURG — On Wednesday night, representatives of Rector Hylan Corporation told Community Board 1 of its plans to demolish the buildings formerly owned by the Royal Wine Company (the Kedem Winery) and replace them with two residential towers. The project site, 420-430 Kent Ave., is on the waterfront and currently includes three buildings. One is vacant, a second is occupied by the Zafir Jewish Center for Special Education, and a third is occupied by a warehouse company.

Plans call for north and south towers of 18 stories (185 feet in height) and 24 stories (245 feet), respectively. These buildings would contain 450 apartments (with two to four bedrooms each), 26,413 square feet of neighborhood stores, 225 parking spaces, and a half-acre shore public walkway.
The retail space would be located on the ground level of both of the proposed towers, facing Kent Avenue, while the parking would be provided beneath each building with separate access from the avenue.
Zafir Jewish Center could not be reached for comment by press time.
While Howard Hornstein of Cozen & O’Connor Attorneys was introducing this project to the board, he noted that 20 percent of the new housing units, 90 altogether, would be affordable, priced at 80 percent of the area’s median income.
“We are developing as a private developer, and we are voluntarily [there’s no mandate] providing 20 percent affordable housing,” Hornstein said. He added that Rector Hylan is not building up to 600 units, which the rezoning would allow, and is paying to clean up the property.
Additionally, Hornstein said the developer is working with Councilman David Yassky and the Department of Housing, Preservation and Development to find a non-profit sponsor. “Right now it’s our intention to have the affordable housing on site,” he said, “but some non-profit sponsors may want to go offsite.”
Several Community Board 1 members weighed in on the affordable housing component, saying that they wanted to know how much the apartments would cost. They also wanted a guarantee that the affordable units would be onsite.
“We can’t approve this unless we have a bedrock commitment that the affordable housing will be onsite. There are also two acres on the waterfront that should be added as additional open space,” said one board member.
“There should be affordable units on the waterfront,” stressed another. Both drew applause from the majority of board members present.
“I will take this to my client and HPD,” responded Hornstein.
To get its project approved, Rector Hylan went to the City Planning Commission, which issued a conditioned negative declaration and initiated a 30-day public comment period. The corporation had come before City Planning seeking approval on rezoning the property for residential use, and getting a special permit to allow bulk modifications.
City Planning specified that the applicant must agree to prepare a hazardous materials sampling protocol, including a health safety plan that requires Department of Environmental Protection approval. Additionally, the commission said that Rector Hylan has to fund the installation of a traffic signal at the intersection of Kent and Division avenues, if the city Department of Transportation finds one is needed. “With the implementation of this condition, no significant adverse traffic impacts would result from the proposed project,” City Planning stated.
CB 1 will review the developer’s proposal at its next ULURP Committee meeting, at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 24 at 435 Graham Ave. (corner of Frost Street). The board is expected to make its recommendation at its next general meeting, on Feb. 7 at the Swinging 60s Center, 211 Ainslie St.

urbanfoto
February 1st, 2006, 04:09 PM
http://thelmagazine.com/archive/covers/cover%20402-1.jpg
If you get a chance to glance at the new Love Issue (http://thelmagazine.com/archive/archive.cfm?issue_id=66) of The L Magazine that just came out, take a skim through the NYC Profiles (http://thelmagazine.com/4/2/NYCProfiles/) section and you'll see the Old Dutch Mustard building (http://urbanfoto.blogspot.com/2006/01/view-on-inside-will-most-definately.html) shots that The fotoUR (http://urbanfoto.blogspot.com) took last month.  NYers find this magazine to be very helpful for keeping up to date on events and shows throughout the city- not to mention, its one of the best subway reads out there.  Find one of those orange bins and put one in your pocket.

BrooklynRider
February 8th, 2006, 05:26 PM
Douglaston Development has put "The Edge" site on the market. Looking to sell it with the approved plans.

Peakrate212
February 8th, 2006, 07:03 PM
For the EDGE?

Derek2k3
February 21st, 2006, 01:06 PM
http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2005/03/18/realestate/20willi_slide4.jpg

20 & 30 Bayard Street (http://www.flickr.com/photos/bigstimuli/99445049/in/pool-curbed/)

ryan
February 21st, 2006, 03:19 PM
I'm loving the optimistic landscaping in the rendering... and I actually like how big the buildings are now that they're built (though I'm very wary of the rendering of tallest red brick tower...)

Anyone know anything about the building going up at Engert & Eckford?

antinimby
February 21st, 2006, 07:04 PM
Derek, the buildings u/c in the pic looks taller than the rendering. Are you sure they are same buildings? BTW, do you have the project's info (# of units, architect, height, etc.)?

ryan
February 21st, 2006, 08:40 PM
antinimby, the pics and the rendering are the same project. The pics on flickr are taken from the Southeast (on the BQE?) and the rendering is from the Northwest (across McCarren Park - sort of where the abandoned pool is). The first tower from the left in the rendering hasn't been started yet (the tower in/behind the low formerly industrial building). Brownstoner (http://brownstoner.com/brownstoner/archives/2006/02/set_speed_condo_7.html) posted about the middle building.

BrooklynRider
February 24th, 2006, 09:39 AM
Time for Brach to Get a Shorter Crane

The Daily News is reporting this morning that the controversial Finger Building on North 7th Street in Williamsburg is about to get trimmed back by almost 40 percent. The project has been on hold since November because of a host of zoning and demolition violations. Now, in what appears to be an attempt to break the legal loggerjam that has held up the project, developer Mendel Brach has submitted new plans that would reduce the building's height from 16 stories to 10 stories. The reduction is directly related to adispute over the condo's ability to use the roof of Scott Spector's adjacent building as recreational space--without it Brach can only build 10 stories as of right. As of now, Spector (who began scooping up property in the Burg a decade ago and was the man behind the short-lived but much-praised Chickenbone Cafe) is giving Brach the finger.

ryan
April 10th, 2006, 11:29 PM
...2 months later I get around to uploading a photo of these buildings.

Anthony Van Salee
April 13th, 2006, 11:30 PM
I'm considering some residential development in Williamsburg. Where would I find things like current market sales data, inventory available and local absorption rates? Any direction would be appreciated.

BrooklynRider
April 21st, 2006, 10:34 AM
Townhouse-Style Condominiums On Market in Williamsburg

Familiar Architect, Designer Work Together Again
By Beth Aplin

WILLIAMSBURG — Backed by a familiar architect/design team, a new condominium with a “townhouse style” has begun sales in Williamsburg. Known as Roebling Square at North 8th Street, it is the latest addition to a plethora of Williamsburg condominium projects designed by Karl Fischer Architects of Manhattan with interiors by internationally-known designer Andres Escobar of Montreal.

This particular development’s lot spans 70-80 Roebling Street. Its townhouse style refers to the duplex units on the first and top floors.

Fischer’s brick façade building has five separate entrances and 36 one- and two-bedroom homes. The top floors have double height ceilings and mezzanines; the ground floor’s duplexes flow into a lower level. All layouts include over nine-foot ceilings, Brazilian oak floors, and oversized windows and most have outdoor space — either a garden, balcony or terrace.

Internationally-known designer Andres Escobar, who has lent his eye to the interiors of many Brooklyn condominiums, has also been at work at Roebling Square. He has designed its kitchens with Sapelli wood cabinets, Nero Impala black granite countertops and backsplashes, along with GE profile stainless steel appliances. Master baths feature Casa Grande ceramic tile floor, stainless steel vessel sink, Bianco stone vanity counter, and custom-designed shower.

Other Karl Fischer-designed developments in the neighborhood include 20 Bayard Street with 56 units; The Aurora at 30 Bayard Street with 40 units; 50 Bayard Street (The Aurora) with 70 units; and 64 Bayard Street with 55 units.

