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Kris
July 25th, 2004, 04:12 AM
July 18, 2004

SQUARE FEET

Long Island City: An Office District Slow in Emerging

By JOHN HOLUSHA

http://graphics7.nytimes.com/images/2004/07/18/realestate/sqft.1842.400.jpg
OUT OF MANUFACTURING Gantry Park

http://graphics7.nytimes.com/images/2004/07/18/realestate/sqft.1841.400.jpg
The Information Technology High School on 21st Street.

Decades-long efforts to develop Long Island City as a major office district received a bit of a boost last week with the news that Citigroup would move 700 employees from Lower Manhattan into a planned new 14-story building across the street from the company's 48-story tower, which has stood in splendid isolation since the late 1980's.

Still, the effort has a long way to go.

Long Island City has for years been designated by planners as a potential fourth central business district for the city, after Midtown and downtown Manhattan and downtown Brooklyn. Citigroup put up its 48-story tower in 1989, and earlier this year Metropolitan Life moved 1,600 employees into two renovated factory buildings in the area.

Much of the area was rezoned a few years ago to allow larger office buildings, and a pending additional rezoning, mainly on the edges of the previous district, would permit more residential development and larger supermarkets.

The proposal has been approved by the local community board and the borough president's office and awaits hearings before the City Council.

Amanda M. Burden, chairwoman of the City Planning Commission, said the zoning change is intended to encourage low-rise residential and retail development in Hunters Point. "We expect that this will trigger high-density office and residential development along Jackson Avenue by making the area more attractive," she said.

In anticipation of zoning changes, developers have been buying old industrial buildings for use as art galleries and schools — and possibly as residences if the changes are approved.

In one notable recent sale, the owners of the Scalamandré silk mill in Long Island City announced early this year that they were moving to South Carolina, and the old mill buildings were bought by a Manhattan-based developer, Time Equities. Francis J. Greenburger, the company's president, said Scalamandré would retain part of the space and the rest would be offered to commercial tenants, although he did not rule out a residential conversion eventually. In the 1980's Time Equities was a major converter of rental buildings to co-ops.

Some properties have already undergone conversion. The former Lion Match factory, a four-story, 60,000-square-foot building on 43rd Avenue, is being renovated for use as offices. A four-story, 130,000-square-foot building on 21st Street that lost its manufacturing tenants is now the Information Technology High School.

The economics driving conversion are compelling in areas zoned for housing or likely to be rezoned, said Richard Maltz, chairman of Greiner-Maltz, an industrial and commercial broker active in Queens, Brooklyn and Long Island.

He said a typical 10,000-square-foot factory building in the area sells for $120 to $140 a square foot, or $1.2 million to $1.4 million. But if a builder can put up 30,000 square feet of residential space on that same site, Mr. Maltz said, the value of the property rises to $2.1 million to $2.5 million.

The manufacturers still in the once solidly industrial area are complaining that the zoning changes, if approved, may drive them from the area, which is prized for its proximity to customers in Manhattan.

Adam Friedman, executive director of the New York Industrial Retention Network, a not-for-profit organization that seeks to assist manufacturers in the city, said there is a danger that adding office workers and residents to the area will significantly change the nature of the community. If that happens, manufacturing buildings will be sold for conversion or rents will increase beyond the financial ability of small artisans or distributors.

"There are still 27,000 industrial jobs in the 11101 ZIP code area," covering Long Island City and parts of some nearby neighborhoods, Mr. Friedman said.

Mr. Friedman said city planners had not accepted his organization's proposal to designate a part of the area as an industrial employment district to reduce the pressure on owners to sell to developers.

Some people, however, doubt that there is that much demand for the existing manufacturing space. Gail A. Roseman, an executive vice president of Sholom & Zuckerbrot, a commercial brokerage in Long Island City, said, "The area has changed, and the need for manufacturing buildings is not there anymore."

John Reinertsen, a vice president of CB Richard Ellis, a major commercial property broker, agreed. The overall situation in the area, he said, is "too much space chasing too few tenants." He said he expected that some of the industrial space would be preserved but that "over time a lot will become residential."

The ideal might be a balance, but achieving it is complex. Robert Yaro, president of the Regional Plan Association, a private planning group, said: "We have learned that the most successful business districts are those that are the most diverse. The challenge is to allow for evolution in Long Island City, but also create certainty for the industrial sector."

Despite the general decline of industry in the city, Mr. Yaro said, manufacturing and distribution still provide about 20 percent of the jobs in the city — jobs that are often the first rung on the economic ladder for recent immigrants.

Mr. Maltz said that low interest rates were partly behind the efforts to buy and redevelop industrial properties and that prices might start to decline if rates rise and developers find they cannot get the financing for a major conversion project.

The proposed rezoning will allow for mixed-use development, with housing and stores adjacent to warehouses and manufacturing, said David H. Inerfeld, a senior director of Sholom & Zuckerbrot. But this will be nothing new for the area, where a typical block may already have industrial buildings on the corners and row houses covering the midblock area. Most of this varied development predates zoning rules.

Residential development will attract retailers to serve a growing population, and this will make the area more livable, Mr. Reinertsen said. "Right now, the area pretty much shuts down in the evening."

Copyright 2004 The New York Times Company


Hunters Point Subdistrict Rezoning (http://www.nyc.gov/html/dcp/html/hunterspoint/hp1.html)

Kris
July 25th, 2004, 09:27 AM
July 25, 2004

LONG ISLAND CITY

High-Rises Are Arising, but Are They a Skyline?

By JAKE MOONEY

"The city seen from the Queensboro Bridge," as F. Scott Fitzgerald wrote, "is always the city seen for the first time, in its first wild promise of all the mystery and the beauty in the world."

It should go without saying that Fitzgerald was referring to Manhattan, "rising up across the river in white heaps and sugar lumps." Queens, which Nick Carraway would have glimpsed had he turned around, has always had many things to offer. An awe-inspiring skyline was never among them.

But now the borough, home in Jay Gatsby's world to ash heaps and murderous mechanics, may be taking small steps skyward in Long Island City. The borough's tallest building, the 48-story Citigroup skyscraper at Court Square, is getting a 14-story neighbor across the street, the company announced this month. And Queens West, the development parcel across from the United Nations, is home to 42-story and 32-story apartment buildings, and will get two more rental buildings, each over 30 stories tall. At the East River Tennis Club, two 28-story condominium towers are taking shape.

"Certainly what was there before as you drove along F.D.R. Drive looking at Queens, it wasn't the most inviting view," said Joseph Conley, chairman of Community Board 2. "There used to be this Manhattan view of Queens as being this gritty industrial area, because that's all you saw."

Tall buildings and the zoning that allows them could help give Queens a new image, Mr. Conley said. Still, new development must be done sensitively, he said, to protect residents' "million-dollar view" of Manhattan.

In Brooklyn too, a mini skyline might rise. Its highest building is the 34-story Williamsburgh Savings Bank, but if the developer Bruce Ratner gets his way and builds four towers as part of his Nets arena plan, one of those towers would stand taller than the bank.

But what about the view of Queens?

Carol Willis, the director of the Skyscraper Museum in Lower Manhattan, was hesitant to pronounce it a skyline just yet. Of the planned Citigroup building, she said, "I think it's certainly not a skyscraper." Plus, she added, "You're not going to get a skyline with two buildings."

Ms. Willis said skyscrapers typically required access to mass transit, a waterfront and affordable land, all of which are available in Long Island City. But whether those qualities will yield a memorable skyline depends on a strong economy, a zeal for development and, perhaps most important, a lucky alignment of the stars.

Could that happen in Queens anytime soon?

"I guess you have to define 'soon,' " Ms. Willis said.

Copyright 2004 The New York Times Company

Jeffreyny
July 25th, 2004, 10:46 AM
LIC is a fantastic place for new offices, apartments, museums, etc...
Minutes from Midtown Manhattan it is a mystery to me how this area has been so slow in the making.

Larkin
July 26th, 2004, 12:52 PM
Yep And I live there... it is very slow in the making and whats weird was when LIC was first starting to develop it used to be all industrial!

Larkin
July 26th, 2004, 12:56 PM
yep and i live there i live in the citylights building it is very nice...

billyblancoNYC
December 2nd, 2004, 01:03 PM
Office plan okayed for Queens Plaza
By James DeWeese
11/26/2004
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Community Board 2 voted earlier this month to approve a business deal that could clear the way for as much as 3 million square feet of new commercial office space along Queens Plaza, another milestone in the business development that is reshaping Long Island City.


Under the agreement, Tishman Speyer Properties, whose other holdings include such iconic city locales as Rockefeller Center and the Chrysler Building, would receive a 99-year lease on city-owned land currently occupied by the Queens Plaza Garage at Jackson Avenue and an adjacent lot, said Jeremy Smith, a project manager with New York City Economic Development Corp.


The board had previously approved a land-use request for the project in 2001.

Under the business agreement approved on Nov. 4 in a 31-1 vote with two abstentions, Tishman Speyer, which has buildings in nine cities across Europe and the Americas, would have to build on the Queens Plaza Garage site by no later than 2015, Smith said.

During construction, the 1,150-space Queens Plaza Garage, which currently houses 180,000 square feet of commercial office space, would be demolished and replaced with similar on-site parking, as outlined in the agreement.

Some residents had expressed concern about the temporary loss of parking, but planners said the majority of the garage's users are actually commuters from Long Island who drop off their cars at Queens Plaza before hopping a train into the city.

"We are very excited about building a building in Long Island City," Tony Mannarino, a representative of Tishman Speyer told the community board. "We have been looking for opportunities to do something outside Manhattan."

Long Island City is fast attracting the businesses and office space that are turning it into one of the city's most important financial centers.

The MetLife building and Citigroup's 48-story Court Square skyscraper call the area home. And Citigroup, which already houses 4,800 employees in the borough, is slated to break ground on an additional 14-story, 475,000-square-foot office complex in 2005.

Tishman Speyer's proposed project would dramatically increase the amount of commercial office space available in the area. As part of the deal, the developer also would be required to spend $1 million to market and publicize the area over a period of 10 years, Smith said.

"One of the major advantages to the commercial space being located in Long Island City is it's basically an extension of Midtown," said Michael Reale, a project manager with the Long Island City Business Development Corp. "It's right over the 59th Street Bridge."

But booming development also is forcing planners to perform a balancing act, Reale said.

"Obviously, it would be great to have more commercial space but also at the same time to try to attempt to retain the manufacturing part of Long Island City which is basically part of the area's heritage," Reale said. "It's kind of juggling both interests at the same time."

Portions of Long Island City were rezoned several years ago to accommodate further commercial and residential development.

Zoning regulations allow for the construction of as much as 3 million square feet of office space between the two lots Tishman Speyer is looking to develop, said Suzanne Halpin, executive vice president of Rubenstein Communications, which is handling public relations for the developer.

It was too early to speculate what shape the buildings would take, Halpin said.

But the project has the resounding support of the EDC.

"One of the exciting things about this is Tishman Speyer is a world renowned developer," said Melanie Lenz, the EDC's vice president for Queens Real Estate. "Something on this site will happen soon. It will happen with the right resources. And it will happen in the right way."

Janelle Patterson, a spokeswoman for the EDC, said the development plan has not been finalized and must still be approved by the Borough Board and the EDC board. Final approval could come as early as February, she said.

Reach reporter James DeWeese by e-mail at news@timesledger.com or by phone at 718-229-0300, Ext. 157.



©Times Ledger 2004
http://www.timesledger.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=13442476&BRD=2676&PAG=461&dept_id= 542525&rfi=6

NewYorkYankee
December 2nd, 2004, 02:14 PM
Great! Maybe Queens will finally have a skyline! Great Towers! An extension of midtown...exactly right!

Kris
February 5th, 2005, 11:41 PM
February 6, 2005

LONG ISLAND CITY

A Famed Skyline Fixture, Standing Tall Another Day

By JEFF VANDAM

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/dropcap/t.gifhe Long Island City skyline has but a few jewels. One, the Citigroup tower, is a tall skyscraper of aqua glass. Another is the old Pennsylvania Railroad Power Station, a brick survivor from 1909 with four smokestacks that sits in the shadow of two new condo towers.

As this Queens neighborhood experiences a revival, newer residents have championed the area's industrial past. Last year, a cafe on Jackson Avenue called Ten63 began selling shirts depicting the power plant, its smokestacks adopting the mantle of a neighborhood icon.

But recently, some intrepid Web surfers on queenswest.com (http://queenswest.com/) uncovered an application for a permit filed last month by a developer calling for "demolition of all 4 existing chimneys" of the plant, a prelude to converting the building for residential use. Community reaction, on the whole, has not been positive.

"It would basically disfigure the building," said Monte Antrim, a co-owner of Ten63 and an architect. "At that point it's really a lump of bricks."

Mr. Antrim, along with his wife and co-owner, Talitha Whidbee, has begun a postcard campaign to get landmark status for the plant. "It is a critical part of the aesthetic character of the neighborhood and an important part of its history," said Paul Parkhill, co-director of the educational group Place in History.

Despite the hubbub over the apparent demise of the smokestacks, the developer of the project said on Friday that he had no such plans. "We have no intention to take down the smokestacks," said Cheskel Schwimmer, vice president of CGS Builders, a Brooklyn firm. "We want to try to preserve the smokestacks as much as possible."

The intention behind applying for the permit, he said, was to get permission to remove small pieces of the smokestacks and incorporate them into the design.

To that end, Mr. Schwimmer and the architect he hired, Karl Fischer, have produced a rendering that includes a cube of glass resting on top of the existing building and attached to the smokestacks, which would actually become part of the new building and be equipped with windows. "We will both reinforce the smokestacks and create good living space within the building," Mr. Schwimmer said.

For the time being, he and Mr. Fischer, who was the architect for the renovated Gretsch Building in Williamsburg, are working with the city's departments of buildings and city planning to get the cube design approved. In the meantime, it seems that the smokestacks, beacons of Queens past, will continue to point their brown spires into the sky.

Copyright 2005 (http://www.nytimes.com/ref/membercenter/help/copyright.html) The New York Times Company (http://www.nytco.com/)

ZippyTheChimp
February 6th, 2005, 09:13 AM
Originally called the Westinghouse Power Station
McKim Mead & White (1909)

Penn RR power plant.
NY & Queens Electric Light & Power Co.
Schwartz Chwmical Co
http://www.pbase.com/zippythechimp/image/21219814.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/zippythechimp/image/21227499.jpg

NoyokA
February 6th, 2005, 09:31 AM
I have always loved this building and I am glad to hear it might not be torn down. I have always hoped it could be incorporated into an indoor space, how the Winter Garden is for Battery Park City, such incorporation has been done in Cities like Washington D.C. and Pittsburgh and would be appropriate for Long Island City still making the transformation from an industrial district to a 24/7 residential community.

Kris
February 8th, 2005, 01:42 PM
On the Waterfront

With the developments River East and Silvercup West, a stately cityscape would stretch along the river from the Queens line to the Queensboro bridge

BY DANIEL HENDRICK
Daniel Hendrick is a frequent contributor to Newsday.

February 6, 2005

Move over, Queens West.

The Long Island City skyline is expected to get a little more crowded soon as a new mixed-use development rises along the East River and a second complex, just south of the Queensboro Bridge, begins to go from the drawing boards to reality.

In June, construction is expected to begin on River East, a five-acre nexus of restaurants, condominiums, shops and gardens on 44th Avenue between Vernon Boulevard and the waterfront. When the $350-million-plus complex by Vernon Realty is finished, estimated in mid-2007, it will encompass eight buildings, including two 30-story towers.

A third of a mile to the north, on Vernon Boulevard near the Queensboro Bridge, the founders of Silvercup Studios, Stuart Match Suna and his brother Alan, have revived plans for Silvercup West, a film-inspired minicity of apartments, shops, sound stages and even a museum. After the six-acre project nearly fell apart four years ago, work now is expected to begin late this year and end in late 2009.

The two ventures harness momentum generated by Queens West, a public-private partnership that produced the 43-story City- lights building in 1997 and 32-story Avalon Riverview in 2002, and will eventually encompass 19 buildings over 74 acres.

River East and Silvercup West go a step further, incorporating everything from parking to retail to open space. "Even within the presence of some of these very strong architects that work in the neighborhood, we want to do something that raises the bar completely beyond what anyone's done for residential development, including in Manhattan," said Jay Valgora, whose V Studio is designing River East.

River East's plan

Rising between Board of Education and Con Edison buildings, River East will be built on land now occupied by the Fila Tennis Club.

Two eight-story mixed commercial and residential buildings will flank the entrance on 44th Avenue, followed by two eight-story buildings to the east that will include town house-style duplexes on the first two floors and single-floor apartments above.

A pair of 30-story towers will dominate the scene, overlooking a waterfront esplanade, playground and park. The complex will house 902 condominiums overall and include 1.1-million square feet of interior space.

V Studio's design seeks to meld new materials with concepts seen elsewhere in Long Island City. The waterfront towers will be constructed with floor-to-ceiling glass, making them the largest residential glass buildings in the city, Valgora said. Meanwhile, billboard-size architectural slabs atop buildings in the complex will echo the nearby PepsiCo and Silvercup Studios billboards - except that River East's billboards will be parts of rooftop gardens and will be covered with foliage. Two parking garages will be built underground, and noted landscape architect Ken Smith plans to locate trees and shrubbery throughout the development.

Silvercup silent

Silvercup West will be on Vernon Boulevard between 43rd Avenue and the Queensboro Bridge. Silvercup Studios representatives declined to talk about the project, saying it is in the early phases.

But an application filed with a state agency in December offers the most detailed view yet of the 2.3-million-square-foot development, which promises to reshape a neighborhood now home to warehouses and public housing.

Silvercup West will include 1,000 apartments, 655,000 square feet of office space and a 350,000-square-foot film and television studio. The plan also calls for retail space, a health club, catering hall, underground garage, a 125,000- square-foot museum and a waterfront promenade that will be open to the public.

To get a comprehensive design, Silvercup Studios last year selected the Richard Rogers Partnership, a U.K.-based architectural firm known for its work on the Centre Pompidou in Paris and London's Millennium Dome and Canary Wharf.

Silvercup Studios had hoped to get started on Silvercup West after buying a 2.7-acre property on Vernon Boulevard in 1999. But the following year, the New York Power Authority announced plans to install electricity-generating turbines next door.

Silvercup sued the authority, fearing turbine noise would interfere with a planned sound stage, but the company declined to put up a $5-million bond to shield NYPA from any financial damages incurred by a work stoppage.

Plans for Silvercup West now include the 3.3-acre NYPA-owned property - even though the authority has not agreed to sell it. "It's not like it's chiseled in stone that we are going to stay there," said NYPA spokesman Jack Murphy. "We have said that we would consider negotiating, provided that certain long-term conditions were met. But there is nothing definite."

Long Island City residents and community leaders agree River East and Silvercup West will improve neighborhood aesthetics, but raise questions.

Concern for historic factory

The first concerns the fate of the Terra Cotta Works building, a late 19th century edifice that is the sole visible remnant of a ceramics factory complex that once operated on the property. Plans filed with the state indicate the damaged landmark "will be integrated into the proposed development."

"That landmarked building is not supposed to be touched, and the fear with projects like this is that it somehow will go away," said Ray Normandeau, who lives in the nearby Queensbridge Houses.

The larger question for both projects is how they will impact Long Island City, particularly its economics. Community Board 2 chairman Joe Conley predicted that River East and Silvercup West will increase demand for space, leading to higher rents that will displace working-class housing and manufacturing jobs.

"These developments are not a bad thing for the neighborhood," Conley said. "But there has to be some kind of plan to keep the businesses and jobs that are here now. Otherwise, it's the lower socio-economic groups that are going to be pushed out."

For the 30,000 residents of the nearby Queensbridge, Ravenswood and Astoria Houses, however - where rents are fixed and unemployment is high - the construction blitz could be a godsend, said the Rev. Mitchell Taylor, of the East River Development Alliance. "This experience excites me, because it gives us a window of opportunity to connect residents of public housing to all of the changes taking place in Long Island City."

But the greatest benefit to the public has little to do with economics, planners say. Much of the East River waterfront is inaccessible to the public; these two projects will change that and form part of what may one day be a single contiguous riverfront community.

"The grand opportunity here is a set of waterfront parks and connections from Queensbridge Park all the way to Hunters Point," said John Young, Queens director of the Department of City Planning.

Copyright © 2005, Newsday, Inc. (http://www.newsday.com/)

NewYorkYankee
February 8th, 2005, 02:29 PM
YEAH YEAH! This is good news! Im excited! Great for LIC!

Archit_K
February 8th, 2005, 02:47 PM
Nice photos ZippyTheChimp.

billyblancoNYC
February 11th, 2005, 10:53 AM
by Neille Ilel, Western Queens Editor
February 10, 2005
http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=13931844&BRD=1865&PAG=461&dept_id=152944&rfi=6

Residents and developers in Long Island City are hoping that River East, a 1.2-million-square-foot residential and commercial project in Long Island City, will finally give the neighborhood the “it” status that boosters have been predicting for years.
Vernon Realty, in addition to developing River East, is also in the early stages of three commercial ventures within two blocks of the River East site. One is a large grocery store that the company’s president Marshall Weissman described as “in the Whole Foods type—one of the sexy ones.” Another is the addition of “two very popular New York City restaurants.” And finally there’s talk of a pair of stores of the “Gap-type.” Weissman added that it was too early for him to go into specifics.
According to Weissman, River East is getting 200 to 250 calls a day from interested buyers—and excavation hasn’t even begun on the bu
ildings. “It’s insane,” he admitted.
It isn’t unheard of for real estate developers to create their own buzz. For an area like Long Island City, which has been on the verge of massive development for as long as anyone can remember, developers aren’t the only ones anxious to give it that final push.
The River East complex will include two 30-story glass towers and four 8-story buildings that will be located on 44th Avenue between Vernon Boulevard and the waterfront. In addition, a public park will be landscaped along the waterfront, paid for by the developer, but open to the public.
“This development is long overdue,” said George Stamatiades, a member of the Dutch Kills Civic Association, which is on the north side of the Queensborough Bridge. “We’re just too strategically located to have been skipped over for so long.”
Weissman agreed, noting that the development will be especially attractive to Manhattanites who have been priced out of that borough’s real estate market.
“This is a new vision for Long Island City,” said the project’s architect Jay Valgora, principal of V Studios. He said that as an architect, designing the soaring towers was a thrill, but he is most proud of the waterfront park and playground. The development is situated just north of the Queens West development project.
“We lobbied very hard for the esplanade space,” said Joseph Conley, chairman of Community Board 2. The neighborhood has been working with the Department of City Planning since 1992 to develop the area with a waterfront park reaching all the way to Astoria.
The agency and the site’s previous owners, the East River Tennis Club, agreed on ground rules for the site, including the amount of public space and height restrictions on the structures, before the property was sold to developers.
Terri Adams, president of the Hunters Point Community Development organization said she too welcomed the development, but had reservations about the height and rather large bulk that seem to be standard for the latest string of Long Island City developments.
Silvercup Studios, located just east of River East, has restarted its own plans to develop a mixed-use development in its industrial environs. Relative to the six-acre Silvercup expansion project and Queens West, “this is the most delicately scaled,” Valgora said. The two tall towers will be situated on the waterfront so as not to impose on the rest of the neighborhood. The smaller buildings, which will house townhouses and lofts, will even have their own modern version of stoops.
Valgora said that it makes sense to have large-scale developments on the waterfront because there is a big demand for the accompanying views. Included in the design is 20,000 square feet of retail space, which will be given over to necessities for occupants of the building, like a pharmacy and dry cleaner.
Residents will also have access to an indoor and outdoor pool, a gym and two floors of below-ground parking. The signature design element in all the structures is the glass exterior, which appears frequently in Valgora’s work.
He has recently been involved in the RKO Keith’s Theatre site in Flushing, which also makes extensive use of glass exteriors. It was recently rejected for a variance by the community board, but Valgora and community members are hopeful that an agreement on a smaller building will be reached within the next month.
River East, on the other hand, will be built entirely as of right, meaning the plans are all within current zoning restrictions. Excavation will begin in the coming weeks and the foundation will be laid in June.
“It’s very important that this raises the bar on design,” Valgora said. “Long Island City is one of the most special neighborhoods in New York.” Now will the rest of the city agree?

NewYorkYankee
February 11th, 2005, 11:37 AM
Good news! I cant wait until these start going up! :) :)

TonyO
February 28th, 2005, 06:08 PM
NYSun

February 24, 2005

If City's Olympic Bid Fails, Developers Are Ready

BY JULIE SATOW - Staff Reporter of the Sun
February 24, 2005
URL: http://www.nysun.com/article/9672

If New York loses its bid for the 2012 Summer Olympics, a feeding frenzy could erupt among developers jostling to build on a prime piece of riverfront real estate in Long Island City, where the Olympic Village is now planned.

The $1.6 billion Olympic Village is to be developed on a 61-acre site with a view of the Manhattan skyline, but the plan would be scrapped if the International Olympic Committee does not pick New York when it votes for a host city on July 6.

The state, city, and Port Authority of New York and New Jersey jointly own Queens West, as the land is known. The property covers 74 acres at Hunters Point, where a total of 7,500 apartments are eventually planned. Located across the East River from the United Nations, it is near the no. 7 subway line and is also accessible via the Midtown Tunnel and the 59th Street Bridge.

If the Olympic plan falls through, the southern portion of Queens West, where the Olympic Village is to be built, would be put up for development bids. Rockrose Development Corp. and AvalonBay are already developing the northern portion of the site. The $1 billion Rockrose development includes 3,000 luxury condominiums in seven buildings, and AvalonBay is building three luxury rentals.

"This is one of the most attractive areas in New York, just really prime," a senior fellow at the conservative think tank Manhattan Institute, Julia Vitullo-Martin, said. "It has riverfront views and great transportation into Manhattan."

The managing partner at development advising firm Washington Square, Paul Travis, said the land's development value, already high, is likely to grow.

"The land at Queens West is extremely valuable for residential development," said Mr. Travis, who has advised a number of developers with property in Long Island City. "It is going to grow like Battery Park City, where the more people who move there, the more valuable it becomes, even though it has had a relatively slow start."

Mr. Travis also believes retail will be a lucrative market because of its close proximity to Manhattan and the availability of large parcels of developable land.

"It is possible to assemble larger sites for big-box retail here," said Mr. Travis, who advised developers of the Costco store on nearby Vernon Boulevard.

"I continue not to see office or office related development because of the lack of mass-transit access to the waterfront," he added. While a single subway line is sufficient for residential development, office development is more likely where there are a number of transit lines.

"The office hub will be around the Jackson Boulevard and Queens Boulevard corridor," Mr. Travis predicted.

This Olympic Village plan, with 4,500 units of housing in a long ribbon of low-rise buildings with two high-rises overlooking the East River, is the result of an international competition held after the International Olympic Committee panned NYC2012's original plan.

A private developer will pay for the $1.6 billion plan, which NYC2012 will lease from the developer for 11 months during the Games. After that, the developer will transform the area into 18,000 market-rate apartments, including some affordable units. The number of affordable units has yet to be determined, according to officials at NYC2012.

The Olympic Village plan by Morphosis, a Santa Monica, Calif.-based architecture company, was chosen by an eight-member design review panel that evaluated 132 entries from 20 countries. The Morphosis plan reduced the number of high rises in the Olympic Village by a ratio of 10-to-4, and created 43 acres of new parkland for more access to the riverbanks surrounding the village on three sides. The plan also increased the living space for each of the 17,000 athletes, coaches, and team officials to 314 square feet of space, compared to the IOC minimum of 130 square feet.

More parkland allowed for more training sites near the village, with several multisport fields, a full-size Olympic track around a soccer pitch, tennis courts, and smaller fields for personalized workouts just a short walk from the athletes' residences.

"It takes pioneers to go into a site and build critical mass, but this is what is happening in Long Island City," said the director of planning and design for NYC2012, Andrew Winters. "We are optimistic that any development there would be snatched up by developers."

Kris
March 6th, 2005, 05:46 PM
From today's Daily News:

http://www.nydailynews.com/boroughs/story/287096p-245810c.html

I'd love to see that hulk be converted into residences, but holy moley, how expensive such a process would be. If the developer can do it, my hat is off to him.
.

Boonchies
March 9th, 2005, 01:31 AM
It's about time LIC gets the attention it deserves. It's perfect for all forms of transportation, the views are great, it has this wonderful community feeling, nice parks & more to come. In addition, I suggest you guys walk around the area-I love seeing the unique and random architecture and land use.

JCMAN320
March 9th, 2005, 02:08 AM
We have our own huge Powerhouse from the Hudson Manhattan Railroad (what we now know as the PATH) dating back to 1904 in Downtown Jersey City which is the cornerstone of our Powerhouse Arts District which is comprised of factories dating back to the late 1800s, similar to DUMBO in Brooklyn, which house artist and musicians. It's going to become our SoHo. The Powerhouse is most likely going to become a performing arts facility for the city. The H & M is on the National and State List of Historic Places. Maybe LIC can use there's in the same fashion, I see it all the time from the East River when I take the ferry to Yankee games, it's beautiful.

billyblancoNYC
March 9th, 2005, 05:16 PM
Yeah Jersey! I didn't know LIC moved there.

TonyO
March 10th, 2005, 10:10 AM
NYSun
3/10/2005

The Remaking of Gritty Long Island City

http://www.nysun.com/edition/2005-03-10_large.jpg

MICHAEL STOLER

Can Long Island City, perceived by many real estate leaders as a gritty, undesirable place in need of infrastructure, become one of the city's central business districts? For years, it has been designated by planners as a potential fourth central business district, after Midtown Manhattan, downtown Manhattan, and Downtown Brooklyn. The CEO and co-principal at Silvercup Studios, Alan Suna, said that "Times Square and the Lower East Side were gritty and dirty, and no one ever thought of these places as places to live, work, or, better yet, as a 24/7 environment where people thrived. Well, those naysayers were proven wrong, and I believe that tradition will continue with Long Island City."

Last December, Mayor Bloomberg signed legislation establishing a business improvement district in the vicinity of Queens Plaza and Court Square. The BID covers 85 properties in Long Island City from 21st Street to Jackson Avenue, in addition to all properties along both sides of Jackson Avenue between Court Square and Queens Plaza.

BIDs have been successful in Manhattan and Brooklyn. The goal of the BID is to attract new businesses for the area while also retaining those already there. City Council Member Eric Gioia said, "When you create a business improvement district, you are putting up a sign that says, 'Welcome, we are open for business,' and you become a magnet for attracting other businesses."

The senior real estate lender at Amalgamated Bank, Tom Graf, said, "Even though the BID was formulated, as a result of New York City rediscovering this barren wasteland after 40 years, the area remains undesirable and unsafe, particularly at night, as evidenced by the abundance of crack-addicted prostitutes. The city exacerbates the social problem in Long Island City by continuing to bus and discharge Rikers Island former inmates in front of the Queens Plaza local 24-hour Twin Donut store," he said.

