PDA

View Full Version : Jersey keeps its light-rail rolling



Pages : [1] 2

STT757
September 9th, 2004, 08:59 PM
Jersey keeps its light-rail rolling
Line through Hudson County pushes north as 3 stations open in Hoboken, Weehawken
Wednesday, September 08, 2004

Three new stations opened for service yesterday on NJ Transit's light-rail line through Hudson County, expanding New Jersey's single-most expensive transportation project.

The stops at 2nd Street and 9th Street in Hoboken and at Lincoln Harbor in Weehawken take the $2.2 billion system on its way through some of the state's most densely populated cities.

After a slow start in 2000, the light-rail system steadily has gained ridership and now handles about 17,000 passenger trips per day. Officials expect the three new stations that opened yesterday to increase the ridership by 2,400 trips per day over the next year.

By then, NJ Transit plans to open stations in Union City and North Bergen, which experts say will be pivotal to the system's success.

"The thing that NJ Transit really did right here was open this system in increments, whenever stations were ready, instead of waiting until it was all done and opening it in one fell swoop," said Douglas Bowen, president of the New Jersey Association of Railroad Passengers, a watchdog group. "Opening stations as they were ready really built up ridership."

The line now runs 12.6 miles from Bayonne through Jersey City's bustling downtown financial district to Hoboken Terminal and then out to the three new stops.

Eventually, the system is supposed to run into Bergen County, possibly as far north as Tenafly. But state officials have not secured the money for that phase of the project or even put together firm estimates on how much it would cost.

"The Hudson-Bergen Light Rail line has proven to be a strong economic driver along the Hudson County waterfront," said NJ Transit Executive Director George Warrington. "With the opening of this new segment north of Hoboken Terminal, I believe the so-called 'Gold Coast' will soon become the 'Platinum Coast.'"

The two new Hoboken stops are on the west side, in the shadow of the Palisades, in the part of the city that had not experienced the same rebirth as the section near the Hudson River. During the planning, there had been much debate on whether the route should go through Hoboken's east or west side.

Martin Robins, executive director of the Voorhees Transportation Policy Institute, said the promise of the light-rail station near 9th Street in Hoboken spurred a wave of new housing.

"No one thought that area was going to develop as it has," he said. "Look at all the development around the station."

Robins pointed out that the 9th Street station also has an elevator connecting it with Congress Street in the Jersey City Heights neighborhood on the Palisades up above.

"It's going to be interesting to see how that works, whether they get many riders from the Heights in Jersey City," Robins said.

By coincidence, NJ Transit opened the three new stations on the same day that a national transportation study group released a report showing that America's cities are increasingly becoming choked by gridlock. New Jersey officials yesterday praised the light-rail line.

"This light-rail system isn't just about transporting people to work, school or shopping and entertainment destinations," said Rep. Robert Menendez (D-Hudson), the congressman who fought to ensure that there would be a light-rail stop in Union City when he was mayor there.

"It helps New Jersey fight air pollution, reduce traffic and cut down on sprawl," added Menendez, who is a member of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee. "Finally, our light-rail project shows that we can plan transportation growth carefully, with more thought given to the needs of people who will live and work in the community today and tomorrow."

STT757
September 9th, 2004, 09:06 PM
Red tape snags new light-rail station
Thursday, September 09, 2004

In suits and smiles, an array of elected officials celebrated the opening of three stations on NJ Transit's $2.2 billion light-rail system in Hudson County on Tuesday morning.

Some even mentioned the nifty elevator that would connect the 9th Street station in Hoboken with the Jersey City Heights neighborhood at the top of the Palisades.

What they didn't mention was that the elevator had not received its operating permits from the state Department of Community Affairs and could not open for service.

"We're hoping to have it in operation by the end of the week," said Penny Bassett Hackett, a spokeswoman for NY Transit.

In the meantime, NJ Transit is providing a shuttle bus from Congress Street at the top of the Palisades to the station in Hoboken, a fairly circuitous trip compared to the quick elevator ride.

But during yesterday morning's downpour, the buses had to navigate gridlock that gripped that part of Hudson County.

Passengers have the option of taking a stairway from the Heights down to Hoboken and NJ Transit has posted security guards at the top and bottom of the stairs, Hackett said.

But yesterday, the first day that the station was open for the morning rush hour, the stairway was blocked by a massive puddle that was shin-deep.


http://www.njtransit.com/images/an_cp_hblrnewpic1.jpg

NYatKNIGHT
September 10th, 2004, 10:41 AM
New stations are always good news. Glad to see that Weehawken has finally re-joined the list of rail communities. And that elevator looks pretty cool too.

Ninjahedge
September 10th, 2004, 03:27 PM
I also like the fact that that area of JC is now accessable by elevator instead of running around. WOuld be nice to blade over and blade tha Pallisades....

NYatKNIGHT
September 10th, 2004, 05:06 PM
That really opens up that neighborhood. I used to know someone who lived up there when I lived in Hoboken and we rarely saw each other - it was too much of a hassle.

JCMAN320
February 3rd, 2006, 10:40 AM
NJ TRANSIT ANNOUNCES GRAND OPENING DATE FOR NEW LIGHT RAIL STATIONS

New service plan begins February 11, offering more seats, more frequent service in advance of station openings; Bergenline Avenue and Tonnelle Avenue stations to open February 25

February 2, 2006
NJT-06-009
Contact: Dan Stessel 973 491-7078

UNION CITY, NJ — NJ TRANSIT today announced the opening date for two new stations on the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail system, as well as a series of service enhancements to provide light rail customers with more frequent service and more seating capacity during the busiest times of the day. Service to the two new stations—Bergenline Avenue Station in Union City and Tonnelle Avenue Station in North Bergen—will begin following a grand opening ceremony on Saturday, February 25.

February 25 will also mark the start of full service—seven days a week—to Port Imperial Station, which opened for weekend-only service on October 29, 2005.

The opening of the new stations represents a major milestone in the growth of the five-year-old light rail system. Bergenline Avenue Station, which serves the densely populated communities of Union City and West New York, is located within a tunnel that cuts through the Palisades. Tonnelle Avenue Station, a 730-space park-and-ride facility located on the busy Route 1 & 9 corridor, will become the northern terminus of the light rail system. The new station will offer customers a convenient four-minute trip to the Port Imperial Ferry Terminal for trans-Hudson service, as well as access to the rest of the Hudson Waterfront.


Major service enhancements take effect Saturday, February 11

To prepare for new light rail riders and to improve service for current customers, NJ TRANSIT today announced a series of service improvements to provide customers with more seats and more frequent service. On Saturday, February 11—two weeks prior to the opening of the new stations—NJ TRANSIT will implement the following service enhancements:

-Double seating capacity on most peak-period trips. During peak periods, HBLR will operate with almost all two-car trains, doubling the seating capacity for most trips. The two-car trains will enable NJ TRANSIT to keep pace with growing ridership—up approximately 25 percent in the first quarter of FY2006 over last year.
-More frequent service. Peak-period service will increase to every five minutes, over today’s six-minute intervals, for customers traveling within the core sections of the system.
-The frequency of departures from the endpoint terminals will increase to every 10 minutes from 12-minute intervals today. Starting February 11, stations north of Hoboken Terminal will enjoy the same level of service as those to the south—a train every 5-10 minutes—up from every 15 minutes today.
-New direct service bypassing Hoboken Terminal. Beginning February 11, HBLR will begin using a new service pattern with three connected routes:
22nd Street (Bayonne)—Hoboken Terminal
Lincoln Harbor (Weehawken)—Hoboken Terminal
Lincoln Harbor (Weehawken)—West Side Avenue (Jersey City)

The new service pattern offers customers a faster, direct trip between stations north of Hoboken Terminal and those to the south by eliminating the need to change trains at Hoboken Terminal. This service will extend to Tonnelle Avenue when the new stations open on February 25.


More travel flexibility

Effective immediately, customers who purchase one-way tickets have even greater travel flexibility transferring between NJ TRANSIT buses and the light rail system. Customers can now purchase HBLR "tickets with transfer" from HBLR ticket vending machines at a cost of $2.35. When validated, these tickets may be used for travel on the light rail system, plus a one-zone transfer to any connecting NJ TRANSIT intrastate bus. Customers also may purchase a transfer onboard any intrastate bus that connects with HBLR.


Improved bus connections

NJ TRANSIT has also increased service levels on the 158 Fort Lee-Edgewater-New York bus route to every 30 minutes during the midday and evening to support connections to the light rail system at Port Imperial. During peak hours, the 156 Englewood Cliffs-New York and 159 Fort Lee-New York routes also offer frequent service along the River Road corridor for connections at Port Imperial. Further bus service changes will take effect in April to improve overall connectivity with the light rail system.

NIMBYkiller
February 7th, 2006, 01:43 PM
Hopefully they will now extend it up to Tenafly

Ninjahedge
February 7th, 2006, 02:42 PM
How close is that station to the driving range?

ASchwarz
February 7th, 2006, 02:59 PM
Hopefully they will now extend it up to Tenafly

No, the line from this point northward will be a new NJ Transit commuter rail line. It will have a transfer station with the light rail and then continue on to Manhattan. The line will use DMU technology and will eventually be expanded north up to Stewart International Airport.

If the light rail is extended northward, it will head up (or more likely under) River Road through Cliffside Park, Edgewater, Ft. Lee, etc. There are also proposed extensions west to the Meadowlands area, where they would link with the new NJ Transit Meadowlands rail line.

The light rail is also being extended futher south in Bayonne and Staten Island politicians want it to terminate on the other side of the Bayonne Bridge Staten Island. This might actually happen as Staten Island leaders are pushing for light rail in the western portion of the island.

NIMBYkiller
February 8th, 2006, 12:57 PM
Where did you hear all that? I only heard of the Stewart Line branching off the Port Jervis line, which makes sense. Doesn't make sense to run an entirely new line up there. Also, none of these lines are supposed to continue into Manhattan now that ARC dropped their proposal for the loop at Secaucus Jct which was the biggest joke of an idea I'd ever seen.

The line you're probably thinking of is the West Shore Line project, which I haven't heard anything about in over a year. However, that's just so supposed to go to Havestraw. The HBLR is on another line just east of it.

And yes, there have been ideas of extending it over the Bayonne to SI, which would be a good idea in my opinion.

ASchwarz
February 8th, 2006, 07:38 PM
Where did you hear all that? I only heard of the Stewart Line branching off the Port Jervis line, which makes sense. Doesn't make sense to run an entirely new line up there. Also, none of these lines are supposed to continue into Manhattan now that ARC dropped their proposal for the loop at Secaucus Jct which was the biggest joke of an idea I'd ever seen.

The line you're probably thinking of is the West Shore Line project, which I haven't heard anything about in over a year. However, that's just so supposed to go to Havestraw. The HBLR is on another line just east of it.

And yes, there have been ideas of extending it over the Bayonne to SI, which would be a good idea in my opinion.

NJ Transit is definitely building a new DMU line up the West Shore (Tenefly, Englewood, etc.) and it is going to eventually go into Penn Station. The interchange with light rail will allow for commuting flexibilty until the tunnel is completed. The line will end at the light rail terminal until the ARC tunnel is completed. The line will initially start at Tenefly but there are hopes to eventually extend it well into NY State. I thought it was going to Stewart but perhaps you're right and it's just going to Haverstraw. I'm not entirely sure about the NY State portion of the line.

The decision by NJ Transit was in the NY Times and the NJ papers a few months back. I'll check the Times and the NJ Transit website for a press release.

NIMBYkiller
February 8th, 2006, 11:15 PM
The West Shore line is not supposed to go to Tenafly, it is supposed to go to Havestraw. Tenafly is for HBLR. Trust me on this. I've been following many of NJTs projects VERY closely. And the West Shore line is NOT supposed to go to Penn Station. To do that, NJT would have to build a loop at Secaucus for trains to get from the Main/Bergen line onto the NEC line. Also, DMU can't go into Penn Station. Only electric serivice is allowed into Penn Station.

The planned DMU line from the Tonelle Av HBLR terminal is the cross bergen service to Patterson and possibly beyond. Personally, I think this should be both HBLR and NJT Commuter rail service(HBLR on its own tracks up to Patterson and NJT Commuter rail running from Sparta or Butler to Hoboken).

And the ARC tunnel no longer includes the Secaucus loop, which means none of the north eastern NJ lines(Pascack Valley, Main/Bergen/Port Jervis, West Shore, NYSW/Cross Bergen/Sparta) will go to Penn Station.

ASchwarz
February 9th, 2006, 11:07 AM
The West Shore line is not supposed to go to Tenafly, it is supposed to go to Havestraw. Tenafly is for HBLR. Trust me on this. I've been following many of NJTs projects VERY closely. And the West Shore line is NOT supposed to go to Penn Station. To do that, NJT would have to build a loop at Secaucus for trains to get from the Main/Bergen line onto the NEC line. Also, DMU can't go into Penn Station. Only electric serivice is allowed into Penn Station.

The planned DMU line from the Tonelle Av HBLR terminal is the cross bergen service to Patterson and possibly beyond. Personally, I think this should be both HBLR and NJT Commuter rail service(HBLR on its own tracks up to Patterson and NJT Commuter rail running from Sparta or Butler to Hoboken).

And the ARC tunnel no longer includes the Secaucus loop, which means none of the north eastern NJ lines(Pascack Valley, Main/Bergen/Port Jervis, West Shore, NYSW/Cross Bergen/Sparta) will go to Penn Station.

I don't want to argue, but I don't agree with any of this post. This contradicts everything I have heard through my friends (I am an Urban Planner and have friends working at the MTA, at NJ Transit and I have a transportation consultant friend).

I'll post the NJ Transit press release later today.

NIMBYkiller
February 9th, 2006, 12:07 PM
I don't want to argue either, but even look at the map of proposed NJT projects. The West Shore Line is shown diverting to the Meadowlands and then reconnecting with the main/bergen which has no connection at all to NYP. They would have to build a connecting track and the only place where the two intersect is at Secaucus Junction station, which is now going to be hell to try to weave a connecting track through there with the new interchange.


Now, about Tenafly. I guess the tracks are so close that one could say that the West Shore Line is going to serve Tenafly, but the line proposed to TERMINATE at Tenafly is HBLR.

injcsince81
February 9th, 2006, 04:40 PM
Not to change the topic here, but which genius at NJ Transit came up with this tongue-twister for a name (Hudson Bergen Light Rail)?

Other cities/areas have systems with catchy and easy to pronounce names (DART, MARTA, etc, etc)?

How about simply calling it HUB Rail (HUB coming from Hudson Bergen)? Or some other simple names (they did a good job naming PATH)?

I don't know about you, but this lack of creativity and marketing thought really bugs me. Sure HBLR is great for the development of the areas it connects and I am all for it. But every time I have to pronounce it I just cringe at this clunker of a name.:mad:

NIMBYkiller
February 9th, 2006, 06:04 PM
I think HBLR is a good name. HUB Rail sounds pretty uncreative to me. '

BTW, PATH isn't NJT. It's part of the Port Authority. Before it was part of PA, it was H&M(Hudson and Manhattan).

PATH=Port Authority Trans Hudson

injcsince81
February 9th, 2006, 08:47 PM
HUB Rail sounds pretty uncreative to me. '


That's cool.

I just want a name I can freaking pronounce.

Like DART, PATH, MARTA, Loop, whatever. You get my drift.

HBLR is better than names like Hudson Bergen Light Rail or Light Rail, but nobody's using it.

People say "Light Rail" which is another tongue-twister.

Shame.

NYatKNIGHT
February 10th, 2006, 10:25 AM
"Light Rail" is a tongue twister?

injcsince81
February 10th, 2006, 06:55 PM
"Light Rail" is a tongue twister?

Compared to PATH, yeah, sure.

Or compared to DART, BART, El, T, TRAX, LINK - transit system names used in other cities.

We have Hudson Bergen Light Rail. Or Light Rail (great, an improvement!)

Unwieldy, is all I am saying.

TLOZ Link5
February 10th, 2006, 06:56 PM
How about HudBerg?

STT757
February 11th, 2006, 09:49 AM
Getting back to the discussion further in the thread the Hudson Bergen LR is not going to go up the Northern Branch to Tenafly as originally planned, the Light Rail is going to go to the Meadowlands Sports Complex.

The Northern Branch will see Diesel DMU's that will connect Tenafly with HBLRT, when the new Tunnel for NJ Transit is built the Northern Branch and Tenafly will access NY Penn/34th street via the Secaucus Loop.


With new light rail station, line moves closer to Bergen

Tuesday, October 25, 2005

NJ Transit's light rail system in Hudson County will inch a little farther north this weekend - but it is still a ways off from ringing its trolley bell in Bergen County.

Trains will begin operating on weekends to and from a new Port Imperial station in Weehawken. Weekday commuters won't be able to use the new station until January. Two other stations, including a park-and-ride at Tonnelle Avenue in North Bergen, should also be up and running by mid-January, agency officials said Monday.

Still, Monday's announcement attracted a throng of public officials and Weehawken developers touting the occasion as the start of something big.

"You want to relieve congestion? Get people out of their cars as quickly as you can," state Transportation Commissioner Jack Lettiere said of the new light rail service, part of a $1.2 billion expansion of the line that by January will run from North Bergen to Bayonne. "This gives people an opportunity to do that."

For now, trains will run Saturdays and Sundays every 15 minutes between Hoboken Terminal and the Port Imperial station, across the street from the massive residential development whose name the station bears.

Then, in January, transit expects to open two more stations west of Port Imperial:

ŸA station 160 feet below Bergenline Avenue on the borders of Union City, West New York and North Bergen that NJ Transit officials predict will become the busiest station on the light rail line. Commuters will be shuttled to the sub-Palisades station by three elevators that can make the trip in 20 seconds.

ŸA 750-space park-and-ride station on Tonnelle Avenue in North Bergen, between 49th and 51st Streets.

From those stations, commuters will be able to take the light rail south to Hoboken and there transfer to a Manhattan-bound PATH train or to a Jersey City- and Bayonne-bound light-rail trolley. They also could transfer to Manhattan-bound ferries at Port Imperial.