Branching off Bayard Street but still in Williamsburg are Schaefer Landing at 440 Kent Ave. with 350 units; the Gretsch Building at 60 Broadway with 120 units; and 185-191 South 4th Street with 44 units.

Escobar also designed interiors for Fischer’s Aurora condominiums and the Gretsch Building, among others. Andy Gerringer, managing director of the Prudential Douglas Elliman Development Marketing Group, the company doing sales and marketing for this development, is thrilled with “the luxurious and thoughtfully designed” condominiums at Roebling Square.

“They will enhance this already thriving neighborhood and we expect to attract many new buyers,” he said Prices at Roebling Square are currently listed in the mid $500,000s and occupancy is expected in mid-summer.



© Brooklyn Daily Eagle 2006

jr11211
May 4th, 2006, 05:25 PM
Yikes! (From the New York Post). I hadn't seen a rendering before. Lord help us.

BADILLO'S B'KLYN HEIGHTS
By ANGELA MONTEFINISE

April 30, 2006 -- Former Congressman and Bronx Borough President Herman Badillo made a personal appeal to Brooklynites last week to support his building of a massive four-tower complex in a low-rise part of Williamsburg.

Badillo and his partners from Quadriad Realty told participants at a Community Board 1 committee meeting Thursday they plan to pursue the biggest of four development options on Bedford Avenue between North Third and North Fourth streets.

The developers asked the community to be their "partners," though many are wary of the project's size.

The proposed 675,000- square-foot Williamsburgh Square would feature four towers of 38, 36, 20 and 12 stories. There would be 360 underground parking spaces, a charter school, a "semi-public" park, a day-care center, two floors of retail, and both market-rate and affordable housing.

Plans call for a change in zoning, which now allows for a maximum of six stories.

Activist Phil DePaolo said the plan is "is just too big."

"The neighborhood is not meant to deal with something that size. It doesn't belong here."

Additional reporting by Phil Guie

The pic:
http://www.nypost.com/photos/news04302006002.jpg

Jeffreyny
May 4th, 2006, 10:02 PM
I would support a project as such. While I'm very interested in maintaining the character of Williamsburg, if done properly I believe a project like that would do nothing but increase local property values, create a better local economy as well as enhance design oriented Williamsburg if it were a design oriented building and not a box.

In a city like New York I expect highrises to be built and am for it as long as they don't destroy history in the process and design the buildings to fit in with the neighborhoods character.

jr11211
May 5th, 2006, 12:14 PM
While I'm very interested in maintaining the character of Williamsburg
This certainly doesn't do that.


if done properly I believe a project like that would do nothing but increase local property values, create a better local economy as well as enhance design oriented Williamsburg if it were a design oriented building and not a box.
A lot of "ifs," and having lived on North Third for 10 years now (renting, not owning, so the additional increase in property values is admittedly not a big factor for me), I have a hard time being optimistic about the outcome of those ifs.


In a city like New York I expect highrises to be built and am for it as long as they don't destroy history in the process and design the buildings to fit in with the neighborhoods character.
In certain areas, I would agree. That block would stick out like a sore thumb no matter how well designed. More importantly, the neighborhood can barely support the current population explosion (with plenty more to come, even 6 stories at a time). For one thing, the subway is a nightmare. I'm not anti-development (I'm not at all sad that the meat-packing warehouse across the street from me is going to be a 6 story condo building), just anti bad development.

Jeffreyny
May 5th, 2006, 11:22 PM
But why is that bad development...simply because it is tall? You can barely see the design from the rendering so it's really impossible to say if it is bad or not.
Why is the subway a nightmare? The L train was voted one of the best in the city and runs very frequently.
I think bringing more people into Williamsburg is a good thing. Doesn't everyone want their area to prosper? There will be more services if the population grows.
As a home owner, property values are important to me as well as a prosperous Williamsburg. The way I see it, the current development of lofts, condos and high rises does nothing but enhance the area.
As for the height of the building, this is New York, it doesn't bother me and it would certainly be less of a sore thumb to me than those hideous non discript brick boxes they built around N.3rd and Bedford.
Admittedly there are probably better blocks to build something so tall on but I'd rather see that than something non descriptive and ugly.
I would however, like to see a project like that somewhere in Williamsburg.

lofter1
May 6th, 2006, 01:11 AM
There will be more services if the population grows...
Why do you believe this to be true?

Take Tribeca: That area has boomed in the last 10 years but schools are way overcrowded / busting at the seams and nothing new (meaning ready for students) is on the horizon.

This is kind of like saying "build houses first, put the sewer system in later" (admittedly not the best analogy as I definitely do not view schools / students as sewer / sewage ;) ).

Jeffreyny
May 7th, 2006, 08:03 PM
I guess because when I talk about services I am not thinking schools but am specifically talking about stores, supermarkets, dry cleaners, etc...
These "services" are becoming more numerous as the population in Williamsburg increases. In the short time I've been living in Williamsburg I've seen the number of services increase drastically.
I don't have children so admittedly schools aren't an issue with me.

ryan
May 8th, 2006, 10:52 AM
If you've ever been on the L at rush hour you would acknowledge that it's overcrowded. That's not to say the solution is to build less - makes more sense to me to increase the capacity on the L. Or ride the G, which is never crowded.

BrooklynRider
May 9th, 2006, 10:28 AM
The construction of infrastructure - specifically new transportation - is simply not keeping up with development. It is for this precise reason that 421-a benefits need to be revoked, so the city gets its fair share and we don't get a bunch of whiny rich people complaining how they "pay taxes" and get no services. People always want to talk about the inherent unfairness or damage rent stabilation does to the city, but they tend to be mum on this topic - subsidized luxury housing.

Henri
May 15th, 2006, 02:06 PM
Why is this thread sleepin? It used to have 4-5 posts every single day, and now... it gets 1 post every 4-5 days.
Any explanation?

ryan
May 15th, 2006, 02:28 PM
There's been a few days with multiple posts, but generally not. Why don't you post some content to start conversation?

jr11211
May 19th, 2006, 12:29 PM
I'm sure everyone's seen this story in the Village Voice:

http://www.villagevoice.com/news/0620,murphy,73227,5.html

I posted the NY Post story earlier and we had a brief discussion about the merits of such a development, though somehow we never did get around to the fact that the neighborhood was just rezoned and now a developer wants a humungous variance. But rather than go there, I have to ask a question. I called the owner of the lot on N. 3rd between Bedford and Berry (to tell them that a hole had opened up in their sidewalk) and asked about the Williamsburgh Square development. He told me that they all got a laugh out of the story in the Post since they hadn't sold the lot. Huh? Anyone want to help me understand how this works? Why would Quadriad have their meetings with the community and float their proposal (whatever you think of a 38-story building in this neighborhood), complete with a fancy rendering, to the press without owning the site? As the Voice article says, "One part of the block is owned by Yehuda "Jay" Backer, a businessman with a limited interest in the Williamsburgh Square project. As soon as a court fight over environmental remediation is resolved, he expects to own another piece of the block." But that seems a pretty thin foundation to build such a big project on.

By the way, here's the old Karl Fischer plan for the North Third side of the lot (it's been posted before, but makes an interesting contrast, I think):

http://www.kfarchitect.com/portfolio/residential/multifamily/multi-61.html

Oh yes, the hole in the sidewalk was filled by the time I got home from work that very same day.

krulltime
June 19th, 2006, 09:09 AM
W'BURG SOAR POINT
ANGER ON PLAN FOR 28 TOWERS


By ANGELA MONTEFINISE
June 18, 2006

A proposal to bring 28 soaring towers to north Williamsburg is the latest in a line of high-density projects supersizing the neighborhood's skyline - and it has fed-up residents shaking their heads.

Quadriad Realty Partners, a development company that counts former Rep. Herman Badillo as a partner, presented its vertical vision of Williamsburg at a community meeting last week, and it includes 28 towers ranging from 12 to 40 stories. The towers would be built over seven blocks between North Third and North Sixth streets and Bedford and Kent avenues. Most of the buildings would stand between 16 and 18 stories.