The president of Shalom Zuckerbrot, Frank Zuckerbrot, said, "If you build it, it does not mean people will come to LIC. Markets dictate what happens, and you have to have the right people packaging the product." A partner at Tishman Speyer Properties, Jerry Cohen, said, "We have to create a product that the market wants and which is comparable to Midtown Manhattan. The cost of construction is identical in Long Island City and Manhattan, and, therefore, we need governmental incentives for construction and incentives for employers to relocate."

***

On December 13, Queens Borough President Helen Marshall announced the terms for the redevelopment of the site of the Queens Plaza parking garage. The 99-year lease calls for the 3-acre site to be developed after demoli tion of the existing municipal garage. In 2003, the New York City Economic Development Corporation designated the site for mixed-use commercial development with office space, a garage, and retail tenants. Mr. Cohen said, "We expect to construct 3 million square feet of state-of-the-art, efficient office space with large footprints, which will attract many corporate users. We believe that the time is ready now. There is a demand for new office space." According to industry insiders, Tishman Speyer plans to construct a building on Jackson Avenue with the Department of Transportation as the major tenant.

A vice president at Brause Realty, David Brause, said, "For a rent 75% less than in Midtown Manhattan, a tenant can have a brand-new class A office space, one stop away from Bloomingdale's on 59th Street."

Mr. Zuckerbrot and Mr. Suna said that Long Island City continues to lack critical mass. "Critical mass means lots of people in an area, which is a 24/7 community, people who want to live, work, and have fun in the area."

Both Mr. Zuckerbrot and Mr. Suna added that, over the next five to 10 years, we are going to have critical mass.

Michael Boxer, who is a managing partner of RCG Longview and Ramius Capital Group - which together with Jeffrey Fiel and Lloyd Goldman of BLDG Management, owns 30-30 and 30-20 Thompson Ave., which have about 1.1 million square feet in space - said he is encouraged by the prospects of Long Island City as a viable office market. He believes the growth of the residential market expected along the waterfront in Williamsburg and Greenpoint will push north into Long Island City. He predicts this will take five to seven years.

***

Commercial development in Long Island City has limped through the past two decades. In 1984, Citibank acquired a 2-acre, 82,000-square-foot trapezoidal site in Queens for about $3.5 million. According to industry insiders, the price was at least 75% cheaper than land in Manhattan. In February 1989, the 48-story, 1.4 millionsquare-foot One Court Square, and a four-story service wing, welcomed its first employees. The site includes a fitness center, a small store, dining rooms, a half-acre public plaza, and direct access to the E, F, and G subway lines. Even today, the area lacks enough foot traffic and many of the local restaurants are empty after 7 in the evening.

Mr. Suna said, "In 1989, Citibank built the building that did not work. Their original intention was not to take the entire building for occupancy. At that time, Long Island City lacked zoning, and there was an absence of political willpower."

Later this year, Tishman Speyer will begin development of the $200 million, 14-story, 475,000-square-foot Court Square Two. Also, plans have been announced that the United Nations Credit Union is planning to begin construction of a 250,000-square-foot office building near Citicorp's office campus.

The executive vice president of valuation services in the capital markets group at Cushman & Wakefield, Brian Corcoran, said, "Major Manhattan developers are becoming active in looking at large sites for new office construction for the first time in over a decade."

In May 2001, MetLife announced that it entered into a lease with Brause Realty for the former Brewster building at 27-01 Bridge Plaza North. The city provided MetLife with $26 million in real estate tax abatements and other incentives for the move. Two years later, Brause Realty completed construction of an adjacent 12-story, 282,000-square-foot building, which was then connected to 1 MetLife Plaza.

David Brause said, "MetLife is very happy in the 690,000-square-foot building. All 1,500 employees are learning about the larger variety of amenities the neighborhood has to offer. Great restaurants are constantly opening. The vibe is very much like what you witnessed in SoHo or TriBeCa 20 years ago."

A partner at the real estate financing firm Haves Pine Seligman, Marc Haves, said, "In order for the office market to truly develop in Long Island City, a bulk area similar to Metro Tech development in Brooklyn would have to first be assembled. One obvious area where this type of development could take place is the Sunnyside train yards where a platform would have to be built over the yards. The complex should have a mixed-use purpose to include much-needed market-rate rental and affordable housing, coupled with retail and office."

***

In July 2001, the City Council approved the rezoning of 37 centrally located blocks in Long Island City. The zoning will facilitate commercial development and allow new residences to mix with commercial and light-industry business. The goal of the zoning was to foster reinvestment and redevelopment taking advantage of Long Island City's excellent mass transit access and its supply of large, underdeveloped properties.

One major project scheduled for completion in 2009 on the East River is One Silvercup West. According to Mr. Suna, "The project includes over 2 million square feet, including a 400,000-square-foot building to serve as film production facilities,1,000 apartments, a 100,000-square-foot cultural facility, a 650,0000-square-foot office building, a 1,200-seat catering facility, which is sorely needed in Western Queens, and a variety of waterfront restaurants and pubs, gym, and retail."

Development in the city at large is booming and motivating changes in Long Island City. Still, transportation needs improvement, and the neighborhood lacks retail options and other amenities, such as a supermarkets and cultural activities. The rezoning and planned commercial office buildings, along with residential conversions of industrial properties, new construction, and the possibility of the 2012 Olympics, will help the neighborhood one day reach the critical mass needed to make it the fourth central business district.

Gulcrapek
March 13th, 2005, 05:50 PM
STUDIOS Architecture participated in a competition to design Block 86/72 in LIC, a 1-million sf office building.

http://www.studiosarch.com/ > competitions > Block 86/72

tmg
March 13th, 2005, 09:19 PM
The New York Post
THE HIGH POINT
By JOANNA WALTERS

March 12, 2005 -- If you listen to the buzz, the piece of land deemed to have the most development potential in the area is in -- Queens.

Got that? The race is on for Hunters Point, a lesser-known sub-district of Long Island City, directly opposite Midtown.

The 43-block industrial and residential hodge-podge of factories, rubble and townhouses is currently a little low on glitter right now. But with its combo of unrivalled views of Manhattan (and access to Midtown), and now a crucial rezoning under its belt, loft-living and condos with wraparound terraces are on the way for thousands.

New French bistros, Italian pizza joints, a jazz cafe, lounge bars, gift shops, pet suppliers, boutiques and florists are springing up alongside the Irish pubs and diners on the central retail drag, Vernon Boulevard.

A rezoning that was passed last year gives the green light for more high-rises and factory conversions. "This area has more potential than probably anywhere else in the world," says Queens councilman Eric Gioia.

"This neighborhood is five minutes from Grand Central by subway, and you have a mix of beautiful brownstones, light industry, new condos, lofts, cool restaurants - an artist community and rents and house prices that are half to two-thirds of Midtown," says Luis Chavez, a local manager at Gotham Realty.

The three apartment and office towers that now grace the skyline across the East River from the United Nations building are just the start. At least eight more apartment buildings are planned for the waterfront, and five will be dotted elsewhere in the neighborhood, along with new office space.

That's not counting the planned $1.6 billion Olympic village two blocks to the south, if the city is chosen for the 2012 Games.

Rockrose, a development firm, is spending $1.2 billion to build seven towers on the waterfront, with a total of 3,200 apartments. Some will be for sale, some for rent. The whole thing is coming to market over the next five to 10 years as part of a 74-acre development known as Queens West.

The location is on the site of a former Pepsi-Cola factory, and preserving the famous illuminated sign, and building a park along the esplanade are part of the deal.

LOFTY PRICES

"These are the best views in the world," says Jon McMillan, Rockrose development director. "Our apartments will have style, glamour and services that will make it look like Midtown migrated to Queens."

Since the first Rockrose building will not open until the end of 2006, McMillan refuses to fix the prices yet. "If you look at the prices in Brooklyn Heights and some of the new condo developments in Williamsburg, where they are priced around $675 to $800 per square foot, I would hope to be around that ballpark," he says.

Others are not so coy, as local entrepreneurs create their own piece of the action. Take Joseph Palumbo, who owns one of Hunters Point's best-hidden gems - a spa and hair salon on 50th Avenue called Mind Full Peace.

He supplies upmarket facial and massage products to chic spas all over the country.

While Palumbo ships from downstairs, he and his family run a salon and spa upstairs. He also owns a small parking lot opposite, where he plans to construct a boutique co-op building this year.

The 11 two- and three-bedroom units of around 1,400 square feet will be priced from around $700,000, and will be a two-minute walk from the water.

"Most of the real-estate prices around here have doubled in the past two to three years. I've been here 40 years and I like the progress. I hope this place turns into a new Greenwich Village or SoHo," he says.

FACTORY ROW

Still, some urban myths about Hunters Point need to be shattered. It is not the new SoHo. And it is not the new Williamsburg, as many like to prophecy.

Not in the sense that abandoned factories are waiting for artists and hipsters to move in for peanuts tomorrow.

Instead, it's a five- to 15-year vision for a neighborhood to go from industrial semi-wilderness to tony-town - and not much will be bought for peanuts.

"The factories and warehouses are still functioning as industries," says Chavez. "People are talking about buying them and converting them into artists' lofts, but there are not that many for sale right now."

Experts think many small industries could hold out before selling, as they watch prices for their property skyrocket.

The same is true of the housing stock. From the Italianate brownstones on landmarked 45th 'Millionaire's Row' Avenue to the more modest residential blocks farther south, renting is difficult, and buying and selling is often word-of-mouth only.

New York developers the Lions Group have two apartment buildings in the pipeline; one, opposite the current Citigroup building, will be a 14-story upscale doorman building, with floor plans available now and completion toward the end of the year.

Lions partner Raimon Chirian promises luxury units and a building with a gym, conference rooms and a great view of the river and Manhattan - studios will start at $400,000 and the penthouse with wraparound terrace will cost around $1 million.

The second building will be a similar 13-story condo building on the corner of 50th and Jackson avenues, for completion in 2006. (Corcoran is the broker for both buildings.)

"Stainless-steel kitchens, marble bathrooms, top of the line," says Chirian.

The new buildings will all be a stone's throw from the P.S. 1 Contemporary Art Center (part of the MoMA), and the cluster of artists' studios that already dot the area.

Larger art magnets such as the Noguchi Museum, the Socrates Sculpture Park and the Museum for African Art are to the north.

Hunters Point has just one public school, the highly regarded P.S. 78 Elementary, at the base of the Citylights building. A middle school and a high school are likely to evolve as the area develops.

The area's other disadvantages? There is not a lot of greenery in Hunters Point, and residents complain that the single local supermarket is lame. Many are campaigning to persuade Fresh Direct, which only delivers to large apartment buildings in the area, to deliver more widely.

The waterfront will likely back onto a massive construction site for the next few years, and once the towers are complete there are likely to be a lot of joggers and dog-walkers for one small park.

SCREEN DREAMS

Hunters Point took off as a transport hub when the LIRR moved its terminus there from Brooklyn in 1861. Commuters can still connect from the local station to Jamaica during rush hour.

Commuters to Manhattan have the E, V and 7 lines, or a water taxi to 34th Street or Wall Street.

The nearest movie theater is a short subway ride away in Sunnyside, though movie options could change dramatically if the derelict hulk that was the Schwartz Chemical Factory is turned into a shopping mall, cineplex and apartment-building monolith, as is being suggested by developer Cheskel Schwimmer.

He bought the factory and another building next door, but the rebuilding involved will make it a longer-term project.

The broker on that deal, Ephrom Allen of Halstead Realty, is also involved with another (unidentified) developer who is planning a new 24-unit luxury condo building.

"There is almost no residential inventory in Long Island City, especially in larger apartments," says Allen. "This is going to be the most elite spot to live outside Manhattan."

billyblancoNYC
March 14th, 2005, 12:15 AM
STUDIOS Architecture participated in a competition to design Block 86/72 in LIC, a 1-million sf office building.

http://www.studiosarch.com/ > competitions > Block 86/72

This is not the one to replace that horrid parking garage by Tishman, right? I think that's to have 3 msf.

NoyokA
March 18th, 2005, 01:23 PM
New York Daily News:

$1.4M facelift for Qns. park
BY OREN YANIV
DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER
Friday, March 18th, 2005

In a bid to "reclaim the waterfront," officials have announced $1.4 million worth of improvements to Queensbridge Park, a heavily used recreation area on the East River bank.

"We're not just investing in a park, we're investing in a neighborhood," Councilman Eric Gioia (D-Sunnyside) proclaimed during a press conference Friday outside the Queensbridge Houses.

The project will add a new synthetic turf soccer field and revamp athletic courts, walkways and picnic areas, all on the north side of the park.

Plans call for the revitalization of one-quarter of the 20-acre park that stretches between Queensborough Plaza and 40th Ave., and between Vernon Blvd. and the river.

"It's a perfect spot for a wonderful park," said Borough President Helen Marshall, adding that residents of the Queensbridge Houses, the largest housing development in the nation, are the main users of the facilities.

"When you have such a concentration of people, they need a place to go, exercise and just enjoy life," said the Rev. Mitchell Taylor, a community activist.

The park plays host to outdoor concerts, family gatherings and sporting events, said Elizabeth McQueen, the park's stewardess.

"In the summertime, the park is loaded," she said.

The artificial turf, which is becoming the standard in city parks, will prevent wear and tear, allow soccer to be played year-round and all but eliminate maintenance costs, officials said.

Once completed, a youth soccer league would be organized in the park, joining the baseball and basketball leagues that were founded in the area in recent years. The leagues are being run by Gioia's office, the East River Development Alliance and the YMCA.

Queensbridge Park offers panoramic vistas of the Manhattan skyline and Gioia said he hopes that one day Queens' riverside - from Newtown Creek to the Triborough Bridge - would become an attractive destination.

"Our waterfront should be a place where people can go to bike, jog, or simply relax and enjoy the view," he said. "Today, we reclaim the waterfront."

Now that the blueprints are finalized, construction is set to begin in the fall and is expected to last about 15 months.

"I'm looking forward to coming back here and cutting the ribbon," Marshall said.

NoyokA
March 21st, 2005, 11:19 AM
NYTIMES:

March 21, 2005
American Maverick Wins Pritzker Prize
By ROBIN POGREBIN

Thom Mayne, who has been called the bad boy and angry young man of Los Angeles architecture, will be named today as the winner of this year's Pritzker Architecture Prize, considered the profession's highest honor. Mr. Mayne, 61, is the first American to win the prize in 14 years.

"I've been such an outsider my whole life," he said in a telephone interview from his office at Morphosis, his firm in Santa Monica, Calif. "It's just kind of startling."

Given his reputation as a maverick, Mr. Mayne's selection as this year's Pritzker laureate would seem to signal his induction into the establishment. Indeed, that shift would seem to have begun with his selection for three government projects now rising under the General Services Administration's program to promote "design excellence" in architecture: a glass federal office building in San Francisco that eliminates corner offices in favor of a democratic space, with city views for 90 percent of the workstations; a federal courthouse in Eugene, Ore., that elevates the courtrooms above a glass plinth; and a satellite facility, crowned with 16 antennas and partly submerged in the landscape, for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration outside Washington.

But Mr. Mayne said he saw the prize as a recognition of his iconoclastic approach - and as a mandate to keep agitating.

"I see this as a validation for architecture in general," he said, "and for me to push even harder."

To be sure, in its citation the Pritzker jury acknowledged Mr. Mayne's countercultural roots, calling him "a product of the turbulent 60's who has carried that rebellious attitude and fervent desire for change into his practice, the fruits of which are only now becoming visible in a group of large-scale projects."

Among those is his recent Caltrans District 7 building, a headquarters of the California Transportation Department in downtown Los Angeles. The hulking 1.2 million-square-foot building has cantilevered upper floors and a mechanized perforated skin that adjusts to the light throughout the day, becoming as transparent as glass at dusk.

Like the name of his firm, Morphosis, with its suggested embrace of constant change, Mr. Mayne's signature style has been difficult to pin down over the years. He became known in the 1980's for his ornamental restaurant renovations on the west side of Los Angeles; his first large-scale residence, the widely influential Crawford House in Montecito, Calif., featured redwood totems topped with skylights.

Yet recurring elements run through many Mayne buildings, like blocky jutting shapes, glass and metal, double skins, shifting degrees of light, curvilinear walls and elevators that skip stops.

In New York Mr. Mayne has designed a nine-story art and engineering building for Cooper Union in Manhattan and an Olympic Village in Hunters Point, Queens - a mixed-use waterfront development that is scheduled to go up whether or not the games come to New York in 2012. The Cooper Union building, to begin construction next year, features a central atrium crisscrossed by sky bridges; the Olympic Village preserves most of the site as parkland, with residential towers at the northern end and low-rise ribbonlike housing tilted at an angle toward the water. Reviewing the Cooper Union design, Nicolai Ouroussoff, the architecture critic for The New York Times, praised Mr. Mayne for his social optimism and "enthusiasm for the congestion and dynamism on which cities thrive."

The bands of windows he designed for Cooper Union echo those at Caltrans and the San Francisco federal building; the billboard-size letters adorning the courthouse in Eugene, Ore., echo a massive street number at Caltrans and the big letters labeling the graduate housing he built at the University of Toronto (completed in 2000).

Mr. Mayne described his style as idiosyncratic.

"The multiplicity of ideas is what I'm interested in," he said. "The hybrid in our society - where there is no singular idea of what is beautiful."

The Pritzker jury acknowledged this eclectic quality in its citation. "Mayne's approach toward architecture and his philosophy is not derived from European modernism, Asian influences or even from American precedents of the last century," it says. "He has sought throughout his career to create an original architecture, one that is truly representative of the unique, somewhat rootless, culture of Southern California, especially the architecturally rich city of Los Angeles."

Born in Waterbury, Conn., Mr. Mayne began his career as an urban planner after graduating with an architecture degree from the University of Southern California in 1968. Four years later, with five other architects, he formed a new school, the Southern California Institute of Architecture (SCI-Arc), which aimed to bring to Los Angeles the critical attitude toward the profession that was being practiced at Cooper Union in New York and the Architectural Association in London. The school is still operating, although Mr. Mayne now teaches at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Around the time of the founding of SCI-Arc, he founded an architectural firm with two school friends who were also teachers.

Mr. Ouroussoff has described Mr. Mayne's early works as "militaristic" and characterized by a "brooding aggression." That style was broken by his 1993 design of Diamond Ranch High School in Pomona, Calif., one of his first major public commissions, with two rows of fragmented buildings set on either side of a long central sidewalk "canyon" and a monumental stairway embedded in the hillside that doubles as an amphitheater.

Mr. Mayne's other California projects include two medical office buildings on Beverly Boulevard in Los Angeles, several distinctive private residences and the Cahill Center for Astrophysics at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, currently under way.

His most recent commission, the result of a design competition, is for a new State Capitol building in Juneau, Alaska.

Internationally, Mr. Mayne designed the Hypo Alpe-Adria Center, a mixed-use bank headquarters in Klagenfurt, Austria; the ASE Design Center in Taipei, Taiwan; the Sun Tower in Seoul, South Korea; and a housing project to be completed next year in Madrid.

Mr. Mayne is only the eighth American to be honored since the Pritzker was first awarded, in 1979 to Philip Johnson. He is to receive a $100,000 grant and a bronze medallion on May 31 in Chicago's Millennium Park in a ceremony in the Jay Pritzker Pavilion, named for the founder of the prize and designed by the architect Frank Gehry, one of the Pritzker jurors, who won in 1989.

Mr. Gehry, who is based in Los Angeles, said he did not think of Mr. Mayne as an insurgent so much as an individual. "He's a really authentic architect," he said in an telephone interview. "He's developed his own space and language."

Mr. Mayne, too, questioned this persistent characterization of him as contrarian. "I think my clients would tell you I'm a problem solver," he said. "I'm not there to agree with people. I'm there to articulate a point of view."

"Am I insistent and tenacious?" he said. "Absolutely. I could not get this work done if I was not."

At the same time, Mr. Mayne added, experience has taught him the necessity - if not the art - of compromise. "I've grown up a little bit," he said. "I understand the importance of the negotiation. It is a collective act."

Derek2k3
March 23rd, 2005, 09:24 PM
Project #1

45-56 Pearson Street
20 stories
Scarano & Associates Architects
Dev-Rosma Development
Residential Condominium
120 units
Proposed July 2005-Late 2006

http://www.nydailynews.com/ips_rich_content/597-building.JPG
Preliminary rendering by Scarano Architects of condominium project at 45-56 Pearson St. near Queens West waterfront.


Condo craze building
in Long Island City

Daily News Exclusive
http://www.nydailynews.com/business/story/292477p-250402c.html

By LORE CROGHAN
DAILY NEWS BUSINESS WRITER

The heart of Long Island City is finally going condo.

In a move that could touch off a wave of apartment construction, a Brooklyn condo developer bought the first major building site sold since the 37-block Queens industrial area was rezoned in mid-2001.

The developer is one of a host of builders from hot residential enclaves like Williamsburg who are looking for a new frontier.

"I see a very good opportunity in Long Island City," Mark Junger of Rosma Development told the Daily News. "I think it's going to be a hot neighborhood."

He paid $16.5 million for the site at 45-56 Pearson St. - where he's going to construct a 20-story "Manhattan-style building,"he said.

Until now, big residential projects have hugged the Queens West waterfront. The new condo tower will be further inland, off Jackson Avenue.

Junger's luxury tower will have fancy touches like a swimming pool with a retractable dome, a running track on one roof of the building, and a garden on another.

There will be 120 condos of varying sizes, from one-bedroom units to big penthouses. He plans to break ground by July, and spend the following year and a half building the project. The site now consists of a warehouse and parking lot.

It's too soon to set apartment prices, but Junger anticipates they'll run around $600 to $700 per square foot - comparable to condo rates in sought-after Williamsburg.

He expects to attract buyers who work in Manhattan - it's about a 15-minute subway ride to Grand Central Terminal.

Most of the 15 bidders for the development site wanted to build condos, and the rest were planning rental apartments, said Jeffrey Troy of Eastern Consolidated, the sale broker with colleagues Alan Miller and Louis Ricci.

Junger paid about $92 per buildable square foot for the site. As demand for sites in the nabe heats up, it will be hard to find land for less than $100 per buildable square foot, Eastern brokers predicted.

Still, that's not as high as Williamsburg land prices, which are approaching $150 per square foot.

Several Long Island City sites are now in play - Junger himself's going after one.

Originally published on March 23, 2005

Gulcrapek
March 23rd, 2005, 09:37 PM
Not bad. I'd rather a larger rendering though.

NoyokA
March 23rd, 2005, 10:12 PM
I believe the site, a boarded ware-house is currently being torn down. There's another small condo-development with a rendering posted nearby with excavations starting soon.

Derek2k3
March 24th, 2005, 06:39 AM
Project #2

38-42 11th Street
9 stories 107 feet
Kushner Studios
Dev-KJDS Realty
Commercial
53,000 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/41178937.jpg
Kushner Studios
http://kushnerstudios.com/

Derek2k3
March 24th, 2005, 06:59 AM
Project #3

JCJ Condominium Residence
50th Avenue
5 stories
Dev-Palumbo
Residential Condominium
11 units
Proposed 2005-2006

http://www.licnyc.com/albums/2005-02/IMG_2928.sized.jpg
http://www.licnyc.com


The New York Post
THE HIGH POINT
By JOANNA WALTERS

Others are not so coy, as local entrepreneurs create their own piece of the action. Take Joseph Palumbo, who owns one of Hunters Point's best-hidden gems - a spa and hair salon on 50th Avenue called Mind Full Peace.

He supplies upmarket facial and massage products to chic spas all over the country.

While Palumbo ships from downstairs, he and his family run a salon and spa upstairs. He also owns a small parking lot opposite, where he plans to construct a boutique co-op building this year.

The 11 two- and three-bedroom units of around 1,400 square feet will be priced from around $700,000, and will be a two-minute walk from the water.

"Most of the real-estate prices around here have doubled in the past two to three years. I've been here 40 years and I like the progress. I hope this place turns into a new Greenwich Village or SoHo," he says.

NoyokA
March 27th, 2005, 05:49 PM
Thanks Derek, that's the condo development I was talking about.

Project #4
30-30 Northern Boulevard
15 Storeys
Perkins Eastman Architects P.C.
Dev-Edward J. Minskoff Equities, Inc.
Speculative Commercial
655,000 Sq. Ft.
Proposed

A suburban style office development in Queens.

http://www.mrofficespace.com/ob/pix/mh/dw2075_cp.jpg

EDWARD J. MINSKOFF TO DEVELOP NEW 15-STORY, CLASS-A OFFICE TOWER IN LONG ISLAND CITY
Insignia/ESG, exclusive leasing agent, targets single or multiple users for build-to-suit on Northern Boulevard

New York, NY -- (May 7, 2002) -- A new state-of-the-art Class-A office building is set to rise at 30-30 Northern Boulevard in Long Island City as soon as a single tenant or multiple users pre-lease all or a substantial part of the planned 655,000-square foot 15-story property, to be located just north of Queens Plaza between 40th Avenue and 40th Road.


Offering brand new, high-tech office space, a five-minute subway commute to midtown, and rents at nearly a third of the price for comparable space in midtown Manhattan, the building will be developed by New York-based Edward J. Minskoff Equities, Inc. (EJME). The Insignia/ESG team of Richard Karson, Gregory P. Knoop, Eric Engelhardt, John Reinersten, Dina Raynolds, and Roni N. Horenstein has been named exclusive leasing agent, and Perkins Eastman Architects PC has been retained as project architect.

"30-30 Northern Boulevard presents an unprecedented opportunity for a company to occupy a world-class office building, literally minutes from Manhattan, at prices in the mid-20's per square foot," said Mr. Knoop. "It's a very economically seductive scenario. The State and local economic development corporations are providing excellent financial incentives for companies to move to Long Island City. Transportation is already in place with subway connections to Manhattan via the E, V, N, R, W, F and 7 lines, and direct automobile and bus access via the Queensboro Bridge. Plus, the planned East Side Access project, which will enable Long Island Railroad to access Grand Central Terminal, will soon materialize."

According to Richard Karson who was instrumental in establishing Insignia/ESG's Long Island City office several years ago, "This is an unprecedented and highly financially viable opportunity for a Manhattan-based company to bifurcate its operations between the City and Queens."

Mr. Minskoff has plans in place and can construct a state-of-the-art building in as little time as 18 months.

"Our site is not an assemblage and consists of 100,000+ square feet located within two blocks of Long Island City's major transportation hub," said Mr. Minskoff. "What's significant is that the site is close to MetLife's new premises at 27-01 Bridge Plaza. It will also benefit from all the re-development activity expected to ensue in the newly re-zoned LIC district and our tenants will be eligible for the REAP, ICIP, energy programs and rent abatement benefits available through the economic development authorities."

Insignia/ESG is targeting banks, insurance companies and other institutional tenants who need staff offices, a call center, data/tech building, disaster recovery facilities, or payroll/processing location in close proximity to Manhattan. "We're marketing to tenants in midtown, situated between 34th Street and 59th Streets, who seek a cost-effective alternative to Manhattan in which to house satellite or head-office operations."

Amenities at 30-30 Northern Boulevard, among others, will include access to fiber optic systems for high-speed Internet access, cable television access, state-of-the-art security systems, an institutional-quality main entrance lobby with security desk, and parking for 150 vehicles.

Edward J. Minskoff Equities, Inc. owns leases, and manages more than four million square feet of commercial property. It has developed 1325 Avenue of the Americas and 101 Avenue of the Americas in Manhattan, the recently completed regional headquarters building for the Federal Aviation Administration in Queens, and owns a condominium interest at 1166 Avenue of the Americas. The company also manages the IBM building at 590 Madison Avenue, 825 Seventh Avenue and Niketown. Edward Minskoff was formerly chief executive officer of Olympia & York, which developed many of the office buildings in the World Financial Center and more than 27 million square feet of office space throughout the country.

Insignia/ESG is one of the largest commercial real estate services providers in the United States, with comprehensive brokerage, consulting, property management, fee development, investment sales and debt placement operations. The company operates in top U.S. markets, including New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, Boston, Philadelphia, Atlanta, Miami, San Francisco, Dallas, Phoenix and Washington, D.C. Nationally, Insignia/ESG provides services for a property portfolio spanning approximately 230 million sq. ft. Insignia/ESG also delivers advanced commercial real estate services in the United Kingdom through Insignia Richard Ellis, and in France through Insignia Bourdais, as well as through other Insignia subsidiaries in Europe, Asia and Latin America. Insignia/ESG is a subsidiary of Insignia Financial Group, Inc., a publicly traded real estate company listed on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol IFS.

http://www.rebuz.com/images/Minskoff.jpg

Derek2k3
March 28th, 2005, 09:52 PM
nice..at least for LIC. Here's one more.

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/41374989.jpg


Project #5

Court Square Two
Jackson Avenue
14 stories
Kohn Pedersen & Fox Associates
Dev-Tishman Speyer Properties
Commercial Office
475,000 ft² Commercial Office
Proposed 2005-Early 2007

http://nyc.gov/portal/beans/photogallery/images/2004/07/13/4843/10048/DB7D2955b.jpg

Times Ledger
Citigroup to expand office space in Long Island City
By Matthew Monks 07/15/2004

http://www.timesledger.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=12350427&BRD=1079&PAG=461&dept_id=170338&rfi=6

The largest private employer in Queens is about to get bigger. Citigroup is erecting a new 14-story office building across the street from its landmark skyscraper on Court Square in Long Island City, moving an additional 1,500 workers into the borough, city and company officials announced Tuesday.

The $200 million project should foster the neighborhood's transformation into one of New York City's fastest growing business districts, Mayor Michael Bloomberg said.

Advertisement


"From the start our administration has followed an economic development strategy designed to create jobs throughout the five boroughs," Bloomberg said. "Citygroup's latest expansion to Long Island City does just that."

He said the financial services company decided to expand in the area on its own, with no tax incentives from the city.

In addition to the 475,000-square-foot building, the company will construct an underground escalator between the nearby G and 7 subway lines, improving the connection between the two lines, said Citigroup Chief Executive Officer Charles Prince.

Citigroup is a global company, offering banking, credit cards, loans and insurance. It opened business in Long Island City in 1989, when it completed a 48-story skyscraper on Court Square housing 4,800 employees.

Prince said the company should break ground in 2005 on the new facility and hopes to occupy the building by the end of 2006 or early 2007.

The new office, which is being designed by Manhattan-based Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates, will accommodate management workers, Prince said.

When it is completed, Citigroup will have a total of 6,300 workers in Queens. The mayor said it already is the largest private sector employer in the borough.

Queens officials praised the expansion.

"Long Island City is truly coming into its own and we are - by the way - going to give New Jersey a run for their money," said Queens Borough President Helen Marshal, referring to the rivalry between the state to the south and the neighborhood to draw financial jobs from Lower Manhattan.

"I don't think any mayor has come to Queens with as much good news as Mayor Bloomberg," said state Assemblywoman Cathy Nolan (D-Ridgewood.)