A one-way trip on light rail is $1.75. Monthly passes cost $53.

"All of these things suggest we're being successful in finding alternatives to sitting in traffic and paying the toll gates," U.S. Sen. Frank R. Lautenberg said.

In the first year of operation, NJ Transit is projecting that 1,200 to 1,300 people will pass through the Port Imperial station each day. And NY Waterway, the ferry operator that has been trying to rebuild the passenger base that bottomed out last year, is hoping to get a significant boost from the expanded light rail service.

By next spring, NY Waterway is expected to complete a new ferry terminal about 1,000 feet from the Port Imperial station. A pedestrian walkway over Port Imperial Boulevard eventually will ease the transfer.

"The whole ferry system is going to be entering a new era," said NY Waterway founder Arthur E. Imperatore Sr., who on Monday also inaugurated a terminal at Manhattan's 39th Street, doubling the capacity for ferry operations in midtown.

Eventually, NJ Transit plans to extend the light rail system west to the Meadowlands, terminating at the sports complex. Hudson County officials have been pressing for that extension to provide easy access to residents seeking jobs at the planned Xanadu shopping and entertainment development there.

The state Sports and Exposition Authority, which runs the sports complex, commissioned a study this year of the potential extension.

Originally, the light rail line was supposed to head north into Bergen County, along the old Northern Railroad line. But a $1 billion price tag, and a shifting of priorities toward a new $6 billion commuter rail tunnel under the Hudson River, killed that plan.

Instead, NJ Transit is promising a temporary rail shuttle from Tenafly to North Bergen, where riders could transfer to the light rail line. An environmental study of that line is under way.

Ultimately, the new tunnel would allow NJ Transit to convert the Tenafly shuttle into a full-fledged commuter rail line that would give eastern Bergen County a one-stop ride into Manhattan.

STT757
February 11th, 2006, 09:53 AM
From another article

NJT Plans Bergen Rail Line To Midtown

NJ Transit
(NEWARK) NJ Transit is planning passenger rail service along a freight line in Bergen County.

The Northern Branch line between Tenafly and North Bergen would eventually let commuters ride into midtown Manhattan once a new trans-Hudson tunnel is complete.

The agency's board of directors approved environmental and planning work today.

The Northern Branch would use existing freight tracks owned by CSX Transportation, and would include self-propelled diesel rail cars.

In its first phase, the cars would connect Northern Branch riders with the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail system in North Bergen. The second phase calls for the Northern Branch to be linked to the new Trans-Hudson Express tunnel deep within the Palisades.

NIMBYkiller
February 12th, 2006, 12:57 AM
wow...talked about having my ass handed to me. I appoligize. I had not heard of ANY of that at all except for MAYBE sending HBLR to the Meadowlands. The closest thing to that that I had heard about DMU service was they were thinking of doing DMU from Tonelle Av to Patterson instead of an HBLR extension.


Personally, I think the new plan is really idiotic. And I don't understand how the cost Northern Branch can run so high. The tracks are there and in good condition I believe. It's all at or above ground level. It just doesn't make sense to me.

And the Secaucus Loop is absolutely the biggest waste I have heard of in a LONG time. The max speed that loop will have a chance of seeing is 45mph, and even that is really pushing it with the loop being really long, which means it'll take a good amount of time to complete and send the train through Secaucus Transfer station twice. Also, it makes all the money spent on the station a complete waste.

They should look into a way to extend NJT to downtown Manhattan via either Hoboken or Jersey City. That way the Northern lines that currently have Hoboken service only can run to Manhattan and serve a new area(maybe even 2 areas if via Jersey City) at the same time.

STT757
February 12th, 2006, 12:15 PM
Personally, I think the new plan is really idiotic. And I don't understand how the cost Northern Branch can run so high. The tracks are there and in good condition I believe. It's all at or above ground level. It just doesn't make sense to me.


The Light Rail runs on different type of tracks ands needs to be Electrified, having DMUs operate the line allows for the eventual direct link to Manhattan.

if they had the Northern Branch as Light Rail they would need to spend Billions to bring it up to Light Rail standards only to turn around in 10 years to spend Billions to tear down the Light Rail infastructure to revert the line to heavy rail standards to allow direct service to Manhattan.

They want the Bergen County Lines to have direct access to the new 34th Street station in Manhattan, thus Northern Branch and eventually West Shore will be heavy rail.

As for Lower Manhattan, that's what the PATH is for.

NIMBYkiller
February 12th, 2006, 10:08 PM
Actually, light rail CAN run on heavy rail. Heavy rail just can't run on light rail. That's why on some light rail lines, the light rail service is only during the day. At night, they use the tracks for freight service. So that eliminates those billions of dollars that you thought would have to be spent to convert and revert the entire line.

And light rail does not need to be electrified, but HBLR is. The RiverLine running from Camden to Trenton is DMU light rail. And speaking of DMU, DMUs can NOT operate into Manhattan. The only way they can do that is if it becomes dual mode, in which case it is no longer a DMU. Only electric service is allowed in the tunnels.


And this new 34th St station? It's just a lower level of Penn Station, which still means that the trains have to waste time going around the Secaucus Loop(which will be very hard to build now) and then go to Penn Station via a new Hudson River tunnel. Also, the West Shore was always planned to be heavy rail. The Northern Branch was only recently suggested to be heavy rail, which I think is a horrible idea. Take a look at the map. The two lines are very close to each other. This isn't Manhattan where you need a train every block. It will be a waste to have two heavy rail services so close to each other.

And I know that people can just transfer to PATH, as well as NY Waterway. I just think that if they are trying to get a new Hudson River crossing, then they have the opportunity to serve a new area and make a lot of peoples commute a lot easier, which will probably bring more riders in.

debris
February 13th, 2006, 04:14 PM
Several questions, for people who obviously know more than me:

1. Now that HBLR is turning west to the Meadowlands, would it be physically possible to link it someday with the Newark City Subway? They seem to use the same standards, and this would link give Northern NJ a chance at a unifed light rail network.

2. I understand that PATH uses IRT standards. Interagency conflicts aside, is it possible in theory to link the uptown PATH with the 7 train, and the WTC PATH with the 6 train? Assuming, of course, the MTA has future plans to extend the 7 train to 34th and 11th, then looped it back to Penn Station and Herald Square, and a link could be made between the WTC path terminal and the Brooklyn-Bridge City Hall 6 train station.

Maybe these ideas are a bit loopy but it seems some commuters really hate transfers.

NIMBYkiller
February 13th, 2006, 09:52 PM
Yes, Newark City Subway and HBLR are the same standards, so yes, they can physically link together. I actually have a map drawn out on my computer that shows my ideas for expansion that ends up combining NCS and HBLR.

As for PATH, I know the PATH-Lex idea has been thrown around a lot, and physically, it is possible. As for the 7 and PATH, that would take bulldozing the entire mezzanine of Herald Square station. Also, the 7 should just run down the west side to WTC instead of going back east via 34th.

debris
February 13th, 2006, 10:52 PM
Now THAT would be great for downtown. Could you imagine, a one stop ride to Newark Airport using the 6 train? Extending the PATH to Newark Airport would be easy ($500 million estimate) and should have been done already. Then it would be a matter of linking the WTC PATH station to Brooklyn Bridge-City Hall, and they are working on a new WTC station anyway.

I don't understand why the 7 train should be turned downtown. It would cost a ton of money and there seems to be plenty of capacity on the downtown express trains which leave from Times Square. Plus the Westside is pretty well covered starting at 23rd street heading downtown.

Anyway, steering the conversation back to light rail, it would be really nice to see a dense network of light rail in Northern NJ, especially since NJ is interested in developing the Meadowlands. Someday they should build a 42nd light rail, and send it over the Hudson to link with the HBLR. But that would cost a fortune unless you steal a tunnel from the Lincoln Tunnel. That idea has actually been pushed by the 42nd light rail folks.

ablarc
February 14th, 2006, 07:56 AM
steal a tunnel from the Lincoln Tunnel. That idea has actually been pushed by the 42nd light rail folks.
Also, on the East River side it should extend into Queens. We need a European level of taxation. ;)

JCMAN320
February 14th, 2006, 10:57 AM
The Westside Ave. Light Rail stop is only 8 blocks from my house and I have long thought of NJ Transit extending it through Westside Ave., where the Westside Line currently ends, to NJ 440 then across the Hackensack River where there is an old Jersey Central Bridge that they can rebuild and cross over Kearny, then into Newark through the Ironbound and end at Penn Station. It would def ease up the crowds on the PATH trains. NIMBYkiller if u can send me ur renderings for possible extensions over to Newark. PM me if you would like.

STT757
February 14th, 2006, 11:22 AM
From Todays Star Ledger:

$3.6M to help put Bergen rail project on the fast track
Tuesday, February 14, 2006
BY ANA M. ALAYA
Star-Ledger Staff

NJ Transit has received $3.6 million in federal funding to conduct engineering and environmental studies for the third phase of the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail line project.

Steve Santoro, head of capital programs for NJ Transit, said the money will allow the agency to get the 11-mile Northern Branch on an "aggressive" schedule.

That means construction of the Northern Branch --on which diesel trains would run from Tenafly to North Bergen -- could begin by 2008 and be completed by 2011, officials said.

"This money will help to complete the initial design," said Rep. Steve Rothman (D-9th Dist.), a member of the House Appropriations Committee, which approved the federal funds.

Seven months ago, NJ Transit scrapped its decade-old plan to extend the light-rail line deep into Bergen County and decided instead to run diesel trains along the route. That decision cut the projected cost of the project in half, to $500 million, and reduced the estimated completion time by several years, Rothman said.

"The Northern Branch has always been the most problematic," Rothman said. "We had to come up with a new idea."

The Northern Branch would run from Tenafly through Englewood, Leonia, Palisades Park, Ridgefield and Fairview before ending in North Bergen. From North Bergen, riders could switch to a light-rail line that would take them to the Jersey City waterfront, where they could take ferries or trains to New York City and other points in New Jersey.

"This will become part of a seamless web of rail transportation we want to provide in New Jersey," Rothman said yesterday during a news conference in Englewood to announce the new funding. "The line will offer a much easier commute between New York and New Jersey, relieve traffic on the George Washington Bridge and provide opportunities for economic development throughout the corridor."

Later this month, NJ Transit plans to open stations at Bergenline Avenue in Union City and Tonnelle Avenue in North Bergen, completing the first two phases of the light-rail line, a $2.2 billion project that runs 19.1 miles through Hudson County.

New Jersey Transit officials expect 7,500 trips a day on the Northern Branch.

The existing line in Hudson County has 24,000 trips a day.

NIMBYkiller
February 14th, 2006, 03:42 PM
I still think DMU on the Northern Branch is a waste. It will not make the commute any easier. People can still just take any of the bus services there to Manhattan, and those are one seat rides. This is a THREE seat ride to NYC and Jersey City.

I also think that 42nd St light rail would be a waste. Think about it. 42nd St already hsa 2 buses and 2 subway lines. A street more suitable for light rail IMO is something like Fulton st or 125th st.

JCMAN, using that bridge is actually part of my plan to extend the West End Av line to Newark Airport rail station. Here are the maps:

http://img383.imageshack.us/img383/9232/njrail2eq.th.jpg (http://img383.imageshack.us/my.php?image=njrail2eq.jpg) http://img115.imageshack.us/img115/6335/njrail27xp.th.jpg (http://img115.imageshack.us/my.php?image=njrail27xp.jpg)

Red=Heavy commuter rail
Dark Green=HBLR extensions
Yellow=Light Rail from Downtown Brooklyn/Downtown Manhattan
Light Green=Staten Island light rail
Dark Blue=Existing HBLR
Orage=Existing Newark City Subway
Pink=Newark City Subway extension
Light Blue=Heavy commuter rail(I-287 cross westchester line(Morristown, NJ-Stamford, CT))
Black=Existing NJT commuter rail

debris
February 15th, 2006, 08:42 AM
I think the 42nd street light rail would add the following:

1. Good access ALL the way across 42nd, from river to river
2. Deposit Northern NJ commuters into midtown, assuming it were connected to HBLR
3. Be a nice tourist thing
4. Be relatively cheap compared to the usual transportation projects

JCMAN320
February 24th, 2006, 09:57 AM
Union City, N. Bergen light rail stations open

Friday, February 24, 2006
By BONNIE FRIEDMAN
JOURNAL STAFF WRITER

NJ Transit has seen ridership on the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail swell over the last five years and is expecting even bigger growth with tomorrow's opening of two new stations at Bergenline Avenue in Union City and Tonnelle Avenue in North Bergen, and with the introduction of full-time service to Port Imperial in Weehawken.

During the first nine months of service, a little more than 1 million passenger trips were taken at 12 stations in the light rail system.

By the end of last year, NJ Transit boasted more than a 600-percent increase in ridership - ringing up nearly 7 million passenger rides at 20 stations. Today, roughly 24,000 passenger trips are taken on an average weekday.

NJ Transit expects those numbers to jump to 34,000 average weekday trips a year from now.

"We predict Bergenline Avenue will be among the busiest, given the population density in Union City and West New York," said Dan Stessel, a spokesman for NJ Transit. "We expect ridership at Bergenline Avenue will be more than 2,000 trips per day shortly after opening."

Officials say increased ridership is only one mark of the $2.2 billion project's success.

By far, the busiest station in the system is the Hoboken Terminal - where riders can make connections to rail, PATH, bus and ferry service. On average, 3,708 riders board the light rail at the Hoboken Terminal.

The system's other busy stations include Newport, Exchange Place, Liberty State Park, and Harborside in Jersey City, and 22nd Street in Bayonne.

LocoAko
February 26th, 2006, 11:33 PM
I take the lightrail frequently and love it.

If only there was a way that they could build a transfer to New York City! Can you imagine just walking a few blocks to the station and going straight into Manhattan?

Ahh.. I can always dream I suppose...

z22
February 27th, 2006, 12:30 AM
That transfer is called the PATH train... :-)

JCMAN320
March 16th, 2006, 07:42 PM
Light rail ridership taking off
Thursday, March 16, 2006

By BONNIE FRIEDMAN
JOURNAL STAFF WRITER

Ridership on the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail is booming two weeks after NJ Transit opened two new stations in Union City and North Bergen.

NJ Transit spokesman Dan Stessel said weekday ridership has jumped 16 percent since the agency opened stations on Bergenline Avenue in Union City and Tonnelle Avenue in North Bergen.

Before the opening of those two stations on Feb. 25, the system had an average of 23,378 weekday riders. Today, the average number of weekday riders stands at 27,222.

And the agency is seeing the most dramatic climb in weekend service.

According to Stessel, the number of Saturday riders has increased by more than 70 percent - from 9,435 on Feb. 18 to last Saturday's ridership of 16,081.

Sunday ridership also grew by 35 percent, Stessel said.

Stessel said he expects weekday ridership to continue climbing steadily in coming weeks.

"Changing commuting patterns takes a little more time than changing leisure travel," he said.

As it stands now, Stessel said, the agency is well on track to hitting its target of 34,000 weekday riders by next year.

And he gives much of the credit to the Bergenline Avenue station, which, he said, has already become one of the system's five busiest stations.

"We couldn't be more pleased with the way the new light rail stations have been embraced by the communities," he said."

Union City Mayor Brian Stack said he isn't surprised that the Bergenline Avenue station is a hit.

"It's only going to increase as time goes by," he said. "Once people catch on even more, it's going to be the top station in the light rail system."

ablarc
March 22nd, 2006, 07:37 AM
That transfer is called the PATH train... :-)
Why don't they extend PATH?

Great little subway, but there isn't enough of it.

NIMBYkiller
March 22nd, 2006, 11:55 AM
They should extend it to Newark Airport train station.

Marv95
March 31st, 2006, 11:43 AM
They should extend it to Newark Airport train station.

They have NJT rail for that.

ablarc
April 1st, 2006, 11:14 AM
They have NJT rail for that.
Marv, I flew into EWR my last visit to New York and took the Airtrain. The monorail was nifty and took me to the NJT train station, where I stood around on the platform and watched high-speed trains whizz by in both directions.

Finally an inbound train sauntered into EWR's station. After a short while it clanked to a halt in a Newark railyard. For thirty minutes it lingered stationary while its non-regular passengers fumed. Waiting for a freight train to pass? Finally it moseyed into Penn Station.

Never again. I know, I know...I just got there at the wrong time.

JCMAN320
April 5th, 2006, 01:45 PM
S.I. seeks bus link to light rail

Wednesday, April 05, 2006
By STEVEN LEMONGELLO
JOURNAL STAFF WRITER

Looking to establish a Staten Island/Bayonne bus link, which would connect out-of-state commuters with the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail, Staten Island Borough President James Molinaro filed a lawsuit against the Metropolitan Transportation Authority on Monday, saying the suit is needed despite a promise by transit officials to study demand for the route.

Transit officials say they lack the legal authority to pick up and discharge Staten Island commuters in New Jersey. Still, New York City Transit agreed last week to study the justification for a bus service between Staten Island and Light Rail stations in Bayonne as part of its involvement in Mayor Michael Bloomberg's transportation task force. Those trains link to Jersey City and Hoboken, where there is ferry or PATH service to Manhattan.

Bayonne Mayor Joseph V. Doria Jr. said he has had past discussions with Staten Island officials concerning the possibility of buses dropping off commuters on the Route 440 side of the 34th Street Station.

"We would be very supportive of buses or other mass transit from Staten Island," Doria said in a statement. "It would relieve automobile traffic congestion."

Bayonne Councilman-at-Large Anthony Chiappone called the proposal "a very good idea."

"There would be less cars parking in Light Rail lots," he said. "It would alleviate parking problems for residents."

The bus routes, though, should be made to "have the least amount of impact to residential neighborhoods," Chiappone said.

An MTA spokesman said the authority had not yet seen the lawsuit and would not comment.

Only about 12,000 Staten Island commuters travel to jobs in New Jersey, about 6 percent of all borough commuters. Private bus company Coach USA/Red & Tan line last year cut one of its two Island bus routes to Jersey City, and transit officials question whether there is a market for a new line.