The area's zoning allows a maximum of only six stories, but Quadriad plans to request a zoning change to permit the development, which would yield about 2,500 units of market-rate luxury housing and 1,000 units of affordable housing.

"This is the only way I know for affordable housing to get built without using any government dollars," said Quadriad managing member Henry Wollman.

Under Quadriad's grand plan, each of the seven blocks will have four towers, a public park, retail stores and community facilities, like schools, theaters, day care and health care.

"In an area where land costs $250 to $300 per square foot, the only way to build everything, including amenities for the community, is to build higher," Wollman said.

Residents, however, say the area is already overwhelmed by massive projects. In fact, 20,000 units are predicted for the Brooklyn waterfront.

The area Quadriad is targeting was down-zoned last year to compensate for the influx of waterfront towers.

"We drew a line knowing this neighborhood was going to face higher density," Stephanie Thayer said. "We wanted this part of Williamsburg to stay affordable and protected."

Michael Kriegh asked, "What's going to stop other developers from seeing what you're doing and doing the same thing?"

The company currently owns only one of the seven blocks. That block will hold 650 units and will be called Williamsburgh Square.


Copyright 2006 NYP Holdings, Inc.

Billburgapthunter
June 19th, 2006, 12:12 PM
I live around the corner from a bunch of these new developments by the Graham Ave stop. Question: all of these buildings that are in construction have a sign at their worksite that show the name/#/address of the landlord/owner and the contractors. Is it okay to call the owners to inquire about availabilities, to rent or buy, on a building that isn't even complete? Or is that inappropriate?

antinimby
June 19th, 2006, 06:01 PM
Give it a try, can't hurt. My guess is they'll refer you to a sales number.
Let us know if that works.

ryan
June 19th, 2006, 06:08 PM
You might get a spot higher on the waiting list, but I don't think you'll miss out entirely (but of course it's worth a try).

I've looked into a few buildings right after I noticed marketing banners and there were only a few units sold. Curbed also posts about buildings right after they get press releases announcing their sales have started.

ryan
July 17th, 2006, 11:16 AM
onNYTurf

http://www.onnyturf.com/themes/styles/onnyturf/images/h1icon.gif How The City Has Left Williamsburg In A Traffic Jam (http://www.onnyturf.com/articles/read.php?article_id=306)


Plain and simple the city administration, that is Bloomberg and the agencies he controls, are not providing good leadership on transportation planning. This is most clear in Williamsburg where the transportation system is buckling under the rapid growth of the area. The fundamental problem is that transportation planning is not part of the Development Process, ostensibly lead by Dan Doctoroff and the Department of Planning, and that The City Department of Transportation, lead by Iris Weinshall, is seemingly outright hostile to alternative transportation like bikes and buses.

Last Friday New Yorkers sounded a collective guffaw, or maybe it was a belch (http://www.curbed.com/archives/2006/07/07/newsflash_mta_discovers_the_l_train_sucks.php), when the MTA released a report that said the L-line is operating way over capacity (http://www.nydailynews.com/news/local/story/433207p-364981c.html). The "News" was not news to anyone, as Curbed and its readership so perfectly summarized:

"Next up: The MTA studies the G Train, discovers it bites even worse than the L and concludes it won't know what the hell to do with thousands of new Greenpoint residents, except build a footbridge over Newtown Creek so they can walk to Long Island City and try to squeeze on the 7." -Robert Guskind

"I'll bet those jackasses at the MTA paid someone to conduct that study. Der." -commenter Judy

"'Morning and evening rush hours: 4 mins' My ****ing ass. I was at the Bedford stop at 9:30 this morning. I waited ten minutes for a train, only to have sail right through the station without stopping. Eight minutes later, a train finally came and stopped. Four minutes is wishful goddamn thinking." -commenter Joey Joe Joe



It is fun, and not at all hard to bash on management at the MTA. They certainly have had a significant roll in 'misunderestimating' L-line ridership and ordering too-few new cars. Williamsburg Community Board 1 Transportation Chairperson Teresa Toro says the MTA has been stonewalling Williamsburg for a while. The interim solution the MTA announced on Friday is to put older cars on the line, but Toro told me that before Friday the MTA claimed putting old cars on the L-line was impossible. "We've been suggesting this for a long time, since the spring-summer of 2005."

But the problem did not just start at the MTA, the problem starts with Dan Doctoroff.

When the Department of Planning puts together projects like the Williamsburg Waterfront Redevelopment, the policy is to abdicate all responsibility for transportation to the DOT and MTA. Doctoroff and the DCP do not take a proactive roll in making transportation planning a core part of putting these projects together. Additionally when it comes to alternative transportation, like bicycle use, the DOT and Michael Bloomberg have stonewalled advocates. It is this abdication, indifference, and hostility that have lead to the growing transportation crisis in Williamsburg.

When planning the waterfront redevelopment Doctoroff and the DCP ignored repeated calls from the community to address transportation issues up front.

Toro says the current situation "is a city administration planning failure". She says transit planning should have happened when they were putting together the water front deal. "There were no traffic studies; city planning relied on what the Department of Transportation provided. They seem to prefer operating in crisis mode. Why couldn't they have worked with the transportation agencies to avoid the problems? Where is the partnering with DOT and the MTA during the planning?"

Toro mentioned the Williamsburg Waterfront Environmental Impact Statement makes only a small reference about what to do about an increased burden on the subway: "it basically says something like: the MTA routinely monitors ridership and will make adjustments".

Such abdication it strikes me is a way for the administration to avoid facing the fact that these large developments can have a serious impact on the operational budgets of the transportation agencies. By removing the issue from the planning process they do not have to reconcile the resulting transportation costs created by these new buildings.

Toro predicts similar strains for the G-line when 100+ unit buildings near Nassau Avenue start going up. Not that the average New Yorker need be a sage to recognize that this will happen. Toro, like commenters on Curbed, recognizes that New Yorkers in general see these problems coming early on, "the first thing they complain about is transit." But she says that some opposition to development would melt away if transit planning were done right from the beginning. "I think the administration would be surprised, if things were done right. Most people are not against development, they are against bad development."

Meanwhile the Department of Transportation has also been reluctant to examine the issues. "Now they are starting to acknowledge the need for study; But they are doing studies after the fact." Toro says, "We need a transportation study, which Weinshall has been resistant to. The DOT has said, 'We will work with you as issues arise'. The problem is things are changing so fast. They make a correction in one place without considering the effects down the block. They have crammed a lot of changes into the community and they need to look at it."

The irony of this all is that last Thursday there was an article in the Greenpoint Star, in which Dan Doctoroff was quoted as praising community involvement (http://www.greenpointstar.com/StoryDisplay.asp?PID=3&NewsStoryID=4055) in the Williamsburg Waterfront Plan. "Sometimes we learn the hard way that by listening to the community we come to the right results." he said. But Doctoroff had a completely different reaction when challenged by Phil DePaolo of People's Firehouse in Williamsburg:

"One person Doctoroff didn't want to listen to, however, was Phil DePaolo... 'We need infrastructure, Dan,' DePaolo said, referring to a need for schools, firehouses, and other social services that will be taxed by the thousands of new residents who will move to the neighborhood. Doctoroff waved his hand at DePaolo, dismissing his suggestions."


I spoke with DePaolo too. He says some people mistakenly blame the builders. "When the first development company came to the community and had a public meeting, every body started yelling, 'what are you going to do about transportation?!' I had to laugh. Why are you yelling at them? You should be yelling at your elected official."