With the recent completion of the MetLife insurance headquarters in Bridge Plaza Tech Center at nearby Queens Plaza, the Citigroup expansion means the neighborhood is well on its way to becoming one of the city's major business districts, said City Councilman Eric Gioia (D-Sunnyside)


Thread here:
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=5125&page=1

Links:
http://www.emporis.com/en/wm/bu/?id=211187
http://www.realestatejournal.com/regionalnews/northeast/20040728-siteselection.html
http://www.licnyc.com/modules.php?name=News&file=article&sid=231
http://www.new-york-info.com/news/new-york-jobs-26/
http://www.cityfeet.com/news/default.asp?lCityID=1

NoyokA
April 13th, 2005, 01:15 PM
Office plan okayed for Queens Plaza
By James DeWeese

Community Board 2 voted earlier this month to approve a business deal that could clear the way for as much as 3 million square feet of new commercial office space along Queens Plaza, another milestone in the business development that is reshaping Long Island City.


Under the agreement, Tishman Speyer Properties, whose other holdings include such iconic city locales as Rockefeller Center and the Chrysler Building, would receive a 99-year lease on city-owned land currently occupied by the Queens Plaza Garage at Jackson Avenue and an adjacent lot, said Jeremy Smith, a project manager with New York City Economic Development Corp.


The board had previously approved a land-use request for the project in 2001.

Under the business agreement approved on Nov. 4 in a 31-1 vote with two abstentions, Tishman Speyer, which has buildings in nine cities across Europe and the Americas, would have to build on the Queens Plaza Garage site by no later than 2015, Smith said.

During construction, the 1,150-space Queens Plaza Garage, which currently houses 180,000 square feet of commercial office space, would be demolished and replaced with similar on-site parking, as outlined in the agreement.

Some residents had expressed concern about the temporary loss of parking, but planners said the majority of the garage's users are actually commuters from Long Island who drop off their cars at Queens Plaza before hopping a train into the city.

"We are very excited about building a building in Long Island City," Tony Mannarino, a representative of Tishman Speyer told the community board. "We have been looking for opportunities to do something outside Manhattan."

Long Island City is fast attracting the businesses and office space that are turning it into one of the city's most important financial centers.

The MetLife building and Citigroup's 48-story Court Square skyscraper call the area home. And Citigroup, which already houses 4,800 employees in the borough, is slated to break ground on an additional 14-story, 475,000-square-foot office complex in 2005.

Tishman Speyer's proposed project would dramatically increase the amount of commercial office space available in the area. As part of the deal, the developer also would be required to spend $1 million to market and publicize the area over a period of 10 years, Smith said.

"One of the major advantages to the commercial space being located in Long Island City is it's basically an extension of Midtown," said Michael Reale, a project manager with the Long Island City Business Development Corp. "It's right over the 59th Street Bridge."

But booming development also is forcing planners to perform a balancing act, Reale said.

"Obviously, it would be great to have more commercial space but also at the same time to try to attempt to retain the manufacturing part of Long Island City which is basically part of the area's heritage," Reale said. "It's kind of juggling both interests at the same time."

Portions of Long Island City were rezoned several years ago to accommodate further commercial and residential development.

Zoning regulations allow for the construction of as much as 3 million square feet of office space between the two lots Tishman Speyer is looking to develop, said Suzanne Halpin, executive vice president of Rubenstein Communications, which is handling public relations for the developer.

It was too early to speculate what shape the buildings would take, Halpin said.

But the project has the resounding support of the EDC.

"One of the exciting things about this is Tishman Speyer is a world renowned developer," said Melanie Lenz, the EDC's vice president for Queens Real Estate. "Something on this site will happen soon. It will happen with the right resources. And it will happen in the right way."

Janelle Patterson, a spokeswoman for the EDC, said the development plan has not been finalized and must still be approved by the Borough Board and the EDC board. Final approval could come as early as February, she said.

Reach reporter James DeWeese by e-mail at news@timesledger.com or by phone at 718-229-0300, Ext. 157.



©Times Ledger 2004
http://www.timesledger.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=13442476&BRD=2676&PAG=461&dept_id= 542525&rfi=6

An update to the Tishman project:

Project #6

Queens Plaza Development
Jackson Avenue
Raul De Armas
Dev-Tishman Speyer Properties
Commercial Office
600,000 sq. ft. Commericla Office; 3.5 million sq. ft. development
Proposed

NYPOST:

April 13, 2005 -- TISHMAN Speyer Properties, which controls a handful of back office development sites in Long Island City, is negotiating with the city's Dept. of Transportation to develop 600,000 feet on Jackson Avenue.

The site would be the first of five buildings on the block planned for development by TSP, which along with the Modell family owns properties that total more than 3.5 million square feet.

During a luncheon speech yesterday to the Young Men's and Women's Real Estate Association at the University Club, Rob Speyer would only say the firm was beginning to negotiate with an unnamed tenant and that they would be launching a marketing campaign to the industry over the next few months.

He described the buildings as "totally Class A, perfectly efficient...that will have people feeling like they are in a building in Midtown."

Raul De Armas of Moed De Armas & Shannon is the architect and the rent would be in the mid-$20s.

NoyokA
April 13th, 2005, 01:27 PM
Here are some of the projects from Moed De Armas & Shannon; mostly renovation:

http://www.mdeas.com/images/101%20West%20End/101%20West%20End%20Exterior.jpg

http://www.mdeas.com/images/Montefiore/Montifore%20-%20Exterior%204.jpg

http://www.mdeas.com/images/Wedge%20Bank/wedge%20model%203.jpg

http://www.mdeas.com/images/Hippodrome/ELEVATION1.jpg

http://www.mdeas.com/images/1450%20Broadway/1.jpg

http://www.mdeas.com/images/350%20Madison/350%20Madison%20Rendering.jpg

http://www.mdeas.com/images/340%20Madison/340%20Madison%20CW%20Rendering3.jpg

http://www.mdeas.com/images/430%20Park/2.jpg

NoyokA
April 19th, 2005, 03:32 PM
Daily News:
10.6M for Queens Plaza
Massive face-lift planned
BY DONALD BERTRAND
DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER

Queens Plaza, the gateway to Queens, will get a $10.6 million federal shot in the arm to improve the roadway and provide a system of bike paths and pedestrian walkways at the foot of the Queensboro Bridge.

"What is happening today is a movement forward to make this the next important business district in New York," said Rep. Carolyn Maloney, who took to the roof of the Long Island City municipal garage at the corner of Queens Plaza South and Jackson Ave. on Friday afternoon to make her announcement.

Plans call for the garage to be torn down and replaced with a multiuse commercial/residential structure.

"What we are really doing with this grant today is building the economic development foundation for future economic development and growth here in western Queens and to improve the quality of life for Long Island City residents," said Maloney.

Plans for the plaza area call for a section now used for parking at the northeastern end to be made into a park.

They also propose a swath of that property along Queens Plaza South be used for green space and a reconfigured roadway.

Accepting an enlarged check from Maloney were city Transportation Commissioner Iris Weinshall and Amanda Burden, director of the Department of City Planning.

"This project will make this very important transportation hub user friendly for bicyclists, pedestrians and motorists," said Weinshall.

"All of us feel this is one of the greatest business districts. We are one subway stop from Manhattan. We have every advantage here in Long Island City. We have culture. We have business. We have transportation. It is fantastic," said Burden.

But "it has never been a great gateway," she added.

The new funding, she said, "will make such a difference to pedestrian safety, to amenities, and will really [boost] this business district, which we think has the greatest potential in all of New York."

The principal objective of the project is to reduce traffic congestion and improve air quality along Queens Plaza by encouraging mass transit and alternative forms of transportation, such as walking and bicycling.

The project, already underway and expected to take about five years, will develop a design for new pedestrian and biking amenities and will include new and increased lighting, landscaping, street furniture, crosswalks, public art, and directional signs.

Derek2k3
April 29th, 2005, 03:36 PM
It'd be nice if they built the design that won the competition.

Queens Plaza Competition Winner
Juthathip Techachumreon & Surachai Akekapobyotin

http://www.vanalen.org/__images/drafts/QP_First-Prize-detail.jpg

http://www.art4d.com/back/80/images/queen/q1_head.jpg

Vanalen
The Queens Plaza Design Ideas Competition

http://www.vanalen.org/competitions/queens_plaza/site.htm

"Queens Plaza, as the gateway between Manhattan and Queens, is the most significant commercial district and focus for cultural activity in the area. Our project attempts to develop the area and further the potential of the site as a transit hub by connecting the different modes of transportation, in combination with various communication technologies, for all types of users. The media corridor, the main construct in our design, is partly a connecting device and partly an attempt to create a focus point for the program. The media corridor will serve as the connection between disparate elements: major subway stations, pedestrian ways, medians and public spaces. Walking through this corridor, a variety of users can interact with different programs embedded inside and wrapped around the skin of this passageway. The corridor will also link to traffic medians making them much more accessible and to the plaza at the JFK Commuter Triangle, which can become the main center of the area. Our design encourages a wide range of possibilities. It can accommodate everyday uses such as parking and also, through simple manipulation, can be turned into an exhibition or installation site, market or fair, and can accommodate multiple activities at the same time."

Surachai Akekapobyotin works at Meltzer/Mandl Architects in New York City and also works as a freelance architect in Bangkok. Juthathip Techachumreon works at Meridian Design Associates Architects in New York City and also works as a freelance architect in Bangkok.


Links:
http://www.art4d.com/back/80/queen_1.html

http://www.licbdc.org/news/2004/7-18-04_nydailynews_QPplans.htm
Urban developments
New York Daily News, July 18th, 2004

http://www.gothamgazette.com/citizen/jan02/3.shtml
Thai Team Wins Queens Plaza Design Contest
Muang Nork (The Thai Overseas Newspaper)

Derek2k3
April 29th, 2005, 04:15 PM
Project #7

The Power House
4-5 story addition
Karl Fischer Architect
Dev-CGS Builders
Residential Condominiums
~600 units
Proposed

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42725726.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42725731.jpg

The New York Times
Four Relics From the Past Will Topple After All
By JEFF VANDAM

Published: April 24, 2005

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/04/24/nyregion/thecity/24smok.html?

The much-watched saga of the fate of four smokestacks atop a former power plant in Long Island City, Queens, has a resolution: they are coming down.

Despite a neighborhood campaign to preserve the smokestacks, they will make way for a developer's glass and aluminum tower, which will form a residential complex when combined with the 1909 power plant, the onetime Pennsylvania Railroad Power Station.

"We had no choice but to look for a different design," said Cheskel Schwimmer of CGS Builders, the developer. Mr. Schwimmer said he originally had hoped to incorporate the smokestacks into his design, constructing a glass cube between them. "But the city did not approve it," he said. "We had to look at other options."

In the neighborhood, where the smokestacks' plight has sparked debate for months, Mr. Schwimmer's opponents are not pleased.

"I think it's sad," said Paul Parkhill, co-director of the educational group Place in History, who participated in a postcard campaign seeking landmark status for the plant. "It sort of underscores the fact that the city doesn't do a good job of protecting industrial buildings, especially in the outer boroughs."

Nevertheless, some residents were not particularly disheartened.

"There are mixed feelings in the neighborhood between newer residents and people who are second or third generation here," said Joseph Conley, chairman of Community Board 2. "The artists, the newer arrivals in the neighborhood, they tend to be the preservationists."

But any dispute has been silenced by the scaffolding covering each of the stacks. At last look, one was already halfway gone.


Links:
http://www.forgotten-ny.com/STREET%20SCENES/pennstacks/pennstacks.html
Photos of the demolition.

http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=49830#post49830
More photos of the demolition.

http://curbed.com/index.php?page=2
LIC's Pillars Will Come Tumbling Down

http://www.queenswest.com/neighborhood/discussion/00003446
Thread at queenswest.com

http://www.cityfeet.com/News/NewsArticle.aspx?PartnerPath=&Id=11110
Commercial Real Estate News
SMOKIN’ CONDOS

http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?BRD=1865&dept_id=152944&newsid=14074330&PAG=461&rfi=9
Schwartz Smokestacks Still In Limbo As Developers Negotiate
by Neille Ilel, Western Queens Editor

http://www.nydailynews.com/boroughs/story/287096p-245810c.html
The power of condos
LIC smokestacks site eyed for luxe apts.
By DONALD BERTRAND
DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER

http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=5160
February 6, 2005
LONG ISLAND CITY
A Famed Skyline Fixture, Standing Tall Another Day

Derek2k3
April 29th, 2005, 04:47 PM
So a 4 to 5 story aluminum and glass addition.

Queens Chronicle
http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=14347699&BRD=1865&PAG=461&dept_id=152944&rfi=6

Smokestacks Being Torn Down; Chapter Closes On LIC Skyline
by Neille Ilel, Western Queens Editor
April 14, 2005

The four smokestacks atop the old Schwartz Chemical factory are being demolished in order to construct an addition to the building.
In the latest conflict between development money and aesthetics, money carried the day.
Four iconic smokestacks that have defined the Long Island City cityscape for nearly a century will be taken down in the next several months. A demolition permit was issued to the contractor on March 28th, and the smokestacks have been covered with scaffolding to facilitate their dismantling.
The developer, Cheskel Schwimmer of CGS Builders, is turning the former power plant into luxury condominiums. The site has extra floor-area ratio that Schwimmer would like to take advantage of. But in order to do that he would have to demolish the smokestacks to add extra units to the top of the structure, or get a variance to build within them. Schwimmer said in the end, it was just not feasible to go through the variance process.
“It was a much better design to keep the smokestacks,” said the project’s architect, Karl Fisher. “But he didn’t want to wait.” The variance process requires hearings with the community board, borough president and then the final decision rests with the city’s Board of Standards and Appeals.
“The BSA has changed a lot,” Fisher continued. “There’s no guarantee that it would pass.”
Schwimmer had been meeting with the Department of Buildings for the last several months to see if a design could be worked out that would satisfy the zoning laws and still use the maximum floor-area ratio. No agreement could be reached.
After the smokestacks are removed, a four or five-story addition will be added to the top of the building that will cover almost the entire area of the roof.
The Long Island City waterfront has been in the midst of a large development push. New tower projects, like River East, have followed on the heels of the successful Avalon and Citylights buildings. The neighborhood’s zoning designation was recently changed from light industrial to mixed use including residential, commercial and light industrial use.
“I can’t wait for them to come down.” said Citylights resident Peter Iorlanao. He finds the smokestacks a dirty blot on the neighborhood’s skyline. “You have to go to graduate school to like them,” he said of the structure’s admirers. “They’re stuck in the past.”
Indeed, the smokestacks are a vivid reminder of the neighborhood’s industrial history. Paul Parkhill, director of Place in History, a non-profit community planning organization, started a postcard campaign to get the four chimneys landmarked when they heard of the developer’s plans. “It’s usually an uphill battle,” he said of his chances at the time.
Although there are some vocal proponents of the smokestacks, there was hardly a groundswell of support to save them. Many locals pointed out they were in disrepair and are looking forward to the goods and services that follow an increased residential population. “Upward and onward,” urged Iorlanao.

©Queens Chronicle - Western Edition 2005

NoyokA
April 29th, 2005, 08:15 PM
Too bad they decided not to keep the smokestacks, the cube in between the stacks sounded really interesting and would’ve made the building an instant landmark, a designation this up and coming neighborhood lacks. On that note the sleek and modern renovation of Queens Plaza is apparently not going to be built either, its ashame because landmark projects like this are needed to spur the greater redevelopment and attract the interest of businesses and residents.

krulltime
May 5th, 2005, 12:07 PM
Reckson Takes Citibank Site for $470M


http://www.globest.com/newspics/nyc_onecourtsquarecitibank.jpg
One Court Square

By Barbara Jarvie
Last updated: May 5, 2005 07:40am

LONG ISLAND CITY, NY-Reckson Associates Realty Corp. has inked a deal for the 1.4-million-sf tower at One Court Square here for $470 million, inclusive of transfer taxes and other transaction costs. The 50-story class A tower will remain occupied by its seller, Citibank NA, under a 15-year net lease.

"One Court Square’s attractive price per square foot offers the potential for material asset value appreciation as the surrounding market continues to develop,“ says Scott Rechler, Reckson's president and chief executive officer. “It is our intention to capitalize on this acquisition to pursue additional value-added opportunities in the Long Island City submarket." Tod Waterman, executive vice president and managing director of Reckson's New York City division, says the acquisition complements its 90-property, 17.7-million-sf portfolio.

Citibank plans to develop a 475,000-sf, $200-million office expansion adjacent to One Court Square. Reckson officials believe the Long Island City submarket will benefit from the strength of Midtown Manhattan's class A office market, the continuing trend of regional decentralization in the New York Tri-State area and the significant infrastructure and zoning upgrades planned for the area.

In 2001, the New York City Department of City Planning identified central Long Island City as a growth area with significant potential for office, retail and residential development and the city council adopted the initiative to rezone 37 centrally located blocks in the area. The zoning was expected to facilitate commercial development at increased densities as well as allow new residences to mix with commercial and light industrial businesses.

In another large Long Island City transaction, New York Blood Center inked a long-term lease for 76,000 sf at 45-01 Vernon Blvd., John Maltz, president. and Gary R. Blum, director of conversion development at Greiner-Maltz, the brokers who represented the ownership of NYBC, say the deal will not only bring jobs to the neighborhood, but validates the area as a prime commercial destination at a time when most properties are looked upon solely for their residential conversion value. NYBC first inspected the property in the summer of 2004 through their exclusive broker, CB Richard Ellis. Negotiations continued through to mid-April, due in part to the detailed requirements of NYBC.

Gayle Baron, president of the Long Island City Business Development Corp., says the deals confirm Long Island City’s desirability as a commercial marketplace, both short and long term. “Moreover as the job base grows, and support services increase, LIC’s potential as the city’s fourth great business hub will be realized. Currently commercial properties are well priced given the vitality of the area, including residential development, strong building stock, proximity to Midtown and mass transit assets.”

Reckson expects to generate an initial unleveraged cash flow yield of approximately 6.5% and a GAAP NOI yield of approximately 6.8% on the total anticipated investment, while the net lease is in effect. The Citibank lease contains partial cancellation options effective during years six and seven for up to 20% of the leased space and in years nine and 10 for up to an additional 20% of the leased space, subject to notice and penalty. Closing is expected sometime this month. To facilitate the transaction, Reckson has obtained a $470-million unsecured bridge loan facility.


© 2005 by GlobeSt

Derek2k3
May 5th, 2005, 12:22 PM
Project #7

The Power House
4-5 story addition
Karl Fischer Architect
Dev-CGS Builders
Residential Condominiums
~600 units
Proposed


The cube between the stacks design. It's listed under "The Power House."
http://www.kfarchitect.com/

krulltime
May 5th, 2005, 01:56 PM
The cube between the stacks design. It's listed under "The Power House."
http://www.kfarchitect.com/

Oh cool Derek2k3!! Good find... Thanks!

The Power House:

http://www.pbase.com/image/42994354.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/image/42994331.jpg

macreator
May 5th, 2005, 05:42 PM
Here are a few shots of the smokestacks being taken down from Forgotten-NY (http://www.forgotten-ny.com).

http://www.forgotten-ny.com/STREET%20SCENES/pennstacks/50ave2ente.jpg
View from 50th Avenue and Center Boulevard
Photo credit: Bernard Ente

http://www.forgotten-ny.com/STREET%20SCENES/pennstacks/bordenave2.jpg
View from 5th Street and Borden Avenue

http://www.forgotten-ny.com/STREET%20SCENES/pennstacks/1907.jpg
The smokestacks in their 1907 hayday
Photo from King's Booklets: The Pennsylvania Railroad Tunnels and Terminals In New York City 1904, courtesy Bernard Ente

It's quite depressing to see the smokestacks going down.

Here's a link to the Forgotten-NY story (http://www.forgotten-ny.com/STREET%20SCENES/pennstacks/pennstacks.html) on the smokestacks.

NoyokA
May 5th, 2005, 06:46 PM
What ashame.

Derek2k3
May 7th, 2005, 08:17 PM
Project #8

United Nations Federal Credit Union Building
43-35 24th Street
16 stories 241 feet
HLW International LLP
Dev-United Nations Federal Credit Union
Commercial Office
274,433 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction March 2005-December 2006


Long Island City Building Boost
NY Daily News - columnist Lore Croghan, Sept. 24, 2003

http://www.licbdc.org/news/2003/daily-news-9-24-03-credit-union.htm

The city's largest credit union is percolating a plan to build a 200,000-square-foot office in Long Island City - which could jump-start stalled office development there.

The United Nations Federal Credit Union is zeroing in on a site for the office that's a block away from Citigroup's green glass tower on Jackson Avenue and 44th Drive, the lone skyscraper in the Queens industrial neighborhood.

The location under consideration, 43-35 24th St., is one of a half-dozen Long Island City and Astoria properties that belong to the former owners of Eagle Electric, who sold the company three years ago but held onto its real estate.

The credit union's plan would be good news for a 37-block area of Long Island City that was rezoned two years ago to allow high-rise, high-density construction and is a top development priority of the Bloomberg administration.

http://www.queenswest.com/neighborhood/pictures/kyles_corner/20050406_kyle_16.jpg
More photos by Kyle at:
http://www.queenswest.com/neighborhood/pictures/kyles_corner

Links:
http://www.mapquest.com/maps/map.adp?country=US&addtohistory=&formtype=address&searchtype=address&cat=&address=4335%2024th%20St&city=Long%20Island%20City&state=NY&zipcode=11101%2d4609
Map

http://www.unfcu.org
http://www.hlw.com

Kolbster
May 7th, 2005, 09:16 PM
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

If this goes through it will be amazing for the city and the area!
This is great news! :)

NewYorkYankee
May 7th, 2005, 09:23 PM
It is going through.Construction has begun, good news.

Kolbster
May 7th, 2005, 09:29 PM
Project #8

United Nations Federal Credit Union Building



Long Island City Building Boost
NY Daily News - columnist Lore Croghan, Sept. 24, 2003

http://www.licbdc.org/news/2003/daily-news-9-24-03-credit-union.htm

The city's largest credit union is percolating a plan[/b] to build a 200,000-square-foot office in Long Island City - which could jump-start stalled office development there.

The United Nations Federal Credit Union is zeroing in on a site for the office that's a block away from Citigroup's green glass tower on Jackson Avenue and 44th Drive, the lone skyscraper in the Queens industrial neighborhood.

The location under consideration, 43-35 24th St., is one of a half-dozen Long Island City and Astoria properties that belong to the former owners of Eagle Electric, who sold the company three years ago but held onto its real estate.

The credit union's plan[/b] would be[/b] good news for a 37-block area of Long Island City that was rezoned two years ago to allow high-rise, high-density construction and is a top development priority of the Bloomberg administration.




It's will definately go though, but it isnt quite through yet but who cares, it's gonna be done anayways, all that ends well is well

NoyokA
May 12th, 2005, 07:26 PM
Project #1

45-56 Pearson Street
20 stories
Scarano & Associates Architects
Dev-Rosma Development
Residential Condominium
120 units
Proposed July 2005-Late 2006

http://www.nydailynews.com/ips_rich_content/597-building.JPG
Preliminary rendering by Scarano Architects of condominium project at 45-56 Pearson St. near Queens West waterfront.


Condo craze building
in Long Island City

Daily News Exclusive
http://www.nydailynews.com/business/story/292477p-250402c.html

By LORE CROGHAN
DAILY NEWS BUSINESS WRITER

The heart of Long Island City is finally going condo.

In a move that could touch off a wave of apartment construction, a Brooklyn condo developer bought the first major building site sold since the 37-block Queens industrial area was rezoned in mid-2001.

The developer is one of a host of builders from hot residential enclaves like Williamsburg who are looking for a new frontier.

"I see a very good opportunity in Long Island City," Mark Junger of Rosma Development told the Daily News. "I think it's going to be a hot neighborhood."

He paid $16.5 million for the site at 45-56 Pearson St. - where he's going to construct a 20-story "Manhattan-style building,"he said.

Until now, big residential projects have hugged the Queens West waterfront. The new condo tower will be further inland, off Jackson Avenue.

Junger's luxury tower will have fancy touches like a swimming pool with a retractable dome, a running track on one roof of the building, and a garden on another.

There will be 120 condos of varying sizes, from one-bedroom units to big penthouses. He plans to break ground by July, and spend the following year and a half building the project. The site now consists of a warehouse and parking lot.

It's too soon to set apartment prices, but Junger anticipates they'll run around $600 to $700 per square foot - comparable to condo rates in sought-after Williamsburg.

He expects to attract buyers who work in Manhattan - it's about a 15-minute subway ride to Grand Central Terminal.

Most of the 15 bidders for the development site wanted to build condos, and the rest were planning rental apartments, said Jeffrey Troy of Eastern Consolidated, the sale broker with colleagues Alan Miller and Louis Ricci.

Junger paid about $92 per buildable square foot for the site. As demand for sites in the nabe heats up, it will be hard to find land for less than $100 per buildable square foot, Eastern brokers predicted.

Still, that's not as high as Williamsburg land prices, which are approaching $150 per square foot.

Several Long Island City sites are now in play - Junger himself's going after one.

Originally published on March 23, 2005

Demolition underway, this building will nicely compliment City Lights.

Derek2k3
May 12th, 2005, 09:59 PM
Good news.

Project #7

The Power House
4-5 story addition
Karl Fischer Architect
Dev-CGS Builders
Residential Condominiums
~600 units
Proposed

Larger rendering of the old Power House design.

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/43298741.jpg
Karl Fischer Architect
http://www.kfarchitect.com/

billyblancoNYC
May 14th, 2005, 12:19 AM
Demolition underway, this building will nicely compliment City Lights.

Um, I can only hope Scacrano goes on a tear in Queens like he has in Brooklyn. That would be amazing. I think it's on the way.

Derek2k3
May 15th, 2005, 03:09 PM
Project #9

River View Gardens/Riverview Gardens (Section 202 Senior Housing at Avalon Riverview I)
4-12 49th Avenue/Queens West Parcel 11
8 stories 86 feet
Richard Dattner & Partners
Dev-New York Foundation for Senior Citizens
Residential Rental(Seniors)
80 units 73,640 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction November 2004-2005

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/43404930.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/43404929.jpg

Daily News
Taking care of seniors
Break ground for 80-unit facility in Qns. West

http://www.nydailynews.com/boroughs/story/254149p-217627c.html
BY DONALD BERTRAND
November 19, 2004

Called River View Gardens, the building will have apartments for people 62 and older, and for frail seniors 65 and lder, under the state-approved Enriched Housing Program, said Zibby Tozer, vice chairwoman of the New York Foundation for Senior Citizens.

River View Gardens is the ninth residential senior development for the foundation.

Six other developments are in Manhattan, one is in Brooklyn and one is in the Bronx.

The foundation is planning the construction of a 77-unit senior residence in Coney Island.

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development is providing more than $13.9 million for the construction, as well as rent subsidies for the elderly.

The land is being provided by Queens West Development Corp.

"Building this community creates new economic opportunities, setting a stage for new businesses and new jobs to serve the residents and the area," said Empire State Development Corp. Chairman Charles Gargano.

"Under Gov. Pataki's leadership, we've been implementing a strategy to create a growing, vibrant residential community in Queens West, while at the same time creating affordable housing."

Queens West is a subsidiary of the Empire State Development Corp.

"There is no higher priority than ensuring that our elderly live in decent, safe and affordable housing," said Marisel Morales, HUD regional director. "That is why River View Gardens is so important - not only for the seniors in New York City, but also as part of the development of Queens West."

Borough President Helen Marshal said, "Many people in Queens, especially senior citizens, need affordable housing, and it is wonderful that the private and public sectors have worked together to include the elderly as part of this project."

Edwin Mendes-Santiago, commissioner of the city's Department for the Aging, said his agency "is dedicated to creating and supporting affordable housing for all those who need it - especially the low-income elderly. River View Gardens fits into this vision perfectly. It is another small step in the greater plan of making New York City the best place to live for the young and the aging alike."

Each New York Foundation for Senior Citizens residence offers a combination of social, medical, educational and recreational services designed to help improve seniors' quality of life.

Originally published on November 19, 2004

http://www.queenswest.com/neighborhood/pictures/kyles_corner/20050420_kyle_02.jpg.jpg

http://www.queenswest.com/neighborhood/pictures/kyles_corner/20050420_kyle_02.jpg
Kyle's Corner
http://www.queenswest.com/neighborhood/pictures/kyles_corner


Links:
http://www.mapquest.com/maps/map.adp?country=US&addtohistory=&formtype=address&searchtype=address&cat=&address=412%2049th%20Ave&city=Long%20Island%20City&state=NY&zipcode=11101%2d5609
Map

http://www.nyfsc.org/services/housing_buildings.html
New York Foundation for Senior Citizens
River View Gardens
River View Gardens, in the new Queens West neighborhood being developed along the East River, will contain 79 one-bedroom apartments, lobby, lounge, community room and kitchen, activity and work rooms, an apartment for the resident superintendent and other resident facilities. River View's residents will have spectacular views of Manhattan.

http://www.dattner.com/html/living4.html
Riverview Gardens, Queens, NYC
Client: New York Foundation for Senior Citizens
Size: 80 Dwelling Units
Construction Cost: $7,750,000
Date Completed: 1999

http://www.queenswest.org/

http://www.nylovesbiz.com/press/press_display.asp?id=509
FOR RELEASE: IMMEDIATE
11/18/2004
GARGANO: GROUND BROKEN FOR NEW SENIOR HOUSING AS PART OF QUEENS WEST DEVELOPMENT, HUD PROVIDING FUNDING
Officials Join in Marking Start of 80 Unit River View Housing Project

http://www.qgazette.com/news/2004/1202/Senior_page/030.html
Councilmember Eric Gioia spoke at the New York Foundation for Senior Citizens River View Gardens groundbreaking in Hunter’s Point, Queens. The new senior citizen building will provide 80 seniors with subsidized housing and social services on the beautiful Queens waterfront.

http://www.licbdc.org/news/2004/11-25-04_queenschronicle_srhousing.htm
http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=13431671&BRD=1865&PAG=461&dept_id=152944&rfi=6
Ground Broken On Planned 80-Unit Waterfront Sr. Housing
by Paul Menchaca, Western Queens Editor November 25, 2004
Queens Chronicle, November 25, 2004

kliq6
May 25th, 2005, 02:07 PM
Jerry Cohen, said, "The cost of construction is identical in Long Island City and Manhattan, and, therefore, we need governmental incentives for construction and incentives for employers to relocate."

This is why LIC and Brooklyn are not a alternative to JC for firms

Derek2k3
May 31st, 2005, 10:30 AM
^But isn't the land a lot cheaper


Project #9

Avalon Riverview II
4-65 48 Avenue/Queens West Parcel 9
39 stories 385 feet (DOB)
Perkins Eastman Architects
Dev-AvalonBay Communities Inc.
Residential Rental
585 units 684,862 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2005-2006


http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44107173.jpg
Perspective Arts
http://www.perspectivearts.com/


AvalonBay Awaits Design Approval on 539,000-SF Development
GLOBEST.COM By Glen Thompson
Last updated: Feb 22, 2002 09:34AM

http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/topic.cgi?forum=3&topic=63

NEW YORK CITY-Now that AvalonBay Communities Inc. has begun the leasing process at phase one of Avalon Riverview, its New York City development debut, the Alexandria, VA-based developer is closing in on the design of its sibling. Next to go up is a 539,000-sf residential complex that will comprise roughly 600 rental apartment units on the Long Island City waterfront. The sticking point is whether the second phase should comprise separate structures for residences and amenities.
AvalonBay is making its New York City bow in the 74-acre planned development known as Queens West, directly across the East River from the United Nations. Ground was broken on the Riverview residential complex in December 2000 and the first phase, a 372-unit luxury high-rise rental property, is scheduled to be completed in October. The leasing office opened earlier this month and with move-ins will begin this spring.