Dan Stessel, a spokesman for New Jersey Transit, said it does not want to take sides in the lawsuit, but added that "it's a true testament to the reliability and convenience of the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail that Staten Island residents want to use the service . We look forward to serving them."

Newhouse News Service contributed to this report.

JCMAN320
May 4th, 2006, 09:38 AM
Funds to stretch light rail to 8th St. in Bayonne

Thursday, May 04, 2006
By STEVEN LEMONGELLO
JOURNAL STAFF WRITER

New funding for the extension of the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail to its eventual final stop at Eighth Street in Bayonne will be officially announced Saturday at 10:30 a.m. by Gov. Jon Corzine.

The funds will be available from the New Jersey Transportation Trust Fund - the renewal of which this year was sponsored by Bayonne Mayor and state Sen. Joseph V. Doria Jr.

"I would like to thank Gov. Corzine for coming to Bayonne with this great news," said Doria in a statement.

Doria said NJ Transit hasn't announced a timetable for construction of the rails from 22nd Street to Eighth Street, nor when the new station will open.

Doria will be at the ceremony along with New Jersey Transportation Commissioner Kris Kolluri and NJ Transit Executive Director George Warrington, a native of Bayonne.

JCMAN320
May 12th, 2006, 02:17 PM
Pedal to metal on bus to link S.I., Bayonne

Friday, May 12, 2006
By SETH SOLOMONOW
NEWHOUSE NEWS SERVICE

New York Sen. Charles Schumer is calling for an interim bus link between Staten Island and Bayonne immediately, while lawmakers hash out a plan for a permanent bus connection.

Schumer has asked Metropolitan Transportation Authority chairman Peter Kalikow to establish a charter bus service to make the trips as work continues on a state bill authorizing such interstate bus operation by New York City Transit.

"Charter service will allow thousands of Staten Islanders to immediately truncate what is often an onerous commute," Schumer said in a letter sent to Kalikow, indicating that Kalikow's own office had proffered the idea.

New York City Transit has long said it lacks legal authority to pick up and discharge passengers out-of-state, but Staten Island Assemblyman Michael Cusick hopes to eliminate that obstacle with a bill he plans to introduce today.

Other MTA entities, such as Metro-North, do have the needed state authorities' power to engage in joint service agreements with other transit agencies, allowing them to run interstate.

Meanwhile, Schumer said, "By implementing this link immediately, residents will be able to take advantage of the light-rail in Bayonne and get to work quicker."

MTA officials declined to comment, saying they had not seen Schumer's letter.

For years, elected leaders have envisioned bus service linking the borough with the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail, which operates trains that connect Bayonne to Jersey City and other towns with PATH train and bus and ferry links to Manhattan.

Also people one of New Jersey's plans with the Port Authority besides THE Tunnel is to do studies to see if it is possible and economically fesiable to extend to PATH south to Newark Airport Station, so there is a good chance of it happening. My father works for PATH and has been keeping me informed on this. Will bring more news when it comes.

Zoe
May 13th, 2006, 04:02 PM
Maybe SI and NJ Transit should look at a joint venture to run the light-rail over a bridge and continue into SI. That would drastically reduce traffic and would truely open up these two communities (Bayone and SI) to each other even more than they are now.

stache
May 13th, 2006, 05:09 PM
Makes perfect sense to me!

STT757
May 14th, 2006, 12:20 AM
Maybe SI and NJ Transit should look at a joint venture to run the light-rail over a bridge and continue into SI.

The Bayonne Bridge was built with supports on the outside of the roadway to support streetcars or today light rail.

JCMAN320
May 14th, 2006, 01:16 AM
This makes amazing sense. I can visit my friends in Staten Island without a taxi :)

JCMAN320
May 14th, 2006, 02:12 AM
Excerpt form Wikipedia on possible PATH extension to Newark Liberty.

Future Expansion
"The Port Authority has allocated funds to conduct a feasibility study of extending PATH two miles (3.2 km) south of Newark Penn Station to Newark Liberty International Airport. If the project is deemed to be possible from an engineering, operational, and financial standpoint, the Port Authority would include funding for the project in its Capital Plan. The extension to Newark Airport is estimated to cost $500 million. Extensions of PATH to Newark Airport and Plainfield, New Jersey have been on the drawing board for years, but there has been no movement on either project."

JCMAN320
May 23rd, 2006, 07:12 AM
Here is a link to the map of the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail System complete with PATH and ferry lines included as well as showing the future extension to 8th Street in Bayonne. Other than that, the map does not show any future extensions, I'm guessing they are still up in the air with on when and where they wil be extending: http://www.njtransit.com/images/hblr_06.gif

ablarc
May 25th, 2006, 06:37 AM
Why are the stops in Bayonne so far apart? It's light rail, for goodness sake; that used to be called a "streetcar." The advantage of that is frequent stops and shorter walks. A person going to Bayonne City Hall can't be blamed for not knowing which stop to use to minimize his in-either-case too-long walk.

debris
May 25th, 2006, 03:23 PM
It seems like the stars are aligning for HBLR service into SI. The Bayonne Bridge will need to be replaced in the next 15 years and that, along with the MTA/NJ agreement, will give it momentum. Yes, I know the old Bayonne Bridge has space for Light Rail, but there's no point if its going to be replaced in 15 years anyway. In the meantime, buses will have to do. That extra service will generate pressure from SI to extend HBLR into SI.

Speaking of all these agreements, it makes me sick, this pathetic, infantile NY/NJ rivalry. Can you imagine Maryland, DC, and Virginia squabbling over this crap? Seriously. Personally I think the entire tri-state transportation network should be rolled up into the Port Authority.

Regarding Northern Branch service: the best idea would be to run diesal trains ALL the way down Tonnelle Ave, with a transfer to the last HBLR stop, but also going down all the way to the Journal Square PATH station. The tracks apparently are there, would this be possible? That would make a one-transfer ride to Midown and Downtown very easy. Also, you would have train stops within walking distance of everyone in Hudson County, including those who don't live near the water. Speaking of which, some more PATH stations in NJ, as well as an extension of the uptown branch in New York would be helpful. Does anyone know if the 33rd street PATH stop is hemmed in, or could it extend to Times Square or Bryant Park and beyond, eliminating the need for transfer to the NYC Subway?

debris
May 25th, 2006, 03:36 PM
Actually, let me correct myself: you could run diseal trains down Tonnelle Avenue to the Marion (sp?) section of Jersey City, where the tracks curve into PATH. You could end the diseal service there and build a new PATH station at West Side Ave, just as the mayor wants. Easy transfer to Midtown and Downtown. Voila. Anyone see problems with this? I'm not sure of the status of the Tonnelle Ave right-of-way.

debris
May 25th, 2006, 03:40 PM
Last thought (promise): HBLR should clearly be extended to the Meadowlands Sports Complex, with a stop in Secaucus.

JCMAN320
May 25th, 2006, 03:57 PM
First the walking distances aren't bad at all. The part of the lines from Liberty State Park ot the West Side and from LSP to 8th street are the old Jersey Central Railroads right of ways and those stations are exactly where the old stations were. So you have to understand there were already old spaces from where the old stations and they didnt have too dig out rocks and stuff. The Westside line is cut through the Palisades similar to the PATH trains but in south Jersey City the Palisades aren't that high. Also the DMU's to JSQ are not fesiable because where it ends is at the Erie Railroad old right of way called the Bergen Arches. There are already possibilities to extend it from between Newport and Harsimus Cove lightrail stops up the Sixth Street Enbankment that the Erie railroad once used, through the Arches out to the Secaucus Junction. But that might not happen because a lot of people want the Sixth Street Embankment to be saved as our own "Highline" and become and elevated park going through Downtown Jersey City, and new parks are something we need. So I have no idea what is going to happen with that perseonally, I would like to see it truned into a park.

Debris clearly it should go out to the Meadowlands Sports Complex, umm I don't know going to West Side PATH station because it is not a direct route and there alot of old industrial buildings blocking the direct route and those buildings arebeing turned into condos and artist lofts.

debris
May 25th, 2006, 05:03 PM
I'm not talking about the Westside branch that already exists. If anything, that should be (in the far future, of course) run to Newark through the Ironbound and connected with the Newark City Subway.

I'm referring to the Northern Branch, where some Bergen politicans propose running trains from way up north in Bergen down to the Tonnelle Ave stop of the HBLR. I'm proposing that those trains continue down to PATH *from the north*, on a direct north-south route. Its indirect only in the sense that riders from Bergen would go all the way down to Jersey City just to transfer back to the Uptown branch of PATH. Is that what you meant?

debris
May 25th, 2006, 05:07 PM
Whoops, I missed the part about "DMUs", thanks for answering my question, JCMAN

Dagrecco82
June 7th, 2006, 03:14 PM
Great newsletter showing us the Newark Subway Extension.

http://www.njtransit.com/pdf/sf_lr_NCS_Newsletter.pdf

JCMAN320
June 7th, 2006, 06:48 PM
Customer Notice
Let’s Talk about the New Newark Light Rail…

Come talk to us in Newark during the month of June regarding the new stations and service opening on the Newark Light Rail. Customer forums will be held on:

Monday, June 12 at Newark Penn Station at the Newark Light Rail entrance (near McDonalds)
Tuesday, June 13 at Newark Broad Street Station
Wednesday, June 14 we will be at Newark Penn Station Bus Lanes (Raymond Blvd.)

From 6:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. and from 3:00 p.m.. to 7:00 p.m., each day.

JCMAN320
August 5th, 2006, 02:12 AM
Apparently the First Section of the the proposed Newark Light Rail Link system, that would go from Penn Station to Newark Airport (Second Section) and then into Elizabeth (Third Section), will be the last link for a while. Apparently NJ Trasnit has taken those last 2 sections off its Candidate Project List. Although they are on the FY2007 Capital Project List.

THE Tunnel apparently is sucking in alot of money off other projects. Here are links to Wikipedia and NJ Transit Project list to show my point.

http://www.njtransit.com/an_cp_capital_improvement_projects.shtml
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newark-Elizabeth_Rail_Link

So basically all we can hope for is for the PATH to be extended to EWR because right now that is the only thing that looks somewhat on the right track, no pun intended. :)

z22
August 6th, 2006, 01:02 AM
So basically all we can hope for is for the PATH to be extended to EWR because right now that is the only thing that looks somewhat on the right track, no pun intended. :)

Do you have info on the timeline for the PATH extension? All I saw from PANYNJ web site is the strategic plan that they will spend $30 millions during 2006/2007 and will put up $550 millions for this project between 2008 and 2015.

JCMAN320
August 6th, 2006, 07:58 PM
Whenever construction starts, it would take atleast 2-3 years.

STT757
August 6th, 2006, 10:06 PM
So basically all we can hope for is for the PATH to be extended to EWR because right now that is the only thing that looks somewhat on the right track, no pun intended. :)

The PATH extension to Newark Liberty International Airport's rail link station after the new Hudson tunnel is the most important project to New Jersey, it's being held up as NY politicians do not want a connection from Lower Manhattan to Newark Airport to happen before the Lower Manhattan-JFK project is assured and shovels in the ground.

I guess they feel the momentum or support for the Lower Manhattan-JFK project might falter if there's an existing connection from Lower Manhattan to Newark Airport.

Also with a price tag of $550 Million the Lower Manhattan-Newark Airport rail link looks like a tremendous return on investment compared to the $6-8 Billion Dollar Lower Manhattan-JFK rail link.

Besides the obvious benefits of connecting Lower Manhattan/World Trade Center/Santiago Calavatrava's PATH hub with Newark Airport, connecting the PATH's World Trade Center line to Newark Airport would also provide a direct connection between Jersey City and Newark Airport.

Also it will be alot more conveinent for travelers to/from Hoboken to ride the PATH from Hoboken terminal to Newark Airport via Journal Square or Exchange Place than it is to ride the one or two NJ Transit trains a day that operate between Hoboken Terminal and Newark Airport or to connect at Secaucus Junction.

JCMAN320
August 7th, 2006, 12:19 AM
STT I never thought of it that way but when you put it like that, I think your right. Newark and JFK are always going back and forth over who is the supreme ruler of the air in the NY area. It really is so much easier to just extend the PATH 2 Miles with that line already connected to Lower Manhattan than building an entire new line and infrastructure for about 6 miles to JFK from Lower Manhattan.

STT I agree with you.

TimmyG
August 17th, 2006, 08:03 PM
This was on NJ.com. Sounds like a good deal.

Free parking extended at North Bergen light rail stop
NJ Transit will extend its free parking offer at the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail (http://www.mylightrail.com/) Tonnelle Avenue station in North Bergen until Oct. 1.

Located on Routes 1&9 at 51st Street, the Tonnelle Avenue Station has a 730-space park-and-ride facility.

For information, call 1-800-772-2222

millertime83
August 18th, 2006, 01:24 PM
Last thought (promise): HBLR should clearly be extended to the Meadowlands Sports Complex, with a stop in Secaucus.

there are plans for that

JCMAN320
September 10th, 2006, 05:42 PM
NJ TRANSIT EXPANDS LATE-NIGHT LIGHT RAIL SERVICE TO BAYONNE
Last two trips from Hoboken extended to 22nd Street

September 6, 2006
NJT-06-116
Contact: Dan Stessel 973 491-7078

NEWARK, NJ — Customers traveling from Hoboken to Bayonne now have the benefit of light rail service that operates up to a half hour later, enabling customers to spend more time enjoying attractions along the Hudson waterfront and in Manhattan without rushing to catch the last departure.

The 1:17 a.m. and 1:37 a.m. southbound trips from Hoboken have been extended to serve five additional stations, terminating at Bayonne’s 22nd Street Station seven days a week. (Under the previous schedule, the trips terminated at Liberty State Park Station. Now, after departing Liberty State Park, the trains make stops at Richard Street and Danforth Avenue in Jersey City, followed by 45th Street, 34th Street and 22nd Street in Bayonne.)

“This change provides additional late-night travel options for our Jersey City and Bayonne customers returning from New York City and Hoboken,” said Joe North, NJ TRANSIT General Manager of Light Rail Operations. “As ridership increases, we continue to make adjustments to meet our customers’ growing needs with an expanded level of service.”

The new extended trips do not appear in current Hudson-Bergen Light Rail timetables, dated April 24. The change will be shown in the next printing of the timetables.

About Hudson-Bergen Light Rail

Hudson-Bergen Light Rail provides more than 34,000 weekday trips between 23 stations in Bayonne, Jersey City, Hoboken, Weehawken, Union City and North Bergen. The system provides a vital link between waterfront destinations, NJ TRANSIT rail and bus routes, PATH trains and trans-Hudson ferry services.

The one-way adult fare on Hudson-Bergen Light Rail is $1.75. Discounted monthly passes are available for $53. Children, senior citizens and passengers with disabilities save 50 percent or more at all times. In addition, NJ TRANSIT customers holding a monthly or weekly rail pass, or a bus pass for two or more zones, can ride the system at no additional charge simply by displaying their pass.

For Hudson-Bergen Light Rail schedules or information, visit www.mylightrail.com or call 1-800-772-2222.

JCMAN320
September 14th, 2006, 02:33 PM
Light Rail to serve Bergen Point

Thursday, September 14, 2006
By GREG HANLON
JOURNAL STAFF WRITER

It's official - the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail is heading farther south.

The New Jersey Transit Board of Directors yesterday voted unanimously to award contracts for preliminary work to extend the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail from 22nd Street to Eighth Street in Bayonne.

"This project is much more than a one-mile extension of track," said state Transportation Commissioner and NJ Transit Chairman Kris Kolluri. "It's an investment in Bayonne's future."

This preliminary work - which will cost a total of $2.16 million, paid for with state and federal funding - will pave the way for the project to go out for bid. Officials predict construction will begin in 2008 and be completed by late 2009.

"I am happy that this extension of the Light Rail will provide the residents of Bayonne's Bergen Point section with ready access to convenient, clean and timely public transportation," said Bayonne Mayor and state Sen. Joseph V. Doria Jr.

The proposed extension of the tracks will run from the 22nd Street Station along a viaduct on Avenue E, curving along with Avenue E until it reaches the new station and platform, to be constructed at Eighth Street and Avenue C.

The design of the new station will recall the elegant Central Railroad station that burned down in the 1970s, officials said.

Doria expressed gratitude about the restoration of "an important part of our community, the Eighth Street Station, which many people thought would never come back."

The extension is expected to accommodate the growing population of the Bergen Point section, home to two major proposed developments.

The Kaplan Companies plans to build a 76-acre "mini-city" on waterfront property currently owned by Texaco. This new development is expected to bring 1,300 residential units to the area, as well as retail and office space.

A residential development, dubbed the Waterfront and planned for Kennedy Boulevard between Second and Third streets, is expected to add 145 luxury units to Bergen Point.

"The extension will serve existing residents and those who will move into new housing that Bayonne officials recently approved for the Eighth Street area," Doria said.

Strattonport
September 14th, 2006, 02:35 PM
Incredible. At the same time, the MTA moves continuously slowly with the Second Avenue Subway...

Dynamicdezzy
September 14th, 2006, 03:25 PM
Can't compare the costs.

TimmyG
September 14th, 2006, 06:31 PM
The development sure seems to follow the light rail.

urbanaturalist
September 16th, 2006, 04:17 PM
As someone not from the Tri-State area or Northeast for that matter, I have a question??? Somebody explain this to me. I've been to New York City and have been on the subway which of course is very fast and efficient and holds a lot of people. I think its a great idea that northern NJ has started installing more rail infrastructure, but I'm just wondering why LIGHT RAIL (HBLR)?? as the main mode??? Besides the obvious thats its cheaper to buildthan subway (PATH).

I'm only saying this because looking at a map of say the NJ area parallel to Manhattan it would seem that a light rail line would take a long time to travel compared to subway line (PATH) running the same distance. Of course it would b/se it light rail. Plus the HBLR trains only seem to be able to carry like 50 people, the pictures show like two cabs. Although, I understand northern NJ is not as dense as Manhattan, it seems like a PATH train could be able to handle future densification more efficiently.