During the planning of the Williamsburg Waterfront, the community not only urged the city to take a leadership roll, it also advocated solutions. Solutions the community is still advocating. One is keeping older cars on the L-line as mentioned above. Another is adding Bus Rapid Transit service between Williamsburg and Manhattan. DePaolo says, "We would like more express bus service. When they were re-doing the bridge they should have designed a bus lane, like the ones they have in the Lincoln Tunnel. The city is taking over private bus companies out here, it would be nice if the city would use some of that to create express service and allow people to use their metro card."

Bus Rapid Transit is cheap and easy to implement, even if for just testing it as a solution. In general however the DOT has been dragging it's feet (http://nyc.theoildrum.com/story/2006/4/19/077/28158) on BRT for a while now.

The only solution the city has put on the table is Ferries and Water Taxis from Williamsburg to Manhattan, but water transport has a huge flaw: what to do when you get to the other side? Toro, DePaolo, commenters on Curbed all have said the same things about water taxis: they are expensive since they are not part of the regular bus/subway fare, and once you get to the other side you then need to take a bus, and then maybe take that to a subway, and ultimately your commute ends up being more than an hour. In our conversation DePaolo observed the irony that the city wants to move all these people closer to the city center, putting them on the water front, but the commute time is not being reduced.

With the lone exception of congestion pricing, which Bloomberg seems to have backed off of, over the past five years Doctoroff and Bloomberg rarely have been interested in hearing from the community on transportation issues or ideas. Ms.Toro put it best, "Perhaps they are interested in learning the really really hard way."

The city chose The Hard Way with the bike path on the Williamsburg Bridge.

As many in Williamsburg know, the bridge had a problem with metal bumps spanning expansion joints on the bike path. The bumps were in place when the bike path opened in 2002, and the problem was serious. "People have broken ribs, collarbones, arms. One person had to have facial surgery. There have been internal injuries" reported (http://www.transalt.org/press/media/2005/42.html) Transportation Alternatives in 2005. They made traversing the path dangerous for bikes and impossible for wheelchairs. Despite the seriousness of the problem and outcries from the community, DOT and the Bloomberg administration refused to address the problem for years. David Snetman at Transportation Alternatives told me, "We were pushing the city on Williamsburg Bridge since 2001, and it was constant advocacy." It took the city 4 years to finally remove the bumps! Now the Williamsburg Bridge is one of the finest bike paths to the city, and is used daily by many riders. But even in the end the city was never really agreeable to making this improvement. David says, "it really wasn't until there was the threat of lawsuits to the DOT that the city removed the bumps".

This is not to say all things are bad. There are good examples where agencies are listening to the community, and they should be modeled by the Bloomberg administration.

Toro says, "The Brooklyn Department of Transportation has been good. They have done a lot more with bike lanes and bike parking. They are building out the sidewalk at Bedford and 7th to create room for more bike racks there. And we are putting a list together of other needs so that the Brooklyn DOT can fast track them."

"NYState Assembly Person Joe Lentol has been a champion on bike racks! He asked the 94th Precinct to do an abandon bike tagging program, because they don't want to. I would really like to see the police come around on that, not just go on a bike clipping blitz." Having Bike racks is great, but people abandon bikes for weeks or who knows how long, and it ties up the racks, so people end up chaining their bikes all over the place in Williamsburg, such as to the entrances of the subway. That's when the NYPD comes around with the chainsaws (http://www.flickr.com/photos/untitledname/49828226/) to remove these bikes, which Toro says, just throws everyone into a panic. Toro says a bike tagging program would be more productive at addressing the problem. "And jointly I want to get more bike racks!" she eagerly says.

But make no mistake, Toro here is talking about the regional Brooklyn Department of Transportation. The city DOT has a record of hostility to bikes. Last Friday, the same day as the MTA L-line report, New York City DOT Bicycle Program Director Andrew Vesselenovitch resigned from his position, and on the way out expressed significant frustration (http://www.streetsblog.org/2006/07/10/dot-bike-director-bombshell-resignation-letter/) with Commissioner Weinshall and her top deputy for traffic operations, Michael Primeggia.

The long-time Director of the New York City Department of Transportation's Bicycle Program says that Commissioner Iris Weinshall and her top deputy for traffic operations, Michael Primeggia have burdened the city with unnecessary law suits and stymied the progress of the city's bicycle programs.

"I waited for a long time for the direction from the commissioner's office to change, or for the commissioner to be changed," Andrew Vesselenovitch e-mailed to about twenty agency colleagues and a handful outsiders on Friday, his last day at the agency. "I hope that you won't have to wait much longer."

In his resignation letter, Vesselenovitch cites two specific examples of agency failures. First, he claims that DOT could have saved the city millions of dollars in lawsuits "resulting from the puzzling addition of unusually high expansion joint covers on the Williamsburg Bridge." Vesselenovitch says he brought the issue to the attention of Deputy Commissioner Michael Primeggia in 2003 and was told to "butt out."

Vesselenovitch also says the agency "could have produced plans for forty to fifty miles of workable bicycle lanes each year" but inexplicably only managed to install a little more than fifteen miles of bike lanes in the last two years.

Source: StreetsBlog.org (http://www.streetsblog.org/2006/07/10/dot-bike-director-bombshell-resignation-letter/)


The City Administration, the DOT and MTA all clearly have some things to learn from the Brooklyn DOT and Assemblyman Lentol. And these problems are not exclusive to Williamsburg, these transportation issues are happening throughout the city. While it would be nice to end this article with a quip that maybe Doctoroff and Bloomberg will eventually learn, even if it is the hard way, the reality is that it is residents who are ultimately experiencing things the hard way. Not that that is news to you.

BrooklynRider
July 18th, 2006, 11:23 AM
Excellent article

investordude
July 18th, 2006, 03:25 PM
Seems like Williamsburg project are moving forward significantly faster than Greenpoint, even city projects like parks. It seems like both the Greenpoint Terminal Market and the Park Tower Group site have no major activity at all, even building demolitions (excepting the fire, which doesn't count IMHO).

I just get nervous if they don't act while the market is hot and lending is available, those sites will languish for years. Why isn't more demolition and preparatory work underway - is the city dragging its feet or the developers?

BrooklynRider
July 18th, 2006, 03:27 PM
With zoning changed, the waterfront properties won't languish. They might change hands a few times or go through redesign, but I think we'll see the waterfront pop up to maximum height in the next two to five years.

ryan
July 18th, 2006, 03:32 PM
It's a much mature market, so prices are better. (I generally assume greed is the motivator in these things) Away from the waterfront properties (that have only been zoned for a few months) there's a lot of activity on both sides of the park...

Greater NYC
July 26th, 2006, 04:09 PM
A couple of semesters ago, did a mock development of this exact site. Our team kept to the existing zoning regs, and still created a profitable 80/20 development. Kept the "Williamsburg" look, added parking, and made money. Our only obstacle would have been that much of the site, although recently demo'd & previous variances already granted, wasn't for sale. The block is huge though, and it could still be worth the investment to build within the regs... maybe with some height/FAR concessions for greenspace, leeds, parking, or low-mod income availability, you'd gain just a bit more space.:cool:

BrooklynRider
July 26th, 2006, 04:12 PM
Hi Greater NYC. Welcome to the forum! Hope you'll stay engaged with us on this neighborhood and other developments.

Greater NYC
July 26th, 2006, 04:31 PM
You got..... look forward to it.

Derek2k3
August 19th, 2006, 01:20 AM
Here are some renderings of The Edge. It's not that bad.

http://www.sunassociate.com/page-3p.htm

Current > 060203

BrooklynRider
August 19th, 2006, 02:32 PM
Kind of a Brooklyn BPC.

sfenn1117
August 19th, 2006, 10:28 PM
It does look pretty nice. Looks like they will extend the streets past Kent, with some retail too. The architecture is average, but the lay out is very good.

Plans for a 6 story and a 15 story were issued by the DOB, under the address 128-142 kent ave. Seems like the other two are 30 and 40 stories. Architect will be Stephen B. Jacobs, which coincides with the average architecture comment.