The developer, which is working in cooperation with the Queens West Development Corp., an Empire State Development Corp. subsidiary, is now going through final approvals on the design for phase two. QWDC owns the land, which is ground-leased to AvalonBay. The second building is scheduled to break ground late this year or early in 2003.

"The second tower is in preliminary design," says AvalonBay vice president Fred Harris. "We're working in cooperation with QWDC and we have leases on three parcels. We're working out final details on the next two. The exact layout is being considered by the QWDC staff and board." The big question, Harris says, is whether the second building will be strictly residential, leaving the third parcel to be developed as an amenities facility. The alternative would be a single building situated on both remaining parcels and combining residences and amenities. QWDC representatives were unavailable for comment.

The final configuration notwithstanding, Harris confirms for GlobeSt.com that the second phase of the project will be more amenity-laden than the first and residents of both towers will have access to all facilities. While the list of amenities has not been finalized, definite at this point is a swimming pool. Residents of the first building will likely be canvassed for their preferences regarding additional facilities. Other AvalonBay communities include extras such as indoor basketball and racquetball courts.

The nearly finished first building, located at 2-01 50th Ave., contains studio, one-, two- and three-bedroom apartments. Six duplex floor plans are also available. And in what might be considered less than noteworthy in other markets, it is one of the first New York City buildings to offer garbage disposals, which only recently became legal here. Other amenities include a conference facility, business center, a fitness center and a landscaped roof garden with a putting green. Rents range from $1,635 for studios to $6,500 for three-bedroom duplexes.

AvalonBay owns or has interest in 141 apartment communities containing 41,191 units in 11 states and Washington, DC. Of those, 15 communities are under construction and three are under reconstruction. It specializes in the acquisition, development and management of luxury residential properties in high barrier-to-entry markets in the US.



Links:
http://www.mapquest.com/maps/map.adp?country=US&addtohistory=&formtype=address&searchtype=address&cat=&address=465%2048th%20Ave&city=Long%20Island%20City&state=NY&zipcode=11101%2d5603
Map

http://www.queenswest.com/riverview/discussion/00000239

http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=12084133&BRD=1865&PAG=461&dept_id=152958&rfi=8
Qns. West Continues To Grow, But Residents Raise Concerns
by Paul Menchaca, Western Queens Editor
June 24, 2004

Derek2k3
May 31st, 2005, 10:45 AM
Project #10

East Coast Tower I
47-20 Center Boulevard/Queens West Parcel 6
31 stories 299 feet (DOB)
Arquitectonica/SLCE
Dev-Rockrose Development Corporation (East Coast 6 LLC)
Residential Rental
650 units 477,246 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2005-Late 2006


http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44107177.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44119806.jpg
Arquitectonica
http://arquitectonica.com/



Rockrose Development Corporation: East Coast
http://www.rockrosenyc.com

The Long Island City waterfront is undergoing an ambitious re-development and economic revitalization and growth. Rockrose is a dominant player in this renaissance having been designated by the Queens West Development Corp. to build seven residential buildings totaling over 3,000 units at what is presently referred to as the Pepsi Site
Rockrose views this development as a logical expansion of midtown. The site offers unparalleled city views, and is only one stop from Grand Central Station on the subway. In the past few years, there has been a growing artist’s movement generated by the expansion of PS1, MoMA, and Isamu Noguchi Museum.

The first building’s exterior is being designed by the world renowned Arquitectonica, and will be a magnificent 31 story glass structure comprised of studios, one, two, and three bedroom units. The anticipated occupancy for this tower is late 2006.

Apartment features:
- Large variety of spacious layouts, some duplexes
- Floor to ceiling windows
- Luxury bath and kitchen features
- High tech smart wiring
- Many with walk-in closets and washer/dryers
- Many with private outdoor space
(garden, balcony, or roof terrace)
Building amenities:
- Dramatic lobby with views of the Manhattan skyline
- 24 hr concierge
- Valet service
- Attended on site parking
- Resident’s fitness center and private clubroom
- Bicycle storage
- Bountiful open spaces and private park for tenants exclusive use
- Common roof deck with spectacular city views

Easy transportation:
- #7 subway to Vernon Blvd.
- Jackson Ave. Station (1 stop to Grand Central Station)
- E, F, and G trains at 23rd Street / Ely Ave. (CitiBank Bldg.)
- Queens Midtown Tunnel and 59th Street Bridge minutes away
- Easy access to LIE and LIRR, Hunters Point Station


Links:
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/topic.cgi?forum=3&topic=109
Daily News.
Developers Go West
Deal close on $2.3B waterfront complex
By Donald Bertrand

http://www.queenswest.com/citylights/discussion/00001038

Derek2k3
May 31st, 2005, 10:50 AM
Project #11

5-15 49 Avenue
5 stories 58 feet (DOB)
GKV Architects/Meltzer/Mandl Architects
Dev-Milestone 49th Avenue, LLC
Residential
48 units 74,915 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2005-2006

Passed by this decent sized site directly behind Citylights. I was expecting something bigger.

http://www.mapquest.com/maps/map.adp?country=US&addtohistory=&formtype=address&searchtype=address&cat=&address=515%2049th%20Ave&city=Long%20Island%20City&state=NY&zipcode=11101%2d5610
Map



http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44120187.jpg
Copyright ©2004, Ethan Fuster
http://www.fujirangefinder.com/document.php?id=1079

Gulcrapek
May 31st, 2005, 01:10 PM
East Coast is nice. 650 units is massive... the lowrise portion must be huge.

Derek2k3
June 5th, 2005, 11:07 PM
Project #12

45-31 Court Square
27-08 - 27-52 Thomson Avenue/45-29 - 45-59 Court Square
6/9 stories 137 feet (Conversion + Expansion)
Costas Kondylis & Partners Architects
Dev-Tag Court Square, LLC (The Andalex Group)
Residential Condominiums
243 units 456,000 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2005-February 2006


http://www.pavarinimcgovern.com/img/exp_metro_court_square.jpg

Pavarini McGovern
Court Square | Thomson Avenue & Court Square, Long Island City, Queens, NY

http://www.pavarinimcgovern.com/experience/metro/residential/residential_court_square.html

Project Information
Owner: The Andalex Group
Architect: Costas Kondylis & Partners Architects
Role: Construction Manager (Currently in Preconstruction)
Contract Value: $69 Million
Size: 456,000-SF/6-Stories
Completion Date: February 2006

Currently in preconstruction, this $69M project will entail the conversion of an existing 456,000-SF warehouse building into approximately 170 residential condominium apartments.

The building is located on a triangular shaped lot bordered by Thomson Avenue, Court Square and the Sunnyside Rail Yards in Long Island City.

The work, beginning in the schematic design phase, will involve installing new windows, the build-out of new apartments with finishes at a low to mid-Manhattan level, as well as some vertical expansion.



New York Times
BIG DEAL; The Upper (Far) East Side
By WILLIAM NEUMAN
Published: May 8, 2005, Sunday

Manhattan Views From a Less Expensive Perch

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9F0CE6DF1430F93BA35756C0A9639C8B 63

Meanwhile, here in New York, the developers Alex and Andrew Silverman are betting that apartment shoppers who can't afford to live on the east side of Manhattan will pay to look at it from across the river.

In January, they paid $52.5 million for the 485,000-square-foot Eagle Electric building in Long Island City, Queens, and they have embarked on a $75 million project to turn it into 238 luxury apartments. The eight-story building has wide-open shop floors punctuated by hefty concrete columns. The ceilings are as high as 18 feet.

But what sold the brothers on the building were the views of the Manhattan skyline.

The apartments will be relatively large, many with walk-in closets, and several will have terraces. The building will have a gym and swimming pool and a parking garage. There will also be 17 work spaces for artists, which will be sold, like the residences, as condos.

The apartments will go on sale in the fall through the real estate marketer the Sunshine Group, and work on the building should be finished by the middle of next year. Prices have not been set, but the brothers aim to attract buyers priced out of Manhattan.

''Given what's going on in Manhattan, we're a real value play,'' said Andrew Silverman, 29. He said the apartments will go for ''about half the price of Manhattan, with the same finishes.''

The project is the first begun by the brothers, who grew up watching their father buy and sell office buildings and shopping centers and now work with him in the company that he started and named for them, the Andalex Group. It is also the family's first venture into residential real estate in New York.

The building, at 45-31 Court Square, used to house a company that made switches and other electrical devices. It is opposite Queens Supreme Court, where the famous bank robber Willie Sutton once stood trial and across Court Square Park from the Citibank building, the borough's tallest.

Published: 05 - 08 - 2005 , Late Edition - Final , Section 11 , Column 4 , Page 2



Eric Ettinger & Robert Ettinger Partnering to Re-Shape Long Island City
http://pressreleases.newspad.com/pr/20056/pr246914.html

(PRWEB) June 3, 2005 -- Eric Ettinger and the Ettinger Engineering Associates team is in the process of designing a project at Thomson Avenue & Court Square (45-31 Court Square), which is being developed by The Andalex Group. This residential conversion project is situated in the heart of Long Island City the dynamic neighborhood just minutes from Manhattan that is home to a spectacular arts community. The unique triangular shaped structure will be transformed into luxury condominium residences with outstanding views of Manhattan. Ettinger Engineering Associates is excited to be a part of the progress in Long Island City and honored to perform the (MEP) engineering design for this project. We look forward to being an integral part of the ongoing development in this area. Ettinger Engineering has chosen to use vertical water source heat pumps to provide heating and cooling to all of the apartments. The obvious benefit is the ability for each tenant to control their individual heat and air conditioning temperature in their own apartment. Other benefits include the system’s energy efficiency long-term will accrue cost savings. For the developer, a substantial cost savings will come from Ettinger Engineering Associates ability to adapt the existing steam boilers to feed the closed loop heat pump system.

Thomson and Court Square will also have many special features including a distinctive pool and gym. Advanced technology will be utilized in these areas to keep the tenants and their guests comfortable. Ettinger Engineering chose a “Desert System” unit for the pool area dehumidification requirements. This system dehumidifies the air coming from the pool, maximizing comfort levels for all. This is truly an exceptional building in a part of our metro-area promising to be the next “hot spot” to live.

The architectural firm working on this project is Costas Kondylis & Partners.

For additional information about Ettinger Engineering Associates contact:
Eric Ettinger or Emily Kron at
Ettinger Engineering Associates
Phone: 212-244-2410
Fax: 212-643-1606
http://www.ettingerengineering.com


Links:
http://www.mapquest.com/maps/map.adp?formtype=address&searchtype=address&country=US&addtohistory=&1ahXX=&address=45-31+Court+Square&city=Long+Island+City&state=ny&zipcode=
Map

http://www.queenswest.com/neighborhood/discussion/00003978
http://www.queenswest.com/neighborhood/discussion/00003960
QueensWest.com discussion

http://www.ettingerengineering.com/
Ettinger Engineering Associates

Derek2k3
June 8th, 2005, 01:58 PM
Project's #13-15

Silvercup West
42-20 Vernon Boulevard & 7-49 43rd Avenue
Richard Rogers/NBBJ
Dev-Terra Cotta, LLC (Stuart Match Suna and Alan Suna)
Mixed-Use
* Residential: approximately 1,044,000 gsf (1,040 dwelling units)
* Production Studios: approximately 347,000 gsf
* Office: approximately 655,000
* Retail: 77,000 gsf
* Catering Facility: approximately 45,000 gsf
* Cultural/Community Facility: approximately 131,000 gsf
* Health Club: approximately 43,000 gsf
* Parking: approximately 433,760 gsf (1,400 accessory spaces)
Proposed Late 2005-2009


Silvercup West I
42-20 Vernon Boulevard & 7-49 43rd Avenue
557 feet
Richard Rogers/NBBJ
Dev-Terra Cotta, LLC (Stuart Match Suna and Alan Suna)
Commercial
655,000 Sq. Ft.
Proposed Late 2005-2009


Silvercup West II
42-20 Vernon Boulevard & 7-49 43rd Avenue
600 feet
Richard Rogers/NBBJ
Dev-Terra Cotta, LLC (Stuart Match Suna and Alan Suna)
Residential
1,040 units 1,044,000 Sq. Ft. (TotalR esidential)
Proposed Late 2005-2009


Silvercup West III
42-20 Vernon Boulevard & 7-49 43rd Avenue
517 feet
Richard Rogers/NBBJ
Dev-Terra Cotta, LLC (Stuart Match Suna and Alan Suna)
Residential
1,040 units 1,044,000 Sq. Ft. (TotalR esidential)
Proposed Late 2005-2009


ENB
Positive Declaration And Public Scoping

http://www.dec.state.ny.us/website/enb2005/20050525/not2.html

New York City (Queens) County - The New York City Planning Commission, as lead agency, as determined that the proposed Silvercup West may have a significant adverse impact on the environment and a Draft Environmental Impact Statement must be prepared. Written comments will be accepted by the lead agency through the tenth day following the scoping meeting. A public scoping meeting has been scheduled for Tuesday, June 28, 2005 at 10:00 a.m. at City of New York Department of City Planning, Spector Hall, 22 Reade Street, New York, New York. The action involves an application by Terra Cotta, LLC to develop "Silvercup West", an approximately 2.77 million gross square foot (gsf) mixed-use development on an approximately 6-acre waterfront site (the project site) located at 42-20 Vernon Boulevard (Block 477, Lots 13, 15, 20 and 24) in the Long Island City neighborhood of Queens Community Board 2. The project site is generally bounded by the Queensboro Bridge to the north, Vernon Boulevard to the east, 43rd Avenue to the south, and the East River to the west, and is located within the area covered by the Waterfront Access Plan (WAP) Q-1 for Northern Hunters Point.

Silvercup Studios is a television and movie production studio facility currently located in Long Island City. The proposed Silvercup West project is intended to expand and enhance their television and movie production operations, improve access to the waterfront, and provide for a mix of uses at the project site. The proposed development would be comprised of the following uses:

* Residential: approximately 1,044,000 gsf (1,040 dwelling units)
* Production Studios: approximately 347,000 gsf
* Office: approximately 655,000
* Retail: 77,000 gsf
* Catering Facility: approximately 45,000 gsf
* Cultural/Community Facility: approximately 131,000 gsf
* Health Club: approximately 43,000 gsf
* Parking: approximately 433,760 gsf (1,400 accessory spaces)

The proposed project would contain three towers. Two residential towers at the southern portion of the building would be 517 feet and 600 feet in height, respectively, and a commercial tower at the northern portion of the building would be 557 feet in height. The project would also include a 1,400-space accessory parking garage with access provided by two driveways on Vernon Boulevard. Also, the portion of 43rd Avenue along the southern portion of the project site, between Vernon Boulevard and the East River, which is a mapped but currently unimproved street, would be re-graded and improved as part of the proposed project, and the East River bulkhead would be reestablished along the project site’s western boundary. The proposed project would provide a publicly accessible waterfront esplanade between the project site’s western boundary and the East River and an upland connection along the project site’s northern boundary.

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44514833.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44514834.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44514835.jpg
KPF's proposal

"From an invited list that included Arquitectonica, Enrique Norton of Ten Arquitectos, KPF, and Foster & Partners, Silvercup Studios owners Stuart and Alan Suna paired Richard Rogers and NBBJ to plan and design the site. "


Links:
http://www.mapquest.com/maps/map.adp?formtype=address&searchtype=address&country=US&addtohistory=&1ahXX=&address=42-20+Vernon+Boulevard+&city=Long+Island+City&state=ny&zipcode=
Map

http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=3622
WNY thread

http://www.queenswest.com/neighborhood/discussion/00002365?pp=1
Newsday
On the Waterfront
With the developments River East and Silvercup West, a stately cityscape would stretch along the river from the Queens line to the Queensboro bridge
BY DANIEL HENDRICK

http://nytimes.com/2003/05/11/realestate/11BPOST.html
Richard Rogers to Plan 6 1/2-Acre Waterfront Complex
By DAVID W. DUNLAP

www.findarticles.com/cf_dls/m3601/ 45_49/103826488/p1/article.jhtml
Silvercup Studios hires Richard Rogers for Queens development.(Brief Article)
Real Estate Weekly, June 11, 2003

kliq6
June 8th, 2005, 02:48 PM
Realdeal.net

Queens: the new Brooklyn
Long Island City set to boom: a look at new projects
By Melissa Dehncke-McGill
Long Island City is closer to Midtown Manhattan than Downtown, and in many ways farther along in its development than the much-touted revival of the Brooklyn waterfront.

The rising prices of Manhattan that made Brooklyn attractive only a few short years ago is set to transform Queens as well, making it the new borough for young professionals. New buyers may come to realize that Corona is not just a Mexican beer and there is a Murray Hill outside of Manhattan.

This month, The Real Deal gathered a list of new developments underway in the borough, presented in a detailed map. Long Island City leads the way, with 11,550 apartments slated for development out of the 16,400 new units planned for the borough.

Some 3,500 of those units - enough to house a small town - will come online in the next two years. High-profile developments include waterfront projects by Rockrose and AvalonBay, condo towers on the former site of the East River Tennis Club, and the transformation of the Smokestacks Building. A luxury project next to the Citibank tower, to be marketed by the Sunshine Group, serves as a portent for the area's upscale trajectory.

"All of the critical mass is bought, signed, sealed and delivered," said Barbara Corcoran, founder of the Corcoran Group, which is marketing several new projects in the neighborhood.

"Everyone is getting ready with every deal," said Neil Binder, a principal at Manhattan brokerage Bellmarc, who grew up in Queens. "It will happen as one big effort, not dribs and drabs."

Other development hotspots in the borough include Flushing, the most built-up urban area of Queens, where nearly 2,000 new units are planned. Developer Joshua Muss is planning a $600 million, 1,000-unit mixed-use development on the Flushing River. Boymelgreen and Vornado are also planning or competing for projects in Downtown Flushing.

Prices in Forest Hills, arguably the most desirable section of the borough, are appreciating more dramatically than Manhattan, brokers say. The neighborhood is also getting its first major luxury residential project in over a decade, designed by the same architect who did the Time Warner Center condominiums.

Astoria, for a decade an established outpost for renters priced out of Manhattan, is also bustling. Jackson Heights, the most ethnically diverse neighborhood in the city's most ethnically diverse borough, is drawing buyers seeking value in its prewar apartments and tree-lined streets. Substantial high-rises are planned for nearby Corona and Elmhurst.

The Rockaways, rundown for decades, are also seeing condo development.

The survey didn't look at areas dominated by single-family homes, such as Bayside or Little Neck.

Sounds great, but Queens still has a certain reputation, much as Brooklyn did a decade ago. Corcoran believes the only thing wrong with Long Island City in the minds of young urban professional Manhattanites is that it is called Queens.

"Right now if you say you live in Brooklyn, that is hipper than living in Manhattan," added Binder. "An artsy name would speed the transformation in people's minds. But it will happen."

Market forces could take care of the image problem.

"The market is so hot in Queens," said Donna Reardon, the branch manager of Prudential Douglas Elliman's Bayside office. "I have been a manager of this office for the past 12 years and I have never seen anything like this year. The more that prices go up, the more people want to come."

A look at some of the neighborhoods:


LONG ISLAND CITY


While the Brooklyn waterfront gets headlines, with the City Council last month rezoning 175 blocks in Williamsburg and Greenpoint, the transformation of Long Island City's entire waterfront will happen sooner (see detailed story in this issue).

"It's a market that is waiting to happen and it's coming in the next year," said Andrew Gerringer, managing director of Douglas Elliman's Development Marketing Group, which is representing several projects there.

Units in new projects are expected to fetch anywhere from $675 to $800 a square foot, compared to Manhattan, where $1,000 a square foot for conversions and $1,300 for new construction is now a moderate price. Longer-term projects involve Rockrose's seven buildings at the Queens West site, one of which will be done by summer 2006 and the rest over the next five or more years, according to Rockrose CEO H. Henry Eighanayan. Also planned are Silvercup Studios West, with 1,000 units, and an Olympic Village with 4,500 apartments if the city wins its bid for the 2012 Games. "If the Olympics come the place is going to be unbelievable," Binder says.

More office buildings will also help fuel the area's rise. Citibank is developing another $200-million, 475,000-square-foot office building next door to its existing 50-story tower, the tallest structure in Long Island City. Tishman Speyer is negotiating with the city's Department of Transportation to develop a 600,000-square-foot office building on Jackson Avenue, the first of five buildings planned for the block.

FLUSHING


When Dottie Herman, CEO of Prudential Douglas Elliman, purchased the 100-agent Goldmark Realty company in Flushing last year, she said the neighborhood was the borough's fastest growing "emerging market."

Downtown Flushing, with a mainly Asian population, is the site of plenty of new development, and big players are starting to notice.

Most projects in the works only average around 20 units, but Muss Development, which built Brooklyn Renaissance Plaza, is planning a massive six condo and rental building project with 1,000 units. It's part of a larger project with 725,000 square feet of retail space and a waterfront esplanade along the Flushing River. The first apartments will open in 2008.

"It will be a major economic stimulus," said Joshua Muss, president of Muss Development.

In other major projects, Boymelgreen Developers is planning an 18-story, mixed-use project on the site of the former RKO Keith's Theater, which could fetch prices in the $500 per square foot range. Vornado and Silvercup Studios are competing for a five-acre site in the middle of Downtown.

"Boomtown Chinatown has become a very exciting location," said Binder. "Until 20 years ago it was suffering, then the Asian population moved in and that area has undergone a renaissance."

ASTORIA


Astoria was once a suburb of industrial Long Island City when a housing boom began in Queens in the 1920s. But it has long been a destination for Manhattanites seeking bargain rents for the better part of a decade.

It's also getting new housing stock as former warehouse space is converted to apartments by Pistilli Realty Group.

The former Eagle Electric Company factory and warehouse site will become a $30 million co-op complex with 188 apartments. The project includes the construction of three floors on top of the existing warehouse and a new building connected to the old plant.

"The warehouses have outlived their time," said Joseph Pistilli, chief operating office of Pistilli Realty. "They are in the middle of residential areas, not like Long Island City."

The other conversion by Pistilli is a residential condominium at the former Stern's warehouse site at Ditmars Boulevard and 45th Street.

The 300,000-square-foot industrial structure was built by piano magnate William Steinway and will become 200 apartments by the end of the year, Pistilli said.

Broker Demetrius Partridge of Partridge Realty says contractors are paying up to $700,000 for old dilapidated houses and tearing them down. "They are essentially paying just for the land."

The average starting price for a one family house in Astoria is $700,000. A one family attached house is $575,000 and up.

"There are so few homes for sale and such demand that in Astoria a little 18-by-45 foot deep house on a 100 foot lot has an asking price of $800,000," Partridge said. "That's what's driving the market; there's nothing available."

Demand for condos is hot. "If I had 100 condos right now, I would sell them out," he said.

Partridge, who grew up in Astoria, moved out to Long Island 20 years ago to raise his children, and now said he's looking at moving back.

"The city built brand new schools here, a new state of the art elementary school," he said. "The irony is I moved out of the neighborhood because of the decrepit schools."

FOREST HILLS


The new Windsor at Forest Hills condominium is the first major luxury residential project in the area in over 10 years, according to developer Cord Meyer, though more are likely to follow. (The developer has a century-long history in the neighborhood. It bought 600 acres of farmland in 1906 and named the area Forest Hills.) Architect Ismael Leyva, whose projects include the residential condominiums at the Time Warner Center, is designing the building.

Property appreciation in Forest Hills recently has been substantial.

"I own property in Forest Hills, condos where the appreciation has been more dramatic than Manhattan," said Binder. "Whereas Manhattan appreciation over the last few years has been 100 percent, in Queens it has been 150 percent."

One-bedrooms generally sell for $200,000. Prices for an apartment in a high-rise on Continental Avenue might be 50 percent more, and prices generally go up with proximity to the train. Attached houses run in the high $600,000's to $700,000's, up from the mid-$500,000's last year.

The most sought after area in the neighborhood is Forest Hills Gardens, a planned community with stately, Tudor-style homes and winding tree-lined streets designed by Frederick Law Olmstead Jr.

Nearby Rego Park is also seeing change. Giant REIT Vornado is betting on the future of the area, planning a mixed-use project with 450 residential units and 650,000 square feet of retail on the site of an old Alexander's department store. The project generated controversy when Wal-Mart announced plans to open there in what would have been the national discounter's first foray into New York. Vornado reportedly dropped Wal-Mart, and there are plans for a Home Depot now.

"Rego Park has continued to strengthen and has started to go through a resurrection," said Binder.

JACKSON HEIGHTS


Ethnically diverse Jackson Heights, which is starting to see arrivals from hip Brooklyn neighborhoods, boasts wide, green streets and prewar apartment houses. In the 36-block Jackson Heights Historic District, one- and two-bedroom co-ops are available for under $200,000, and single-family homes start at $450,000. Further afield, neighboring Corona and Elmhurst are set to see new development, including the tallest residential structures (at 16 and 17 stories) seen in those neighborhoods.

ROCKAWAYS


Far Rockaway and Rockaway Beach is going to be the new hot area," said Reardon.

"Developers are looking for rundown multifamily properties to convert, to tear down and build up."

At least eight projects with more than 800 units are in the works on the long, thin peninsula south of Kennedy Airport. The Rockaways fell on hard times in the early 1960s, due both to the jet airplane and low-income housing built on the eastern end of the peninsula. The first new projects in the recent era began in 1999.

billyblancoNYC
June 8th, 2005, 06:17 PM
Project's #13-15

Silvercup West
42-20 Vernon Boulevard & 7-49 43rd Avenue
Richard Rogers/NBBJ
Dev-Terra Cotta, LLC (Stuart Match Suna and Alan Suna)
Mixed-Use
* Residential: approximately 1,044,000 gsf (1,040 dwelling units)
* Production Studios: approximately 347,000 gsf
* Office: approximately 655,000
* Retail: 77,000 gsf
* Catering Facility: approximately 45,000 gsf
* Cultural/Community Facility: approximately 131,000 gsf
* Health Club: approximately 43,000 gsf
* Parking: approximately 433,760 gsf (1,400 accessory spaces)
Proposed Late 2005-2009


[/i]

Nice, finally getting this party started. The timing is perfect, get it done. Would like to see the real plans, though. 600 ft ain't bad.

Kolbster
June 10th, 2005, 08:36 AM
Nice, finally getting this party started. The timing is perfect, get it done. Would like to see the real plans, though. 600 ft ain't bad.

I couldn't agree with you more i want to see what they are designing...but that will not be for some time. But besides, its a 600 a 557 and a 517 footer in LI City..finally citibank will have some neighbors

Derek2k3
June 10th, 2005, 01:31 PM
Project #16

River East Master Plan
44-02 Vernon Boulevard
Two 29-story Towers & Four 8-story Buildings
Walker Group/V Studio/Peter F. Poon Architect
Dev--Vernon Realty Holdings, LLC
Mixed-Use
1.2 Million Sq. Ft.
*910 units Residential Condominiums, Lofts, Town houses, and possibly Rentals
*115,000 Sq. Ft. of Parking
*17,500 Sq. Ft. of Indoor Recreation Space
*11,750 Sq. Ft. of Commercial Retail
*20,000 Sq. Ft. Riverfront Esplanade,
*93,217 Sq. Ft. of Outdoor Recreation Space
Under Construction August 2004-?


River East Tower I
4-21 44 Avenue
29 stories 293 feet
Walker Group/V Studio/Peter F. Poon Architect
Dev-Vernon Realty Holdings, LLC
Residential Condominiums
540 units (Total Tower Condominiums Units) 546,772 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2005-2006?


River East Tower II
4-20 44 Avenue
29 stories 293 feet
Walker Group/V Studio/Peter F. Poon Architect
Dev-Vernon Realty Holdings, LLC
Residential Condominiums
540 units (Total Tower Condominiums Units) 689,415 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2005-2006?


http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44598849.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44598850.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44598852.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44598853.jpg


Long Island City Development Poised To Transform Waterfront
by Neille Ilel, Western Queens Editor
February 10, 2005

Residents and developers in Long Island City are hoping that River East, a 1.2-million-square-foot residential and commercial project in Long Island City, will finally give the neighborhood the “it” status that boosters have been predicting for years.
Vernon Realty, in addition to developing River East, is also in the early stages of three commercial ventures within two blocks of the River East site. One is a large grocery store that the company’s president Marshall Weissman described as “in the Whole Foods type—one of the sexy ones.” Another is the addition of “two very popular New York City restaurants.” And finally there’s talk of a pair of stores of the “Gap-type.” Weissman added that it was too early for him to go into specifics.
According to Weissman, River East is getting 200 to 250 calls a day from interested buyers—and excavation hasn’t even begun on the bu
ildings. “It’s insane,” he admitted.
It isn’t unheard of for real estate developers to create their own buzz. For an area like Long Island City, which has been on the verge of massive development for as long as anyone can remember, developers aren’t the only ones anxious to give it that final push.
The River East complex will include two 30-story glass towers and four 8-story buildings that will be located on 44th Avenue between Vernon Boulevard and the waterfront. In addition, a public park will be landscaped along the waterfront, paid for by the developer, but open to the public.
“This development is long overdue,” said George Stamatiades, a member of the Dutch Kills Civic Association, which is on the north side of the Queensborough Bridge. “We’re just too strategically located to have been skipped over for so long.”
Weissman agreed, noting that the development will be especially attractive to Manhattanites who have been priced out of that borough’s real estate market.
“This is a new vision for Long Island City,” said the project’s architect Jay Valgora, principal of V Studios. He said that as an architect, designing the soaring towers was a thrill, but he is most proud of the waterfront park and playground. The development is situated just north of the Queens West development project.
“We lobbied very hard for the esplanade space,” said Joseph Conley, chairman of Community Board 2. The neighborhood has been working with the Department of City Planning since 1992 to develop the area with a waterfront park reaching all the way to Astoria.
The agency and the site’s previous owners, the East River Tennis Club, agreed on ground rules for the site, including the amount of public space and height restrictions on the structures, before the property was sold to developers.
Terri Adams, president of the Hunters Point Community Development organization said she too welcomed the development, but had reservations about the height and rather large bulk that seem to be standard for the latest string of Long Island City developments.
Silvercup Studios, located just east of River East, has restarted its own plans to develop a mixed-use development in its industrial environs. Relative to the six-acre Silvercup expansion project and Queens West, “this is the most delicately scaled,” Valgora said. The two tall towers will be situated on the waterfront so as not to impose on the rest of the neighborhood. The smaller buildings, which will house townhouses and lofts, will even have their own modern version of stoops.
Valgora said that it makes sense to have large-scale developments on the waterfront because there is a big demand for the accompanying views. Included in the design is 20,000 square feet of retail space, which will be given over to necessities for occupants of the building, like a pharmacy and dry cleaner.
Residents will also have access to an indoor and outdoor pool, a gym and two floors of below-ground parking. The signature design element in all the structures is the glass exterior, which appears frequently in Valgora’s work.
He has recently been involved in the RKO Keith’s Theatre site in Flushing, which also makes extensive use of glass exteriors. It was recently rejected for a variance by the community board, but Valgora and community members are hopeful that an agreement on a smaller building will be reached within the next month.
River East, on the other hand, will be built entirely as of right, meaning the plans are all within current zoning restrictions. Excavation will begin in the coming weeks and the foundation will be laid in June.
“It’s very important that this raises the bar on design,” Valgora said. “Long Island City is one of the most special neighborhoods in New York.” Now will the rest of the city agree?


http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44598851.jpg


Links
http://www.mapquest.com/maps/map.adp?formtype=address&searchtype=address&country=US&addtohistory=&1ahXX=&address=44-02+Vernon+Boulevard&city=Long+Island+City&state=ny&zipcode=
Map

http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=4839
WNY Thread

http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=4839
May 7, 2004
RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE
Condos to Rise Near the Pepsi Sign in Long Island City
By RACHELLE GARBARINE

http://www.therealdeal.net/issues/July_2004/1089838076.php
LONG ISLAND CITY
Two condominium towers slated for the site of the East River Tennis Club just south of the Queensboro Bridge. The waterfront towers will each be 28 stories, and will have a total of 540 one- to three-bedroom apartments. Prices have not been set. The buildings are part of a larger plan by Vernon Realty of New Jersey to build 910 residences, which will also include townhouses, lofts and rentals, in six buildings on six acres. There also will be a park, a riverfront promenade and gardens as well as 20,000 square feet of retail space. Construction on the two towers is set to begin in August. Contact: Andrew Gerringer, Douglas Elliman Development Marketing Group, 212-702-4060.

http://www.pavarinimcgovern.com
Our team is currently providing Preconstruction
services to Vernon Realty Holdings,
LLC for this phased residential and site
development project in Queens, NY. The
1.2-million-SF complex will consist of five
low-rise buildings, two 28-story residential
towers, 115,000-SF of parking; 17,500-SF of
indoor recreation space and 11,750-SF of
retail. Site development will consist of
20,000-SF of riverfront esplanade, 93,217-SF
outdoor recreation space and 47,342-SF
street and streetscape. The design team is
being led by the Architect,Walker Group/CNI.
River East Residential Complex

http://www.queenswest.com/neighborhood/discussion/00001063
Two 28 story towers
- 540 total apartments (1,2,3 bdrms)
- Avalon's is between 32-39 stories (does not sound done to me)
- Rockrose's is 32 stories
- Plan by Vernon Realty of Jackson of NJ
- 6 buildings, a park and 20,000 sg ft of retail space
- $350 million project
- Apts will cost in the $600 a sq ft range or "$720,000 for an average 1,200-square-foot two-bedroom

http://www.radcribs.com/salestatscounty.php?county=4
Vernon Realty paid $26,100,000 for the site.