These are my 5 Questions
1)Can someone give me an idea of say how long a 13 mile ride (lenth of Manhattan) would take on the HBLR?
2) and how many cabs are on each train?
3) and how many people they can hold?
4) and how often the trains arrive?
5) and would a subway (PATH) be better transportation mode than the light rail (HBLR) for the future?

I know its sounds like a stupid question, and I know that they are not going to rip up the light rail line, but from my unfortunate vantage point, it seems like HBLR would be inefficient for a contstantly densifying and growing area, especially during rush hour.

JCMAN320
September 16th, 2006, 05:35 PM
One where the lightrail runs is on old passeneger right of ways left over from the Jersey Central railroad and old freight right of ways, that's why that was choosen. The lightrail is two cabs and can probably hold close to a 100 people full capacity. Also the prospect of a subway throughout Jersey City and Hudson County is too costly because much of Hudson County is on the Palisades which is solid rock. Yes it would take longer than the subway because there are alot of turns. It is too coslty to put new subways in around here anyway because there is so much infrastructure underground.

The lightrail arrives every 5 minutes during peak and every 10 mins off peak. Also North Jersey is very dense. New jersey alone is the most densely populated state in the USA.

Here is a map of North Jersey rail system:
http://www.njtransit.com/images/railmap06.jpg

HBLR Map:
http://www.njtransit.com/images/hblr_06.gif

with the exception of the Downtown JC route (the part that connects with the PATH lines) the rest of the route is old rail right of way.

tmg
September 16th, 2006, 11:14 PM
If you want the gory, technical details for comparing light rail vs. commuter rail vs. heavy rail, here is the place to look:

http://onlinepubs.trb.org/onlinepubs/tcrp/tcrp100/part%205.pdf

JCMAN320
September 22nd, 2006, 12:42 PM
NJ TRANSIT LAUNCHES NEW WEB FEATURES FOR ON-THE-GO CUSTOMERS
Train status, schedules and service information now accessible on web-enabled mobile devices

September 21, 2006
NJT-06-122
Contact: Dan Stessel 973 491-7078

NEWARK, NJ – NJ TRANSIT customers can now access essential information, including train status, train schedules and fares—when they need it and wherever they are—through any web-enabled mobile device.

Thanks to a recently installed technology upgrade, NJ TRANSIT customers can tap into the most popular areas of njtransit.com in a streamlined format optimized for mobile devices, such as Blackberry®, Treo™ or web-enabled cell phones.

“This technology upgrade places NJ TRANSIT at the forefront of communications technology and gives customers an unmatched level of information,” said New Jersey Transportation Commissioner Kris Kolluri.

NJ TRANSIT customers now have the power to scan up-to-the-minute train information while waiting on a station platform, find the next departure while sitting in a Midtown restaurant or get the details about an upcoming schedule change while riding in the middle seat.

“Through this investment, we are giving our customers the resources they need—at their fingertips—to make informed decisions and identify their best travel options,” said NJ TRANSIT Executive Director George D. Warrington.

For maximum convenience, customers can continue to use the same URL for NJ TRANSIT that they already know—www.njtransit.com. The system automatically provides optimized on-the-go content when a customer logs on using a mobile device.

My Transit alert system gains speed, capacity

NJ TRANSIT recently added server capacity to its popular My Transit alert system to provide faster delivery of delay information and the ability to accommodate more customers. With My Transit, NJ TRANSIT will send an alert directly to a customer’s cell phone, pager or email whenever there is a delay affecting their designated itinerary. Signing up is quick, simple and free at www.njtransit.com. Customers select their preferred method of notification—pager, SMS (text message) or email—and enter information about the rail, bus or light rail trips they take each day.


New high-tech approach to “Lost & Found”

NJ TRANSIT also announced the launch of a corporate-wide computer database for managing lost-and-found items and a new customer webpage for assistance in recovering those lost items. Prior to this technology investment, NJ TRANSIT relied on a paper-based system for lost-and-found inventory, without a centralized database, requiring customers to “call around” to any of 21 locations where lost-and-found items were turned in.

The new computerized system gives a customer who reports a lost item a case number and attempts to match the lost item to the inventory of found items. Customers are notified when a possible match is identified, usually within 48 hours. Since January 1, 2006 a total of 3,489 items have been returned to customers, including 724 cell phones, 438 pairs of eyeglasses, 419 wallets, 338 umbrellas and 148 backpacks.

In addition to the new web page, customers can now find assistance in locating lost items by calling a single number—1-800-772-2222—or from any NJ TRANSIT customer service office.

JCMAN320
October 10th, 2006, 03:54 PM
On this route, it's standing-room-only

Tuesday, October 10, 2006
By GREG HANLON
JOURNAL STAFF WRITER

The shimmering office buildings of Jersey City's waterfront are populated in no small number by residents of Hudson County's neighbor to the south - Staten Island.

The Staten Island Chamber of Commerce estimates 12,000 Islanders work in Hudson County, mostly in Jersey City. But because of severe cutbacks by Red & Tan Tours - a private company that transports hundreds of Staten Islanders to Hudson County every day - the daily commute for these workers has become much more arduous.

And, if more Staten Islanders opt to take their cars instead of the bus, Bayonne and Jersey City roads will be that much more crowded.

Red & Tan has recently eliminated four pick-up times from its rush-hour schedule, turning the wait from what was once a 10 to 15 minutes into as much as an hour. And the lack of buses also makes finding a seat a challenge, commuters said.

"During rush hour, it's always full," Adam Sierra, 24, a computer programmer from the Richmond section of Staten Island. "The buses will be so packed that people are standing in the stairwells."

Staten Island community leaders are calling on New York's Metropolitan Transportation Authority to launch a bus service to compensate for the Red & Tan cutbacks, and the MTA says it's looking into that possibility with the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey and NJ Transit.

Last fall, legislation was passed by New York lawmakers allowing the MTA's New York City Transit Division to operate in New Jersey, paving the way for the MTA to supply service to Hudson County, should it chose to do so.

In the meantime, however, many Staten Islanders who work in Hudson County will have to wait - and Hudson County residents will have to share the road with more cars with New York plates.

"We would like to see the MTA move a little quicker than they usually move, so we can get people over to Bayonne and prevent them from getting into their cars," said state Assemblyman Michael Cusick, D-Staten Island.

Newhouse News Service contributed to this report.

JCMAN320
October 16th, 2006, 05:18 PM
T.V.s to be installed in PATH cars by 2011

Monday, October 16, 2006
By GREG HANLON
JOURNAL STAFF WRITER

A German computer technology company called Inova has announced it has reached a $14.7 million deal with NBC Universal to install and maintain a passenger "infotainment" system for the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey's PATH trains and stations.

But even after Inova's announcement, NBC refused to comment about the deal, while a Port Authority spokesman said it hasn't been reached yet.

Inova spokesman David Lieberman said each PATH train car will be equipped with four pairs of high-resolution, 12-inch television screens that will broadcast pre-programmed news and train information. In the stations, larger screens will broadcast information about arrival times and delays, Lieberman said.

The project, which coincides with the $809 million undertaking to modernize the PATH system, is expected to begin in early 2008 and be completed by 2011, Lieberman said.

"A lot of urban centers are interested in this technology. But in the U.S., we're way behind what's been happening in Europe," he said. "There's a lot of catch up that needs to be played."

Lieberman said similar technology already is in use in Frankfurt, Vienna, Geneva, Madrid and Athens.

The modernization of the PATH system will include the complete overhaul of all 340 trains in the fleet, as well as improved lighting, air conditioning, and heating on both the trains and the stations, among other modern amenities, according to the Port Authority. The project is expected to be completed by 2011.

JCMAN320
December 1st, 2006, 12:08 PM
WIN-WIN FOR PATH RIDERS
Budget plan: New cars, no hikes

Friday, December 01, 2006

By JOURNAL STAFF AND WIRE REPORT
Newhouse News Service

PATH riders will travel in style under a preliminary Port Authority budget released yesterday that calls for $87 million for new cars - but no fare increase.

The proposed $5.7 billion budget for 2007, which also includes significantly increased capital spending on a new Hudson River train tunnel and Ground Zero's redevelopment, also holds vehicle tolls and rail fares at their current levels.

The preliminary budget's $2.5 billion capital budget includes: $34.8 million for improvements to the Hoboken waterfront, including construction of a permanent ferry terminal and reconstruction of Pier C; $10.4 million in improvements to the Lincoln Tunnel, including a $1.6 million Baldwin Avenue widening project for Weehawken; $10 million for "roadway improvements" at the Secaucus Transfer railroad station; and $8.2 million for maintenance work and improvements to the Bayonne Bridge.

"This budget funds our commitments to build new infrastructure, upgrade existing facilities, and invest heavily in security improvements, while holding the line on operating expenses and reducing administrative costs," Port Authority Chairman Anthony Coscia said in a statement.

"The Port Authority is now responsible for some of the most critical projects of our generation, including the rebuilding of the World Trade Center, construction of the memorial and the construction of a second commuter rail tunnel into Manhattan."

The release of a preliminary budget two weeks before a vote on the final spending plan marks a significant step toward openness for the Port Authority. Bi-state agency officials long have held information about pending budgets secret. Three years ago, for example, the plan was announced and passed within hours, with no public input.

Next year's $2.5 billion capital plan represents a 33-percent increase over 2006, with most of the increase dedicated to preparing the infrastructure for the planned 1,776-foot Freedom Tower and 9/11 memorial at the former World Trade Center site. Approximately 65 percent of the $625 million capital budget increase will be reimbursed to the agency through insurance and other sources.

Port Authority officials announced $251 million will be dedicated next year toward construction of Ground Zero's permanent PATH hub, designed by Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava.

Agency officials also plan to make the first major expenditures - $85 million - for "preliminary planning and site acquisition" costs for the proposed trans-Hudson rail tunnel, designed to increase rail capacity between New Jersey and midtown-Manhattan.

The full budget can be viewed at www.panynj.gov.

staff writer Ron Marsico contributed to this report.

jhoetzl
December 1st, 2006, 05:13 PM
So, last month, I went to get my Monthly permit a the TVM at Liberty state park, and was displayed a message that all available spaces were occupied. So, off to West-Side station I drove, where I purchased my $93 combined parking and transit tickets. I didn't enjoy that because it meant I couldn't get on any train from Exchange place, so this month I made sure I got my permit earlier. Imagine my surprise to see the price went up $10!? Meanwhile, all the other stations are still at $93, and Tonnelle was free. Are we subsidizing those parkers?
A $10 increase is pretty outrageous! Especially since it isn't across the board.

Meanwhile, over at http://www.njtransit.com/sf_lr_fares.shtml it still says $93, but, look carefully at http://www.mylightrail.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=15&Itemid=63 and you will see about this.

Any thoughts on this one? Did I miss something in the news about this one?

Thanks!

jhoetzl
December 1st, 2006, 05:21 PM
but I'm just wondering why LIGHT RAIL (HBLR)?? as the main mode??? Besides the obvious thats its cheaper to buildthan subway (PATH).
<snip>
I know its sounds like a stupid question, and I know that they are not going to rip up the light rail line, but from my unfortunate vantage point, it seems like HBLR would be inefficient for a contstantly densifying and growing area, especially during rush hour.


Have you ever seen a Toonerville Trolley cartoon? The layout of the tracks reminds me a lot of that series...

For those who have no idea about the Toonerville Trolley (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toonerville_Trolley), one of the ideas was that the tracks were laid out such that the conductor could go around lighting the lampposts without leaving the trolley. Zig-zagging all the way.

And yes, there are more affectionate names for the line -

Light Snail
Bullet Train

Anyone have more?

JCMAN320
December 13th, 2006, 07:54 PM
New rail tunnel, rebuilding Ground Zero on Port Authority agenda

Mapping out an ambitious vision for the next decade, the Port Authority today unveiled a $26 billion capital plan that includes funding for a new trans-Hudson rail tunnel, a fourth regional airport and rebuilding Ground Zero.

Other potential major projects include upgrading the PATH rail system, a new span to replace the crumbling Goethals Bridge and various improvements to the region’s three major airports and sprawling port facilities.

Tomorrow, the Port Authority is expected to approve the 10-year capital financing plan along with the proposed $5.7 billion operating budget for 2007 at a meeting of the board’s commissioners in New York. While next year’s budget does not include a toll or fare hike, officials have said privately that such increases will be necessary in future years to fund long-term initiatives.

A $2 billion commitment is included in the capital plan for a second trans-Hudson River rail tunnel to ease congestion for commuters traveling between New Jersey and midtown Manhattan.

Another $2 billion is slated for a yet-to-be-determined “regional’’ project that is expected to finance one of incoming New York Gov.-elect Eliot Spitzer’s pet transportation initiatives. In May, Spitzer said he backed the new trans-Hudson tunnel, but wanted the Port Authority to help pay for a Long Island Rail Road extension to Grand Central Terminal or the long-delayed Second Avenue subway line.

The single highest amount of capital spending - more than $8 billion - is pegged for the World Trade Center site, where the Port Authority already has begun preliminary work on a permanent PATH station that will link to the city’s subway lines and the 1,776-foot Freedom Tower. More than $4 billion, however, is expeced to be reimbursed by the federal government and other sources.

Projects to improve facilities at the agency’s existing airports and help develop Stewart Airport in upstate New York as a fourth regional hub total nearly $4 billion.

Contributed by Ron Marsico

West Hudson
December 13th, 2006, 10:41 PM
Hey Port Authority - I see you're building a second NJ Transit tunnel, but do you think you can build us a third PATH tunnel across the Hudson!? That would be pretty SWEET :)

They really ought to extend the PATH system under Washington Street in Hoboken so that more development could take place in the Weehawken/Hoboken area...

JCMAN320
December 14th, 2006, 12:31 PM
Ambitious P.A. transit plans will take a toll

Thursday, December 14, 2006
BY RON MARSICO
Star-Ledger Staff

Toll and fare hikes will be needed to help fund the Port Authority's massive 10-year, $26 billion construction program that includes a new trans-Hudson rail tunnel, a fourth regional airport and rebuilding Ground Zero, the agency's chairman said yesterday.

"It's unrealistic to think there will not be a toll increase as we attempt to build out this plan over the next 10 years," agency chairman Anthony Coscia said. "We have a responsibility to use that capital for something that actually improves the region."

Coscia could not say when or by how much tolls at the agency's bridges and tunnels and PATH rail fares would rise. However, he said the increases will not occur until 2008 at the earliest.

The last increases were in 2001.

The ambitious list of capital projects the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey will undertake over the next decade also includes upgrading the PATH rail system, a new span to replace the aging Goethals Bridge, improvements to the region's three major airports and sprawling port facilities and various security initiatives.

Tolls at Port Authority bridges and tunnels -- excluding E-ZPass discounts -- are now $6 round-trip, while PATH fares are $1.50. Tolls at the Metropolitan Transportation Authority's bridges and tunnels -- excluding E-ZPass discounts -- are $9 round-trip, while city subway fares are $2.

Any increases will have to be approved by Gov. Jon Corzine and New York Gov.-elect Eliot Spitzer, who will share control over the bistate agency starting in January.

"The Port Authority has made clear that there is no need for an increase in tolls or fares in 2007," said Brendan Gilfillan, a spokesman for Corzine. "However, increasing costs associated with security concerns, the ambition of the (construction) plan and its importance to our state dictate that a limited amount of new revenues will be needed at some point in the future.

"We trust the Port Authority to make the necessary decisions to make this plan financially viable while minimizing the cost to commuters," Gilfillan said.

For the first time, the Port Authority's capital plan spans 10 years rather than the typical five. The $26 billion, 10-year proposal reflects Coscia's desire to have the agency focus on new regional transportation projects rather than simply maintaining existing facilities.

The Port Authority's board of commissioners is expected to approve the 10-year capital financing plan today along with a proposed $5.7 billion operating budget for 2007.

While many commuters will likely balk at any fare hikes, the Regional Plan Association, a good-government advocacy group, hailed the Port Authority's plans.

"I think we applaud two things: A 10-year (plan for capital spending) and that they're talking very honestly and frankly with the public about how they're going to fund it," said Tom Wright, the association's executive vice president.

Wright said the agency's previous five-year capital plans "weren't long enough for any of the major projects we're talking about" to reach fruition. The agency, he said, should join with the MTA and New York City officials to coordinate future toll and fare hikes, as well as potential fees for vehicles entering Manhattan during peak periods.

Overall, the Port Authority's capital plan includes:


-$2 billion for a second trans-Hudson River rail tunnel to ease congestion for commuters traveling between New Jersey and Midtown Manhattan. This has been a top transportation priority for Corzine and Coscia.


-$2 billion for a yet-to-be-determined "regional" project that is expected to finance one of Spitzer's pet transportation initiatives -- extending the Long Island Rail Road to Grand Central Terminal or construction of the Second Avenue subway line.


-Nearly $4 billion for improvements at Newark Liberty International, JFK International and LaGuardia airports and development of Stewart Airport in upstate Newburg, N.Y., as a fourth regional hub. Included in the total is $150 million to help expand Stewart Airport so it can accommodate up to 5 million travelers over the next decade. Stewart now handles fewer than 500,000 passengers a year.


-$1 billion for construction of a new span to replace the 78-year-old Goethals Bridge, which links Elizabeth and Staten Island.


-More than $8 billion to redevelop the World Trade Center site, where the Port Authority already has begun preliminary work on a permanent PATH station that will link to the city's subway lines and the 1,776-foot Freedom Tower. More than $4 billion, however, is reimbursable from the federal government and other sources.



Ron Marsico may be reached at rmarsico@starledger.com or (973) 392-7860.

JCMAN320
December 18th, 2006, 10:22 AM
Green light for Bayonne, S.I. bus route

Monday, December 18, 2006
NEWHOUSE NEWS SERVICE

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority has given the green light to a proposal that a new weekday rush-hour bus service run from Staten Island to Bayonne's light rail stations via the Bayonne Bridge.