This and the project to the south are going to be really mammoth complexes.

investordude
September 21st, 2006, 10:05 PM
I had heard construction was suppossed to start in September. This, after already delaying from May. There's not that much of September left and it looks to me like absolutely nothing is happening on the site, including getting equiptment or supplies ready for a groundbreaking.

Are they chickening out in the softening market?

pianoman11686
October 18th, 2006, 08:26 PM
Renderings of new residentials, courtesy of Curbed (http://www.curbed.com):

http://www.curbed.com/2006_10_165%20N%2010th.jpg

"Holy crap. What you are looking at above is a rendering of the building that presumably will be rising at 165 N. 10th in Williamsburg, off Bedford Ave. It comes from Gene Kaufman Architect. A tipster pointed us to the rendering, which is on the Kiska Group's website. What's interesting is that there are a whole bunch more depictions of buildings going up on a number of demolition and construction sites scattered around the Williamsburg. Some we've seen before. Some we haven't. It's a definite worthwhile click, but not if you had a heavy lunch. A couple more selections after the jump.

· Kiska Group Projects [http://kiskadevelopment.com]

http://www.curbed.com/2006_10_Seven%20Berry.jpg

Here's "Seven Berry," which is at N. 7th and Berry and is a Karl Fischer Architect project.

http://www.curbed.com/2006_10_170%20N%2011.jpg

This is 170 N. 11th Street, another Kaufman project."

http://www.curbed.com/2006_10_N%208.jpg

Jeffreyny
October 23rd, 2006, 11:23 PM
Does anybody have any news on this project? The lot was cleaned up last spring but nothing further has happened.
I'm wondering if the project was scrapped or if it is just delayed perhaps due to the slowing market. According to the website it should have been completed in 2005...???
http://www.netconnection.us/norm/dev.html#william

antinimby
October 24th, 2006, 06:11 AM
http://www.curbed.com/2006_10_165%20N%2010th.jpg


http://www.curbed.com/2006_10_170%20N%2011.jpg


"Holy crap . . . It comes from Gene Kaufman Architect.Couldn't have described it any better.

kurokevin
October 24th, 2006, 10:42 AM
I have seen the bottom rendering rising around McCarren Park and don't find it half bad actually. I was nerely stunned to find that it came from Gene Kauffman. If I were a high school teacher, and he were my pupil, I would immediatly accuse him of plagerism and theft from his fellow student Scarano and send him right to the principle.

But in all honesty I would not mind if Genie-Boy Coughman quit his day job and focused on these smaller residential buildings.

antinimby
October 24th, 2006, 05:22 PM
You're way too kind kurokevin.

That horrible, mostly blank-walled base, with what appears to be not one but two garage doors is atrocious. There is absolutely no excuse for that kind of bad design in this day and age.

I would say the Guillotine is a better punishment for him (and O'Hara) for their heinous crimes against this city.

investordude
October 25th, 2006, 01:28 AM
http://www.northsidepiers.com/

Nothing special architecturally, but I think having it there will help people get the vision that Brooklyn's waterfront could look attractive with towers lining it. When that happens, I think more towers will follow.

I'm hoping the Edge gets its act together and starts shovelling dirt sometime soon, but I don't see any good reason to be optimistic about that.

investordude
November 17th, 2006, 01:45 AM
I called the development company to find out what's up, and informally I was told the tenative new plan is for them to break down by February 2007. The first phase will suppossedly consist of 4 midrise buildings (up to 30 stories). After those sell, they will build a large 40 story large scale tower in a second phase.

Claim is groundbreaking is dependent on when they get through the government approvals process, which is slowed down by the large amount of development they want to do at one - or at least that was the claim made.

sfenn1117
February 19th, 2007, 08:01 PM
Greenberg Farrow updated their website....does anyone else know anything about "south 8th st"?

http://www.greenbergfarrow.com/Experience/ExperienceSubCategory.aspx?id=11&open=Residential&sub=HighDensityLowRise

Also, how about "11 broadway"? I know Karl Fischer designed a building for this site, but maybe it changed hands?

http://www.greenbergfarrow.com/Experience/ExperienceSubCategory.aspx?id=5&open=Mixed-Use&sub=Retail/Residential/Commercial

NoyokA
March 3rd, 2007, 02:41 AM
I cant believe it but Kaufmans Williamsburg buildings arent that bad...

http://www.curbed.com/2006_10_170%20N%2011.jpg

I actually like the finished product, I like the movement which is emphasized by an interplay of cool earthen tones and a quality glass color as well.

http://www.curbed.com/2007_02_N11th%20with%20Trucks.jpg

165 North Street might turn out good as well, if quality materials and colorization are used as at 170 North 11th Street this might pass as a Richard Meier building.

Also per curbed theres an opportunity for an absolutely exceptional building by another mediocre architect, 161 North 4th Street. The rendering shows a future classic by Karl Fischer.

http://www.curbed.com/2007_03_161N4th.jpg

investordude
April 21st, 2007, 03:02 AM
its hard to actually know if this means anything because there have been so many false starts, but it looks like the Williamsburg Edge project is having some activity - new fencing and some bulldozers moving dirt around on the site (source curbed)

pianoman11686
May 11th, 2007, 05:07 PM
Project #36

184 Kent Avenue
184-198 Kent Avenue/1-41 North 3rd Street
10 stories (4 story addition)
Karl Fischer Architect
Dev-Moishe Kestenbaum
Residential Condominiums
184 units
Proposed

http://www.kfarchitect.com/portfolio/residential/multifamily/multi-45.jpg
Karl Fischer Architect
http://www.kfarchitect.com

Updated rendering from Curbed (www.curbed.com):

http://www.curbed.com/2007_05_184%20Kent%20Rendering.jpg

More info on the building:

· 358 Units (810 avg. rentable sf) with "loft-type" finishes, high ceilings, etc.
· Rents in the range of $52 - $58 per rentable sf (roughly $3000/month for 1BRs).
· Will add two additional stories
· Rooftop pool, landscaped garden on third floor courtyard, fitness center, blah blah blah
· Historic status will allow for significant (read: ****ing huge) tax credits

krulltime
June 22nd, 2007, 11:31 PM
June 19, 2007:


http://www.pbase.com/image/80987719.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/image/80987720.jpg

sfenn1117
June 22nd, 2007, 11:51 PM
Not a bad looking tower, at least FxFowle used much better glass here than at the Epic. That shot will be a big cluster in a few years, 2 more 30 story towers at Northside Piers and towers of 40, 30, and 15 stories at the Edge site. Plus we will see what comes out of the Domino site.

The new state park will be a nice asset in breaking up the inevitable wall of towers along the rest of the waterfront.

sfenn1117
June 22nd, 2007, 11:57 PM
Also, a new finger proposal for the Williamsburg crowd to deal with:

110 South 8th, 20 stories by Greenberg Farrow
http://i15.tinypic.com/4ypdssl.jpg
http://a810-bisweb.nyc.gov/bisweb/JobDetailsServlet?allisn=0000933488&requestid=1

FeloniousPhil
July 7th, 2007, 04:44 PM
Hello,

Does anyone know where I can find a good map of current/on-going development in Williamsburg and Greenpoint. Something like the one on page 5 in this thread, but more recent.

Phil

sfenn1117
July 7th, 2007, 11:14 PM
Leave lot alone, W'burg merchants say

Williamburg merchants battle plan to develop lot that helps business

A group of Williamsburg merchants is battling a city plan to develop a parking lot that for more than a decade has helped attract customers to the thriving commercial strip.

But the city and the developer - which is set to buy the city lot for $1 - said the plans for 152 units of affordable housing at McKenna Court also would benefit the merchants.

The lengthy city land-review process, which will determine whether the project will be approved, continued on Monday with a hearing before the borough president.