Derek2k3
June 11th, 2005, 04:48 PM
Rough view of what LIC might look like. It should be similar to the linear Jersey City skyline.

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44651362.jpg

Original photo by Ethan Fuster
http://www.fujirangefinder.com/document.php?id=1079

NewYorkYankee
June 11th, 2005, 07:00 PM
I like it, even if it does resemble JC I still like it!

NoyokA
June 11th, 2005, 07:26 PM
Derek, which design is project #16?

I like this design the best it has an art-deco industrialist look to it.
http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44598852.jpg

NewYorkYankee
June 12th, 2005, 12:06 AM
Stern, arnt they all the same?

NoyokA
June 12th, 2005, 10:27 AM
Stern, arnt they all the same?

Its the same project but there's atleast two designs for it.

Derek2k3
June 13th, 2005, 04:57 PM
I didn't notice there were two designs also. But yea, the greenish design looks less generic. No clue which will be built though.

Kolbster
June 17th, 2005, 12:09 AM
there are aspects in both that I like, but I like the second design best

NoyokA
July 18th, 2005, 03:55 PM
New York Buisness:

July 18, 2005

Rockrose plans huge development in Queens
Rockrose Development Corp. is proposing construction of a residential high rise in Long Island City, Queens, that would be the largest condominium in the five boroughs, according to sources.

The building, which would be designed by architect Thomas Phifer, could be built at the Queens West site where the Olympic Village for the 2012 Summer Games had been proposed.

The Queens West Development Corp., a state-run body overseeing the 74-acre parcel, earlier this month began a study examining development possibilities for the site. It says no decision will be made until the study is completed in the fall.

NoyokA
July 18th, 2005, 04:01 PM
Posted by Billy:

Luxury condos for Queens waterfront
http://www.newyorkbusiness.com/article.cms?articleId=23348&a=a&bt=toll+brothers&arc=n

3 buildings will be taken down


Published on July 18, 2005

Three buildings along the East River waterfront in Queens have been sold to residential developer Toll Brothers, which plans to demolish them to construct 100 luxury condominiums.

Long Island City has experienced a residential boom in the past year, including new buildings from Avalon Bay Communities and Rockrose Development Corp. offering rental units.

"Many of the other buildings in the area are rentals," says David VonSpreckelsen, Toll Brothers' director of acquisition and development in New York City. "This will be one of the first condominium buildings.

The structures, from 5-01 to 5-17 48th Ave. and 5-19 to 5-29 48th Ave., have 130,000 square feet of buildable space and sold for $130 a square foot, Mr. VonSpreckelsen says. The seller, represented by Cushman & Wakefield, was import-export firm Stuart Gilbert.

Toll Brothers, which expects to break ground on the condos in early 2006, was represented by Greiner Maltz.

--Julie Satow

NoyokA
July 18th, 2005, 04:03 PM
Posted by Billy:

Long Island City gets first condo building
http://www.therealdeal.net/

July 6, 6:07 pm
In a sign of Queens' rising development, the Developers Group announced Wednesday that sales of the 66 units in the new 10-story Queens Plaza would start this autumn. The Queens Plaza on 27th Street in Long Island City will be the first condo building ever in that neighborhood. Major projects built in Long Island City so far include Citylights, a co-op, and Avalon Riverview, a rental building. The units at Queens Plaza range from 505 to 1,568 square feet, according to a release from the Developers Group. Residents are expected to start moving in during early 2006.

NoyokA
July 18th, 2005, 04:08 PM
Thomas Phifer looks to be an exciting young modernist. And Rockrose is a well established developer, this should be an exciting development.

http://www.tphifer.com/#

billyblancoNYC
July 20th, 2005, 12:38 PM
As per Curbed...

A Curbed tipster sends along a bit of a scoop: the first images we've seen of the plans for Silvercup West in Queens, an offshoot of Silvercup Studios where The Sopranos, among other shows, film. Seems they're planning three towers (600', 537', and 517' tall) with new studio facilities between the towers. (By comparison, the spikes of the towers of the Queensboro bridge are 424' tall.) Expected completion in 2009. After the jump, another view.

billyblancoNYC
July 28th, 2005, 10:56 AM
Queens Neighborhood's Mix of Industry, Housing May Be Remixed
Dutch Kills

BY JULIA VITULLO-MARTIN - Special to the Sun
July 28, 2005
http://www.nysun.com/article/17677

Just over the Queensboro Bridge and immediately north of Queens Plaza lies an intriguing, mixed-up, dense, partly industrial, partly residential neighborhood called Dutch Kills. Every urban use seems to flourish here side by side - manufacturing plants nudged in between tiny houses, movie production facilities beside grocery stores, nightclubs on industrial blocks, auto repair shops on residential blocks. It has virtually no vacant land and very little public space. Still, it's a Jane Jacobs kind of place - low-rise buildings, narrow streets, people of all sorts coming and going. It feels both energetic and sleepy.

All that is probably about to change - especially the sleepy part. Dutch Kills is at the center of one of the most charged and unpredictable real estate markets in New York.

The neighborhoods all around it have already changed, due to a combination of market forces and city policies - most importantly, a major rezoning in 2001 of adjacent Long Island City plus a few blocks of the southern portion of Dutch Kills. In August of last year, the Bloomberg administration took another major step, upzoning large swaths of Hunters Point. Decades of city efforts have resulted in substantial luxury residential development on the Queens waterfront, and some high-end commercial development inland - including the Citi Tower, the tallest building in Queens. The conversion market is brisk, perhaps even frenetic. A sign on a former industrial building shouts: Condos! Condos! Condos! Coming Soon!

This is an amazing transformation for an area that was thought to have the strongest concentration of industry in New York just a few years ago.

What, then, lies ahead for the 428-acre Dutch Kills enclave, bounded by Northern Boulevard on the south, 21st Street on the west, 38th Street on the east, and 36th Avenue on the north? Residents, who see the boom all around them, are of mixed minds about what should happen. Many fear an increase in rents that might drive them out. Others welcome development and the jump in property values it might bring - especially those who own modest houses from which they had never before expected much of a windfall. And some fear getting the worst of both worlds - huge towers on the periphery of their neighborhood while their own property is confined to current low-rise zoning.

A new study prepared for the Manhattan Institute by an economist, Regina Armstrong, of the research firm Urbanomics has weighed in, urging the city to keep on the path it has forged. Ms. Armstrong would like to see the 2001 upzoning extended to the rest of Dutch Kills to permit far more housing - up to 10,000 units - as well as mixed-use development. Dutch Kills is one of five neighborhoods (one in each borough) chosen by Ms. Armstrong to illustrate the conundrums of the city's inefficient zoning policies, which are based on a 1961 view of the world. "The city's current zoning regime," she says, is anachronistic "not only because it is rooted in an outdated concept of the city's economy, but because it fails to reckon with the strength of residential demand." Or, as the president of the Partnership for New York City, Kathryn Wylde, says, "Where our 19th-century centers of industry were located is not necessarily where we want them in the 21st century."

Ms. Armstrong argues that much of the 22,500 acres reserved for industrial development across the city is underused - and should be rezoned to permit some residential and commercial development. The current rate of housing construction (25,000 units a year) must continue for two decades just to meet demand. Yet vacant residential (R-zoned) land can only meet half this demand. Dutch Kills is a case in point of how to fix this shortfall.

Of Dutch Kills' 20 million square feet of floor space, more than half (11.4 million square feet) is currently classified as manufacturing and industrial use. Yet between 1993 and 2002, industrial jobs in the area declined to 3,178 from 4,834, according to the New York State Department of Labor. Population has been going up: increasing to 7,761 in 2000 from 6,050 in 1990 - even though no new housing was built.

These figures, of course, reflect citywide trends of declining industrial jobs and increasing residential population. In other words, demand for industrial property has been steadily decreasing throughout the five boroughs even as residential demand has been growing. Yet huge amounts of land are still zoned for manufacturing use. Indeed, Ms. Armstrong says the city has space for 500,000 more manufacturing jobs than actually exist.

The executive director of the New York Industrial Retention Network, Adam Friedman, says that some M-zoned property should be rezoned residential, but not Dutch Kills. "There's a term called 'planner's blight,' " he says. "If you rezone an area and nothing happens - no residential development - what happens to manufacturers who are still there? They get put on month-to-month leases, which starts a downward spiral. You can't get financing. You can't buy equipment. You can't remain competitive."

A commercial real estate manager, Dick Maltz, chairman of Greiner-Maltz Management, is also worried. "Last year's zoning change is affecting the character of the area, which is visibly changing now," he says. "There are quite a few nice little places to eat. There's certainly more night activity on the streets. But if every piece of land becomes an apartment or a condo, then where are the people going to work? When do we have more apartments than we have jobs?" And, indeed, what Mr. Maltz calls "a very healthy mix" of housing and jobs is what Jane Jacobs once set as her first criterion of a successful urban neighborhood.

One lifelong resident of Long Island City, John Malloy, has another view of zoning - past and present. "The issue is the mid-blocks," he says, gesturing at a row of small-frame houses dwarfed by the factory behind them. "We're not being allowed to develop our property. City Planning is going to let that factory add two stories to its top, which means 80 feet, which will tower over our backyards. But in the name of protecting manufacturing, they're sticking us with a FAR [floor area ratio] of 4. We're being redlined by zoning."

The truth is that zoning can indeed redline - simply prevent new development, whatever the market demand. But can it mandate the right kind of development? Probably not. Ms. Armstrong thinks that city government can unleash the forces of development and investment by getting out of the way - and upzoning Dutch Kills.



The New York Sun
105 Chambers Street, New York, NY 10007
© 2005 The New York Sun, One SL, LLC. All rights reserved.
Use of this site signifies your agreement to the Terms of Service

Gulcrapek
August 6th, 2005, 09:37 PM
Rendering of Citibank II

http://www.permasteelisausa.com/image/exteriors/unfcu01.jpg


www.permasteelisa.com (http://www.permasteelisa.com)

NoyokA
August 6th, 2005, 10:06 PM
You can tell by the position of the rendering, from the el and north of Citibank, that it’s not Citibank 2 rather the United Nations Federal Credit Union Building already well under construction. The design is similar to Citibank 2, it should provide a unique interplay with the piling square forms of Citibank 1.

NoyokA
August 6th, 2005, 10:12 PM
As per Curbed...

A Curbed tipster sends along a bit of a scoop: the first images we've seen of the plans for Silvercup West in Queens, an offshoot of Silvercup Studios where The Sopranos, among other shows, film. Seems they're planning three towers (600', 537', and 517' tall) with new studio facilities between the towers. (By comparison, the spikes of the towers of the Queensboro bridge are 424' tall.) Expected completion in 2009. After the jump, another view.

I knew Rogers was the perfect architect for the site. This design has a language that is line with the past and future of Queens which is intertwining and this design is the culmination of what’s happening in Long Island City.

Gulcrapek
August 6th, 2005, 10:16 PM
Oops, I thought it might be different given the different facade but I settled...

NoyokA
August 6th, 2005, 10:30 PM
Oops, I thought it might be different given the different facade but I settled...

The design is similar to Citibank 2 and about a million other suburban office developments but atleast its a commercial development and any commercial development is a good development.

tmg
August 8th, 2005, 05:28 PM
The plans for street level will be key. Hopefully the resemblance to "suburban office parks" will end there.

NoyokA
August 19th, 2005, 06:23 PM
United Nations Federal Credit Union Building and Rockrose Development both considerably above ground.

Gulcrapek
August 19th, 2005, 07:20 PM
I was gonna say, I saw a big white crane adjacent to like 5 floors of concrete yesterday... another one behind Citibank...

sfenn1117
August 19th, 2005, 09:58 PM
Yeah driving on the FDR you can see Rockrose's development rising. I think the design is kind of bland though.

I'm looking forward to Silvercup's project.....including a 600 foot tower, the tallest on the waterfront.

NewYorkYankee
August 21st, 2005, 02:56 PM
Which one is the Rockrose again? Im sorry, I looked back and I think its the 2 green towers, right?

NoyokA
August 24th, 2005, 11:29 AM
Which one is the Rockrose again? Im sorry, I looked back and I think its the 2 green towers, right?

No, its this development:


Project #10

East Coast Tower I
47-20 Center Boulevard/Queens West Parcel 6
31 stories 299 feet (DOB)
Arquitectonica/SLCE
Dev-Rockrose Development Corporation (East Coast 6 LLC)
Residential Rental
650 units 477,246 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2005-Late 2006


http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44107177.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44119806.jpg
Arquitectonica
http://arquitectonica.com/



Rockrose Development Corporation: East Coast
http://www.rockrosenyc.com

The Long Island City waterfront is undergoing an ambitious re-development and economic revitalization and growth. Rockrose is a dominant player in this renaissance having been designated by the Queens West Development Corp. to build seven residential buildings totaling over 3,000 units at what is presently referred to as the Pepsi Site
Rockrose views this development as a logical expansion of midtown. The site offers unparalleled city views, and is only one stop from Grand Central Station on the subway. In the past few years, there has been a growing artist’s movement generated by the expansion of PS1, MoMA, and Isamu Noguchi Museum.

The first building’s exterior is being designed by the world renowned Arquitectonica, and will be a magnificent 31 story glass structure comprised of studios, one, two, and three bedroom units. The anticipated occupancy for this tower is late 2006.

Apartment features:
- Large variety of spacious layouts, some duplexes
- Floor to ceiling windows
- Luxury bath and kitchen features
- High tech smart wiring
- Many with walk-in closets and washer/dryers
- Many with private outdoor space
(garden, balcony, or roof terrace)
Building amenities:
- Dramatic lobby with views of the Manhattan skyline
- 24 hr concierge
- Valet service
- Attended on site parking
- Resident’s fitness center and private clubroom
- Bicycle storage
- Bountiful open spaces and private park for tenants exclusive use
- Common roof deck with spectacular city views

Easy transportation:
- #7 subway to Vernon Blvd.
- Jackson Ave. Station (1 stop to Grand Central Station)
- E, F, and G trains at 23rd Street / Ely Ave. (CitiBank Bldg.)
- Queens Midtown Tunnel and 59th Street Bridge minutes away
- Easy access to LIE and LIRR, Hunters Point Station


Links:
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/topic.cgi?forum=3&topic=109
Daily News.
Developers Go West
Deal close on $2.3B waterfront complex
By Donald Bertrand

http://www.queenswest.com/citylights/discussion/00001038

NewYorkYankee
August 24th, 2005, 12:25 PM
Thanks man!

JD
August 25th, 2005, 03:29 PM
The two renderings shown in post #89 are not of the Rockrose building that is currently going up. Those renderings are of a building to come later. (Rockrose will put seven buildings total.)

mailarama
August 25th, 2005, 04:19 PM
Hi,

I am a first-time home buyer. I am looking for newly constructed (ready for accomodation after 2005) condos in Long Island City.

I would greatly appreciate it if someone from this forum could provide some guidance about whom I would need to speak with/where I would find agents for such properties.

Thanks in advance,
mailarama

shocka
August 29th, 2005, 04:01 PM
Hi,

I am a first-time home buyer. I am looking for newly constructed (ready for accomodation after 2005) condos in Long Island City.

I would greatly appreciate it if someone from this forum could provide some guidance about whom I would need to speak with/where I would find agents for such properties.

Thanks in advance,
mailarama

well i know posting to other board is usually not well recieved but, since i am trying to be of help, take a look at queenswest.com. There is a guy there posting about an upcoming condo that is expected to open mid 2006. There are no condos up yet and everything is in the works so just keep an eye out on that site.

Douglas Elliman is suppose to be marketing the first couple projects.
http://www.elliman.com/RK (http://www.elliman.com/RK)

sfenn1117
September 13th, 2005, 12:22 AM
Great article in the daily news......

http://www.nydailynews.com/09-12-2005/business/story/345424p-294890c.html

Long Island City's hot nabe

Big change is coming to the grimy industrial neighborhood of Long Island City.


Among a warren of auto shops, small manufacturers and storage facilities, a dozen developers are building luxury condos with the same upscale amenities as new projects in Manhattan and increasingly pricey Brooklyn nabes.

Booming demand for housing has driven the builders to shop for development sites in a 37-block section of the Queens nabe that was rezoned in mid-2001 to allow residential and office development.

The Long Island City sites cost them less than land in places like Williamsburg - an industrial area that has successfully made the transition to hot residential area.

They expect Long Island City's proximity to midtown Manhattan - which is one or two subway stops away from most of the area - and breathtaking views of the Manhattan skyline from its waterfront sites to draw condo shoppers.

"We believe it's the up-and-coming neighborhood," said Shlomo Melkman, one of the developers of a new building called The Queens Plaza.

New buildings are springing up from sites where old structures are being demolished. And old industrial properties are being converted into lofts.

Some developments are on or near Jackson Ave. - a main artery where a Citigroup office tower stands like a beacon among low-rise buildings.

Others are on the East River waterfront, currently the home of two pioneering apartment towers - a co-op called City-lights, and a rental complex that belongs to real-estate investment trust AvalonBay Communities.

Word is that developers are planning to charge around $600 to $700 per square foot for their apartments.

That means 500-square-foot condos will cost at least $300,000, and 1,500-square-foot units as much as $1.05 million - substantial sums, but less expensive than Williamsburg condos, which go for $650 to $800 per square foot these days.

"Long Island City is going to become a very desirable residential area," predicted Hal Henenson of Prudential Douglas Elliman, who is working with several developers in the neighborhood.

PLENTY OF NEW PLACES TO LIVE

COMING SOON:

<LI>Sales will start this month at the Gantry, a 47-condo building whose foundations are being dug at 48-21 Fifth St.

The development is located on the waterfront, across the street from the parking garage of the Citylights co-op.

It will be six stories tall - and will have private rooftop cabanas.

Prudential Douglas Elliman's Hal Henenson is handling the sales campaign, at a nearby marketing office on Vernon Blvd.

<LI>Half a block from the street called Queens Plaza, a new 10-story red-brick building is topping out at 41-26 27th St. The building is called - you guessed it - The Queens Plaza.

It will have 66 condos - most with private terraces - and a doorman.

Pre-sales marketing will start this month, which will allow prospective buyers to see apartment designs and interior finishes, said broker Highlyann Krasnow of The Developers Group. Sales will begin early next year.

IN THE WORKS:

<LI>Demolition is under way at 45-56 Pearson St. - where developer Mark Junger plans a 20-story tower with 120 condos. It will have a swimming pool with a retractable dome and a running track.

The Daily News broke the story about this development last spring.

Marketing will begin early next year, and sales will start in the spring, Krasnow said.

<LI>Developer Ron Hershco is laying the foundations for 13-11 Jackson Ave., a 13-story building with 55 apartments.

The Developers Group will start marketing the units early next year, and sales are expected to start in the spring.

<LI>On the waterfront, an old Pennsylvania Railroad power plant at 50-09 Second St. is being gutted and four new floors added, to build 175 condos. Its four smokestacks have been removed.

Developer Cheskel Schwimmer is calling the development the Powerhouse. It will have a big fitness center, a kids' playroom and a screening room for Super Bowl parties and other festivities.

Elliman's Henenson will start marketing the property next spring.

<LI>At 41-17 Crescent St., developer Ari Chitrik plans a 17-story development called the Crescent Club - 119 condos with a lap pool and a putting green in a landscaped back yard.

Pre-sales marketing might start next spring, or else next fall, said Henenson.

The site's currently occupied by Ethnikos Kirix, a 90-year-old Greek-language daily newspaper.

The paper will move this fall to another Long Island City location, 37-10 30th St., editor and publisher Antonis Diamataris told Your Money.

ALSO ON THE DRAWING BOARD:

<LI>JCE Construction plans a new condo building at 5-03 50th Ave., on the waterfront.

<LI>At 46-44 11th St., floors will be added to a small building where badges were once manufactured, to make room for 44 apartments.

<LI>Floors will also be added to the red-brick building at nearby 10-63 Jackson Ave., to build 31 condos.

<LI>A new condo building is planned for 42-37 Crescent St., a development site that changed hands late last year.

SURPRISE - A RENTAL BUILDING:

Condo shoppers have been calling the office of Hentze-Dor Real Estate like crazy about the new seven-story red-brick building at 10-30 Jackson Ave., whose construction is almost completed. It's got a classic, old-fashioned look, with decorative carved lions' heads on the outside. But its 24 apartments are not for sale. Prospective tenants can apply to rent them, starting next month.

Originally published on September 12, 2005



It doesn't even count the office construction, Rockrose's development, or Silvercup!

krulltime
October 2nd, 2005, 10:57 PM
Taking another view of Manhattan


October 03, 2005

The residential construction boom on the Queens waterfront is pushing north.

In a move that will mean more East River condominiums with Manhattan views, Brooklyn developer Shia Ostreicher has bought an Astoria warehouse for $6.85 million.

The property, located on the corner of 26th Avenue and Fourth Street, offers nearly 155,000 square feet of space for development. The seller, Robert Zirinsky, was represented by Massey Knakal Realty Services. Mr. Ostreicher was represented by the Greiner Maltz Co.

For the past three years, the southern part of the waterfront has seen a flurry of construction activity tied to the $2.3 billion Queens West project. One of New York's largest mixed-use developments, Queens West will cover 74 acres and feature 15 residential and four commercial buildings when completed in 2011.

--Tommy Fernandez

©2005 Crain Communications Inc.

krulltime
October 2nd, 2005, 11:23 PM
Hot damn! Also, check out "Queens Plaza" - a 45 story residential for LIC.

Oh yeah... Wow!

http://i.pbase.com/v3/55/435155/1/50181379.QueensPlaza.JPG

http://www.kfarchitect.com/

NoyokA
October 2nd, 2005, 11:31 PM
This would be Queens second tallest building.

Something people havent really discussed but I feel must be addressed is the current infastructure. It looks like the area around Citibank is about to take off as a buisness and residential district. This area is surrounded by the entrance to the Queensboro bridge and as such this would be a logical approach. The approach is already dangerous and congested. Im just wondering if new exits will be created and if everything can coincide when this area bounded by elevated road and rail finally takes off, I hope it doesnt reach a breaking point.

tmg
October 6th, 2005, 12:08 PM
You're right, Stern.

QB Plaza is incredibly inefficient (not to mention ugly). The pedestrian environment in the area needs dramatic improvement, and in a world where funds were available, I'd love to see a creative effort to rethink the transit connections and traffic flows.

The Van Alen Institute ran a design competition a while back
(http://www.vanalen.org/competitions/queens_plaza/QP_introduction.htm), but unfortunately the teams competing seemed to consist entirely of architects. I wish they would do this again with interdisciplinary teams of designers, planners, and engineers. It will take a lot of hard work to untangle that area.

Here's an old thread on an earlier, more cosmetic effort. I wonder how far that went:
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=2973

Strattonport
October 20th, 2005, 12:03 PM
While riding the 7 through LIC yesterday, I spotted new construction only a block or so away from the Citi Building. Is this the new office building CitiGroup is planning?

kliq6
October 20th, 2005, 01:24 PM
No its the United Nations Federal Credit Union Job, a 14 story office building. The citi building is on hold and being reevaluated as they have recently leased over 700,000 sf of space in two Midtown building

kliq6
October 20th, 2005, 04:44 PM
Reclaiming Unused Land for Affordable Housing:
The City will pursue underutilized sites for development as part of a new housing program targeted at middle class New Yorkers. One potential site for this program is the 61-acre Queens West site that was originally going to be the Olympic Village. Working closely with the Port Authority and the State, the site could be converted into a new residential community along the East River with up to 4,400 units of housing for middle class New Yorkers, together with retail space, park land, and open space.
Inclusionary Zoning:

This is LIC true future, not a office area

NoyokA
October 25th, 2005, 12:21 PM
I admire Citicorp for its huge expansions in midtown and the outer boroughs, its much more than you can say about J.P. Morgan Chase.

NYPOST:

CITI GETS A NEW LEASE

By STEVE CUOZZO

Realty Check

CITIGROUP'S dizzying realignment of people and property went into overdrive this week with a just-inked lease signing for 300,000 square feet at SL Green's 485 Lexington Ave.

The news comes just days before the world's largest bank breaks ground on Court Square Two, a new 475,000 square-foot office tower in Long Island City.

The deal at 485 Lexington is Citigroup's second big Midtown expansion in a month, on the heels of the 250,000 square feet it gobbled up at 787 Seventh Ave. Citigroup has 25,400 employees in 9.3 million square feet in the city.

Both new leases and the new building are part of a reshuffling that will see some back-office jobs moved to Queens, New Jersey and Long Island, but more front-office jobs created in Manhattan — all adding up to what the bank said is a net growth of 600 jobs in the city. The 485 Lexington deal had kept brokers guessing for months.

As we reported a few weeks ago, Citigroup committed earlier in the year to a 500,000-foot chunk at 485 Lexington, but the lease remained in escrow pending the bank's board approval.

Upheaval at Citigroup — rattled by regulatory scandals and executive turmoil — put things on hold.

Sources said Green, eager to negotiate leases with other prospective tenants in the soon-to-be-vacant tower, pushed Citigroup "for some finality" last month.

A few days ago, Citigroup and Green agreed on an "amended" lease — smaller than first planned, but still one of the year's largest.

Paul Glickman, leader of a Cushman & Wakefield team that also included Tara Stacom and I. Mitti Liebersohn, represented SL Green.

"Green and Citi collectively decided to consumate the 300,000 feet now, leaving open the possibility for Citi to have a larger presence in the building," Glickman said.

He said a capital improvement plan at 485 Lexington will include new windows, storefronts, lobby and enough facade changes that will "make it look like a new building."

Publicly traded SL Green is expected to announce the Citigroup lease during an investor conference call today. Green bought the 920,000 square-foot tower from TIAA/CREF last year as part of package with adjoining 750 Third Ave.

The teachers fund will leave behind 1 million square feet in the two-building complex, now called Grand Central Square, at the end of the year, but will retain a presence via a just-signed lease for 85,000 feet at 750 Third.

Asking rents at 485 Lexington are $57-$60, according to online database Mrofficespace.com.

Citigroup was repped by Newmark's Neil Goldmacher, who could not immediately be reached.

shocka
October 25th, 2005, 03:58 PM
Reclaiming Unused Land for Affordable Housing:
The City will pursue underutilized sites for development as part of a new housing program targeted at middle class New Yorkers. One potential site for this program is the 61-acre Queens West site that was originally going to be the Olympic Village. Working closely with the Port Authority and the State, the site could be converted into a new residential community along the East River with up to 4,400 units of housing for middle class New Yorkers, together with retail space, park land, and open space.
Inclusionary Zoning:

This is LIC true future, not a office area

this is interesting and I constantly hear about creating middle class housing... how is this suppose to happen. Perhaps rentals which limit incomes, but if they are properties for sale (even the middle class would like to be home owners) how do they plan on limiting? A co-op that limits the income of those who purchase the property? What happens if you go into the "upper class" and when you sell will there be limitations on the buyer?

Perhaps I am thinking way too much into it. Anyone got any insight?

Strattonport
October 25th, 2005, 10:24 PM
Good news! Citigroup's investments in the city should be a model for other companies looking to expand in the Big Apple, especially in the outer boroughs.

NoyokA
October 25th, 2005, 10:34 PM
this is interesting and I constantly hear about creating middle class housing... how is this suppose to happen. Perhaps rentals which limit incomes, but if they are properties for sale (even the middle class would like to be home owners) how do they plan on limiting? A co-op that limits the income of those who purchase the property? What happens if you go into the "upper class" and when you sell will there be limitations on the buyer?

Perhaps I am thinking way too much into it. Anyone got any insight?

You got it. Public housing is very flawed. If many instances if you make more money you will be evicted from your home. I know people who live in public housing and cannot work on the books because if they do their parents will be evicted from public housing. How are you supposed to better yourself if they only provide disincentives for trying?

kliq6
October 27th, 2005, 11:27 AM
Citigroup Inc. officials said yesterday the company plans to bring 1,800 jobs to Long Island City as part of a plan to build a $290-million, 15-story office tower, while New York City pledged to spend $30 million in street and other improvements.

Citibank retail distribution group president Maura Markus said at the groundbreaking yesterday that the new building will be the national headquarters for Citibank's credit card division and branch banking business.