The new route could reduce traffic and parking problems in Bayonne by reducing the number of Staten Islanders who drive into Bayonne every day.

The long-awaited MTA finding comes after months of growing frustration over reduced and limited bus service from Red & Tan, the private company that currently operates the route.

"I'm very pleased the study showed there is a need, and the MTA is coming forward to get this done," said MTA board member Frank Powers.

The MTA now will investigate partnering with the Port Authority and New Jersey Transit to share the costs of the new bus route, expected to be about $1 million a year.

Another $4 to $5 million would be needed in start-up costs, including fitting buses with fareboxes.

If all the details are worked out, the new bus service could begin early next year.

JCMAN320
December 18th, 2006, 10:33 AM
NJT to study bus routes

Monday, December 18, 2006
NEWHOUSE NEWS SERVICE

For the first time in 24 years, NJ Transit is going to take a hard look at the bus system in North Jersey, including routes in Hudson County.

The last review was conducted when the agency took over operations of the former Transport of New Jersey and 30 other private bus companies. In the years since, development and employment patterns in the region have shifted, congestion has grown and the needs of the public have changed.

The board voted unanimously last week to pay a Philadelphia-based consultant $1.28 million to begin work on a Greater Newark Bus System Study. The study will begin next month and cover an area that includes parts of five counties - Essex, Union, Passaic, Bergen and Hudson.

The study is expected to take about three years to complete and will consider whether routes need to be added or adjusted, and whether innovations such as "bus only" lanes might shorten travel times for the 250,000 riders who travel over 51 different bus routes on a typical weekday.

JCMAN320
December 19th, 2006, 02:35 PM
JERSEY JOURNAL
IN OUR OPINION

Higher fares yes, but expand PATH

Monday, December 18, 2006

Commuters better enjoy the New Year because it will cost a bit more to travel to and from work in 2008, according to the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey.

The increases to tolls and fares are inevitable because of the bi-state agency's 10-year, $26 billion construction plan that includes a new trans-Hudson rail tunnel, a fourth regional airport (Stewart) and rebuilding Ground Zero.

It's not known how much of an increase, but it will effect the PATH rail line. The next decade of projects includes upgrading the PATH system, according to PA officials.

The last fare hike was in 2001. Tolls at the George Washington Bridge, the Lincoln and Holland tunnels and the three bridges that connect New Jersey and Staten Island, then at $4, increased to $6. PATH fares jumped to $1.50 from $1. Back then, the agency proposed doubling PATH fares to $2 and increasing tolls to $7. Gov. Christie Whitman had called those increases "much too high." It was to help finance a five-year, $9 billion plan for major improvements at airports and marine terminals and for a new fleet of PATH rail cars.

The 9/11 attacks put a halt to improvements and the Port Authority faced a monumental task of rebuilding Ground Zero and part of the PATH line. PATH ridership fell off for several years. Then there were the extra millions of dollars needed for tightened security. While millions in federal dollars were targeted for Ground Zero (Federal Transit Administration released $699 million for infrastructure improvements at the former World Trade Center site in 2005), the commuters ultimately will continue to finance projects.

Between now and 2016, the agency also is repeating its needs - improvements to facilities at the region's three major airports, a new Goethals Bridge and upgrades to the PATH system, including replacing the entire rail-car fleet.

This newspaper continues to call for more than improvements to the PATH. This is the nation's oldest commuter rail system and prior to 9/11, it had already exceeded its passenger capacity during rush hours. No amount of expansions to stations or lengthening of trains will help and it will be a nightmare by 2016. It was this newspaper's opinion that another PATH tunnel was needed before the proposed trans-Hudson tunnel that will encourage more suburban sprawl and do little to reduce rush hour traffic. The Port Authority should at least study the proposal for a third PATH tunnel under the Hudson River.

JCMAN320
December 22nd, 2006, 05:56 PM
Report: NYC commuter rail tunnels vulnerable to terrorist attack

12/22/2006, 5:05 p.m. ET
By TOM HAYS
The Associated Press

NEW YORK (AP) — The forecast is ominous: A small explosive sneaked onto a commuter train punches a 50-square-foot hole in a tunnel under the Hudson River. More than a million gallons of water a minute surges in. Flooding engulfs parts of the system within hours.

That worst-case scenario was included in a newly disclosed draft analysis of the PATH rail system linking New Jersey and Manhattan, which serves 230,000 riders each weekday. The analysis suggests the system's tunnels are more vulnerable to terrorist attack than originally thought, and raised questions about whether officials have taken enough precautions.

"It's a cause for concern," Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly said Friday about the analysis, adding that he was waiting to see a copy of it.

Gov. George Pataki said he had received the analysis, first reported in Friday editions of The New York Times, and called it part of an ongoing effort to look at security on regional transit systems.

"There are going to be continual efforts to upgrade the infrastructure and to take security measures to protect us in the post-9/11 era," he said Friday.

Other lawmakers including U.S. Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton said the report shows a need for more federal funding for transit security.

Officials with the agency that runs the system, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, would not discuss the specifics of the analysis.

"The Port Authority constantly conducts threat analyses and risk assessments for our facilities and we will continue to work with our partners on all levels of government," agency spokesman John McCarthy said Friday. "It's an unending process, as we are never satisfied and will always look for ways to upgrade security."

Concerns have long been raised about potential terrorist attacks on tunnels connecting to New York City. In July, authorities said they had thwarted a suicide-bomb plot involving the PATH tunnels.

Law enforcement officials said the overseas suspects arrested in that scheme had hoped to unleash the Hudson River on the city in part by destroying an underground wall that keeps water from entering the World Trade Center site. Entrances to the ground zero pit have been under 24-hour police guard ever since.


The analysis, characterized as preliminary and continuing, was based on work by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California and the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy. The Times obtained it from an unidentified government official who it said was troubled by the agency's response to it.

McCarthy defended the system's safety.

"If at any time we believed the riders of the PATH were in imminent jeopardy, we would immediately close the system," he said.

The Port Authority police recently increased patrols and bag searches in the PATH system, and the agency's board voted last week to spend $180 million to boost security on the rail line. Unlike other tunnels that were bored through bedrock, the PATH's tunnels consist of four cast-iron and concrete tubes that run along the riverbed.

The analysis relied on both computer models and physical tests on cast iron from the tunnels, according to the Times. It describes several steps to lessen the effect of any explosions, including installing floodgates and fortifying critical parts of the tunnels.

Commuters catching the PATH on Friday morning said that while the threat of a terrorist attack was unsettling, they would continue riding. "I don't have a choice," said David Sensenich, 37, boarding the train at Newark (N.J.) Penn Station. "I have to for work."

___

Associated Press writers Janet Frankston Lorin in Newark, N.J., and Michael Gormley in Albany, N.Y., contributed to this report.

LocoAko
December 23rd, 2006, 12:27 AM
I read that article while riding the PATH train today. I guess I'm SO paranoid about the idea of another terrorist attack happening here and it's strange to actually be part of the "threatened commuters", but that sounds like an awfully scary scenario.

ablarc
December 23rd, 2006, 09:00 AM
The Metropolitan Transportation Authority has given the green light to a proposal that a new weekday rush-hour bus service run from Staten Island to Bayonne's light rail stations via the Bayonne Bridge.
Why just rush hour? What if you find you have to work late?

JCMAN320
December 23rd, 2006, 10:45 PM
Hopefully they expand it Ablarc, maybe they will expand it if the service becomes very popular and commuters demand it.

Here is an article in response to the PATH security issue:

Port Authority says it's intent on protecting PATH tunnels

Saturday, December 23, 2006
BY RON MARSICO
Star-Ledger Staff

Port Authority officials yesterday defended their efforts to safeguard the PATH rail system, despite a report the agency did not act quickly enough to strengthen its Hudson River tunnels from a potential terrorist bombing.

Marc La Vorgna, a spokesman said the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, said the agency authorized $180 million on Dec. 14 for security projects on the system that handles 230,000 one- way trips each weekday.

"That's a major expenditure for capital security improvements at the PATH," said La Vorgna, who declined to discuss specifics be cause of security concerns. "Those dollars are being spent based on past and ongoing analyses as to what are the needs."

La Vorgna's comments follow a story in yesterday's New York Times that cited a preliminary engineering analysis that found the nearly century-old PATH tubes running from New Jersey to the World Trade Center and Christopher Street in Manhattan are more susceptible to a bomb attack than initially believed.

The paper reported damage from even a small amount of po tent explosives could blow a hole in the side of the mostly steel tunnel and cause major flooding. It said a summary of the analysis was provided by a government official who felt the Port Authority had delayed taking action to fix the problem and notify other law-enforcement and security agencies.

Several solutions were cited by the analysis as under consideration by the Port Authority: installing a "concrete blanket" atop the tunnels to cover blast holes, reinforcing various sections and building flood gates to limit water damage in case of an explosion.

The newspaper report revives concerns over PATH safety; in July, authorities said the FBI thwarted a plot by al Qaeda allies to blow up a PATH tunnel. Officials said three people were detained overseas in connection with the plot, which included five other suspects and was to be carried out late this year.

At the time, authorities also said there was no imminent threat.

Port Authority officials also re leased a statement yesterday in which they said they recognize the "difficult realities" of protecting an open transit system.

"But if at anytime we believed the riders of the PATH were in im minent jeopardy, we would immediately close the system," the statement said.

Meanwhile, U.S. Sen. Frank Lautenberg (D-N.J.) promised an increased emphasis on rail security when Democrats take control of Congress next month.

"The security of our tunnels has been ignored for too long," said Lautenberg, who will chair a subcommittee with jurisdiction over rail tunnels. "One of the first bills that the Senate Commerce Committee will complete will be a rail security bill. I will be attaching strong tunnel security provisions to that legislation."

Lautenberg did not specify how much money will be sought to strengthen the PATH tubes, but his statement noted $470 million already is expected to be earmarked for "safety and security improvements" to Amtrak's tunnels in the New York-New Jersey region.


Ron Marsico may be reached at rmarsico@starledger.com or (973) 392-7860.

JCMAN320
January 21st, 2007, 09:47 PM
Press Release from the PANYNJ; this is more evidence of why the PANYNJ should extend the PATH line 2 miles to EWR!

AIRTRAIN JFK, AIRTRAIN NEWARK MORE POPULAR THAN EVER IN 2006

Date: January 17, 2007
Press Release Number: 3-2007

AirTrain JFK’s paid ridership increased more than 15 percent in 2006 and AirTrain Newark’s paid ridership grew by more than 8 percent last year as both airport rail systems set annual passenger records.

Nearly 4 million paid riders used AirTrain JFK in 2006 to connect between John F. Kennedy International Airport’s passenger terminals and mass transit systems operated by New York City Transit and the Long Island Rail Road. AirTrain Newark, which links Newark Liberty International Airport to the Northeast Corridor Rail Line served by NJ Transit and Amtrak, handled nearly 1.6 million paid passengers in 2006. Both systems also serve tens of thousands of daily riders who use the rail systems for free to travel between passenger terminals and to connect to parking lots and rental car areas.

“AirTrain JFK and AirTrain Newark continue to gain riders every year as the ground transportation of choice for millions of people who use our nation’s premier domestic and international gateways in New York and New Jersey,” Port Authority Chairman Anthony R. Coscia said. “Thirteen percent of JFK’s passengers now use AirTrain’s free or paid service to access passenger terminals, while AirTrain Newark is the primary ground transportation for 10 percent of Newark’s passengers.”

Port Authority Executive Director Anthony E. Shorris said, “It’s our job to increase the popularity of these services even more in 2007. It just makes good sense. They’re fast, reliable, and provide a great benefit to the region by easing traffic and reducing emissions on roadways at and near the airports.”

With a record annual paid ridership in 2006 of 3,937,041 – a 15.4 percent increase over 3,411,762 paid passengers in 2005 – AirTrain JFK has now surpassed more than 10 million paid customers since it opened in late 2003. AirTrain Newark, which linked the existing airport monorail to mass transit in 2001, had a record 1,581,649 paid riders last year, up 8.5 percent from 1,457,704 paid passengers in 2005.

AirTrain JFK has helped support robust air passenger growth over the last several years at Kennedy Airport. In 2003, the airport served 31.7 million passengers. In 2004, that figure rose dramatically to 37.5 million, followed by another increase to 40.8 million in 2005. Kennedy Airport’s final passenger count for 2006 is expected to be about 42 million.

AirTrain Newark has done the same for Newark Airport. Passenger growth has climbed from 29.4 million in 2003, to 31.9 million in 2004, to 33 million in 2005. When the final numbers are in for 2006, Newark Airport is expected to set an all-time annual high with about 35.5 million passengers.

JCMAN320
February 22nd, 2007, 11:20 PM
NJ Transit study to determine light rail's impact along line

Thursday, February 22, 2007
By DORINE BETHEA
JOURNAL STAFF WRITER

It was only a hunch when plans began, but there is no doubt today that the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail is spurring the unprecedented economic development that is driving Hudson County's extraordinary renaissance, officials and experts say.

According to one transportation expert, building along the light rail line is proof that public transit is a powerful tool in shaping development. NJ Transit, which operates the line, has commissioned a study of the light rail, its effect on surrounding areas and its connectivity to nearby transit systems.

"We want to show New Jersey and the rest of the world what has happened and why the $2 billion that's been spent here is so well invested," said Martin E. Robins, senior fellow at the Alan M. Voorhees Transportation Center at Rutgers University.

The study's findings so far are "re-proving a theory that was in existence before the automobile age," Robins said.

"A lot of that occurred about 100 years ago," he added. "People have lost track. There was no experience in New Jersey."

The light rail system evolved through an innovative public-private partnership that has already received numerous national honors.

The light rail is a modern system of old streetcars and trolleys. It connects with PATH trains and NY Waterway's ferries. It makes it easy to get to and from locations. And that has translated into economic gains for local property owners.

Property values in Bayonne have gone up by more than 140 percent since the light rail system began, according to Joseph Ryan, the city's public information director.

"That's because it makes Bayonne a convenient community for people commuting to work and to school and other nearby communities in New Jersey and in New York," Ryan said.

Robins said the study is expected to be completed in April.

"If you don't document, people can say these are boondoggles," he said. "These kinds of systems promote a very positive lifestyle.

"It is very important for public investment," Robins said. "From a matter of public policy it is to show people that it really works."

STT757
February 23rd, 2007, 05:24 PM
Bring the Light Rail to Atlantic City!

Atlantic City International Airport-Atlantic City Convention Center/NJ Transit station-Board Walk Casinos-Marina Casinos.

NIMBYkiller
February 24th, 2007, 06:36 PM
I say extend HBLR to Staten Island over the Bayonne like it was built for. Also, over to Newark via the abandonned ROW.

JCMAN320
February 24th, 2007, 07:47 PM
There was an article about 8th St. station in Bayonne in the small bi-weekly publication. The 8th street station will be finished by 2009. Also it was revealed that NJ Transit is sending out bids to help finanice an extension west to the Meadowlands Sports Complex with a stop in Secaucus from the Tonelle Avenue stop in North Bergen. No date on when it will be started but it seems to be the second phase of the Meadowlands Rail Spur from the Pascack Valley Line with the light rail extension to that future Meadowlands stop being the second phase.

Also I was talking to Councilwoman Mary Spinello at a recent meeting on open space master plan and the developers of the Residences at Westside Station have been talking to NJ Transit about having the Westside line extend from Westside across the parking lot to 440. So we possibly a quater mile extension of the Westside line to Route 440.

So it looks like the Hudson Bergen lightrail in the near future will run from 8th St, in Bayonne all the way to a new Giants Stadium, Racetrack, Xanadu, and possibly to.....dare I say new Meadowlands Casinos; and the Westside line will go to 440. Can't Wait!!!!!!

Possible extensions I would love to see are: Westside line extended to Newark Penn through Kearny and Ironbound to connect to Newark Subway considering they are the same vehicles. Other extension is too use the 6th Street embankment from JC through the Bergen Arches to Secaucus Jnct with stops Downtown and one in the arches.

JCMAN320
March 26th, 2007, 05:42 PM
Trolley pricetag jumps $15M

Monday, March 26, 2007
By RONALD LEIR
JOURNAL STAFF WRITER

The reality of Bayonne's Peninsula Railway is still a work in progress - as is finding the cash for it.

The Bayonne Local Redevelopment Authority remains committed to installing a streetcar system to service the Peninsula at Bayonne Harbor - the former Military Ocean Terminal now being converted to a mini-city - but the projected price tag has jumped from $35 to $50 million.

Experts are continuing to look at many other obstacles associated with the project, but BLRA transportation planner Sue Mack says that "the real issue here is financing.

The BLRA has asked Congress for a $50 million appropriation, with $5 million up front for continuing an engineering study.

In December, the BLRA voted to pay the Washington International Group, of New York, up to $235,000 through November to conduct engineering work.

While many questions, such as how the system will be operated, still need to be resolved, Mack said the planners have made these decisions:

Electric-powered streetcars would share the street with cars, much as the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail Transit System operates in downtown Jersey City;

The streetcar system would require no station platforms so that riders can board directly from curbside;

The streetcar route would run 2.4 miles, east-west, across the Peninsula, from approximately 34th Street and Route 440 to the so-called "Bayonne Pointe" development district, near the entrance to the Cape Liberty cruise port.

The experts still have to figure out a host of other issues, such as fares, who will run the system and how to avoid any disruption of underground or overhead utilities.

In addition, officials are considering whether it makes financial sense to renovate the trolley cars donated by Newark or buy new ones.

Mack and BLRA transit consultant Matt Stanton said that it could cost $1.5 to $1.6 million to recondition each of the old cars but it may be more efficient to buy new vintage-style cars, which run in the area of $1.9 million apiece.

Peninsula commuters would be afforded some type of transfer fare connection with the Light Rail station at 34th Street "so you could be at Exchange Place in Jersey City within 15 minutes or at downtown Manhattan within, perhaps, 20 minutes," Stanton said.