The local community board approved it last month but faulted the city Department of Housing Preservation and Development for "some of the acrimony" over the "very worthy project."

Under the current plan, the number of parking spots would increase by 14, but valet parking also would be required, upping the cost for motorists.

The merchants said that many more spaces would be needed for the new tenants. But the developer said past experiences have shown that few, if any, of the new tenants would have cars.

Without a transportation study - which the community board has now requested - the merchants remained convinced that their businesses would suffer.
Convenient parking is crucial to good business, said Betty Cooney, executive director of the Graham Avenue Business Improvement District, which represents 180 businesses.

"We need those amenities to keep our customer base," she said.

Some of the clientele will balk at the increase in parking costs to a minimum of $2 an hour, merchants said.

"If they don't have convenient parking, they won't bother," said Angel Santiago, 51, owner of Anibel Meat Market, which attracts clients from as far away as New Jersey.

"Not many places in the city roast pigs," he said, adding that his wasn't the only store with unique wares attracting customers with cars.

The lot was so important that the merchants used to lease it from the city before it became an official municipal parking lot in 1999.

HPD spokesman Neill Coleman said there had been "several meetings" with the community board since last summer and that everyone would benefit from the project.

"That's 152 families that I'd imagine are potential new customers," Coleman said.

"When people don't overpay on rent, they can spend a whole lot more money," said Martin Dunn of Brooklyn-based Dunn Development Corp., one of the developers being paid by luxury condo builder Toll Brothers to take on the affordable housing project in return for building the Northside Piers condos on the waterfront.

http://www.nydailynews.com/boroughs/brooklyn/2007/07/03/2007-07-03_leave_lot_alone_wburg_merchants_say.html
----

In a country where urban renewal has left hundreds of cities with parking lots in their downtown areas, with communities begging for the demand to develop urban friendly buildings on them, residents fight a plan to build affordable housing on a surface lot. We know they would be adamantly against it if it were slated for luxury apartments, but even affordable housing is fought against.

I just don't understand residents of this city sometimes. We should pride ourselves that we live in the densest city in America with an unbeatable public transit ridership, but sadly the storeowners want to think it's a suburban strip mall with a parking lot. It's sad.

sfenn1117
August 2nd, 2007, 01:02 AM
^lol I wonder what got me worked up that day.

This could be the first tower to rise in Greenpoint:
http://www.archpaper.com/images/features/feature2007_13/grid29.jpg

155 WEST STREET
Location: 155 West Street
Developer: 155 West Street
Architect: Ismael Leyva Architects
Size: 26 floors, 569 units, 703,000 sq. ft.
Type: Mixed-use
Completion: In design

We know about the Edge
http://www.archpaper.com/images/features/feature2007_13/grid31.jpg

WILLIAMSBURG EDGE
Location: North 5th to North 7th Street, Kent Avenue to the East River
Developer: Douglaston Development, Williamsburg Edge
Architect: Stephen B. Jacobs Group
Size: Phase I: 30- and 15-story towers with 575 market-rate units, 8- and 6-story buildings with 347 affordable units. 60,000+ sq. ft. retail, 34,000 sq. ft. public open space.
Type: Mixed-use
Completion Phase I (est.): 2009

http://www.archpaper.com/features/2007_13_grid.htm

antinimby
August 27th, 2007, 05:11 PM
Counting on a River to Entice


http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/08/24/realestate/600-posting.jpg
The Edge, a development in Williamsburg.


By C. J. HUGHES
Published: August 26, 2007 (http://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/26/realestate/26post.html)

THE East River is still polluted, from sewage runoff and a long-ago oil spill, according to the city’s Department of Environmental Protection, so it is probably not quite fit yet for doing the backstroke.

But that hasn’t altered its role as a selling point for developments springing up along its banks in Brooklyn and Queens, where a recent rezoning has allowed housing to take the place of warehouses.

How popular are developers expecting the waterfront to become? Well, the sheer size of some projects provides an indication.

Take the Edge, a mixed-use development going up in the Northside neighborhood of Williamsburg. It is to span more than two full city blocks, or seven acres, between North Fifth and North Seventh Streets, from Kent Avenue to the river.

Plans call for 1,432 units, with 1,085 condos and 347 rental apartments, spread among five buildings from 8 to 30 stories high, said Jeffrey E. Levine, the chairman of Queens-based Douglaston Development, the developer.

Other partners in the $1.2 billion project include UBS, the investment bank, and Louis Silverman, the former owner of the site, which used to house a trucking business.

A would-be city-in-miniature, the Edge will be crisscrossed by streets lined with 60,000 square feet of retail space. Residents will have access to 34,000 square feet of parks; 27,000 square feet of indoor recreation space, including a spa and a video-game room; and two garages, for 550 cars.

But under the terms of the new zoning, the Edge, like neighboring developments, must also provide parkland for nonresidents, and so 21,000 square feet of the property, mostly on two piers, will be open to the public, Mr. Levine said.

The state attorney general has not yet approved the Edge’s offering plan, but Mr. Levine said prices had already been determined. The smallest studios, about 600 square feet, will cost $600,000, and the largest two-bedrooms, with about 1,075 square feet of space, will run about $1.08 million, he said. Finishes throughout include oak floors, quartz kitchen counters and Miele appliances.

In addition, the city’s 421a tax-abatement law requires 20 percent of the units to be priced for people with lower incomes, so the rental apartments, one- and two-bedrooms, will cost $800 to $1,200 a month, Mr. Levine said, adding that the first round of closings is set for the summer of 2009.

Housing directly on the water “is desirable in other cities like Chicago or Paris,” he said. “There’s no reason it can’t be here.”

Reconnecting people with the East River, especially in a park-starved area, is a noble undertaking, said Roland Lewis, the president of the Metropolitan Waterfront Alliance, which advocates for greater waterfront access.

But, he said, “you have to be careful about what’s promised and what’s delivered.”

Many of Manhattan’s vest-pocket parks, which were often created by builders in exchange for greater development rights, are often poorly maintained or locked, Mr. Lewis said.

“It’s one thing to cheat the public out of a pocket park,” he said, “but it’s another to cheat them out of access to a river.”

Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company

sfenn1117
November 1st, 2007, 04:31 PM
Northside Piers and Palmer's Dock
Brooklyn, NY
Client:
Completion:

Northside Piers & Palmers Dock at 164 Kent Avenue is a mixed-use residential development along the East Rivers edge in the Williamsburg neighborhood of Brooklyn. Three iconic, landmark towers - Northside Piers - flank the waters edge, while the inland block features a smaller third tower and lower base. Floor to ceiling glass provides dynamic views of Manhattan and creates a modern living experience. Building amenities include a sauna, fitness room, roof top desk, and childrens playroom. A new park is being created which will include shoreline paths and a 400 foot long pier. The three towers are phased. The first will be completed in 2008.

http://i19.tinypic.com/5z5cwsy.jpg

http://i8.tinypic.com/2el5axf.jpg

http://i11.tinypic.com/676uqvl.jpg

http://fxfowle.com/

sfenn1117
November 1st, 2007, 04:41 PM
This could be the first tower to rise in Greenpoint:
http://www.archpaper.com/images/features/feature2007_13/grid29.jpg

155 WEST STREET
Location: 155 West Street
Developer: 155 West Street
Architect: Ismael Leyva Architects
Size: 26 floors, 569 units, 703,000 sq. ft.
Type: Mixed-use
Completion: In design

http://i16.tinypic.com/61tvdau.jpg

http://i16.tinypic.com/548rhg4.jpg

http://i3.tinypic.com/6hf5gxz.jpg

http://i18.tinypic.com/4mh9zes.jpg

http://ilarch.com/

Alonzo-ny
November 4th, 2007, 03:45 PM
What the hell is iconic about those towers? Uhh i hate ismael leyva!!!!!!!!

lofter1
November 4th, 2007, 06:03 PM
All those balconies with that blue glass and doo-doo brown brick looks like a riff on The Chelsea Stratus (not a good thing)

http://wirednewyork.com/forum/images/icons/icon13.gif

Jeffreyny
November 4th, 2007, 08:13 PM
http://i19.tinypic.com/5z5cwsy.jpg

In the above design it shows parkland directly north of Northside Piers. If I'm not mistaken The Edge is being built directly on that site. The park is to be north of the Edge and not nearly as large as shown here.