Parent company Citigroup first announced plans in May to build an additional building after it sold its 50-story skyscraper known as Court Square One to Reckson Associates Realty Corp. for $470 million. But Citigroup stayed put after signing a 15-year lease to rent all the space in the green-glass tower where about 4,800 employees work.

The city said it obtained $17 million in federal money to improve Queens Plaza and Jackson Avenue as well as add street lighting, public art and open space, while the remaining $13 million will be spent by Queens Borough Hall. Citibank will pay to install elevators and escalators at a subway stop and to build an underground passage between the G and 7 lines.

"We're aggressively working to turn underutilized city-owned land into job-creating private developments," Mayor Michael Bloomberg said, also at the groundbreaking. "Long Island City has a great future we're going to make a reality."

A Citibank official confirmed that the bank recently signed a deal to lease 300,000 square feet at 485 Lexington Ave., a Manhattan building owned by the realty firm SL Green.

Tishman Speyer will build the new Court Square Two, but Citibank plans to be the main tenant. When Court Square Two is completed in 2007, the bank will have 2 million square feet in Long Island City and 10.4 million square feet of office space throughout New York City.

shocka
October 28th, 2005, 01:29 AM
You got it. Public housing is very flawed. If many instances if you make more money you will be evicted from your home. I know people who live in public housing and cannot work on the books because if they do their parents will be evicted from public housing. How are you supposed to better yourself if they only provide disincentives for trying?

Thanks for your reply... I am glad to see my thinking is not totally off .


But to get back on topic of LIC.. has anyone here taken a deeper look into the upcoming properties.. The Gantry, Arris Lofts, Powerhouse or even the Rockrose and Avalon Rentals..

pianoman11686
October 28th, 2005, 08:42 PM
When Court Square Two is completed in 2007, the bank will have 2 million square feet in Long Island City and 10.4 million square feet of office space throughout New York City.

That's really an incredible number. Most central business districts have less office space than just this one company has in New York.

macreator
October 28th, 2005, 10:00 PM
That's really an incredible number. Most central business districts have less office space than just this one company has in New York.

It is amazing the sheer space that Citigroup occupies. I believe 10 million square feet of office space translates to roughly the entirety of Cincinnati's CBD.

I think Citigroup should be commended for not moving backoffice employees to Jersey City like many other New York Financial Services firms did in the late 90's and into post-9/11. Same goes for American Express.

NoyokA
October 28th, 2005, 10:12 PM
I commend citibank by having all my banking accounts with them. Im appauled at the fallout of J.P. Morgan Chase Manhattan.

billyblancoNYC
November 1st, 2005, 10:12 AM
It is amazing the sheer space that Citigroup occupies. I believe 10 million square feet of office space translates to roughly the entirety of Cincinnati's CBD.

I think Citigroup should be commended for not moving backoffice employees to Jersey City like many other New York Financial Services firms did in the late 90's and into post-9/11. Same goes for American Express.

Well, Citi has a pretty large prescence in NJ as well, just not JC. But, it is great to see them commit to NYC and build up LIC. Too bad more NYC companies don't/haven't followed suit.

billyblancoNYC
November 1st, 2005, 10:14 AM
I commend citibank by having all my banking accounts with them. Im appauled at the fallout of J.P. Morgan Chase Manhattan.

Chase is a disgrace and a train wreck. People are getting RIFed (Reduction In Force) and moved all over the place. Wilmington, DE is booming. Sad. And the amazing part is that Chase BOUGHT Bank One. Bank One was nothing comepared to Chase. Shows what a load and agressive CEO can do.

kliq6
November 1st, 2005, 11:26 AM
The problem is that Bank One people are now basically running Chase

Derek2k3
November 5th, 2005, 10:16 AM
Hunter Street Condos
17 stories
Dev-Basile Builders Group
Residential Condominiums
Proposed ?

http://www.basilebuilders.com/images/hunter/big.jpg
Basile Builders Group
http://www.basilebuilders.com/main/hunter.html

NewYorkYankee
November 5th, 2005, 05:06 PM
I commend citibank by having all my banking accounts with them. Im appauled at the fallout of J.P. Morgan Chase Manhattan.

My credit card is Citi, but my checking account here is at Chase. I chose to open it there due to every Duane Reade having a Chase ATM. (Although sometimes I cant find a Duane Reade.)

Derek2k3
November 12th, 2005, 10:04 PM
Project #10

East Coast Tower I
47-20 Center Boulevard/Queens West Parcel 6
31 stories 299 feet (DOB)
Arquitectonica/SLCE
Dev-Rockrose Development Corporation (East Coast 6 LLC)
Residential Rental
650 units 477,246 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2005-Late 2006


http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/52166217.jpg

NoyokA
November 13th, 2005, 12:30 AM
United Nations Federal Credit Union:

http://img359.imageshack.us/img359/7286/unfcu3pz.th.jpg (http://img359.imageshack.us/my.php?image=unfcu3pz.jpg)

United Nations Federal Credit Union and Court Square Two in foreground:

http://img138.imageshack.us/img138/4287/unfcu24vi.th.jpg (http://img138.imageshack.us/my.php?image=unfcu24vi.jpg)

East Coast:

http://img138.imageshack.us/img138/4889/eastcoast1xe.th.jpg (http://img138.imageshack.us/my.php?image=eastcoast1xe.jpg)

Large construction site at Jackson Avenue:

http://img138.imageshack.us/img138/2695/jackson9yi.th.jpg (http://img138.imageshack.us/my.php?image=jackson9yi.jpg)

NoyokA
November 13th, 2005, 12:38 AM
http://img452.imageshack.us/img452/217/citibank1em.th.jpg (http://img452.imageshack.us/my.php?image=citibank1em.jpg)

TLOZ Link5
November 15th, 2005, 01:00 AM
Yowza, that East Coast building went up fast.

macreator
November 15th, 2005, 07:19 AM
You don't really think about it, but the Credit Union building shows you how low-rise Queens really is near Manhattan. One can easily see the building being constructed from Manhattan.

sfenn1117
November 15th, 2005, 01:00 PM
Any cladding yet on that East Coast Tower? I'm curious to see it....

NoyokA
November 15th, 2005, 06:58 PM
My credit card is Citi, but my checking account here is at Chase. I chose to open it there due to every Duane Reade having a Chase ATM. (Although sometimes I cant find a Duane Reade.)

I actually just opened a free checking account with Chase just so that I can screw them over. They gave me $50 to open it and I only put money in it just so that I could take it out and write checks to ING.

Strattonport
November 15th, 2005, 08:29 PM
You don't really think about it, but the Credit Union building shows you how low-rise Queens really is near Manhattan. One can easily see the building being constructed from Manhattan.

True, but with the way that LIC is going, I wouldn't be surprised if it mirrors Midtown within the decade.

Strattonport
November 16th, 2005, 09:52 AM
Some photos of the Rockrose project on the former PepsiCo site. From Queens West (http://www.queenswest.com/neighborhood/pictures/rockrose/index_html?query_start=17):

http://www.queenswest.com/neighborhood/pictures/rockrose/20051105_rockrose_14.jpg (http://www.queenswest.com/neighborhood/pictures/rockrose/20051105_rockrose_14.jpg?display=small) (http://www.queenswest.com/neighborhood/pictures/rockrose/20051112_rockrose_25.jpg?display=small)
(http://www.queenswest.com/neighborhood/pictures/rockrose/20051105_rockrose_14.jpg?display=small)http://www.queenswest.com/neighborhood/pictures/rockrose/20051108_rockrose_16.jpg (http://www.queenswest.com/neighborhood/pictures/rockrose/20051108_rockrose_16.jpg?display=small) (http://www.queenswest.com/neighborhood/pictures/rockrose/20051112_rockrose_25.jpg?display=small)
(http://www.queenswest.com/neighborhood/pictures/rockrose/20051105_rockrose_14.jpg?display=small)http://www.queenswest.com/neighborhood/pictures/rockrose/20051108_rockrose_17.jpg (http://www.queenswest.com/neighborhood/pictures/rockrose/20051108_rockrose_17.jpg?display=small) (http://www.queenswest.com/neighborhood/pictures/rockrose/20051112_rockrose_25.jpg?display=small)
(http://www.queenswest.com/neighborhood/pictures/rockrose/20051105_rockrose_14.jpg?display=small)http://www.queenswest.com/neighborhood/pictures/rockrose/20051108_rockrose_21.jpg (http://www.queenswest.com/neighborhood/pictures/rockrose/20051108_rockrose_21.jpg?display=small) (http://www.queenswest.com/neighborhood/pictures/rockrose/20051112_rockrose_25.jpg?display=small)
(http://www.queenswest.com/neighborhood/pictures/rockrose/20051105_rockrose_14.jpg?display=small)http://www.queenswest.com/neighborhood/pictures/rockrose/20051112_rockrose_25.jpg (http://www.queenswest.com/neighborhood/pictures/rockrose/20051112_rockrose_25.jpg?display=small) (http://www.queenswest.com/neighborhood/pictures/rockrose/20051112_rockrose_25.jpg?display=small)

NoyokA
November 16th, 2005, 11:14 AM
Are they constructing a dock or more land around the Pepsi sign?

krulltime
December 25th, 2005, 01:35 AM
So are they building this development? I see alot of cranes and construction close to the citibank tower.

http://i.pbase.com/o4/55/435155/1/53931755.GothamCenter.JPG

macreator
December 25th, 2005, 02:10 AM
Damn it, I hope so!

Where did you find those renderings?

Strattonport
December 25th, 2005, 10:43 AM
Ditto. I like those renderings; only goes to show LIC will resemble Midtown Manhattan in a couple of years...

BrooklynRider
December 27th, 2005, 10:23 AM
That's more office park than business district, but it will sure look nice from the river. Long Island City really has the greatest opportunity to transform itself due to its relatively small population and the availability of parcels. Downtown Brooklyn is going to face the NIMBY hurdles and might not ever truly realize the potential we all see in it.

infoshare
December 27th, 2005, 05:18 PM
Downtown Brooklyn is going to face the NIMBY hurdles and might not ever truly realize the potential we all see in it.

Where's 'Nimbykiller' when you need em!
Or is it 'antinimby' - i dont know - but either voice is much needed and appreciated!
yuk

Edward
December 27th, 2005, 10:19 PM
The view of Queens West across East River. 18 December 2005.

http://www.wirednewyork.com/queens/queens_west/images/queens_west_pepsi.jpg

TLOZ Link5
December 28th, 2005, 03:07 AM
That's more office park than business district, but it will sure look nice from the river.

Those buildings look like that mental hospital-turned-office park in The Bronx, only made of rubber and stretched to the height of 40 stories.

Apologies to any fans of The Fountainhead for my shameless sampling of Ayn Rand :D

shocka
January 1st, 2006, 05:08 PM
The view of Queens West across East River. 18 December 2005.

http://www.wirednewyork.com/queens/queens_west/images/queens_west_pepsi.jpg


Does any one know anything about that building to the left of the citigroup building? I see it EVERYTIME i am taking the N/W from Queensboro Plaza but can not find anything more about it. There isnt much posted around it.

Strattonport
January 1st, 2006, 09:55 PM
I think it's Court Square Two, an expansion of the Citi building.

Derek2k3
January 1st, 2006, 10:07 PM
This project rose really fast, they were just excavating in May. Court Square II will rise just south (right in the pic) of this. It will be 221 ft tall according to the construction permit.


Project #8

Court Square Place/United Nations Federal Credit Union Building
43-35 24th Street
16 stories 241 feet
HLW International LLP
Dev-United Nations Federal Credit Union
Commercial Office
274,433 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction March 2005-December 2006

http://www.permasteelisausa.com/image/exteriors/unfcu01.jpg
http://www.permasteelisausa.com

Long Island City Building Boost
NY Daily News - columnist Lore Croghan, Sept. 24, 2003

http://www.licbdc.org/news/2003/daily-news-9-24-03-credit-union.htm

The city's largest credit union is percolating a plan to build a 200,000-square-foot office in Long Island City - which could jump-start stalled office development there.

The United Nations Federal Credit Union is zeroing in on a site for the office that's a block away from Citigroup's green glass tower on Jackson Avenue and 44th Drive, the lone skyscraper in the Queens industrial neighborhood.

The location under consideration, 43-35 24th St., is one of a half-dozen Long Island City and Astoria properties that belong to the former owners of Eagle Electric, who sold the company three years ago but held onto its real estate.

The credit union's plan would be good news for a 37-block area of Long Island City that was rezoned two years ago to allow high-rise, high-density construction and is a top development priority of the Bloomberg administration.


Links:
http://www.queenswest.com/neighborhood/pictures/kyles_corner
Photos by Kyle

http://www.mapquest.com/maps/map.adp?country=US&addtohistory=&formtype=address&searchtype=address&cat=&address=4335%2024th%20St&city=Long%20Island%20City&state=NY&zipcode=11101%2d4609
Map

http://www.unfcu.org
http://www.hlw.com

krulltime
January 2nd, 2006, 07:28 AM
So they are not building the one in the middle yet?


Hmm, is it....this one?

http://img212.imageshack.us/img212/4269/citigroupinqueensny2el.jpg

sfenn1117
January 2nd, 2006, 09:50 AM
I don't think they are building it at all. Isn't the middle one the site of Court Square II, which looks similar to the one already topped out?

infoshare
January 2nd, 2006, 10:16 AM
July 25, 2004

LONG ISLAND CITY

High-Rises Are Arising, but Are They a Skyline?

By JAKE MOONEY


But now the borough, home in Jay Gatsby's world to ash heaps and murderous mechanics, may be taking small steps skyward in Long Island City. The borough's tallest building, the 48-story Citigroup skyscraper at Court Square, is getting a 14-story neighbor across the street, the company announced this month. And Queens West, the development parcel across from the United Nations, is home to 42-story and 32-story apartment buildings, and will get two more rental buildings, each over 30 stories tall. At the East River Tennis Club, two 28-story condominium towers are taking shape.



Copyright 2004 The New York Times Company


Yes, great news. But, another new addition to LIC (happening beneath the radar of public awareness) is the recent addition of a "public boating" facility. Another of nyc many "cultural enhancements" that are abundant in this town.

I will look for a link (if any) to this public amenity: and post it here. (Found it at, http://www.licboathouse.org/) enjoy!

Any help finding it, also would be welcome.

cheers

krulltime
January 4th, 2006, 02:30 AM
http://i.pbase.com/o4/55/435155/1/53931755.GothamCenter.JPG



Damn it, I hope so!

Where did you find those renderings?


It is been advertise on the back of the crains newspaper... I scan it.

BrooklynRider
January 4th, 2006, 01:47 PM
Look at those huge parking lots out front.

EWWWWWWWWWWWWW!

macreator
January 4th, 2006, 06:02 PM
I haven't seen any other mention of The Gotham Center.

Derek2k3
January 4th, 2006, 10:23 PM
Gotham Center is the same project as Midtown East just with a different developer, Tishman Speyer.


So they are not building the one in the middle yet?
Well half of it. That's Citigroup's new 14 story building. I remember reading that the 1 msf version was looking for a tenant to lease atleast half its space to begin constuction. Though the site is zoned with a FAR of 15, (1MSF..30-40 stories) I guess Citi didn't want all that space or share the building with another tenant. The only other site in LIC zoned for a FAR of 15 is on the opposite side of the 1st Citigroup Tower, so this current version is somewhat a disappointment...atleast its unused air rights can be transferred elsewhere.

Derek2k3
January 5th, 2006, 12:04 AM
The Crescent Club
41-17 Crescent Street
17 stories
Karl Fischer Architect
Dev-Ari Chitrik
Residential Condominium
119 units 180,579 Sq. Ft.
Proposed ?

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/54422681.jpg
Karl Fischer Architect
http://www.kfarchitect.com


Long Island City's hot nabe
BY LORE CROGHAN
DAILY NEWS BUSINESS WRITER
Big change is coming to the grimy industrial neighborhood of Long Island City.

http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=65038#post65038

...At 41-17 Crescent St., developer Ari Chitrik plans a 17-story development called the Crescent Club - 119 condos with a lap pool and a putting green in a landscaped back yard.

Pre-sales marketing might start next spring, or else next fall, said Henenson.

The site's currently occupied by Ethnikos Kirix, a 90-year-old Greek-language daily newspaper.

The paper will move this fall to another Long Island City location, 37-10 30th St., editor and publisher Antonis Diamataris told Your Money....


Map (http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&hl=en&q=41-17+Crescent++Street,+long+island+city,+NY&btnG=Search&ll=40.75089,-73.93948&spn=0.003674,0.013475)

http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m3601/is_44_51/ai_n14703194
MAI Investment, a division of Manhattan Apartments, Inc., announced the sale of 41-17 Crescent St., a land plot in Queens, N.Y. containing a factory building and two adjacent parking lots, for $10.8 million
Real Estate Weekly, June 15, 2005

Derek2k3
January 5th, 2006, 01:34 PM
42-37 Crescent Street
9 stories 118 feet
Karl Fischer Architect
Dev-Jacob Elberg
Residential Condominium
16 units 25,224 Sq. Ft.
Proposed


New York Daily News
Long Island City's hot nabe
BY LORE CROGHAN
Monday, September 12th, 2005

http://www.thedevelopersgroup.com/Images/Press/Printer%20Friendly%20Version%20-%20Long%20Island%20City's%20hot%20nabe.htm

....A new condo building is planned for 42-37 Crescent St., a development site that changed hands late last year....



Map (http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&hl=en&q=42-37+Crescent+Street,+long+island+city,+NY&btnG=Search&ll=40.750313,-73.941422&spn=0.014142,0.053773)

http://www.therealdeal.net/issues/NOVEMBER_2005/1130884861.php
42-37 Crescent Street
A new condo building is planned for the site in Long Island City, the Daily News reported.

DOB Permit (http://a810-bisweb.nyc.gov/bisweb/JobDetailsServlet?requestid=2&allisn=0001158676&allboroughname=&allnumbhous=&allstrt=&s=DCB051D04D4345256F48D12433631AE6)

Derek2k3
January 5th, 2006, 01:39 PM
43rd Avenue Hotel
10 stories
Scarano & Associates Architects
Commercial Hotel
Proposed ?

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/54443604.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/54443605.jpg http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/54443606.jpg

Scarano & Associates Architects
43rd Avenue

http://www.scaranoarchitects.com/

An in-depth site analysis for this location made it very clear that taking advantage of the sweeping views of midtown Manhattan and the Queensboro Bridge was a priority that must guide the entire design.
This helped to determine the form of the building, placing hotel rooms toward the views and the corridors and services toward the rear of the building.
To provide some architectural interest in this predominantly industrial neighborhood, the core was placed on the corner with glass elevators so that people could see and be seen.

Derek2k3
January 5th, 2006, 01:49 PM
Queens Plaza
41-26 27th Street
10 stories 112 feet
GKA.Design Group
Dev-Mitchell Hirth
Residential Condominium
66 units 78,125 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2004-Early 2006


http://www.nydailynews.com/ips_rich_content/768-realestate.JPG


Queens Plaza setting a trend in Long Island City.
From Real Estate Weekly: July 20, 2005 issue

http://www.allbusiness.com/periodicals/article/490263-1.html

The Developers Group will make real estate history when it opens the first condominium in Long Island City, the Queens Plaza. Situated at the heart of a transforming and burgeoning neighborhood, the Queens Plaza, a 66-unit condo, will be a mecca for young professionals who seek reasonable prices and proximity to Manhattan.

"With its luxurious amenities and convenient location, the Queens Plaza will be in high demand when it opens this fall," said Highlyann Krasnow, executive vice president at The Developers Group.

"Residents will be thrilled that Midtown Manhattan is closer to Long Island City to Downtown." Located at 41-26 27th Street, the Queens Plaza is comprised of 66 units on 10-story building, with floors three and above boasting private terraces with wood decking. Other amenities include ample storage, parking, a part-time doorman, video intercom and state-of-the-art appliances.

Queens has been dubbed "The New Brooklyn," by real estate gurus because it is positioned to experience a boom similar to the one in Brooklyn a few years ago. With real estate prices on the rise in Manhattan, real estate developments in nearby boroughs became attractive options for young professionals. Long Island City in Queens is the latest neighborhood to catch buyers' attention.

The Developers Group is on the cutting edge with its Queens Plaza, which will be for sale starting fall 2005, and occupancy is slated for early 2006.



The Real Deal
Long Island City gets first condo building
July 6, 6:07 pm

http://therealdeal.net/

In a sign of Queens' rising development, the Developers Group announced Wednesday that sales of the 66 units in the new 10-story Queens Plaza would start this autumn. The Queens Plaza on 27th Street in Long Island City will be the first condo building ever in that neighborhood. Major projects built in Long Island City so far include Citylights, a co-op, and Avalon Riverview, a rental building. The units at Queens Plaza range from 505 to 1,568 square feet, according to a release from the Developers Group. Residents are expected to start moving in during early 2006.



Map (http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&hl=en&q=41-26+27th+Street,+long+island+city,+NY&btnG=Search&ll=40.752556,-73.938761&spn=0.013784,0.053902
)

http://www.nydailynews.com/09-12-2005/business/story/345424p-294890c.html
Long Island City's hot nabe
BY LORE CROGHAN
DAILY NEWS BUSINESS WRITER
Big change is coming to the grimy industrial neighborhood of Long Island City.

http://www.envirovaluation.org/index.php?blog=7
A Transformation Slips Into High Gear
Jackson Avenue ends at Queens Plaza and the entrance to the Queensborough Bridge, which acts as a sort of 1970's Times Square late at night, with erotic dance clubs, DVD outlets and the occasional prostitute. Nevertheless, efforts are beginning to clean up the area, with security patrols, street-cleaning crews, business incentives and, later, add green spaces. Already, the Developers Group, also behind the Jackson Avenue tower, has started sales at the Queens Plaza, a 10-story condominium building on nearby 27th Street.

DOB Permit (http://a810-bisweb.nyc.gov/bisweb/JobDetailsServlet?requestid=2&allisn=0000977369&allboroughname=&allnumbhous=&allstrt=&s=DCB051D04D4345256F48D12433631AE6)

Derek2k3
January 5th, 2006, 01:59 PM
13-11/ 13-97 - 13-05 Jackson Avenue
11-24 - 11-38 47th Avenue
13 stories 123 feet
Newman Design Group
Dev-Jackson Avenue Partners, LLC (Ron Hershco)
Residential Condominium
55 units 63,828 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2005-2006


The Real Deal
New Residential Developments

http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=4883&page=37

13-11 Jackson Avenue
Developer Ron Hershco is laying the foundation for a 13-story building with 55 apartments in Long Island City. The Developers Group will start marketing the units early next year, and sales are expected to start in the spring, the Daily News reported.


Map (http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&hl=en&q=13-11+Jackson+Avenue,+long+island+city,+NY&btnG=Search&ll=40.745111,-73.949575&spn=0.014143,0.053773)

http://www.envirovaluation.org/index.php?blog=7
A Transformation Slips Into High Gear
11/20/05
...Jackson Avenue, which runs diagonally from Vernon Boulevard past the tall green Citicorp tower at Court Square, offers fewer shops but is host to several new residential developments, including a 13-story tower with 55 apartments designed by the Newman Design Group...

DOB Permit (http://a810-bisweb.nyc.gov/bisweb/JobDetailsServlet?requestid=2&allisn=0001107919&allboroughname=&allnumbhous=&allstrt=&s=DCB051D04D4345256F48D12433631AE6)

Peakrate212
January 5th, 2006, 02:29 PM
Derek - Why all the postings on LIC? (just curious)

BrooklynRider
January 5th, 2006, 02:32 PM
Derek is a prolific poster of project facts. He undertakes the most comprehensive research. I, for one, am very thankful.

Thank you Derek!

antinimby
January 5th, 2006, 02:37 PM
I second that.
Derek, where would we be w/o you?
Keep on posting them new devs.

Derek2k3
January 5th, 2006, 07:07 PM
Thanks guys...I'll try.

Derek - Why all the postings on LIC? (just curious)
No real reason. Maybe a sudden realization that these projects could create a decent skyline. But after posting these future ugs, my hopes have been shot down. Developers and the city planners just don't have enough vision.


Gotham Center Master Plan (formerly Midtown East)
Queens Plaza Municipal Garage @ 28-10 Queens Plaza South & “QP” site directly across Jackson Avenue
? Architects (formerly Fox & Fowle Architects)
Dev-Tishman Speyer Properties
Commercial Office & Retail
3,000,000-4.2M Sq. Ft.
Proposed


http://i.pbase.com/o4/55/435155/1/53931755.GothamCenter.JPG

Office plan okayed for Queens Plaza
By James DeWeese
Times Ledger
11/26/2004

http://forums.wirednewyork.com/viewtopic.php?t=3370

Community Board 2 voted earlier this month to approve a business deal that could clear the way for as much as 3 million square feet of new commercial office space along Queens Plaza, another milestone in the business development that is reshaping Long Island City.


Under the agreement, Tishman Speyer Properties, whose other holdings include such iconic city locales as Rockefeller Center and the Chrysler Building, would receive a 99-year lease on city-owned land currently occupied by the Queens Plaza Garage at Jackson Avenue and an adjacent lot, said Jeremy Smith, a project manager with New York City Economic Development Corp.


The board had previously approved a land-use request for the project in 2001.

Under the business agreement approved on Nov. 4 in a 31-1 vote with two abstentions, Tishman Speyer, which has buildings in nine cities across Europe and the Americas, would have to build on the Queens Plaza Garage site by no later than 2015, Smith said.

During construction, the 1,150-space Queens Plaza Garage, which currently houses 180,000 square feet of commercial office space, would be demolished and replaced with similar on-site parking, as outlined in the agreement.

Some residents had expressed concern about the temporary loss of parking, but planners said the majority of the garage's users are actually commuters from Long Island who drop off their cars at Queens Plaza before hopping a train into the city.

"We are very excited about building a building in Long Island City," Tony Mannarino, a representative of Tishman Speyer told the community board. "We have been looking for opportunities to do something outside Manhattan."

Long Island City is fast attracting the businesses and office space that are turning it into one of the city's most important financial centers.

The MetLife building and Citigroup's 48-story Court Square skyscraper call the area home. And Citigroup, which already houses 4,800 employees in the borough, is slated to break ground on an additional 14-story, 475,000-square-foot office complex in 2005.

Tishman Speyer's proposed project would dramatically increase the amount of commercial office space available in the area. As part of the deal, the developer also would be required to spend $1 million to market and publicize the area over a period of 10 years, Smith said.

"One of the major advantages to the commercial space being located in Long Island City is it's basically an extension of Midtown," said Michael Reale, a project manager with the Long Island City Business Development Corp. "It's right over the 59th Street Bridge."

But booming development also is forcing planners to perform a balancing act, Reale said.

"Obviously, it would be great to have more commercial space but also at the same time to try to attempt to retain the manufacturing part of Long Island City which is basically part of the area's heritage," Reale said. "It's kind of juggling both interests at the same time."

Portions of Long Island City were rezoned several years ago to accommodate further commercial and residential development.

Zoning regulations allow for the construction of as much as 3 million square feet of office space between the two lots Tishman Speyer is looking to develop, said Suzanne Halpin, executive vice president of Rubenstein Communications, which is handling public relations for the developer.

It was too early to speculate what shape the buildings would take, Halpin said.

But the project has the resounding support of the EDC.

"One of the exciting things about this is Tishman Speyer is a world renowned developer," said Melanie Lenz, the EDC's vice president for Queens Real Estate. "Something on this site will happen soon. It will happen with the right resources. And it will happen in the right way."

Janelle Patterson, a spokeswoman for the EDC, said the development plan has not been finalized and must still be approved by the Borough Board and the EDC board. Final approval could come as early as February, she said.

&#169;Times Ledger 2004


http://www.licbdc.org/news/newsday-dreyfus-5-16-02.htm
Queens Plaza Project Loses a Key Partner
Newsday, May 15, 2002, A41



Here's the older version that was developed by the Arete Group & Louis Dreyfus Property Group and designed by Fox & Fowle Architects.

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/54453214.jpg http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/54453218.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/54453215.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/54453212.jpg http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/54453213.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/54453216.jpg http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/54453217.jpg
FXFowle Architects
www.fxfowle.com/


http://www.nyc.gov/html/om/html/2001b/pr329-01.html
Tuesday, October 23, 2001
Contact:
Sunny Mindel / Peter C. Fenty (646) 328-7418
Gregory Miley / Janel Patterson (EDC) (212) 312-3523
Paul Travis (QPMG) (212) 906-9090
Mayor Giuliani Announces Developer for Long Island City Municipal Parking Garage (10/23/2001)

NoyokA
January 6th, 2006, 12:23 AM
? Architects (formerly Fox & Fowle Architects)



Moed De Armas & Shannon

BrooklynRider
January 6th, 2006, 05:17 PM
Your question has been reposted and answered in the "Forum Issues" section.

Derek2k3
January 18th, 2006, 01:56 AM
Badge Building
10-55/ 10-49 10-59 47th Avenue/ 46-38 46-48 11th Street
8 stories 80 feet
Bricolage Designs
Dev-Tibi Zickerman
Residential Condominium
44 units 56,124 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2006


http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/55009090.jpg http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/55009091.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/55009092.jpg
http://www.badgebuilding.com
Badge Building


QueensWest.com
The Badge Building
http://www.queenswest.com/neighborhood/badgebuilding/

The Badge Building is another new building going up in Long Island City. Built on top of a factory the Badge Building will feature 713 sq ft 1 bedroom going up to 1,320 sq ft two bedroom living spaces. The aparments will also feature 9 to 12 foot ceilings, Long Island City and Manhattan views, balconies and roof access. Apartments will have washer / dryer hook-ups, oak floors and premium appliances.
Quick Facts

* Located at 10-55 47th Ave, Long Island City, NY 11101
* 1 & 2 bedroom apartments
* Condos
* Storage Units
* Private indoor and gated parking

Resources

* QueensWest.com Neighborhood discussion board
* Local weather in Queens West & Long Island City
* Local classifieds
* The local business directory
* www.badgebuilding.com


Map (http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&hl=en&q=10-55+47th+Avenue,+Long+island+city,+NY&btnG=Search&ll=40.745956,-73.951807&spn=0.014631,0.054245)

http://www.queenswest.com/neighborhood/discussion/00007017
The Badge Building discussion at QueensWest.com

Derek2k3
January 18th, 2006, 06:36 PM
Project #10

East Coast Tower I
47-20 Center Boulevard/Queens West Parcel 6
31 stories 299 feet (DOB)
Arquitectonica/SLCE
Dev-Rockrose Development Corporation (East Coast 6 LLC)
Residential Rental
650 units 477,246 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2005-Late 2006


Apparently I posted the wrong renderings of this before. This is it
http://www.pbase.com/image/55031436.jpg



They've begun construction on the second building which is located just east of the first one.

East Coast Tower II
47-02 47-10 5th Street/ 4-50 4-88 47th Avenue/ Queens West Parcel 7
30 stories 316 feet
Arquitectonica/SLCE
Dev-Rockrose Development Corporation (East Coast 7 LLC)
Residential Rental
395 units 698,688 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction Late 2005-2007


http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44107177.jpg http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44119806.jpg
Arquitectonica
http://arquitectonica.com/


NY Construction News
Feature Story - October 2005

Queens West
Major Waterfront Redevelopment Poised to Advance after Many Snags
by Adrian MacDonald

http://newyork.construction.com/features/archive/0510_feature2-b.asp

For 20 years, New York state authorities have sought to turn a 74-acre parcel of land in western Queens into a residential and commercial boomtown and in the process reclaim 1.5 mi. of East River waterfront as a state park. But a host of unique delays raise the question of when exactly this major redevelopment will ever be finished.