NIMBYkiller
March 26th, 2007, 09:24 PM
I think a better idea for the Bergen Arches would be an NJT line to downtown

STT757
March 26th, 2007, 09:33 PM
The best use for Bergen Arches would be to connect the Jersey City Waterfront with Secaucus Transfer Station via Light Rail through the Bergen Arches. There's no room on the crowded Jersey City waterfront for a rail yard for heavy NJ Transit trains, Light Rail would be able to run more frequently and serve the neighborhoods surrounding the arches.

NJ Transit Heavy rail has Hoboken, with it's restored ferry slips and PATH connection. Why would you build another NJ Transit heavy rail facility with all the infastructure needed to support such a facility about 1-2 miles from Hoboken Terminal?

NIMBYkiller
March 28th, 2007, 09:07 PM
Not downtown Jersey City, I meant downtown Manhattan. There's been push for LIRR to downtown, why not NJT as well?

STT757
March 28th, 2007, 10:41 PM
Not downtown Jersey City, I meant downtown Manhattan. There's been push for LIRR to downtown, why not NJT as well?

First of all the Bergen Arches Right of Way would have nothing to do with bringing NJ Transit trains to Lower Manhattan as the Arches are too close to the River, meaning you would have to start tunneling your grade down before you even reach the Arches from the West.

The Arches are useless to a theoretical NJ Transit-Lower Manhattan rail link because of the grades required to clear the Hudson River you would have to be below the Bergen Arches, so it does not matter what is there.

You could have Light Rail through the arches and still have NJ Transit trains serve Lower Manhattan, by the time they reach the Bergen Arches they would need to be well below ground.

As for the LIRR to Lower Manhattan there is a big time misconception folks have about this project, the Lower Manhattan rail link project will not provide a one seat ride to LIRR passengers to Lower Manhattan. They cannot co-operate the Auto-mated Airtrain and LIRR along the same tracks, there's three things that at this point cannot be overcome.

1.) FRA crash worthiness standards (Airtrain vs LIRR M7 for example)
2.) Propulsion, signaling etc..
3.) Union issues, LIRR manned vs Airtrain automated

The project scope involves the following.

1.) LIRR turns over operation and control of the Jamaica-Atlantic Ave branch to the Airtrain.
2.) Tunnel from Atlantic Avenue, under Downtown Brooklyn and the East River to Lower Manhattan
3.) Airtrain operates two routes and two services, commuter and airport express.

Commuter trains would be longer (10+ Airtrain vehicle trains) and they would operate Jamaica-Lower Manhattan making every stop in between, LIRR riders from the Suburbs heading to Lower Manhattan or Downtown Brooklyn would connect at Jamaica Station to the Commuter Airtrain.

Airport Express trains would be shorter (3 Airtrain Vehicles) and operate Lower Manhattan-Downtown Brooklyn-Jamaica-JFK Terminals.

The only folks with a one seat rider to Lower Manhattan will be airport travelers, LIRR commuters would switch at Jamaica for Airtrain to Downtown Brooklyn or Lower Manhattan.

Airport travelers would get an express one seat ride, LIRR commuters would get a set up very similar to the NJ Transit-PATH connection at Newark Penn Station. At Newark Penn Station NJ Transit commuters heading to Lower Manhattan or Jersey City transfer (sometimes right across the platform) from their NJ Transit train to the PATH.

LIRR commuters would make a similar connection at Jamaica for Airtrain to Downtown Brooklyn and Lower Manhattan.

This would mean no more LIRR on the Atlantic Avenue branch, all LIRR trains would serve either NY Penn or Grand Central Terminal.

ASchwarz
March 29th, 2007, 01:16 PM
^
This post is completely off. Again you have misconstrued the LIRR extension to JFK and Lower Manhattan.

Under the plan the LIRR WILL continue service on the Atlantic Avenue line, but now service will be upgraded and will extend to JFK and Lower Manhattan.

The current Airtrain cars will NOT be used on the Atlantic Avenue line. The Airtrain tracks were built to handle commuter rail trains. The LIRR can run trains on the existing Airtrain tracks, along the existing Atlantic Avenue line, and then along a new segment to Manhattan. Stations are planned for Downtown Brooklyn-Metrotech, Water Street-T train connection and the WTC. This will be a huge improvement for both LIRR commuters, JFK passengers and MTA users in general.

NIMBYkiller
March 29th, 2007, 01:31 PM
STT57, you are WAY off. First of all, the LIRR east river tunnels start diving underground at a point much closer to the East River than the Bergen Arches are to the Hudson. I don't know how much deeper the Hudson is, but given the fact that the Arches already put the line in a depression, I'm willing to bet it can be done. I assume your not an engineer and neither am I, so I won't say I'm right for sure, but just saying that they look too close and then ignoring the LIRR example is a mistake.

And once again, you're mistaken about my reference to LIRR to downtown. I am talking about LIRR, NOT Airtrain. Before the idiotic Airtrain to downtown idea was brought up, there was LIRR to downtown, which I think is a much better choice. I know all about the problems with the Airtrain project and I am 100% against it. LIRR absolutely can NOT afford to loose a single inch of the line to Flatbush Av. It will completely ruin LIRR's capacity and just bring LIRR back to the same place they were before ESA was started.

ASchwarz, you are confused as well. With the current equipment, it is physically impossible to do what you are saying. How can you say the Airtrain tracks were built for commuter rail services. Have you seen how tight the turns are on that system? No way your typical LIRR car can take those turns. Unless you can prove to me that the radii of those curves are greater than what they appear to be, I don't believe you. I haven't seen anything to suggest that any of what you said is right. While they haven't explicitly said that they're going to be kicking LIRR off the Atlantic, the plans seem to indicate that.

STT757
March 29th, 2007, 01:32 PM
^
This post is completely off. Again you have misconstrued the LIRR extension to JFK and Lower Manhattan.

Under the plan the LIRR WILL continue service on the Atlantic Avenue line, but now service will be upgraded and will extend to JFK and Lower Manhattan.

The current Airtrain cars will NOT be used on the Atlantic Avenue line. The Airtrain tracks were built to handle commuter rail trains. The LIRR can run trains on the existing Airtrain tracks, along the existing Atlantic Avenue line, and then along a new segment to Manhattan. Stations are planned for Downtown Brooklyn-Metrotech, Water Street-T train connection and the WTC. This will be a huge improvement for both LIRR commuters, JFK passengers and MTA users in general.

Again the LIRR and Airtrain cannot operate over the same rails at the same time, the LIRR is not going to JFK. You will not see M7s shuttling passengers between Terminals, Car rental and long term lots.

The Airtrain will take over the Atlantic Avenue branch, the LIRR will not take over the Airtrain.

Dynamicdezzy
March 29th, 2007, 01:57 PM
New (airtrain) Hybrid cars would be used to run on both sets of track. It has been reported (by who i don't know) that the LIRR service would be terminated but that has not been confirmed....none of it has for that matter. From what I've seen on the MTA site, there would be a new platform for Lower Manhattan service (Lirr) and there will be a connector from the airtrain terminal to the atlantic ave track. So this implies that both services will run simultaneously. And I agree that any NJ transit (heavy rail) terminating at hoboken should be routed to Lower manhattan (kinda like the lirr). The light rail shouldn't even be considered (to lower manhattan). It probably runs more efficient as it is with possible expansion to the meadows on one end and maybe SI on the other.

STT757
March 29th, 2007, 11:39 PM
LIRR will no longer operate on the Atlantic Avenue branch, riders from the LIRR will transfer to the Airtrain for the trip to either the airport or Downtown Brooklyn and Lower Manhattan. The LIRR will not operate on the same tracks as Airtrain, the LIRR will not go to JFK, Downtown Brooklyn or Lower Manhattan. It will be all auotmated Airtrain.

Please Read this article.

http://www.downtownexpress.com/de_115/longislandcommuters.html


The rail link would establish a direct link from Lower Manhattan to Downtown Brooklyn and Jamaica, Queens by building a new tunnel beneath the East River. Riders could transfer at Jamaica for the Long Island Rail Road or continue on to J.F.K. airport. Travel time from Jamaica to Lower Manhattan would be cut by more than 10 minutes and from Lower Manhattan to J.F.K., travel time would be cut by 20 minutes officials insist.

Again the Airtrain and LIRR will not operate side by side because the Federal Government will not allow a light rail (which Airtrain is classified) with Heavy rail (LIRR) along the same ROW. Then there's the technology differences to over come, and finally the Union issues (Airtrain automated, LIRR manned with Union employees).


Business leaders hail the $6 billion plan because they say it will trigger development and attract new companies Downtown. But critics insist that because the trip from Long Island would not be a “single seat” ride or even a same platform transfer, it will not be. Instead, riders would have to climb stairs or escalators at the transfer points, creating a cumbersome commute.

“Long Islanders will have a worse ride than they have now,” said Gerard Bringmann, vice chairperson of the Long Island Rail Road Commuters Council, at a public comment session for the project held on Monday. The New York State Legislature created the council in 1981 to represent L.I.R.R. riders. “We seriously question how many Long Islanders can use this.”

Dynamicdezzy
March 30th, 2007, 09:21 AM
I was reading a PDF file in regard to this. It seems that I stand corrected (half way). There would be 2 combining services. One would be the Airtrain service replacing the existing LIRR service. The 2nd would be a "Jamaica express" for LIRR commuters. It seems that it would be the same Airtrain cars (Just more in #) providing a connection with LIRR (at jamaica) to lower manhattan. I'm not sure If I'm making any sense?

http://www.renewnyc.com/plan_des_dev/transportation/pdf/chapter2.pdf

STT757
March 30th, 2007, 09:42 AM
Two routes:

1.) JFK Airtrain express, Lower Manhattan-Downtown Brooklyn-Kennedy Airport terminals. Operating with the current roomier (for baggage) Airtrain vehicles, perhaps a three Airtrain vehicle train for JFK Airport services.

2.) Commuter service: Lower Manhattan-Downtown Brooklyn-Flatbush avenue-Norstrand ave-East New York-Jamaica.

Transfers to LIRR trains at Jamaica, the Commuter trains would have more commuter style seating (benches), as well as being longer (10 Airtrain Vehicles).

The LIRR-Airtrain Lower Manhattan connection at Jamaica would be a similar set up to the NJ Transit-PATH connection at Newark Penn Station. NJ Transit riders heading to Lower Manhattan or Jersey City transfer at Newark Penn to the PATH.

Dynamicdezzy
March 30th, 2007, 10:42 AM
I think the max # is 4 (when demand calls for it). I recall seeing a few closed doors (in jamaica and airport terminals) in front and in back of the 2 car airtrain. I've seen a few 3-cars running already.

NIMBYkiller
March 31st, 2007, 12:14 AM
So if none of this Airtrain crap has been confirmed, then why the hell are we talking about it now? It's just a bunch of useless studies for a project that will end up being a waste of money. Obviously the PA is going to want to run it at an attractive headway, which means LIRR is going to have to cut a lot of trains, so LIRR would get screwed by this project either way. It's more pointless than the actual Airtrain itself. I agree with the general consensus here in that Airtrain would take over the Atlantic line, but as far as I'm concerned, this thing is already dead. LIRR will never stand for it, commuters will never stand for it, and downtown businesses will never stand for it(except for the the few idiotic ones who value the occasional business traveler(who is more likely to come in from LGA anyway) more than their daily workers.

And I'm not saying send all Hoboken trains to downtown, or anything about light rail to downtown. I'm saying have downtown as a 3rd terminal. You need Hoboken as a terminal for the space to lay up the trains. Run a new line via the Arches, then underground with the potential for a stop in Jersey City, then to downtown Manhattan. The light rail to downtown was never an option(nor should it be one).

So basically:
1. LIRR, NOT Airtrain, extended to lower Manhattan via new double stack tunnel(for SAS provisions)
2. NJT heavy rail to lower Manhattan via the Bergen Arches. 4 tracks with the two outter ones having platforms at Jersey City(So now, NJT has 3 terminals and 2 yards).

STT757
March 31st, 2007, 04:01 PM
1. LIRR, NOT Airtrain, extended to lower Manhattan via new double stack tunnel(for SAS provisions)

You just increased the cost by doubling the size of the tunnel, right now it's$7 Billion. Double that would put it in or past the Big Dig scale, no one is going to touch that.


2. NJT heavy rail to lower Manhattan via the Bergen Arches. 4 tracks with the two outter ones having platforms at Jersey City(So now, NJT has 3 terminals and 2 yards).


Again that makes no sense, for a train to still be above ground in the Bergen arches and then proceed underground to cross under the Hudson you would need a grade so steep that it would not be safe. The mouth of a new Hudson Tunnel to Lower Manhattan would have to start on the West Side of the Palisades, not after.

That's how the tunnels to Penn Station are currently configured, which is why there is no Weehawken statiom on the NEC. The tracks are too deep at that point.

NIMBYkiller
April 1st, 2007, 10:31 AM
The options are either take over a subway tunnel or build a new one. If a new one is built, EXISTING PROPOSALS have said to build it as a double stack tunnel for SAS provisions. This is NOT a new concept. I don't even thing a tunnel soley for the LIRR has been discussed.

The Palisades are a lot steeper further north, like near Weehawken. The ground is more level around Jersey City. How bout this. Show me proof that those tunnels would need to start so far back. Show me the depths for the Hudson and the East Rivers, show me the elevation where the LIRR tunnels dive down in Queens, and show me the elevation of the Bergen Arches ROW

Dynamicdezzy
April 1st, 2007, 12:41 PM
Spitzer said he would support the airtrain link if it included a lower level for the SAS.

Marv95
April 1st, 2007, 12:42 PM
The world doesn't revolve around NYC. Does NJT honestly need to create a NEW line to lower Manhattan? You have the PATH for that. Leave Hoboken alone.

z22
April 1st, 2007, 01:03 PM
The options are either take over a subway tunnel or build a new one. If a new one is built, EXISTING PROPOSALS have said to build it as a double stack tunnel for SAS provisions. This is NOT a new concept. I don't even thing a tunnel soley for the LIRR has been discussed.

The Palisades are a lot steeper further north, like near Weehawken. The ground is more level around Jersey City. How bout this. Show me proof that those tunnels would need to start so far back. Show me the depths for the Hudson and the East Rivers, show me the elevation where the LIRR tunnels dive down in Queens, and show me the elevation of the Bergen Arches ROW

NIMBYkiller may be right. PATH starts the underground section east of NJ Turnpike. So, technically a new train line can still be above ground at the Bergen Arches.

STT757
April 1st, 2007, 01:08 PM
NIMBYkiller may be right. PATH starts the underground section east of NJ Turnpike. So, technically a new train line can still be above ground at the Bergen Arches.

Not really, the PATH like the NYC Subway system and like Airtain pulls power from each car, each car has it's shoes on the third rail. NJ Transit uses push/pull locomotives, one engine source to pull an entire train which is on the front pulling or in the back pushing.

NJ Transit commuter trains cannot operate on steep grades, nor can Amtrak or any other heavy rail.

NIMBYkiller
April 1st, 2007, 06:51 PM
Actually, the majority of NJT service also draws power from every car since most of the NJT system, like NYC Subway, PATH, LIRR, and Metro North, is electrified. So yes, they can climb grades just as steep.

The lines we're talking about though will end up being electrified because NJT has expressed no known interest in dual mode locomotives, probably given the udder failure they have been for the LIRR. So the only other option is to electrify since they are trying to bring them into NYP via that rediculous Secaucus Loop.

And no one is saying to touch Hoboken. Hoboken is perfectly fine the way it is. What I'm saying is a THIRD line, WITH A STOP IN JERSEY CITY, to downtown Manhattan. BTW, you have PATH for midtown too. Why not just ditch Penn Station and send everything to Hoboken where you can get PATH to midtown?

BTW, such a line would create a THIRD terminal for NJT, creating ADDITIONAL CAPACITY, which means MORE train service. It's not a necessary thing right now, but it's definately an idea for the future.

STT757
April 1st, 2007, 11:02 PM
Actually, the majority of NJT service also draws power from every car since most of the NJT system, like NYC Subway, PATH, LIRR, and Metro North, is electrified. So yes, they can climb grades just as steep.

NJ Transit uses mostly push pull Electrics, the only MU's are Arrow IIIs which are being replaced by push pull trains with Bi-levels. Even the Arrow IIIs do not pull power from each car, it's every other car. And they are on the way out.


The lines we're talking about though will end up being electrified because NJT has expressed no known interest in dual mode locomotives, probably given the udder failure they have been for the LIRR. So the only other option is to electrify since they are trying to bring them into NYP via that rediculous Secaucus

Again that's innacurate information, NJ Transit's main purpose of the new Hudson tunnels to Manhattan is to connect Manhattan with their non electrified territory through Dual mode Diesel/electrics.

However not the third rail type, dual mode with catenary power.

JCMAN320
April 2nd, 2007, 12:44 PM
MORE USE LIGHT RAIL
Ridership jumps systemwide as lines spur development

Monday, April 02, 2007
By COTTON DELO
JOURNAL STAFF WRITER

Hudson-Bergen Light Rail ridership has surged in the past year - with a 52.6 percent systemwide increase between Jan. 2006 and Jan. 2007.

Overall ridership climbed from 23,619 boardings per day to 36,042 during the 12-month stretch. This figure is calculated using a formula that factors in counts made by agents and the number of tickets purchased at station vending machines, officials said.

"In the last year, we've seen growth at virtually all of the stations," said Neil Fitzsimmons, NJ Transit's director of light rail service planning. "It's a combination of the new service plan, the new direct service, and the new stations that we've opened."

In Feb. 2006, NJ Transit opened three new stations at Port Imperial, Bergenline Avenue and Tonnelle Avenue, and service adjustments enabled passengers accessing the system at points north of Hoboken to ride to the Jersey City waterfront without transferring trains in Hoboken Terminal.

The only station to experience a dip was Hoboken - where ridership declined by 3.7 percent. Light rail officials attribute the drop to implementation of the direct service option that eliminated the need for many passengers to stop there.

Pavonia/Newport's ridership increased by 60.2 percent, and it now shares the title of most trafficked hub with Hoboken - depending on the month, officials say.