TREPYE
November 9th, 2007, 12:10 AM
http://i16.tinypic.com/548rhg4.jpg


http://i16.tinypic.com/61tvdau.jpg

http://ilarch.com/

I like it. Nice varied non-monotonous texture facade and looks like it will use quality materials. No, its not iconic but its a good looking design. Better than most residentials we see built nowadays.

lofter1
November 9th, 2007, 12:20 AM
How on earth can you tell from that drawing that the developer here "will use quality materials" :confused: :confused:

antinimby
November 9th, 2007, 11:11 PM
Do any of these new projects have the dreaded, above-ground parking garages? Please say no.

TREPYE
November 10th, 2007, 10:31 AM
How on earth can you tell from that drawing that the developer here "will u se quality materials" :confused: :confused:

I cant, but from his previous projects (such as Oro, in DT Bkln) you can see that he uses good looking materials. But even more important, he does a nice job mixing the glass and non-glass elements of the facade. Based on the projects listed on his website (http://ilarch.com) he's a pretty good architect I must say.

Jeffreyny
November 10th, 2007, 01:26 PM
Do any of these new projects have the dreaded, above-ground parking garages? Please say no.

no. So far all below ground.

antinimby
November 10th, 2007, 09:32 PM
That's good to hear. The mistakes over in LIC don't need to be repeated here.

ramvid01
November 10th, 2007, 10:49 PM
^^ Those mistakes are due to the ground under that part of LIC. Their real mistake though is no street level retail.

ablarc
November 11th, 2007, 07:20 AM
Their real mistake though is no street level retail.
That's what makes a multi-story deck unacceptable. As long as you provide ground floor retail, the rest is a styling exercise; but nothing can redeem a garage with ground floor parking.

A simple rule: no ground level off-street parking.

investordude
December 4th, 2007, 07:18 AM
There's way too much affordable housing in this plan: http://www.brooklyneagle.com/categories/category.php?category_id=5&id=17036

investordude
December 4th, 2007, 07:19 AM
Anyways, continuing the last post (not sure what happened to the rest of the text) the affordable housing should be reduced and the money gained should be spent on better public schools in Williamsburg. Given the population influx, we should be building schools there, not affordable units.

Jeffreyny
December 6th, 2007, 02:23 PM
Anyways, continuing the last post (not sure what happened to the rest of the text) the affordable housing should be reduced and the money gained should be spent on better public schools in Williamsburg. Given the population influx, we should be building schools there, not affordable units.

I agree with you. As someone who has invested in Williamsburg it needs more public services period, ie, schools, public transportation, etc...
Affordable housing is great and needed but many of the current developments in Williamsburg have included way too much affordable housing and the area lacks services that those living in affordable housing need.

vemo1972
January 7th, 2008, 02:10 PM
Can anybody tell me what is going up on the South West Corner of South 8th and Wythe? (Or direct me to somewhere I could find out?) I've known for years that I would eventually lose my view of downtown, now it looks like it's about to happen...

Thanks!

If you google map 470 Wythe Avenue, Brooklyn 11211, you'll see where I'm talking about... the site spans the entire block between Wythe and Kent along South 8th

zinka
January 7th, 2008, 07:27 PM
Can anybody tell me what is going up on the South West Corner of South 8th and Wythe?

http://www.vosizneias.com/2007/12/willimasburg-brooklyn-ny-issac-hagers.html


Low-income housing for Hasidim. I'm not sure how that is legal, what with housing discrimination laws and all...

lofter1
January 7th, 2008, 10:23 PM
Exactly ^ what's up with that?

Discrimanatory housing -- and with 37 occupants per unit :rolleyes:

vemo1972
January 8th, 2008, 02:07 PM
Thanks so much for letting me know, except that is exactly the answer I was NOT looking for... I'd rather a glass tower hide my view of the river than those ugly Hassidic boxes with their barred windows... ugh.

antinimby
January 8th, 2008, 09:18 PM
Yeah, from reading that article I have a feeling it will be ugly, too. :(

Brick Fedder boxes.

Anyway, they should also have or the city's zoning laws should require that all new residentials in that area need to have ground floor retail. Before when it was mostly industrial, you didn't need services but now that they're making many of those areas residentials, people are going to need them.

Shortsightedness.

Jeffreyny
January 8th, 2008, 09:21 PM
Thanks so much for letting me know, except that is exactly the answer I was NOT looking for... I'd rather a glass tower hide my view of the river than those ugly Hassidic boxes with their barred windows... ugh.


While Broadway seems to be the dividing line between Hasidic Williamsburg and hipster Williamsburg, with all the high end condos, restaurants, stores and bars edging ever further south, I am very suprised the developer chose to build low income housing for hasidics.
That lot, directly across from Schaefer's Landing, has stunning views of lower Manhattan, downtown Brooklyn and the river.

krulltime
January 9th, 2008, 02:24 AM
By kim+jeffrey (http://flickr.com/photo_zoom.gne?id=2169676717&size=l)

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2416/2169676717_162abf68e4_b.jpg

lofter1
January 21st, 2008, 05:24 PM
City Evacuates 11-Story Building in Brooklyn,
Citing Safety

NY TIMES (http://www.nytimes.com/2008/01/21/nyregion/21loft.html?_r=1&ref=nyregion&oref=slogin)

By BRUCE LAMBERT
January 21, 2008


An estimated 150 people had to relocate when city officials evacuated an 11-story factory building in Brooklyn on Sunday night, citing illegal loft conversions and fire safety violations involving a matzo bakery in the basement.


The city also shut an adjoining four-story factory building, which had been converted to a Hasidic school and catering service.


The loft building, a blocklong concrete structure converted from a pasta factory years ago, is at 475 Kent Avenue in South Williamsburg. The smaller building is at 32 Division Street.


Firefighters and buildings inspectors gave tenants a midnight deadline to leave. The American Red Cross was on hand offering hotel lodging for the night.


“People have been living here for 10 years, so why, all of a sudden on the coldest day of the winter, the night before a holiday, are we being asked to leave?” said Yuri Sivo, 48, a screenwriter, who said he had moved there last fall.


The local city councilman, David Yassky, called Mr. Sivo’s complaint “a fair question.” He said he “would like to see every option exhausted before putting people out on the street in 16-degree weather.” But he acknowledged that some violations at the loft building constituted “a firetrap.”


The hazards, city officials said, included the unauthorized basement bakery, with piles of coal, wood, empty cardboard boxes and large containers of combustible grain. Other violations, they said, included blocked exits, cracked windows, and unauthorized alterations.


The adjoining building was cited for inoperable sprinklers, cracks in the exterior wall and unauthorized alterations.


A man who answered the phone at the loft building’s management office, Sheila Properties, did not give his name and declined to comment beyond saying the city was responsible for the evacuation.


Copyright 2008 The New York Times Company

JCMAN320
January 21st, 2008, 08:14 PM
Bet you that the city will have the developer turn the place into condos or hell even knock the building down.

It simple artists don't have the money that office workers and the well healed have. So pull the rug out from under them and turn the place into condos.

brianac
January 22nd, 2008, 03:41 AM
For Evacuated Building’s Tenants, an Uncertain Future

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/01/22/nyregion/evacuation600.jpg Gabriele Stabile for The New York Times
A mover took a box from a loft at 475 Kent Avenue in Brooklyn on Monday. More than 200 tenants live and work there.