So far, one phase of the waterfront plan is nearing completion. There are still three phases to go, with another wave of work on the horizon.

Queens West Development Corp., the public agency overseeing the development, plans to one day complete the ambitious $2.3 billion project that would create 6,400 residential units in up to 20 building parcels; 20 acres of waterfront parks; and 2 million sq. ft. of commercial space.

Today, two residential high-rises stand on the site from the first phase. The first is a 42-story, 495,000-sq.-ft., 522-unit coop building developed by New York-based Manhattan Overlook Associates, which was completed in 1998 for about $90 million. The other is a 416,000-sq.-ft., 372-unit, 32-story residential building developed by AvalonBay Communities of Alexandria, Va., for $96 million in 2002.
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Just north of the two high-rises, AvalonBay will start construction on another apartment tower next month, finishing out development for the first phase. The $170 million Avalon Riverview North would top out next August and open in February 2008 with 602 apartments on 600,000 sq. ft. over 39 floors.

Between the two existing buildings, meanwhile, the New York Foundation for Senior Citizens is completing a $15 million Section 202 senior housing center that will have 80 units over 70,000 sq. ft. on eight floors. Kreisler Borg Florman is the contractor on the RiverView Gardens property.

Also under construction is the first of seven planned residential buildings in phase two of the project, which is being developed by the Rockrose Development Corp. of New York. Infrastructure improvements across the 20-acre phase two site are also underway, and if all goes as planned, Rockrose will break ground on a second tower before the end of the year.


Work on the Horizon

Other work in the phase two portion will begin later this year. EIC Associates of Springfield, N.J., is set to begin work on a $22 million contract to build and improve streets, parks, and utilities on a contract let by the development corporation.

And Rockrose is on course to have a second tower under construction by the end of the year. The first already broke ground in May at parcel 6 of the Queens West master plan. All of those projects are on parcels in the already-remediated sector.

"It will be completely unusual," said Jon McMillan, director of planning at Rockrose. "Nothing in New York will be quite like this building."

The design, a collaboration between Arquitectonica of Miami and SLCE Architects of New York, will feature dramatic and colorful elements intended to attract attention from across the river in Manhattan.

Though details made public in recent years about the project included crisscrossing patterns of window mullions in a variety of colors, including burgundy, blue, green and yellow, it is unclear if those ideas remain in the final design. McMillan declined to give specific details. However, the state official who had requested anonymity said the design will include a double-high exterior façade - with a gridwork of varied materials and multiple colors of bricks - that gives the appearance that the building is not as high and bulky, with two to three floors appearing to be a single level.

Rockrose hopes to start construction on its second building on parcel 7 by the end of this year. McMillan said that obtaining design approval for the second building from Queens West Corp. took over a year.

"There is a long process where we submit a schematic design, they bounce it back with changes, we resubmit, and so on," he said. "You get tripped up on technicalities."

Rockrose and Queens West had already been through a complicated round of negotiations during the land acquisition process. Rockrose purchased the site through condemnation proceedings from Pepsi-Cola, which had a former bottling plant, for about $20 million. Rockrose then transferred ownership to Queens West, because the development corporation is the entity that has zoning approvals to develop on the land. Rockrose is leasing the land back for $1 a year in an arrangement that also gives it tax benefits. Rockrose also fronted roughly $80 million in development fees for the property.

The Pepsi-Cola presence will remain in a sense, however. The company will keep a small plot of land that holds its famous neon sign facing Manhattan, forming a decorative centerpiece for the star-crossed development.

krulltime
January 26th, 2006, 02:54 PM
This one seems to be under construction already...


Avalon Riverview North:


http://i.pbase.com/o4/55/435155/1/55331168.AvalonRiverviewNorth.JPG

http://i.pbase.com/o4/55/435155/1/55267566.43.JPG

krulltime
January 26th, 2006, 03:00 PM
A look at what is at the waterfront right now...


http://i.pbase.com/o4/55/435155/1/55267073.1.JPG

krulltime
January 26th, 2006, 03:06 PM
Badge Building
10-55/ 10-49 10-59 47th Avenue/ 46-38 46-48 11th Street
8 stories 80 feet
Bricolage Designs
Dev-Tibi Zickerman
Residential Condominium
44 units 56,124 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2006


http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/55009090.jpg http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/55009091.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/55009092.jpg



http://i.pbase.com/o4/55/435155/1/55267549.39.JPG

Derek2k3
January 26th, 2006, 09:06 PM
nice job. I have a bunch of photos from today and saturday too. That Avalon tower is so blah.

TonyO
February 8th, 2006, 09:56 PM
NY Times
February 8, 2006
Square Feet

A Long Island City Awakening

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2006/02/08/business/queens184.jpg
The Eagle Electric factory, near the Citicorp high-rise in Long Island City, a subway stop from Manhattan, is being converted into residences.


By JOHN HOLUSHA
Midtown Manhattan is closer to Long Island City than it is to downtown Manhattan, and the transportation links are excellent. All this has made the area particularly attractive to deep-pocketed developers of residential projects, like Rockrose and AvalonBay, and they and other builders have a number of projects under way to house people who cannot afford Manhattan prices or decline to pay them.

As a result, the prospective influx of people to what had been an industrial area seems likely to attract retailers and other service companies. But will office developers and business tenants be attracted to what has long been designated as New York City's fourth central business district, after Midtown, downtown Manhattan and downtown Brooklyn?

Opinions vary. Some office projects have been developed, and others are being planned. But despite high rents and a shortage of prime space in Midtown, office tenants are not clamoring for sites in Long Island City, real estate professionals say, and developers are reluctant to build without an anchor tenant.

"The East Side of Manhattan is one subway stop away from the Citicorp building" in Long Island City, said Christopher Jones of the Regional Plan Association, a nonpartisan research group. "That is closer than the West Side. But the East River remains a physical and psychological barrier."

The Citicorp tower, also known as Court Square One, is a 48-story, 1.4-million-square-foot office building that opened in 1989.

Mr. Jones said that government-aided efforts to revive downtown Manhattan in the wake of the attack of Sept. 11 may delay efforts to develop a commercial core in Long Island City, despite favorable zoning changes intended to encourage high-rise development.

"There is some potential tension between downtown and Long Island City," Mr. Jones said. "But over all, Long Island City caters to a different market than downtown, and it is on a different time scale" in that there is a sense of urgency to redevelop Lower Manhattan relatively quickly.

Residential development is starting to transform Long Island City, argued Sanford Zuckerbrot, chairman of Sholom & Zuckerbrot, a brokerage firm with headquarters in the area. "Until recently, we had only local developers in the area. Now, we have had an influx of big-time developers — Manhattan developers who were not associated with Queens."

He said Rockrose was planning to build seven residential buildings that would house 3,200 to 3,300 condominium units, along with other residential developments. "Now we are having long-term development, like Jersey City," where major projects have been built in several stages, Mr. Zuckerbrot said.

Some industrial buildings, like the Eagle Electric factory near the Citicorp high-rise, are being converted into residences. But Mr. Zuckerbrot said some operations, like printers, were still viable and were needed to service businesses in Manhattan.

He said the remaining industrial companies could co-exist with newer residential development in separate zones, as they do in Brooklyn in neighborhoods like Williamsburg and Greenpoint.

Some commercial projects have already happened. To house up to 2,000 MetLife workers transferred out of Manhattan, Brause Realty converted and added to an old factory facing the Queensboro Bridge. Construction is under way near the Citicorp tower for a 16-story, 270,000-square-foot building that will house the United Nations Federal Credit Union and other commercial tenants. It is called Court Square Two.

But other projects remain stalled. Tishman Speyer's plan for a major office tower in Queens Plaza [Gotham Center - not a sure thing folks] has not attracted a major tenant so far. "The site is all zoned and ready to go for as much as 3.5 million square feet, but they will not build without a tenant," said John Reinertsen, a specialist in Queens properties for CB Richard Ellis, a Manhattan-based brokerage and services company.

Mr. Reinertsen said a growing residential population might help to spur the development of commercial properties, but he added that for now areas zoned as residential would be the first to be developed. "The value of land that is zoned for residential is three times more than for commercial," he said.

The residential and commercial markets are really not linked in Long Island City, unlike in some other areas where there are mixed-use projects with offices, stores and housing, said John Maltz, the president of Greiner-Maltz, a brokerage firm focusing on Queens, Brooklyn and Long Island. The projects that have taken place, like the MetLife development or the United Nations Credit Union, have been driven by a single major tenant.

Most developers, he said, have no stomach to put up speculative office buildings in hopes of filling them with multiple tenants. "There is land available along Jackson Avenue" that is zoned for high-density commercial development, he said, "but nobody is going into the ground."

Nevertheless, when the Reckson Associates Realty Corporation, a real estate investment trust, acquired the Citicorp building and recapitalized it last fall, the company noted the potential of the area.

Scott Rechler, the president of Reckson, said Long Island City was "one of the last remaining underdeveloped New York City submarkets."

kliq6
February 9th, 2006, 03:22 PM
LIC will be a residential area and Downtown brooklyn future is more residential as well, Hudson yards is the only place left to build massive office buildings that will attract the interest needed

lofter1
February 22nd, 2006, 12:17 AM
Silvercup Studios Sets $1 Billion Complex

By CHARLES V. BAGLI (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/b/charles_v_bagli/index.html?inline=nyt-per)
New York Times
Feb. 22, 2006

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/02/22/nyregion/22studio.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

With New York City suddenly awash in film and television productions, Silvercup Studios has unveiled plans for a version of Hollywood on the East River, a $1 billion complex with soundstages, commercial space and housing on the Queens waterfront south of the Queensboro Bridge.

The six-acre project in Long Island City, which formally began wending its way through the city's land use review process yesterday, is called Silvercup West, an expansion of Silvercup's existing operation six blocks to the east, the home studio for television shows like "The Sopranos" and "Hope & Faith" and where many movies have been filmed.

If it is approved, the expansion would include eight soundstages, production and studio support space, offices for media and entertainment companies, stores, 1,000 apartments in high-rise towers, a catering hall and a yet-to-be-named cultural institution. Silvercup would easily be the largest production house on the East Coast, although Steiner Studios in Brooklyn has the largest single soundstage.

"With added studio space, more productions that may have been filmed elsewhere will now take advantage of all the benefits of filming in New York City," said Stuart Match Suna, who together with his brother Alan formed Silvercup in 1983. "In addition, we are creating a 24/7 live, work and leisure community."

The project was designed by an architect with his own marquee value: Lord Richard Rogers, best known for the Pompidou Center in Paris and the Millennium Dome in London.

Lord Rogers is also designing the expansion of the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center on the West Side of Manhattan. His plans in Queens also call for a plaza and a public waterfront esplanade.

In the latest example of the boom in television and film production in New York, Mr. Suna said there are now five television pilots taping at Silvercup, including "Ugly Betty," "Six Degrees" and "Kidnapped," as well as two movies for Warner Brothers. There would have been a third, he said, but there was not enough space.

"Mostly Martha," starring Catherine Zeta-Jones (http://movies2.nytimes.com/gst/movies/filmography.html?p_id=36062&inline=nyt-per), and "Music and Lyrics By," with Drew Barrymore (http://movies2.nytimes.com/gst/movies/filmography.html?p_id=4289&inline=nyt-per) and Hugh Grant (http://movies2.nytimes.com/gst/movies/filmography.html?p_id=28225&inline=nyt-per), will be filmed at Silvercup this year.
Gone are the days when shows about New York like "Seinfeld" and "NYPD Blue" were shot in California. Last year, there were more than 100 new and returning TV shows taped in New York, according to the Mayor's Office of Film, Theater and Broadcasting.

New York attracted more than 250 independent and studio films in 2005, up from 202 in 2004 and 180 in 2003. The total number of days film crews spent shooting on location soared by 35 percent last year from 2004, to 31,570. And that number does not include additional work done at studios and soundstages, said Julianne Cho, assistant commissioner at the mayor's film office.

The Suna brothers and Hal G. Rosenbluth, president of Kaufman Astoria Studios, the city's original film studio, also in Queens, attribute the jump in activity to a joint city and state program that went into effect at the end of 2004 that offers tax incentives for films that complete 75 percent of their studio work in New York City.

"This town is fairly busy, so I think there's still room for growth," Mr. Rosenbluth said. "Tax credits have really worked."

Kaufman Studios, which is in talks to merge with Culver Studios, a Los Angeles-based production house, hopes to begin construction next year on its own long-awaited expansion.

At Steiner Studios, the $118 million production house on 15 acres at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, "The Producers" started filming before the five giant soundstages officially opened at the complex in November 2004. Since then, Spike Lee (http://movies2.nytimes.com/gst/movies/filmography.html?p_id=99175&inline=nyt-per) has shot "Inside Man" with Denzel Washington (http://movies2.nytimes.com/gst/movies/filmography.html?p_id=74843&inline=nyt-per) and Julie Taymor (http://movies2.nytimes.com/gst/movies/filmography.html?p_id=113783&inline=nyt-per) recently finished "Across the Universe."

Still, film and TV production is a tough business. Unlike office buildings that rent to tenants for 10 and 15 years at a time, soundstages are booked for weeks, or even days, at a time, and require a steady stream of new business to remain economically viable. The question remains: Can New York sustain this level of activity against competition from Canada and 20 other states and cities that offer tax breaks and other incentives?

Alan Suna, the chief executive of Silvercup, acknowledged that his two-million-square-foot project was ambitious but added that "it's also a very sensible project." The Silvercup expansion, he said, will incorporate the restoration of the landmark New York Architectural Terra Cotta Company building.

Trained as architects, the Sunas also have experience in developing housing, including the Renaissance project on 116th Street and Lenox Avenue in Harlem.

Mr. Suna said that the project was designed to be built entirely within two years, or in phases as demand dictates. It faces its first public hearing on April 6 at Community Board 2 in Long Island City.



Copyright 2006 (http://www.nytimes.com/ref/membercenter/help/copyright.html)The New York Times Company (http://www.nytco.com/)

BrooklynRider
February 22nd, 2006, 09:32 AM
I'm loving the rendering.

lofter1
February 22nd, 2006, 10:23 AM
Silvercup Studios Sets $1 Billion Complex
Ooops! Existing thread: http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=3622

krulltime
March 1st, 2006, 09:58 PM
From the top of the Empire State Building. March 1, 2006:


http://i.pbase.com/o4/55/435155/1/56705448.15.JPG

http://i.pbase.com/o4/55/435155/1/56705451.16.JPG

http://i.pbase.com/o4/55/435155/1/56705456.17.JPG

Derek2k3
March 4th, 2006, 12:46 AM
Lots of new renderings and projects on Karl Fischer's website. Be sure to look in News > Upcoming Projects.
http://www.kfarchitect.com/

antinimby
March 4th, 2006, 01:53 AM
Wow.
You're not kidding. I like their style.
Karl Fischer Architects, remember the name - it's quality architecture.
This is what this city needs more of:

Queen's Plaza (God, I hope this happens and soon)
http://img145.imageshack.us/img145/8399/queensplaza8bt.jpghttp://img145.imageshack.us/img145/5269/queensplaza18jr.jpghttp://img63.imageshack.us/img63/48/queensplaza27fe.jpg

sfenn1117
March 4th, 2006, 05:45 PM
Queens Plaza does look incredible...

TLOZ Link5
March 6th, 2006, 06:52 PM
Not seeing anything.

antinimby
March 6th, 2006, 07:06 PM
Go to the firm's website here (http://www.kfarchitect.com/).

Strattonport
March 9th, 2006, 10:35 AM
Queens West tower on tap
Ground broken for site's 5th building
BY DONALD BERTRAND
DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER

Link to article (http://www.nydailynews.com/boroughs/story/398026p-337298c.html)

The towers keep rising in the West - Queens West, to be exact. Ground was broken at the Queens West development site yesterday for a $175 million, 39-story residential tower that will feature 602 upscale rental apartments.
When completed late next year, it will become the fifth residential building at the site.
The groundbreaking comes 10 years and two days after ground was broken on the first building - Citilights - at the 74-acre site on the East River just across from the United Nations.
Called Avalon Riverview North, it joins Citilights and Avalon Riverview, a 32-story luxury apartment tower, which is fully occupied.
An 80-unit low-income senior housing building and a 32-story glass apartment building are nearing completion.
That glass-walled tower is part of the $1 billion project - including 3,200 apartments in seven towers - that will rise on the 21-acre former Pepsi-Cola plant site. Now owned by Rockrose Development Corp., it is part of the second phase of Queens West.
"By breaking ground today on Avalon Riverview North we will reach a critical milestone," said Charles Gargano, chairman of the Empire State Development Corp.
Avalon Riverview North is the last residential building being constructed in Phase One of Queens West, said Gargano, who added that Rockrose is expected to break ground on a second Phase Two building in a few weeks.
"By 2008, we will have achieved critical mass - constructing more than 2,400 apartments within the four blocks between 47th and 50th Aves.," Gargano said.
"With the success of our first community in Long Island City, the new property promises to offer more amenities and luxury living conditions, and we are confident that it will attract more residents to Long Island City," said Fred Harris, senior vice president of Avalon Bay.
Gargano said that Queens West, a subsidiary of Empire State Development Corp., is now making plans to develop the southern portion of the site. However, he noted, Queens West no longer plans to develop any commercial space, but rather will be concentrating on residential and "some small commercial retail."
Councilman Eric Gioia (D-Sunnyside), who represents the area, issued a statement yesterday calling for more to be done at the Queens West site for the middle class.
"As this neighborhood grows, we need home ownership opportunities that people can afford, new schools, and amenities like libraries and parks," said Gioia, who did not attend the groundbreaking.
When Avalon Riverview opened, rents for studios ranged from $1,495 to $1,920 a month; one bedrooms, $1,845 to $3,475; two bedrooms, $2,750 to $3,880, and three bedrooms, $3,565 to $4,395.
Prices at the new building will be market rate, Harris said.
Originally published on March 9, 2006


Really good news. I can't wait when Phase 2 begins!

Derek2k3
March 24th, 2006, 11:18 PM
Originally posted by Krulltime on SkyscraperPage.


Development Descends on Queens


http://www.archpaper.com/images/feature_05_06/patch03.jpg


RESIDENTIAL

1 Silvercup West
Owned by Alan and Stuart Match Suna and designed by Richard Rogers Partnership, Silvercup West is a $1 billion mixed-use project spread over 6 acres, and includes residential, commercial, cultural, and civic spaces, in addition to 1 million square feet of film-production studios.

2 River East
44–02 Vernon Blvd.
Developed by Vernon Realty and sited on 6 acres just south of Silvercup West, River East will contain 1.2 million square feet of residential and commercial space. Rows of townhouses will lead to two 30-story towers on the river and a newly landscaped esplanade. The WalkerGroup of New York and its in-house V Studio, led by architect Jay Valgora, are masterplanning the site and designing the buildings.

3 Queens West
The Queens West Development Corporation (QWDC), a subsidiary of the Empire State Development Corporation, has divided their large waterfront site into four development phases.

Phase II, contracted to Rockrose Development Corporation will contain seven buildings with 3,000 residential units and 20,000 square feet of commercial space. The first two buildings have been designed by Arquitectonica; one will be completed in May, and the other broke ground this month. Handel Architects have designed a third building, with construction to begin late 2006. Arquitectonica will design at least one more building, and the other two are as-yet uncommissioned.

Avalon Bay Communities is developing phase I, just south of Rockrose’s. Its first residential tower was completed in 2001 and the second broke ground early this year, and will be completed by May of 2007. Both were designed by Perkins Eastman. A third lot on Avalon Bay’s site will likely serve as either a public park or a branch of Queens’ Public Library.

Phases III and IV, located partially on the Olympic Village site, have no developers attached, but will likely see the type of mixed-use projects as the first two phases. The QWDC is considering keeping parts of the Olympic site plans.

4 Power House
50–09 Second St.
Cheskel Schwimmer and CGS developers will add 100,000 square feet to the former Pennsylvania Railroad Power House’s existing 150,000, converting the structure into a residential complex. The new building, designed by Karl Fischer Architect, will contain 190 condominiums.

5, 6 The Gantry
5–15 49th Ave. and 48–21 5th St.
The Milestone Group, based in New York City, will develop an existing warehouse into 64 condos, designed by local firm Gerner Kronick + Valcarcel Architects. The Gantry will be ready for occupancy early this summer.

7 50th Ave. and 5th St.
Developers Joseph Escarfullery and Joseph Palumbo are planning an 11-unit, high-end co-op on the site of a current parking lot.

8 5–49 Borden Ave.
535 Borden LLC has been working with New York architect Juan Alayo to develop a 12-story, 132-unit residential building. The project’s backers are presently closing on the sale of the lot to another developer. The sale includes the architectural plans, which, as of now, will remain unchanged.

9 East View Condos
10–40 46th Rd.
The East View Condos are in development by owner Henry Khanali and the New York architecture firm Bricolage Designs. The ground-up construction will be five stories, with an as-yet undetermined number of units, and should be completed by the summer of 2007.

10 41–43 47th Ave.
No information available.

11 Vantage Jackson
10–50 Jackson Ave.
This 13-story building is being developed by the Lions Group with Emmy Homes, and will contain 35 to 40 units.

12 10–63 Jackson Ave.
MKF Realty is planning a 40-unit building just west of the Polaski Bridge. Completion expected in early 2007.

13 Badge Building
10–55 47th Ave.
Bricolage Designs is designing an eight-story ground-up building that will be attached to an exisiting and soon-to-be-refurbished four-story factory, which once manufactured medallions and badges. The building complex will contain 44 condos; interiors will be designed by Front Studio. Badge Building Development LLC is a group of independent investors led by the building’s current owner, who has been sitting on the property for the last ten years.

14 12–01 Jackson Ave.
Hentze-Dor Real Estate is developing a 35-unit rental on an irregularly shaped lot on Jackson Avenue.

15 Echaelon Condominiums
13–11 Jackson Ave.
Ron Hershco of Jackson Realty LLC is planning a 52-unit condominium designed by Newman Design Group of Cold Spring Hill, New York. Occupancy is scheduled for late spring of 2006.

16 Venus Site
Queens Plaza North and 24th St.
Developer Moshe Feller is reportedly working on a condo building that will house 320 units.

17 24–15 Queens Plaza North
Karl Fischer Architect is planning alterations to an existing 50,000-square-foot office building for an unnamed developer.

18 42–37 Crescent St.
Owner Ruben Elberg of Royal One Real Estate and Karl Fischer Architect are planning a 16-unit condominium building with two ground-floor commercial spaces. Completion is expected mid-2007.

19 42–59 Crescent St.
Adjacent to 42–37 Crescent Street, the same developer-architect team will build another residential project with retail space. 42–59 Crescent will be slightly bigger, at 24 units, and completed by early 2007.

20 45–56 Pearson St.
Rosma Development of New York is set to build a 20-story project on a 30,000 square-foot site, creating 120 condos that should be ready by 2007.

21 Arris Condominiums
27–28 Thompson Ave.
The Andalex Group is planning an $80 million conversion of a 1920s warehouse into a mix of 237 lofts and 17 studios. Costas Kondylis and Partners is completing the design, which will involve a total overhaul of the interiors as well as exterior restoration.

22 Vantage Purves
44–27 Purves St.
Another development in the area by the Lions Group and Emma Homes Partnership, the Vantage Purves will have 57 units.

23 42–51 Hunter St.
A small group of investors under the name 42–51 Hunter Street LLC is developing a seven-story condo building with Manhattan firm Israel Peles Architects.

24 41–23 Crescent Street
No information available.

25 The Queens Plaza
41–26 27th St.
The Developers Group of New York is planning a 10-story, 66-unit condo building just north of the Queens Plaza Improvement Project.

26 27–14 41st Ave.
41st Avenue Property LLC, with Queens-based architect Surja Widjaja of Maison Design, is planning a 24-unit, 8-story residential building.

27 Gaseteria Site
Northern Blvd. and Queens Blvd.
Oil company Gaseteria has partnered with Lowe Enterprises Real Estate to develop a site bordering Long Island City’s Sunnyside Yards into a mixed-use complex with a projected 400 housing units, in addition to office and retail space.


COMMERCIAL


1 Silvercup West
(See above.)

2 United Nations Federal
Credit Union
24th St. and 45th Dr.
With a tentative completion date of this September, the $65 million United Nations Federal Credit Union building, designed by HLW international, will be the second all-commercial highrise in Long Island City, after the 1.4-million-square-foot Skidmore, Owings and Merrill– designed Citigroup tower, completed in 1989.

3 Citigroup, Phase II
Citigroup is several months into the construction of its second office buidling in the neighborhood, next door to its 48-floor tower, the tallest building in the boroughs. Designed by Kohn Pedersen Fox, the second building will be significantly smaller, at 475,000 square feet and 14 floors. An estimated 1,800 Citibank employees will be housed in the new building, which will be completed in 2007.

4 Queens Plaza Municipal Garage
Tishman Speyer recently signed a 99-year lease for the city-owned parking lot, and plans to raze the lot to build an office building with underground parking. Recently upzoned to 12 FAR, the site could accept 1.5 million square feet of development.

5 QP Site
Tishman Speyer is razing several low-scale commercial buildings and a parking lot, the former site of the QP flea market, and likely building office space in addition to that across the street at the Queens Plaza Municipal Garage. The lot is owned by businessman Bill Modell.

6 Gaseteria Site
(See above.)


OPEN SPACE


Queens Plaza Improvement Project
In 2001 the Department of City Planning began implementing a plan to improve Queens Plaza, the boulevard that runs from Sunnyside Yards to the Queensborough Bridge. The plan includes extensive infrastructural improvements, including new roadways and subway station renovations, as well as an extensive landscape scheme by Philadelphia-based Margie Ruddick, which would extend a lush, pedestrian-friendly esplanade to the East River waterfront.


http://www.archpaper.com/images/feature_05_06/patch01.jpg
The development of the Queens waterfront is modeled after that of Battery Park City. Now on the drawing boards are (from left to right) residential highrises by V Studio/Walkergroup, Arquitectonica, Perkins Eastman, and Handel Architects.


Copyright © 2005 The Architect's Newspaper, LLC

Derek2k3
March 24th, 2006, 11:31 PM
I posted this before but here's the rendering.

Echaelon Condominiums
13-11/ 13-97 - 13-05 Jackson Avenue
11-24 - 11-38 47th Avenue
13 stories 123 feet
Newman Design Group
Dev-Jackson Avenue Partners, LLC (Ron Hershco)
Residential Condominium
55 units 63,828 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2005-2006

Photo by NYCTowers (Carlos) (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v109/nyctowers/2006/DSC01318.jpg)

Derek2k3
March 24th, 2006, 11:40 PM
Hunter's Point Lofts
5th Street
7 stories 65,000 Sq. Ft.
Alayo Architects
Dev-Aris Investments
Residential
Proposed


http://www.alayo.com/images/m_hunter1.jpg
Alayo Architects

Hunter Point's Lofts
New York, New York
http://www.alayo.com/hunter.htm

This site in Long Island City is currently in the process of rezoning from manufacturing uses to also accommodate residential. This project takes advantage of this imminent rezoning and proposes a new mid rise residential block along 5th Avenue, and 41st Street in Long Island City. The site is behind the current City Lights project and the new high rises under construction along the East River. The building’s design also takes advantage of the view corridor down 5th street to the river by creating alternating corner window conditions to allow residents open views towards the park across the street and the Manhattan skyline. The building is designed as a masonry base structure with a metal panel and glass set back level above.

Client:
Aris Investments

Cost:
$15,500,000

Size:
65,000 GSF

Completion:
Summer 2006

Derek2k3
March 24th, 2006, 11:54 PM
One Hunter's Point
5–49 Borden Avenue
12 stories 123 feet
Alayo Architects
Dev-535 Borden LLC
Residential
138 units 154,092 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2006-

http://www.alayo.com/images/m_onehunter.jpg

http://www.alayo.com/onehunter.htm
Alayo Architects
One Hunter's Point
New York, New York

One Hunter’s Point is a 12 story, 150,000 SF residential project in the Hunter’s Point District of Long Island City. The building sits opposite the proposed Olympic Village, and takes advantage of the site’s panoramic views across the East River to Manhattan. The building’s design is an interpretation of the traditional loft buildings that have been typically built in the area. This vocabulary allows the use of expansive glass surfaces to allow light and views into the apartments and the use of masonry to convey a sense of permanence to this evolving neighborhood. The building’s technical challenges include locating the building partially over the Queens Midtown Tunnel and utilizing a steel and plank superstructure. The units are designed with open kitchens, and dining alcoves to enlarge a typically small unit type.
A landscaped private garden and roof deck are unique amenities to this project.

Client:
The Domain Companies

Cost:
$35,000,000

Size:
150,000 GSF

Completion:
Spring 2007

Derek2k3
March 25th, 2006, 12:02 AM
I think I posted this on another page along with the proposed Vantage Jackson.

Vantage Purves
44-27 Purves Street
14 stories 151 feet
Gene Kaufman Architect
Dev-Emmy Homes and Lions Group
Residential Condominiums
57 units 77,470 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2005-2006

Vantage Purves
http://www.multifamilyexecutive.com/industry-news-print.asp?sectionID=546&articleID=217426

The New York Lions Group is developing Vantage @ Purves Street, a 57-unit condominium community in Long Island City, N.Y. The 14-story project will offer studios, one-, two-, and three-bedroom units featuring balconies, 9-foot ceilings, and cherry wood flooring. Units are selling from the $400,000s to more than $1 million. Completion is scheduled for fall 2006.

Derek2k3
March 25th, 2006, 12:13 AM
I guess one of these "Hunter's Point Lofts" are going to have to change their names.

Hunter's Point Lofts
Fogarty Finger Architects
Residential Condominiums
40 units
Proposed

http://www.fogartyfinger.com/

Located in the heart of the Hunter's Point section of Long Island City this 7 story residential building overlooks a small city park. Forty bi-level live/work lofts with large full height windows provide generous light and unobstructed views for the apartments over to Manhattan.

NewYorkYankee
March 26th, 2006, 01:01 AM
Which two on that list are the two buildings in LIC that are already completed?
EDIT: Also, the Gantry is the 3rd building that is u/c currently now correct?

krulltime
March 26th, 2006, 01:16 AM
Waterfront activity builds
Queens West nears second phase; more construction soon


By Tommy Fernandez
Published on March 27, 2006

The redevelopment of Long Island City's waterfront is picking up: One builder recently started work on a 39-story luxury residential tower, and another one is putting the finishing touches on plans to begin construction of two other buildings.

The first groundbreaking, which took place earlier this month, was for Avalon Riverview North. The tower is the third by developer and landlord Avalon Bay Communities Inc. at the giant Queens West development, which will span 74 acres along the East River.