They say that much of the passenger surge can be attributed to redevelopment - which has started to affect areas like West Side Avenue in Jersey City and the western side of Hoboken.

"Wherever we are, especially on the waterfront, we've been a tremendous catalyst for redevelopment," said Joe North, NJ Transit's general manager of light rail. "I think that's going to be part of our legacy."

The uptick in ridership has been noticeable to many commuters, who say the trains are crowded at rush hour but much less filled in the afternoon.

"In the morning commute, whenever I come in at 9, it's jam-packed," said Ronald Krenc, 22, of Rutherford, who travels between Hoboken and Essex Street and says he's noticed a pronounced increase in ridership at the Jersey City stations.

The most dramatic increase - 150.7 percent - occurred at Hoboken's Second Street station, where ridership went from 292 to 732 boardings per day.

"Most definitely, it's been a lot more," affirmed Second Street rider Raymond Perez, 26, of Hoboken.

COTTON DELO can be reached at cdelo@jjournal.com

TimmyG
April 2nd, 2007, 12:49 PM
This is great news. I didn't expect ridership to grow this quickly.

NIMBYkiller
April 2nd, 2007, 09:49 PM
Ah, you are correct about the fleet. My mistake. Either way, by the time such a project would be completed, it'd be time for replacement of one of the fleets, which means the opportunity for cars drawing power from every car.

And even so, your argument is pretty weak considering that those same NJT trains that wouldn't be able to climb the grade from the arches to the river bed climb the grade from the East River bed to Sunnyside yard with no problems.

However, you are wrong about the intentions for the Hudson River tunnel project. It's for several reasons
1. The existing tunnels are operating above capacity(hence the constant delays)
2. NJT wants to boost service in general, but can't because of the lack of tunnel capacity as well as lack of platform/track capacity in Penn Station
3. Amtrak wants to add more service, but can't for the same reason, and booting NJT for their sake, while they certainly can, is not a reasonable option.

I have not heard a single thing about NJT purchasing dual mode locomotives. If you could direct me to where you heard such a fantasy, I'd be more likely to change my tune. But for now, I'll trust the 4 or 5 dozen other people I've heard who ALL say NJT is NOT looking into dual modes. Instead, several people have confirmed that IF the Secaucus Loop is built, NJT will be stringing the PVL, Bergen, and Main lines.

JCMAN320
April 3rd, 2007, 01:13 AM
It says it on the ARC's website that NJT would buy dual locamotives.

STT757
April 3rd, 2007, 09:24 AM
I have not heard a single thing about NJT purchasing dual mode locomotives. If you could direct me to where you heard such a fantasy, I'd be more likely to change my tune. But for now, I'll trust the 4 or 5 dozen other people I've heard who ALL say NJT is NOT looking into dual modes. Instead, several people have confirmed that IF the Secaucus Loop is built, NJT will be stringing the PVL, Bergen, and Main lines.

You have obviously been told wrong.

From the Access to the Regions Core website:

http://www.accesstotheregionscore.com/images/deis/4_1_0017.PDF

Check out page 9 to find out where the new slots made available by the new tunnel would go, and again dual modes on page 14.

http://www.accesstotheregionscore.com/images/ARC%20RCLC%206-29-05.pdf


At the same time, NJ Transit is advancing several other projects that support ARC. Consultants are designing a dual-mode locomotive that can be switch from diesel to catenary power to carry trains through the new tunnel. Others are working to convert 140 acres of brownfields into a yard for 40 new locomotives and 200 new train cars.

http://www.recordonline.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070319/BIZ/703190318


DUAL-mode propulsion has been around for generations, most of it combining diesel and de-third-rail power supply. Equipment that combines ac catenary with diesel propulsion is rare, and non-existent in North America. But New Jersey Transit (NJT) and Montreal's Metropolitan Transport Agency (AMT) are now seriously attempting to design and procure dual-mode equipment to provide passengers with one-seat tides between electrified and non-electrified territory while avoiding the high cost of ac electrification.

http://www.encyclopedia.com/doc/1G1-148480313.html

NIMBYkiller
April 3rd, 2007, 01:39 PM
I'd rather hear it from the horses mouth. And ARC is NOT the horses mouth, they do NOT speak for NJT. If they did, NJT would be at Grand Central and MN would be a Penn Station already.

STT757
April 3rd, 2007, 04:40 PM
And ARC is NOT the horses mouth, they do NOT speak for NJT.

What are you talking about? ARC is a study funded by NJ Transit and the Port Authority of NY and NJ. ARC, their website and various documents are funded by the two agencies and the Federal Transportation Administration as part of the planning and engineering stages.

Please read the big bold words at the bottom of the ARC homepage that reads" Sponsored by NJ Transit and the Port Authority of NY and NJ"

http://www.accesstotheregionscore.com/

STT757
April 3rd, 2007, 04:47 PM
Also read this page which details the ARC study as lead by NJ Transit as the project sponsor, the Port Authority as the study partner and the Federal Transit Administration as the lead Federal Agency.

http://www.accesstotheregionscore.com/Contacts.html

The Access to the Regions Core, their documents, and public meetings and mailings are all funded by the Federal Government, NJ Transit and the Port Authority.

Here's the lead contacts for each agency and group involved with ARC.


FTA Contacts:
Ms. Nancy Danzig
Acting Director, Office of Planning and Program
Development
Federal Transit Administration, Region II
One Bowling Green, Room 429
New York, New York 10004-1415
Tel: (212) 668-2180
Fax: (212) 666-3329
Nancy.Danzig@fta.dot.gov

Mr. James Goveia
Community Planner
Federal Transit Administration, Region II
One Bowling Green, Room 429
New York, New York 10004-1415
Tel: (212) 668-2325
Fax: (212) 668-2136
James.Goveia@fta.dot.gov


ARC DEIS Contacts:
Tom Schulze
ARC Project Director
NJ TRANSIT
One Penn Plaza East, 4th Floor
Newark, NJ 07105-2246
Tel: (973) 491-8912
Fax: (973) 491-4142
Tschulze@njtransit.com

Mr. David Widawsky, AICP
Project Manager
Port Authority of New York and New Jersey
233 Park Avenue South
New York, NY 10003
Tel: (212) 435-4421
Fax: (212) 435-4423
dwidawsk@panynj.gov

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Study Team

Project Sponsor
NJ TRANSIT

Study Partner
The Port Authority of New York & New Jersey

Lead Federal Agency
Federal Transit Administration

Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO)
North Jersey Transportation Planning Authority (NJTPA)

Study Consultants
Transit Link Consultants – A Joint Venture of SYSTRA Consulting, Inc.
& Parsons Brinckerhoff Quade & Douglas, Inc.

In association with:
A. Strauss-Wieder, Inc.
A.D. Marble & Company
InGroup, Inc.
KM Chng Environmental, Inc.
KSE Engineers
LMS Engineers
Matrix Environmental Services
Organizational Learning Associates
Robinson Aerial Surveys
The Louis Berger Group


http://www.accesstotheregionscore.com/Contacts.html

NIMBYkiller
April 4th, 2007, 12:04 AM
Regardless, I think the loop is a waste of money and that the Bergen Arches would be better suited for a downtown NJT line. Send HBLR somewhere else. Continue it along the former CNJ ROW to Newark, across the Bayonne to SI, and up to Tenafly. Those are good extensions. The NJT to downtown can make a stop at Jersey City if the grade isn't too steep.

HBLR to Secaucus wont accomplish anything that's already possible. If you're comming from the former Erie lines, you just transfer at Hoboken to PATH or HBLR. If your comming from any other line operating via Newark Penn, just transfer there to PATH(and HBLR via the extension I suggested).

The only one is if you're comming via Newark Broad, which I think most of those trains are going to Hoboken anyway.

JCMAN320
May 11th, 2007, 10:03 PM
National Guard to patrol PATH stations starting next week

5/11/2007, 11:48 a.m. EDT
By JANET FRANKSTON LORIN
The Associated Press

NEWARK, N.J. (AP) — PATH commuters will see National Guard troops patrolling 13 stations in New Jersey and New York starting next week, authorities said.

The effort is similar to one already in place in New York's Penn Station and Grand Central Station.

"Protecting an open interstate transit system requires incredible cooperation and the Port Authority is an appropriate vehicle to test bistate partnerships," Port Authority board chairman Anthony Coscia said in a statement.

The pilot program, which will cost $200,000 a month, will deploy up to 40 National Guard troops in and outside 13 stations. The measure is designed to supplement existing security by adding more manpower at mass transit facilities.

The Port Authority and two states will share the cost of the patrol.

"I think it's just about trying to be smart, using resources from the two states in new ways that keep us ahead of the curve and not behind it," said Port Authority Executive Director Anthony E. Shorris.

Since Sept. 11, the Authority has invested nearly $3 billion to enhance security at its facilities. That includes about $300 million for the PATH subway system, which links Manhattan and New Jersey by century-old underground tunnels.

The transit system is already patrolled by Port Authority police, including K-9 detection and special operations units. PATH passengers are subject to random bag inspections.

About 230,000 passenger trips are taken on a normal weekday, and 67 million passenger trips were taken last year.

The agency said the Guard deployment is not a reaction to any threat, or to the recent arrests of six men prosecutors say planned to attack Fort Dix in New Jersey, but fulfills a promise of renewed regional cooperation on security first discussed by New Jersey Gov. Jon S. Corzine and New York's Eliot Spitzer last January.

The two governors said they would work together to pursue money for beefed-up security for things such as mass transit and sent a joint letter to Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff.

The Bush administration on Thursday announced it would divvy up $445 million in grants to protect commuters, shipping ports, and transit systems from attacks — a boost of more than 10 percent from last year.

New York City, which has complained for years that such grants are spread around too widely, was a big recipient again this year, receiving some $93 million.

Some of that money is shared with New Jersey and Connecticut, where many of the city's workers live. The area received $79.5 million in 2006, and $50 million in 2005.

The Department of Homeland Security devoted a lion's share of the $445 million to seaports and mass transit: $202 million for ports, $155 million in grants to bus and rail lines, and $48.5 million for critical infrastructure around the United States.

Concerns have long been raised about potential terrorist attacks on tunnels connecting to New York City.

Last summer, authorities said they had thwarted a suicide-bomb plot involving the PATH tunnels.

Law enforcement officials said the overseas suspects arrested in that scheme had hoped to unleash the Hudson River on the city in part by destroying an underground wall that keeps water from entering the World Trade Center site.

JCMAN320
June 27th, 2007, 11:54 PM
Businesses to move for station

Monday, June 25, 2007
By RONALD LEIR
JOURNAL STAFF WRITER

There's always a price to pay for progress.

NJ Transit plans to extend the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail Transit System south to Eighth Street in Bayonne, but to do that, the agency will have to knock out two local businesses that employ nearly 30 people, most of them from Bayonne.

Both businesses are searching for other places to operate.

Meanwhile, NJ Transit spokesman Dan Stessel said the agency is in the process of selecting a team of professionals to implement the extension of the rail line, from its current southernmost point, the 22nd Street station, to Eighth Street off Avenue C.

Stessel said the project's cost "is estimated at about $90 million, inclusive of property (acquisition)." He said the track will be "at grade for about half the distance (from 22nd Street)" and will then be "on a viaduct to an elevated platform at Eighth Street."

Stessel said the station will provide for "short-term parking only - 'Kiss-and-Ride' drop-off mainly. About 15 spaces are projected for the station."

The projected completion date is 2009, he said.

Properties NJ Transit needs to acquire include the land now occupied - under lease agreements with the landowner ALD Realty of Bayonne - by Burger King and STS Tire & Auto Center.

Kaval Walter, manager of the Burger King, said that his bosses "are looking to sites to relocate. Hopefully, they'll find something." He said there was speculation about some type of food concession operating from the new station.

There is another Burger King on Broadway at the city's northern border.

Walter said the downtown store has about 25 workers, of whom "95 percent" are Bayonne residents.

At the tire shop, the four mechanics on duty all live in Bayonne, a supervisor said yesterday. Bayonne has at least two other tire specialists.

When the agency is ready to begin building the West Eighth Street station, it wants to use the old Pagano supermarket site at West Eighth and North streets as a staging area for construction equipment, property owner Asher Lipman advised the city Zoning Board of Adjustment Monday night.

The board had asked Lipman, accompanied by West Orange attorney Daniel M. Murphy, to update it on plans for the site. In February 2006, the board approved Lipman's application to develop 74 residential units and ground-floor retail on the empty lot but nothing has been built.

"NJ Transit has ordered an appraisal of the site and they should be ready in a few weeks to use that as the basis for an offering price for a license agreement to use the property," Murphy said. Lipman will report back to the board in two months for a further update.

JCMAN320
July 1st, 2007, 07:47 AM
Kearny: What would rail service return do?

Thursday, June 28, 2007
By ROSE DUGER
JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT

KEARNY - The town's plans to restore commuter train service are steaming forward, with NJ Transit now seeking to establish an advisory panel to look further into the effects a rail line would have on the town.

Mayor Al Santos said top management at the state transit agency has agreed to establish the advisory panel and hold at least two meetings to gauge the public's input.

Preliminary plans call for rebuilding the Harrison-Kingsland Rail Line, a defunct line running along the eastern border of Gunnell Oval, and construct a new station near Bergen Avenue east of Schuyler Avenue.

The plans also call for NJ Transit to provide additional planning support to redevelop the areas both east and west of the proposed rail line.

The rail line would open sometime between 2010 and 2013 and would initially lead to the Secaucus Junction station, where passengers could transfer to trains bound for Manhattan and other locations in New Jersey.

Eventually, the Harrison-Kingsland line would travel through a new tunnel to be constructed under the Hudson River to connect with Manhattan's Penn Station. The $7.2 billion tunnel is slated for completion sometime in 2016.

The advisory panel would consider a wide range of topics, including the station's effect on redevelopment in the area, including schools, infrastructure and traffic, along with potential ridership.

Santos said the panel would most likely include representatives familiar with local school issues, engineering concerns, commuters and members of the Kearny Municipal Utilities Authority.

STT757
July 3rd, 2007, 11:46 PM
I have not heard a single thing about NJT purchasing dual mode locomotives. If you could direct me to where you heard such a fantasy, I'd be more likely to change my tune. But for now, I'll trust the 4 or 5 dozen other people I've heard who ALL say NJT is NOT looking into dual modes. Instead, several people have confirmed that IF the Secaucus Loop is built, NJT will be stringing the PVL, Bergen, and Main lines.

The Horses mouth has spoken, NJ Transit and Montreal's Transit agency are seeking dual mode catenary diesel/ac electric locomotives, this and the Secaucus loop will allow NJ Transit to offer direct one seat rider service to NY Penn from non electrified territories.


NJT/AMT dual-mode RFP is out
May 10, 2007

New Jersey Transit and Montreal’s AMT (Agence Métropolitaine de Transport) have released a request for proposals for a joint procurement of dual-mode diesel/a.c. catenary commuter rail locomotives. The initial purchase calls for 30-35 units; options could bring the total number to as many as 70. NJT and AMT, working with prime engineering consultant STV, Inc., have developed a detailed technical specification for the locomotives, which must be capable of running multi-level commuter rail coaches in push-pull configuration at speeds up to 125 mph in single or multiple-unit locomotive consists. Responses to the RFP are due at NJT by July 20, 2007, and a pre-proposal conference is scheduled at NJT headquarters in Newark, N.J., for May 31. NJT and AMT will be awarding separate contracts.

Dual-mode diesel/third-rail-electric propulsion has been around for quite some time in North America, but locomotives that combine a.c. catenary with diesel propulsion have not been seriously attempted. NJT and AMT now want to provide passengers with one-seat rides between electrified and non-electrified territory while avoiding the enormous cost of electrification. NJT already operates services where a transfer is required and is moving ahead on the multi-billion-dollar ARC (Access to the Region’s Core) project, which includes two new rail tunnels under the Hudson River. AMT plans to construct new lines that feed into an existing electrified line, the 25Kv Deux Montagnes Line, which serves Montreal’s Central Station and which includes a three-mile-long tunnel. AMT plans to connect the non-electrified Blainville Line to the Deux Montagnes Line just outside the tunnel, and construct a new, non-electrified Repentigny-Mascouche Line, which will feed into the Deux Montages at Mont-Royal.

According to STV, today’s modular locomotive designs should be able to support a dual-mode locomotive configuration within several constraints. Among these are Amtrak’s tunnel clearances (the locked-down-pantograph height in the Hudson River tunnels is 14 feet 7 inches), carbody space (no more than 75 feet long), noise levels, EPA emissions compliance (Tier II, with Tier III coming up in 2010), tractive effort, and weight (Amtrak’s maximum locomotive weight on the Northeast Corridor is 288,000 pounds GRL for speeds above 79 mph). The challenge for builders will be to fit a diesel power plant and an electrical transformer into one carbody within those parameters.

Industry observers say potential builders for this new-design locomotive are Siemens, Alstom, Bombardier, and Vossloh. They say it’s unlikely that EMD or GE will bid, though either builder could partner with someone else to supply diesel power plants. EMD, for example, supplied diesel engines for NJT’s PL42AC, which is built by Alstom.

NIMBYkiller
July 4th, 2007, 05:25 PM
Well, good luck to NJT with the dual modes. I still think the loop is a rediculous waste

ablarc
July 4th, 2007, 06:23 PM
Wow, 125mph!!

I guess the track's already upgraded for Acela.

NIMBYkiller
July 5th, 2007, 09:34 AM
125mph, nowhere do they go that first. Maybe the Trenton express? Even that is doubtful. Maybe 90, but 125? Granted....it is Newark to Princeton Jct no stops

JCMAN320
July 10th, 2007, 08:55 PM
NJ Transit posts record ridership

by Tom FeeneyTuesday July 10, 2007, 4:51 PM

Commuters took nearly 10 million more trips last year than the year before on NJ Transit's trains, buses and light rail cars, marking the fourth straight year of ridership growth, the transit agency announced today.


The number of trips climbed from 241.1 million to 250.9 million in the fiscal year that ended on June 30. That's an increase of 4.1 percent.