By DARYL KHAN

Published: January 22, 2008

To artists, photographers and writers, it is known as the “kibbutz” — a pock-marked pasta factory converted into a commune of creative types.
http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/01/21/nyregion/factory190.jpg Gabriele Stabile for The New York Times
The building, a onetime factory.

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/01/22/nyregion/tenants190.jpg Gabriele Stabile for The New York Times
Residents met to discuss the evacuation ordered after flammable materials were found.

It sits at the river’s edge in Brooklyn, between warehouses, idle factories and riverside industries in Williamsburg, a neighborhood emblematic of the economic success of gentrification as well as its character-flattening dark side. But on Monday, it was the site of a government-ordered evacuation.

“It’s weird seeing your home turned into a disaster area,” said Max Dickstein, a writer and editor for amNew York, who has lived in the building for a year and a half. He stood next to the entrance, where a sign taped to the doors read, “American Red Cross (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/a/american_red_cross/index.html?inline=nyt-org) Disaster Relief.”

The day before, the Fire Department designated the building, at 475 Kent Avenue, a fire hazard after its owner, Nachman Brach, was said to have had flammable materials in a makeshift matzo bakery in the basement. That led to the evacuation, and to concerns by tenants as to whether they would be able to return soon — or ever — because of questions about the long-term use of the building for apartments.

Tenants, some of whom had lived at 475 Kent for nearly a decade, scrambled to haul whatever belongings they could out of their lofts from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Monday, before the doors were shut. The residents get another chance to move items during the same period Tuesday. After that, they will be allowed to return on a case-by-case basis.

They bottlenecked the one freight elevator in the building trying to meet what many described as an impossible deadline. Inside, signs were haphazardly taped to tenants’ doors. One read, “We have left. Thanks.” A sad face had been drawn beneath the sign. Another read, “Do Not Break Open the Door Please.”

More than 200 tenants live and work in the building, which tenants described as a small town stacked 11 stories high, despite its being zoned exclusively for commercial use. A massive abstract painting hung on a 10th-floor wall.

The fourth-floor hallway looked like a photo gallery.

Late in the afternoon, one tenant, Lai Ling Jew, 41, held an impromptu meeting.

“We’re trying to figure out how to organize ourselves as tenants to get to the bottom of what’s going on here,” she said. “We love our homes. This is a vibrant community we created. People look to New York as the most creative city, and the city is pushing us to the edges.”

The meeting lasted past 4 p.m., in defiance of the deadline for the doors to be closed. Signs of confusion and sadness punctuated the frigid day. One tenant, Betsy Kelleher, said she had fought for years to get the lofts legally converted into apartments. She said it was suspicious that the evacuation came weeks before a court decision that could have made the building rent-controlled.

“They want to clean everyone out and then convert them into expensive condos,” she said.

Calls to Mr. Brach’s management office, Sheila Properties, went unanswered on Monday. Reached on his cellphone, Mr. Brach hung up.

Rob Swainston, who operates S11 Press from his 10th-floor studio, was one of a number of tenants whose livelihood was put in jeopardy. “I found out yesterday that (a) I was unemployed, and (b) homeless,” he said. “Bang. Just like that. Thank you.”

Mr. Dickstein left with good memories and apprehension about the future.

“This is a fantastic place,” he said. “It’s hurtful to see it described as a flammable matzo factory instead of a community.”

Copyright 2008 The New York Times Company

brianac
January 22nd, 2008, 03:47 AM
(Calls to Mr. Brach’s management office, Sheila Properties, went unanswered on Monday. Reached on his cellphone, Mr. Brach hung up.)

Typical. When desperate people need some answers.

Run away from the problem.

Tectonic
April 4th, 2008, 10:35 AM
Some new developments in Williamsburg, not sure of the names:

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2392/2386618093_f42fa73ffe_b.jpg

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3106/2387453648_9f9f8d4677_b.jpg

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2179/2386622699_d0326f7f14_b.jpg

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2115/2386623187_0f5f30236a.jpg?v=0

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3231/2387452242_5359008c3c.jpg?v=0

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3099/2386621323_5995a0a438.jpg?v=0

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3015/2386620287_7ee107e18c.jpg?v=0

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3002/2387450160_bd0dd91211.jpg?v=0

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2070/2386619527_db67c1006d.jpg?v=0

Tectonic
April 4th, 2008, 10:37 AM
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3164/2387448650_84afc92970.jpg?v=0

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2360/2386618819_0a5775c5da.jpg?v=0

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3183/2386619233_e49c25cbe5.jpg?v=0

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3045/2373920749_0ef867b083.jpg?v=0

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2290/2373919489_e3f8531d66.jpg?v=0

antinimby
April 4th, 2008, 12:57 PM
Where exactly was the second one from the top?

It looks like a new construction but it could also be one of those conversions.

Tectonic
April 4th, 2008, 06:32 PM
Its on Broadway between Berry and Wythe.

antinimby
April 4th, 2008, 06:47 PM
Thanks. It is 60 Broadway and was built back in 1916 as a factory so it's a conversion.

I had a feeling it was a conversion because I don't think you can build that large under today's zoning.

BrooklynLove
April 4th, 2008, 09:06 PM
that's the gretsch building, homie.

Tectonic
April 5th, 2008, 10:59 AM
Thanks, a lot of activity on Kent too. Williamsburg is very gray, like William Beaver and 100 West 18th.

NoyokA
April 21st, 2008, 01:04 AM
Has the nighttime lighting effects on Schaffer Landing been discussed yet? Its a little tacky, but cool nonetheless.

antinimby
May 23rd, 2008, 02:28 AM
From curbed (http://curbed.com/archives/2008/05/21/proposed_burg_rose_plaza_on_the_river_rendered.php #reader_comments):


Proposed Burg Rose Plaza on the River Rendered
Wednesday, May 21, 2008, by Robert

http://curbed.com/uploads/2008_05_Rose%20Plaza%20Rendering.jpg

Last week, we had some details about a proposed development on the South Williamsburg waterfront that would be called Rose Plaza on the River. It would go on a large site north of the big power plant on Kent Avenue that Con Edison is currently demolishing and south of Schaefer Landing. Brownstoner got info from City Planning about the size of the three buildings that are planned: 801 units of housing and 29,000 square feet of commercial space, plus a waterfront esplanade. The buildings would be 28, 24 and 18 stories in height. In any case, we came across this rendering on the Gene Kaufman Architect website. Mr. Kaufman also designed neighboring Schaefer Landing, which is much smaller, with a 25-story building and two 15-story buildings with 350 units. Rose Plaza would cover four acres, and they have to be rezoned. The Kaufman site lists it as a $375 million project with a 2009 completion date, which may have to be tweaked a bit.

The site at present:
http://www.brownstoner.com/brownstoner/archives/rose-05-2008.JPG
brownstoner (http://www.brownstoner.com/brownstoner/archives/2008/05/big_in_the_burg.php)

pianoman11686
June 26th, 2008, 12:13 AM
Okay, so it's not technically a new residential development, but it's still news. Plus I'm a big fan.

Top Chef Rumormongering: Cheftestants to Be Housed in Williamsburg
Wednesday, June 25, 2008, by Amanda

Attention hipster Top Chef fans, residents of the Rocket Factory and the Gretsch Building, and the general army of Eater tipsters: we hear from inside sources that the Season 5 Top Chef contestants will be housed in Williamsburg. No confirm coming in (now or ever) from the Bravo execs, but we expect all of you to be on guard for camera crews, a leggy Indian model who goes by the name of Padma, and a motley crew of young faux hawked chefs scanning the produce section at Tops. Also keep an eye on those new condos around McCarren Park (we're looking at you Ikon and 20 Bayard), whose owners would probably be willing to trade free housing for shots of their building signs each time the cheftestants return home.

Eater.com (http://eater.com/archives/2008/06/top_chef_rumorm.php)