Avalon Riverview North, which is set to be done by fall 2007, will complete the first phase of Queens West. It is "another step in enhancing an already vital neighborhood," says Gayle Baron, president of the Long Island City Business Development Corp.

The second phase of Queens West will be launched with two planned groundbreakings by Rockrose Development Corp.--one next month and the other possibly by the summer.

Over the next decade, Rockrose will build seven luxury towers in a 21-acre area that was formerly the home of a Pepsi-Cola bottling plant. Although some of the towers have not been fully designed, officials expect that this construction will create nearly 3,000 market-rate apartments and condominiums and 40,000 square feet of retail space. An elementary school is also planned.

In total, the $2 billion Queens West project will go through four stages and generate 6,000 residential units in 15 buildings.


Projects under way


Queens West is one part of the commercial and residential rebirth of Long Island City, which has enjoyed explosive growth over the past three years. A dozen residential projects, including an eight-story, 237-unit residential community by The Andalex Group and a 160-unit residential tower by Rosma Development Inc., are under way. Commercial projects include a new regional headquarters for HSBC Bank as well as a 16-story, 270,000-square-foot tower for the United Nations Federal Credit Union.

"This project will change the entire scope of Long Island City," says Alfonso Holloman, a director of sales at Massey Knakal Realty Services.

Real estate prices have already spiked. Rents for studios have risen above $1,100, while commercial rents have jumped by at least 50% to as much as $50 per square foot. Consequently, some local leaders have warned that the area's economic renaissance might be proceeding too quickly and may soon drive out middle-class residents.

City Councilman Eric Gioia, who represents the area, says that he supports Queens West but is also pushing developers to build more schools, parks and civic amenities. He wants assurances that at least some of the residential units will be affordable for middle-income families. He is talking with city officials about his concerns.

"We have an opportunity to build a place where the middle class can thrive," he says. "My hope is that we live up to that opportunity."



©2006 Crain Communications Inc.

Derek2k3
March 26th, 2006, 03:30 AM
Commercial projects include a new regional headquarters for HSBC Bank,
hmm...sounds like it could be big.



Which two on that list are the two buildings in LIC that are already completed?
EDIT: Also, the Gantry is the 3rd building that is u/c currently now correct?
Which list? The two buildings completed in Queens West so far are Avalon Riverview (32 stories) and Citylights. (42 stories)


Here's another new condo called Hunters Vu by Newman Design Group (http://www.newmandesigngroup.com/Projects/Multi_Family/Luxury/HuntersPoint.html)

http://www.newmandesigngroup.com/Projects/Multi_Family/Luxury/images/HuntersPoint_06.gif

Peakrate212
March 29th, 2006, 03:48 PM
Where is this? corner of Jackson avenue - and bridge?

Peakrate212
March 29th, 2006, 04:04 PM
Hunter's Point Lofts
5th Street
7 stories 65,000 Sq. Ft.
Alayo Architects
Dev-Aris Investments
Residential
Proposed


http://www.alayo.com/images/m_hunter1.jpg
Alayo Architects

Hunter Point's Lofts
New York, New York
http://www.alayo.com/hunter.htm

This site in Long Island City is currently in the process of rezoning from manufacturing uses to also accommodate residential. This project takes advantage of this imminent rezoning and proposes a new mid rise residential block along 5th Avenue, and 41st Street in Long Island City. The site is behind the current City Lights project and the new high rises under construction along the East River. The building’s design also takes advantage of the view corridor down 5th street to the river by creating alternating corner window conditions to allow residents open views towards the park across the street and the Manhattan skyline. The building is designed as a masonry base structure with a metal panel and glass set back level above.

Client:
Aris Investments

Cost:
$15,500,000

Size:
65,000 GSF

Completion:
Summer 2006 What site is this? I think its the site of THE GANTRY condo

JD
March 31st, 2006, 10:07 PM
No...this building is proposed for the corner of 48th Avenue and 5th Street--one block north of the Gantry.

Derek2k3
April 5th, 2006, 03:20 PM
Article about 2 20 story rising on the Astoria waterfront.
http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=16408884&BRD=1865&PAG=461&dept_id=152944&rfi=6

http://images.zwire.com/local/Z/Zwire1860/zwire/images/033006WQFront_M543.jpg

Strattonport
April 6th, 2006, 09:37 AM
Action! L.I.C.'s grand plan

Link to Daily News article (http://www.nydailynews.com/boroughs/story/406270p-344030c.html)

1st hearing on Silvercup West development is set for today
BY DONALD BERTRAND DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER

http://www.nydailynews.com/ips_rich_content/23-silvercup.JPG

A $1 billion, 2 million-square-foot mixed-use development on the Long Island City waterfront will gets its first review tomorrow at a community board hearing. Called Silvercup West, the project will include eight new sound stages, other production and studio support space, and residential apartments and commercial office space.
The project is the work of Alan and Stuart Match Suna, the owners of Silvercup Studios, where HBO's "The Sopranos" and ABC's "Hope & Faith" are based.
The project is planned for a 6-acre waterfront site just south of the Queensboro Bridge and six blocks west of Silvercup Studios' main facility.
Plans also call for it to have 1,000 units of residential space in two towers, and 665,000 square feet of office and retail space in a third tower.
In addition, the complex will have a 40,000-square-foot catering hall, a 100,000-square-foot cultural center and a public waterfront esplanade and plazas.
Queens Community Board 2 will hold a public hearing and vote on the proposal at its meeting tonight at 6:30 at the CitiCorp Building, 1 Court Square in Long Island City.
Although some community members question the size of the project, the increased traffic it will bring and its height - among other issues - it is expected to get the board's approval.
One of the residential towers will be 600 feet high and the other will be 517 feet.
The commercial and cultural portion of the project will be located just south of the Queensboro Bridge and will be 538 feet tall.
Also expected to raise questions is a proposed "Silvercup Studios" sign that would be installed on the western facade of the central structure that would contain the studios. The sign would be 195 feet long and 46 feet high.
"The expansion of Silvercup Studios is crucial for the television and film production industry. With added studio space, more productions that may have been filmed elsewhere will now take advantage of all the benefits of filming in New York City, which we like to think of as the best backdrop in the world," said Stuart Match Suna, president of Silvercup Studios.
"In addition, we are creating a 2-4/7 live, work and leisure community," he said. "The public will enjoy new restaurants and retail opportunities while having a magnificent view of the Manhattan skyline."
It is, said his brother, Alan, CEO of Silvercup, "the culmination of all we have been working at for the past 20 years."
The proposal, which is undergoing the city's land use review procedure because it would require zoning changes, is scheduled for a borough president's land-use committee hearing at Queens Borough Hall on April 27.

Originally published on April 6, 2006



---------------------------------------------------------------------



Good news. I have a feeling the project could be shortened, though.

Peakrate212
April 7th, 2006, 10:28 AM
No...this building is proposed for the corner of 48th Avenue and 5th Street--one block north of the Gantry.

So this is the Toll Brothers site?

note: it says client is Aris.........like Aris lofts? Andelex

jrosa51894
April 17th, 2006, 12:44 PM
Did anybody see the new 9 story building about to go up on cresent and 43rd ave !

shocka
April 18th, 2006, 04:34 PM
Did anybody see the new 9 story building about to go up on cresent and 43rd ave !


are you talking about Queens Plaza? : http://thedevelopersgroup.com/buildings/building.aspx?buildingid=1056&

jrosa51894
April 18th, 2006, 11:00 PM
No something totally new on the corner of cresent street & 43rd ave right on the corner. there tearing down a small factory near some houses left on 43rd ave and putting up a nine story building i took pictures but they won't upload on to the screen :mad:

jrosa51894
April 23rd, 2006, 07:48 PM
On the side of queens plaza near the citicorp building on 43rd ave. As of today the old building is completely knocked down. i was informed that the new buildings foundation starts in may! A lot is going around the citicorp area.:)

antinimby
April 23rd, 2006, 08:06 PM
...i took pictures but they won't upload on to the screen :mad:Go here (http://wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=3709) for help.

antinimby
April 23rd, 2006, 08:22 PM
Did anybody see the new 9 story building about to go up on cresent and 43rd ave !Are you talking about the one from Scarano Architects near the QB bridge?

http://www.scaranoarchitects.com/
>>> Projects
>>> Commercial
>>> top row, 3rd one in from your left.

jrosa51894
April 24th, 2006, 04:43 PM
That's it looks great huh? Now they just need to build up on the other three houses on that row(bet cresent st & hunter st). 43rd ave is the gateway to silvercup studios. i expect to see more stores and buildings going up on 43rd ave.:)

antinimby
April 25th, 2006, 04:11 PM
It's all right. The elevator shaft is what makes it stand out. The building itself is very thin.
So it's going to be a hotel? What an odd location for a hotel. Must be some kind of inn or something like that.
You've got construction pics?

jrosa51894
April 25th, 2006, 05:22 PM
it's going to be 9 stories 24 condos. the old building is down and i was informed that the new building will be started next month.
the construction pics will come soon thankyou for the link i will try to put them up soon.:D

antinimby
April 25th, 2006, 06:32 PM
Glad to see you will be taking pics for us. Anything else going up in that area (other than the well documented ones of course)?

shocka
April 26th, 2006, 09:10 AM
it's going to be 9 stories 24 condos. the old building is down and i was informed that the new building will be started next month.
the construction pics will come soon thankyou for the link i will try to put them up soon.:D


yup just a big blue fence right now. I was there last nite the UN Credit Union building looks amazing!

Peakrate212
April 26th, 2006, 01:05 PM
See design for Toll Bros. LIC project:

http://www.hto-architect.com/

click Projects, then click Toll Bros.


.....and the initial reviews are........?

shocka
April 28th, 2006, 09:49 AM
well my initial reaction.. can this website take longer to load.... apparently the designer forgot the 8 seconds rule (users loose attention after 8 seconds if they have to wait for something to load) for web design!

now on to the building.. those renderings dont really give too much, the basic structure looks alot like LIC HS.

lofter1
April 28th, 2006, 09:56 AM
well my initial reaction.. can this website take longer to load...
You must remember that this is the site for Thomas O'Hara (supposed) Architect ... where little is done right or well.

BrooklynRider
April 28th, 2006, 10:37 AM
It's an aside to this thread, but 80 Nassau looked interesting. Never heard of that project before and it looks quite tall.

krulltime
May 10th, 2006, 12:04 AM
See design for Toll Bros. LIC project:

http://www.hto-architect.com/

click Projects, then click Toll Bros.


.....and the initial reviews are........?


I like it... is it underconstruction already?


http://i.pbase.com/o4/55/435155/1/59954500.QTollBroBuilding.JPG

krulltime
May 10th, 2006, 09:05 AM
Anybody has a rendering?


Aiming high at Queens
West Builder breaks ground for 2d housing tower


BY DONALD BERTRAND
DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER
May 10, 2006

Things are heating up at Queens West.

Ground was broken yesterday on the second of seven buildings comprising approximately 3,300 units that Rockrose Development Corp. is building at Queens West.

The Rockrose buildings will occupy a 22-acre northern portion of the 74-acre site, which sits across the East River from the United Nations.

Two months ago, another Queens West developer, Avalon Bay, broke ground for its second tower, a 39-story residential tower with 602 rental apartments.

The latest Rockrose structure is scheduled to open in late 2007, and will be 290 feet tall with 394 rental apartments and 825 parking spaces.

"Our first Queens West building is set to open in less than a month, and we have already begun construction on our second building. This gives you some idea of our enthusiasm for this project and for the residential market in Long Island City," said Henry Elghanayan, a Rockrose principal.

"I am firmly convinced that this community of Long Island City which is being spearheaded by the Queens West project is going to be one of the great communities of New York."

Rockrose's first building, located adjacent to a giant Pepsi:Cola sign, is nearing completion and will start leasing in about a month. The first tenants are expected to start moving into that building in the summer.

"With the completion of the first two Rockrose buildings and Avalon Riverview North by 2008, we will have achieved critical mass constructing more than 2,400 apartments between the four blocks between 47th and 50th Aves.," said Charles Gargano, chairman of the Empire State Development Corp.

When completed, Queens West will have 19 residential buildings, an eight-story senior citizen residence, two schools, and more than 20 acres that encompasses waterfront parkland, open and commercial space, Gargano said.

"This development will literally transform this area into a vibrant neighborhood," he said.

"Rockrose is adding something very magnificent and special to this whole area," said Borough President Helen Marshall, who was especially happy about plans to open a supermarket in the second Rockrose building.


All contents &#169; 2006 Daily News, L.P.

BrooklynRider
May 10th, 2006, 11:44 AM
I think it is in this thread. You have to go backward.

krulltime
May 10th, 2006, 12:15 PM
^ I did... and found nothing yet.

shocka
May 11th, 2006, 11:41 PM
Anybody has a rendering?



This is the best that is out there right now...

https://www.rockroseleasing.com/eastcoast/

shocka
May 11th, 2006, 11:42 PM
I like it... is it underconstruction already?



looks like it.. its soo hard to tell at the site.. there is soemthing going on .. is it contruction for the new building or demolition of the old building not 100% sure..

Derek2k3
May 12th, 2006, 12:39 AM
http://www.archpaper.com/images/feature_05_06/patch01.jpg
Regarding East Coast. The second rendering is the next building to go up by Arquitectonica (UC) and the last rendering is the 3rd building to go up (Late 2006-2008) by Handel Architects.

Strattonport
May 13th, 2006, 12:52 AM
This progress is incredible. I can't wait to see what LIC will be shaped like in the next couple of years... I do think a better transit will be needed. Maybe some bus routes looping around the area would help?

Derek2k3
May 13th, 2006, 02:19 AM
it's going to be 9 stories 24 condos. the old building is down and i was informed that the new building will be started next month.
the construction pics will come soon thankyou for the link i will try to put them up soon.:D

Yea I believe it's part of this two-building development. The 42-59 Crescent building = 25-01 43rd ave. According to this and the permits the architect is Karl Fischer which means that hotel on the Scarano site is either for a different site on 43rd Ave or is just an old proposal.

From the Architect's newpaper:

42–37 Crescent St.
Owner Ruben Elberg of Royal One Real Estate and Karl Fischer Architect are planning a 16-unit condominium building with two ground-floor commercial spaces. Completion is expected mid-2007.

42–59 Crescent St.
Adjacent to 42–37 Crescent Street, the same developer-architect team will build another residential project with retail space. 42–59 Crescent will be slightly bigger, at 24 units, and completed by early 2007.

jrosa51894
May 13th, 2006, 08:30 PM
Thanks for the instructions on how to post pics here they are: it's 25-01 43rd ave sorry

jrosa51894
May 13th, 2006, 08:41 PM
here some more

Derek2k3
May 13th, 2006, 08:42 PM
"World-Renowned Architect" my ass...thanks for the pics though.

jrosa51894
May 13th, 2006, 08:44 PM
Again sorry for the pic size but i am still learning:)

jrosa51894
May 13th, 2006, 08:53 PM
Hey you got to admit though big changes on that block are just beginning and around the corner also:)
Final Pictures and the building is now gone in two weeks not bad?

jrosa51894
May 13th, 2006, 09:00 PM
Hey what's going on with the hunter street condos?
The investment group bought the three attached houses on hunter street bet 43rd ave & 44 ave/ drive for 7.5 million. They put up a web sight but no constuction yet?
Any info? it is going to be a 15-17 story building. :confused:
http://www.basilebuilders.com/main/hunter.html "Web site originally posted by Derek2k3"

antinimby
May 14th, 2006, 01:46 AM
"World-Renowned Architect" my ass...thanks for the pics though.Hey, you've got to admit his stuff is pretty good. Light years ahead of SCLE, HLW (yuck!), Bricolage and H. Thomas O'Hara (triple yuck!).

shocka
May 14th, 2006, 12:01 PM
This progress is incredible. I can't wait to see what LIC will be shaped like in the next couple of years... I do think a better transit will be needed. Maybe some bus routes looping around the area would help?


Looking at the queens west area once the 7 rockrose buildings are completed, the new Avalon tower is up, all the smaller condos (Gantry, Galaxy, Badge, TollBros etc.) are up and the Powerhouse is built I cant imagine what that 7 train is going to be like. Not to mention the fact that Greenpoint condos are advertisting as a "10 minute walk to the 7 train on Vernon/Jackson". http://137dupont.com/ Check the map the 7 train is closer then the G.

It would be nice if they setup buses to get you through the midtown tunnel that would help with the traffic on the 7 train.

jrosa51894
May 14th, 2006, 07:54 PM
i was told that they are in contract to sell the building for around 71 mil to that guy involved with the greenpoint fires, baruch singer i think his name is anybody got any info?:confused:

infoshare
May 14th, 2006, 09:52 PM
i was told that they are in contract to sell the building for around 71 mil to that guy involved with the greenpoint fires, baruch singer i think his name is anybody got any info?:confused:

http://www.citylimits.org/content/articles/weeklyView.cfm?articlenumber=237

http://www.radioislam.org/thetruth/slumlords.htm

http://www.columbiaspectator.com/vnews/display.v/ART/2005/10/26/435f33ec9cda2

jrosa51894
May 15th, 2006, 09:05 AM
Based on the info you linked i hope that's not the guy or that type of businessman coming into LIC:mad:

shocka
May 15th, 2006, 05:25 PM
i was told that they are in contract to sell the building for around 71 mil to that guy involved with the greenpoint fires, baruch singer i think his name is anybody got any info?:confused:

Are you thinking of Joshua Guttman..hes a slimeball as well.
http://www.ny1.com/ny1/content/index.jsp?stid=9&aid=59185

I think Singer and Guttman have been partners in couple projects in the past.

there is also work that Singer is going to be building 2 20 story condos between Vernon and the waterfront in LIC...

Needless to say they do not sound like the type of developers I want to see in NY in general!

jrosa51894
May 15th, 2006, 06:20 PM
Crains states that Long Island City is a very Strong Possibility!

But i wonder where? The article talks about the possibility of queens West, however if they put in near queens plaza in one of those old box manufacturing plants it might work

jrosa51894
May 15th, 2006, 08:16 PM
Everytime i go by the site i see no activity any info? What's the hold up

Peakrate212
May 16th, 2006, 07:52 PM
Everytime i go by the site i see no activity any info? What's the hold up


I hear its back on the market . .........for sale

infoshare
May 17th, 2006, 08:41 AM
New graphics on LIC developments.

https://www.rockroseleasing.com/eastcoast/Site%20Plan.pdf

jrosa51894
May 19th, 2006, 10:13 PM
The giant crane similar to the crane used for united nations credit corp is being put up! Great i will never get any sleep this weeked:p pictures will follow!

jrosa51894
May 22nd, 2006, 06:33 PM
This building should be up in no time

Edward
May 22nd, 2006, 11:45 PM
East Coast Tower I. 21 May 2006.

http://www.wirednewyork.com/queens/queens_west/east_coast/east_coast.jpg

ablarc
May 23rd, 2006, 12:01 AM
Interesting Buick. 1960.

Derek2k3
May 24th, 2006, 10:57 PM
http://static.flickr.com/51/135176645_ea880284ca_b.jpg

http://static.flickr.com/56/135177198_f0cd6976a4.jpg
River East Site in the foreground.

Phyllis Gabor / Odisea Burbujas' photostream (http://www.flickr.com/photos/phyllisgabor/)

Peakrate212
May 25th, 2006, 11:13 AM
LIC rocks........its like a small town, yet 5 minutes to Grand Central (7 train to Vernon-Jackson).

ramvid01
May 28th, 2006, 08:13 PM
http://img118.imageshack.us/img118/4861/dsc00010005tl.jpg (http://imageshack.us)
http://img118.imageshack.us/img118/2994/dsc00011016ng.jpg (http://imageshack.us)
http://img118.imageshack.us/img118/9752/dsc00015008ca.jpg (http://imageshack.us)

some pictures of East Coast from today.

antinimby
May 28th, 2006, 08:15 PM
Ugh!
Modern day "towers in the park?" :(

ramvid01
May 28th, 2006, 08:35 PM
Ugh!
Modern day "towers in the park?" :(

wouldnt say so, the tower takes up all of its block, plus that park is a waterfront park, so it can't be really stated as a tower in a park (although the other towers will probably be that :( ).

antinimby
May 28th, 2006, 09:06 PM
That's unfortunate.
Haven't we learned anything from Jane Jacobs?
What's urban about that picture? Where's the shops on the corner?
A bakery on the ground floor, apartments on top? Isn't that what gives a sense of an intimate, friendly, livable neighborhood?

How ironic is it that taller towers are making that place more suburban than what they replaced, which was essentially blocks that followed the grid pattern of the city?

Bad, bad urban (or lack thereof) planning.

Amanda Burden, please take an introductory course in Urban Planning at your local community college, please.

JD
May 28th, 2006, 09:30 PM
antinimby, you have not the faintest idea of what you're talking about. "Blocks that followed the grid pattern of the city?" Have you ever set foot in that neighborhood?

Believe me, that area is quite pleasant--absence of a quaint bakery on the ground floor of a thirty-story tower notwithstanding.

"Nostalgia...it ain't what it used to be."

ramvid01
May 28th, 2006, 09:34 PM
antinimby, you have not the faintest idea of what you're talking about. "Blocks that followed the grid pattern of the city?" Have you ever set foot in that neighborhood?

Believe me, that area is quite pleasant--absence of a quaint bakery on the ground floor of a thirty-story tower notwithstanding.

"Nostalgia...it ain't what it used to be."

i will have to agree with JD. The only reason these buildings have parks next to them is because the lot is not completely surrounded by roadway, and New York City is rehabilitating the waterfront with parks. That being said, the other 2 highrises in the area have ground floor stores, including a very good restaurant (although pricey). Besides the pretty park, this area is very urban.

antinimby
May 28th, 2006, 10:03 PM
antinimby, you have not the faintest idea of what you're talking about. "Blocks that followed the grid pattern of the city?" Have you ever set foot in that neighborhood?
Believe me, that area is quite pleasant--absence of a quaint bakery on the ground floor of a thirty-story tower notwithstanding.
"Nostalgia...it ain't what it used to be."Actually JD, I have been to that area, even walked around the Citylights development and up to the riverfront. What I saw and felt was exactly what those photos imparted. It felt detached from the rest of the more tightly-knitted neighborhoods (although older and somewhat dilapidated) further to the east.

While it was pleasant as you say, in a sense that it was serene and park-like, but is that what makes a solid, lasting residential neighborhood? To me, this sort of development creates a faceless, sterile, non-intimate setting that--if it weren't for the view of the Midtown skyline--could be found in the suburban outskirts of, say Houston or Atlanta. Shouldn't we aspire to a more higher urban development model than those places?

And btw, you being a veteran on this forum, should know I'm not a necessarily a slave to nostalgia.

JD
May 28th, 2006, 10:21 PM
I suppose we view the area differently. I don't see it as sterile and faceless at all. The freight barges--"gantries"--that are a remant of the neighborhood's industrial past have scrubbed and converted into an interesting park, and the neon Pepsi-Cola sign that has beamed onto the East River since '36 has been preserved as well. The three towers that have been built so far all more interesting architecturally than the usual banal residential skyscrapers, and all have ground-floor retail.

I admit that a row of brownstones is more appealing & more humane than high-rises, but the old expression that a skyscraper is a machine for making the land pay was coined for a reason. The waterfront of LIC, which bore a resemblance to Dresden c. 1945, was not going to be developed under the principles of New Urbanism, so if that is acknowledged, I think what's there now--and what is to come--is change for the better.

antinimby
May 28th, 2006, 11:06 PM
JD, it appears that we are more in agreement than you may believe.

I have nothing against the towers themselves at all. In fact, I believe in creating higher density in the city, but it appears that this is the wrong way of doing it.

To me, this is no different in layout and effect than the public housing projects surrounded by green space that have blighted the landscape of this and many other cities. Those were obvious mistakes that somehow, unfortunately we're repeating all over again here, except now they have shiny facades and are generally unaffordable.

Solution? For starters, the towers should have smaller footprints (but not necessarily shorter towers) with buildings that are closer together (you can say then that this is a flaw with the FAR system but that's a discussion for a different thread). Greenspace and parks should not surround every single building but should be strategically placed in certain areas of the neighborhoods.

What they are creating now is another Battery Park City. What I would like to see is perhaps a Chelsea or an Upper East Side.

ablarc
May 29th, 2006, 07:24 AM
The dividing line is: do you have buildings surrounded by space or spaces surrounded by buildings?

The former is a suburban paradigm; the latter yields streets and squares.

NittanyBlue2002
June 12th, 2006, 02:54 AM
I recently moved to NYC from Chicago. I'm familiar with a number of emerging neighborhoods in the 5 boroughs. However, I've been finding these Long Island City renovation developments to be of particular interest. Most notably, the majority of these luxury high-rise residential projects are expected to be available only for rent. That should be a pretty substantial indication, backed by real dollars, as to what these developers are expecting to become of the neighborhood in the future.

And why shouldn't they expect great things from the place that's supposedly been called a sleeping giant for the last 20-30 years? It boasts a magnificent view of the skyline that is beyond reproach, it offers a number of convenient transportation options (5 minutes to 34th Street-Manhattan via Water Taxi, access to a bundle of subway lines, the Long Island Railroad, the Queensboro Bridge for you drivers out there, proximity to La Guardia Airport, etc.,), it has a feeling of old-world tradition with the famed and long-standing Pepsi-Cola billboard, the manufacturing plants that have been distinguished with historical status, the renovated piers, Vernon Blvd., etc.

Just like Red Hook, Williamsburg & DUMBO, Long Island City appears to have all the right ingredients that would typically lead to an explosion of demand.

I'd be interested in investing in this area, but without having done a whole of of research, the thing I find a little discouraging is the fact that the market seems to have already caught up to Manhattan-style prices. The truth is, regardless of how it's priced, and no matter what is expected of Long Island City, it is NOT Manhattan. I like the Water Taxi Beach, I like the Riverview Lounge, I like the Waterfront Cafe, I like the impending arrival of Whole Foods, I like the plans for the approved/under contruction/planned developments in the works, but I just don't like how this area is already priced as if it was in Manhattan.

In any event, just like the New York Mets, this particular aspect of Queens seems to be unquestionably "On the Rise."


Actually JD, I have been to that area, even walked around the Citylights development and up to the riverfront. What I saw and felt was exactly what those photos imparted. It felt detached from the rest of the more tightly-knitted neighborhoods (although older and somewhat dilapidated) further to the east.

While it was pleasant as you say, in a sense that it was serene and park-like, but is that what makes a solid, lasting residential neighborhood? To me, this sort of development creates a faceless, sterile, non-intimate setting that--if it weren't for the view of the Midtown skyline--could be found in the suburban outskirts of, say Houston or Atlanta.

No offense to anyone, but it sounds like you're describing Newport, NJ. Not an accurate comparison, IMO.

antinimby
June 12th, 2006, 03:41 PM
How's it inaccurate? Do tell.

jrosa51894
June 15th, 2006, 09:20 PM
I heard from a friend today that the bank of america banch building on 44th drive was sold and a building was going up does anybody have any info on this?

jrosa51894
June 15th, 2006, 09:22 PM
Did anybody notice the first level of steel on the new citicorp building is almost complete. They are moving very fast:)

pianoman11686
June 15th, 2006, 10:57 PM
It's Citigroup these days.

jrosa51894
June 17th, 2006, 02:52 PM
Thank you for correcting me. However does anybody have any new information?

NoyokA
June 17th, 2006, 08:20 PM
Of course there’s the proximity to midtown Manhattan that makes Long Island City so attractive however lets not forget about the many unpleasant aspects of LIC. These aspects may contribute to why LIC is somewhat slow to take off as a bonafide central business district. Offhand these negative aspects are the elevated 7 line, put the 7 underground and development would be instantaneous ala Second Avenue. The LIE, entrance to the Queensboro Bridge, the Midtown Tunnel, and other highway infrastructure obstruct a healthy cityscape and reinforces Queens as a point between suburbia and the City. The LIRR rail yards, as hard as it has been to cover and build on top of the Westside rail yards the LIRR rail yards are even more expansive and is located above ground, what’s worse is that the LIRR rail yard is centrally located and will prohibit future expansion. Also prohibiting expansion is the Queensbridge housing projects, America’s largest housing project which is also centrally located, which is in conjunction with the dirty Keyspan power plant right on the waterfront. Among the advantages of LIC is the abundance of warehouses and factories, which allow for large floor plans and large commercial developments however many of these are Brownfield sites and make development costly.

Strattonport
June 18th, 2006, 05:43 PM
Long Island City Rising Update: New Site, Many Drawings

Posted this past Friday on Curbed (http://www.curbed.com):

http://www.curbed.com/archives/2006_06_LIC1.jpg

A cool view of the New Look Long Island City (aka Queens West) has hit the web in the form of the East Coast Long Island City (http://www.eastcoastlic.com/) website, which is what Rockrose Development is calling the high rise city going up on the East River in Queens. The site includes an intricate flash animation with Coldplay-sounding music that makes you wonder if Chris Martin will be pictured happily diving off one of those balconies with magnificent East Side views. Rentals in the new 32-story tower at 4720 Center Boulevard start at $1,615 a month for a studio and run up to $5,730 for a penthouse. The site also includes an "interactive timeline" for your inner builder of construction through 2010. Move the slider to see Queens West as each of six more buildings goes up. Hard to navigate, but fun pointing and clicking if you're stuck inside on a nice Friday afternoon. A couple more photos after the jump.

http://www.curbed.com/archives/2006_06_2007Occup.jpg

This is the luxe rental building currently under construction that will be ready for residents next year. (They build them fast in Queens West.) This building will include a garage for 900 cars, but, until it opens, it will be dog-eat-dog parking in formerly deserted LIC.

http://www.curbed.com/archives/2006_06_LIC2008Occup.jpg
This is the new 20-story condo with 279 apartments that will break ground this December. Occupancy is scheduled for 2008. When all's said and done, there will be 3,000 apartments and 120,000 square feet of retail on 22 acres.

LIC is only getting better!

shocka
June 20th, 2006, 09:04 AM
Of course there’s the proximity to midtown Manhattan that makes Long Island City so attractive however lets not forget about the many unpleasant aspects of LIC. These aspects may contribute to why LIC is somewhat slow to take off as a bonafide central business district. Offhand these negative aspects are the elevated 7 line, put the 7 underground and development would be instantaneous ala Second Avenue. The LIE, entrance to the Queensboro Bridge, the Midtown Tunnel, and other highway infrastructure obstruct a healthy cityscape and reinforces Queens as a point between suburbia and the City. The LIRR rail yards, as hard as it has been to cover and build on top of the Westside rail yards the LIRR rail yards are even more expansive and is located above ground, what’s worse is that the LIRR rail yard is centrally located and will prohibit future expansion. Also prohibiting expansion is the Queensbridge housing projects, America’s largest housing project which is also centrally located, which is in conjunction with the dirty Keyspan power plant right on the waterfront. Among the advantages of LIC is the abundance of warehouses and factories, which allow for large floor plans and large commercial developments however many of these are Brownfield sites and make development costly.

I personally feel, these are items, that help to diversify LIC from any Manhattan 'hood.. as well as Williamsburg, Greenpoint and all the other greate water front 'hoods.