"Given our strong regional economy and job market and sustained higher fuel prices, more New Jersey residents than ever are relying on public transportation," Gov. Jon Corzine said. "This continuing trend of record-high ridership on our state's transit network underscores the critical need for additional capacity expansions such as the ARC project and enhanced intrastate bus service. "

NJ Transit's three light rail lines saw an increase of 22 percent to 18.8 million riders, the agency announced. Ridership on its 11 rail lines was up to 73 million from 68.8 million. That number reflects a 6 percent increase in peak-hour travel, a 5 percent increase in off-peak travel and a 7 percent increase in weekend travel. Ridership on the agency's 240 bus lines grew 1.4 percent to 159.1 million.

Since NJ Transit began operating the state's transit system in 1980, ridership has increased by 41.7 percent.

But as transit ridership has grown so too has the volume of cars on the state's highways. The number of vehicle miles traveled on New Jersey roads has increased between 1.5 and 2 percent a year over the past 20 years except in times of recession, Department of Transportation spokeswoman Erin Phalon said.

Since the creation of NJ Transit in 1980, the number of vehicle miles traveled on New Jersey highways has increased by 45.9 percent, a rate slightly higher than the transit growth.

JCMAN320
July 11th, 2007, 09:01 PM
State approves Bayonne light rail extension

NJ Transit has approved the taking of property in Bayonne to extend the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail Transit System south to 8th Street, the agency announced today.

The property that NJ Transit will need to acquire includes the land now occupied - under lease agreements with the ALD Realty of Bayonne - by Burger King and STS Tire & Auto Center.

Kaval Walter, manager of the Burger King, said last month that his bosses are looking to relocate.

“I would like to thank the board of NJ Transit for moving the light rail extension to 8th Street closer to reality," Mayor Joseph V. Doria, Jr. said in a written statement. "I look forward to the completion of the line to 8th Street and the benefits it will bring to our residents in 2009. I am hopeful that the businesses that will be moving as a result of the construction will be able to find other appropriate locations elsewhere in the city of Bayonne.”

The project will extend the light rail from 22nd Street, the current southern terminus of the system, to a new station at 8th Street.

From the elevated 22nd Street Station, the light rail tracks will be extended south, hugging the existing Conrail right-of-way along Avenue E. A viaduct will carry light rail vehicles over local streets to an elevated platform at the new 8th Street Station, which will feature an elevator and stairs between street and platform levels.

It is expected to be complete in 2009.

JCMAN320
August 29th, 2007, 10:14 PM
PATH CUSTOMERS TO GET UP-TO-THE-MINUTE TRAIN INFORMATION, TV NEWS, ENTERTAINMENT AND WEATHER UNDER DEAL REACHED WITH NBC UNIVERSAL

Date: August 16, 2007
Press Release Number: 67-2007


The Port Authority’s PATH customers soon will get up-to-the-minute train arrival and departure information on PATH platforms and on PATH trains, and digitally transmitted local news and entertainment from WNBC and NBC Universal while en route to their destinations under an agreement reached between the bistate agency, NBC Universal and JC Decaux, N.A.

Each of the 340 rail cars in PATH’s new fleet will feature eight TV screens. The cars currently are under construction, and will be phased into the system starting in 2008 and continuing through 2011. The new monitors will be installed on PATH platforms beginning in 2008.

The Port Authority also will have the ability to override regular scheduled programming on station platforms to broadcast emergency information to customers.

Port Authority Chairman Anthony R. Coscia said, “This agreement provides an important service to our customers at no cost to the agency. It’s a model agreement for advancing customer service goals by leveraging the marketing potential of one of our facilities.”

Port Authority Executive Director Anthony E. Shorris said, “Getting the most up-to-date information to passengers is critical to the successful operation of any transportation network. Our PATH customers understand disruptions and service changes do occur, but they want to be updated so they can make decisions about their commute.”

President of NBC Universal Television Stations John Wallace said, “We’re extremely pleased to join forces with the Port Authority to provide relevant local news and information to millions of PATH commuters. This deal is the latest in our continuing effort to expand our local presence in the out-of-home television market, offering our viewers relevant information in a way that best suits their busy lifestyles and our advertisers the opportunity to reach a new and targeted audience of consumers.”

Under the agreement, NBC will serve as a subcontractor to JC Decaux, which was hired by the Port Authority in July 2005 to provide a broad range of advertising, news media, specialty media and other related revenue opportunities for the bistate agency.

JCMAN320
September 6th, 2007, 01:41 AM
First MTA buses roll over Bayonne Bridge

by Staten Island AdvanceTuesday September 04, 2007, 11:00 PM

Ridership was light on day one of the new S89 Limited bus service across the Bayonne Bridge to the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail, as 100-plus commuters took the $2 ride to work in Hudson County, N.J.

Borough President James Molinaro, one of the biggest supporters of the new service and a passenger aboard the 5:30 a.m. maiden run, estimated that about nine passengers were on the first bus. Only two people took advantage of the first reverse trip of the morning, he said. But ridership picked up later in the day.

Though the total was only a twelfth of the 1,200 projected daily riders, Molinaro praised Metropolitan Transportation Authority CEO and Executive Director Elliot (Lee) Sander for making the service a reality after commuters complained about the unreliability of private carriers in recent years.

"Lee Sander made a commitment to us," Molinaro said. "This morning he ran 10 buses. He didn't make any money this morning; he lost money, but [the MTA has] an obligation to get us to work in a timely manner."

"In three or four weeks, those buses will be jammed," Molinaro predicted.

The S89 service marks the Metropolitan Transportation Authority's first interstate bus service, to connect Staten Islanders with the booming financial district in Hoboken and Jersey City.

"It's been a long time in the making, but Staten Island commuters and drivers have a quicker commute and easier drive to look forward to today thanks to the start of bus service over the Bayonne Bridge," said Sen. Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.).

"All scheduled trips were made with no incidents -- outside of traffic," said Paul J. Fleuranges, a spokesman for MTA New York City Transit. "The customers we carried seemed to be happy. Not bad at all for the first day."

One former X19 commuter called the new route "a pleasure," and said the S89 likely would shave a half-hour off the morning commute and an hour or more in the evening.

Joel Azumah, president of TransportAzumah, the private carrier that stepped in to continue service on a similar route after the sudden departure of Coach USA's Red & Tan line, said he plans to continue business as usual for as long as he has riders. Azumah's average daily ridership had been about 200, but he too reported a lighter-than-normal turnout yesterday, though he said he could not offer a specific head count.

"This week it's going to be very difficult to tell, because a lot of people are still on vacation," he said.

Azumah said he hopes the S89 will drum up more interest among Jersey City-bound commuters. A larger pool of transit riders would mean more people who might be attracted to Azumah's $5 one-seat-ride charter bus service that travels all the way to Jersey City and makes stops at office buildings.

Patrick Hyland, vice president of government affairs for the Staten Island Chamber of Commerce, said some potential riders may have decided to let the first day's commuters serve as guinea pigs.

Meanwhile, Molinaro and Sander star in a television commercial advertising the new service. The ad will run for the next two weeks, Molinaro said.

There were still a number of New York license plates at the 34th Street light rail station, signifying a larger number of Islanders who may someday decide to give the bus a try, Molinaro said.

"Riders will get to work quicker and with less hassle thanks to this new route," said Rep. Vito Fossella. "It's one small victory in our ongoing efforts to enhance mass transit for Staten Island commuters."

-- Contributed by Maura Yates

JCMAN320
September 12th, 2007, 10:37 PM
LIGHT RAIL SERVICE SUSPENDED BETWEEN PAVONIA-NEWPORT AND HARSIMUS COVE ON WEEKENDS

September 12, 2007
NJT-07-096

NEWARK, NJ — Starting on Saturday, September 15 and continuing through Sunday, October 14, Hudson-Bergen Light Rail service will be suspended on weekends between Pavonia-Newport and Harsimus Cove stations from 6 a.m. until 7 p.m. each day, due to construction activity adjacent to the tracks at the site of a future hotel.

Customers traveling during these periods are advised of the following:


Light rail trains will NOT operate between Pavonia-Newport and Harsimus Cove stations.
Light rail service will operate normally from all other stations in four segments:
Tonnelle Avenue – Pavonia-Newport
Hoboken – Pavonia-Newport
Harsimus Cove – West Side Avenue
Harsimus Cove – 22nd Street (Bayonne)
Customers may use free shuttle bus service to travel between Pavonia-Newport and Harsimus Cove stations, or they may walk the short distance between the stations.
In the event of inclement weather, construction may be canceled and normal service will operate.


For Hudson-Bergen Light Rail schedules, fares or information, visit www.njtransit.com or call 1-800-772-2222.

JCMAN320
September 24th, 2007, 08:01 AM
Surveillance camera agreement expected

Monday, September 24, 2007
By N. CLARK JUDD
JOURNAL STAFF WRITER

A deal is in the works to get access to NJ Transit Police surveillance cameras for the Jersey City Police Department, Mayor Jerramiah Healy confirmed last week.

The agreement would be especially helpful in improving public safety around the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail stations, Healy said in a statement.

Healy, NJ Transit Executive Director Rich Sarles, and "tech people" from both NJ Transit and the city plan to meet soon to discuss the feasibility of linking NJ Transit's closed-circuit television cameras at Light Rail stations to the city's existing system, Healy said.

"With the changing of bus routes and elimination of bus routes we would like to be prepared for the potential increase in ridership on the Light Rail," added Jersey City Police Chief Thomas Comey.

Negotiations between NJ Transit and the city had stalled for a couple months because NJ Transit Police Chief Joseph Bober refused to allow the city access to the cameras, Healy said. But Healy intervened with NJ Transit higher-ups, and the process started moving forward again, said Healy spokeswoman Jennifer Morrill.

Healy said about Bober last week, he "should get another job."

A spokeswoman for NJ Transit, said Friday there were no personal issues between Bober and Healy. "We are working very closely with the city to meet their needs through shared technology and we're also cooperatively working together with our respective police departments," said the spokeswoman, Penny Bassett Hackett.

JCMAN320
October 18th, 2007, 04:59 AM
New trains, then more zip

Thursday, October 18, 2007
By KEN THORBOURNE
JOURNAL STAFF WRITER

PATH to get new signals in 7 years

PATH train riders can look forward to a zippier commute seven years from now when a new $500 million signal system goes into effect, Port Authority of New York and New Jersey officials announced yesterday in Jersey City.

Coupled with a previously approved $809 million to replace the PATH's entire 340-car fleet, this outlay represents the largest investment in the 100-year-old rail line since the Port Authority took it over in 1962, said Port Authority Chairman Anthony R. Coscia.

If approved today by the agency's board, the new signal system will increase the system's capacity by 20 percent, said Coscia, who was joined at the press conference at the Exchange Place PATH station by Jersey City Mayor Jerramiah Healy, Port Authority Executive Director Anthony E. Shorris and other Port Authority officials.

PATH trains currently carry 50,000 riders per hour during rush hour, officials said.

"The new signal system . will allow us to run trains safely and efficiently at closer intervals, thereby allowing a lot more capacity to the system," Shorris said.

The new system would be a significant upgrade from the current 40-year-old system and will allow trains to run closer together.

Currently, PATH trains running from Newark Penn Station to the World Trade Center during rush hour arrive every 3.8 minutes, officials said. The new signal system should shave one minute off that time, officials said.

Riders can also look forward to seeing new trains on the rails as early as June. The entire fleet will be replaced within three years, they said.

The new trains all have three doors, unlike many of the existing trains, which have two, officials said. The new trains will also require less maintenance and have fewer breakdowns, Shorris said.

"I hear complaints all the time about how crowded the PATH trains are, especially during peak hours," Healy said. "This 20 percent expansion of ridership capacity can be directed at those peak hours and address some of those complaints."

Sharon Peyton, an employee at the Newport Centre Mall who commutes from Newark Penn Station, said she's "satisfied now" with PATH service.

"But if they can do anything to help it run faster, that would be nice," she added.

STT757
October 18th, 2007, 10:32 AM
They keep going back and forth between Diesel and HBLRT, right now the Light Rail seems to how the most support for the Northern Branch which would extend off the HBLRT from Tonnelle.

http://www.northernbranchcorridor.com/

JCMAN320
December 30th, 2007, 07:51 PM
Feds fork over last light rail payment

Saturday, December 29, 2007
By JASON FINK
CITY EDITOR

The Hudson-Bergen Light Rail system has received more than half the $85 million in federal funds earmarked for New Jersey transportation and economic development projects.

The light rail received $54 million, the final payment from the federal government for the system, which stretches from Bayonne to North Bergen.

"We get payments every year in installments," said Dan Stessel, a spokesman for NJ Transit, which runs the system.

Stessel said the money will be used to fund work that has already been done. Federal transportation dollars make up a part of the total $2.2 billion cost of the system, which opened in 2000.

Work is currently underway to expand the system south to Eighth Street in Bayonne from 22nd Street.

The funding is part of an appropriations bill signed into law by President Bush this week.

Another $15 million will go toward building a new rail tunnel under the Hudson River.

"It is no secret that when we provide safe and efficient transportation options, the public will make good use of it," U.S. Sen. Robert Menendez said in a written statement.

"Investing in our state's public transportation infrastructure, we can reduce the number of cars on the road and in turn reduce greenhouse gas emissions, ease traffic congestion, and provide resources for our communities to spur economic growth."

In all, some 20 transit projects will receive money, including $1.3 million for improvements at Newark Penn Station.

JCMAN320
February 28th, 2008, 03:07 AM
TRANSPORTATION
Bayonne expansion on track for '09

Thursday, February 28, 2008
By RONALD LEIR
JOURNAL STAFF WRITER

Light rail is on the move and heading south.

Well, not too far south. But it will be a big move appreciated by thousands and thousands of people nonetheless.

NJ Transit anticipates awarding a construction contract this spring to extend its Hudson-Bergen Light Rail Transit System one mile south from its current southern terminus at 22nd Street to a new station at Eighth Street in Bayonne, spokeswoman Courtney Carroll confirmed.

The new station is expected to make the trip into Manhattan or the waterfront meccas in Hoboken and Jersey City more convenient for commuters from the southern tip of Bayonne and Staten Island. Plus, the rail has been hailed as raising property values along the line.

The station will be the 24th on the Light Rail route, currently stretching north to Tonnelle Avenue and 51st Street in North Bergen.

Completion of the Bayonne extension is projected for late next year.

While NJ Transit's board of directors has authorized acquisition of all property needed to facilitate the expansion, negotiations with private property owners are still proceeding, Carroll said.

A Burger King and the STS Tire & Auto Center - adjacent properties on West Eighth Street near the Avenue C intersection - are on the transit agency's scope but, so far, no deal has been concluded.

The city has pledged to help the businesses relocate, preferably somewhere in Bayonne.

NJ Transit's board authorized design specifications to be drawn back in September 2006, along with environmental and related work.

The plan is to extend the tracks south from the elevated 22nd Street Station, parallel with the existing Conrail right of way along Avenue E. A viaduct will carry Light Rail cars over local streets to an elevated platform at the new, elevator-equipped Eighth Street station, which will be overlap the east side of Avenue C and the south side of Eighth Street.

The station's design will be modeled after the old Central Railroad of New Jersey station that stood on the site from 1892 until the 1970s.

The old station's tower and arched entrances faced south toward the tracks. But the design for the new station calls for its tower and arched entrances to face north toward Eighth Street.

Parsons Brinckerhoff Quade and Douglas of Newark is the architect for the new station.

The extension will require building retaining walls behind several Avenue E properties, city spokesman Joseph Ryan said.


New lightrail station due next year

For most of the extension, he added, track construction will take place within the existing railway right of way running parallel to Avenue E, but beginning at 11th Street, where Avenue E starts to curve as it goes south, a viaduct will be needed.

Around the southern end of the extension, there will be new crosswalks in various locations on Avenue C, Avenue E, Linnet Street, North Street, Eighth Street, and Ninth Street, Ryan said.

NJ Transit has projected the overall project cost at $90 million.

Federal and state guidelines, Carroll said, mandate that a portion of the project cost shall be allocated for artists' contributions so "art will be incorporated into the new (Bayonne) station."

JCMAN320
April 8th, 2008, 11:49 AM
Weighing 3 bids for extending Light Rail in Bayonne

Tuesday, April 08, 2008

NJ Transit is another step closer to extending the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail Transit System south to Eighth Street in downtown Bayonne.

The transit agency has received three bids for the design and construction of the project, NJ Transit spokeswoman Courtney Carroll said yesterday.

George Harms Construction, Inc., of Howell, was the apparent low bidder with a price of $58,373,125.

Conti Enterprises, Inc., of South Plainfield, bid $68,887,886; and a tri-venture of Railroad

Construction Co., Inc., Joseph M. Sanzari, Inc., and J. Fletcher Creamer & Son, Inc., based in Paterson, bid $72,554,000.

NJ Transit's board of commissioners may award the contract in May, Carroll said.

Carroll said the three bids, which were opened on March 7, are still being reviewed by NJ Transit staff before a recommendation is made to the board.

The agency plans to run the Light Rail one mile south by extending the tracks south from the elevated 22nd Street Station in Bayonne parallel with the existing Conrail right of way along Avenue E.

RONALD LEIR

JCMAN320
April 15th, 2008, 12:12 AM
RIVER LINE POSTS 4.8 PERCENT WEEKDAY RIDERSHIP INCREASE
Gains in 2nd quarter of FY08

March 31, 2008
Contact: Penny Bassett Hackett or Dan Stessel
(973) 491-7078

NEWARK, NJ — Against the backdrop of higher fuel prices, more residents in Camden, Burlington and Mercer counties are turning to the River LINE as part of their daily commute. The 34-mile light rail line posted a 4.8 percent increase in weekday ridership during the 2nd Quarter of Fiscal Year 2008, the three month period from September 1 through December 31, 2007.

Average weekday ridership increased to 7,600 trips—a record high for the second quarter.

“The River LINE is living up to its promise of promoting economic development and providing a convenient, affordable and environmentally-friendly transportation alternative for a wide range of travelers – from daily commuters to weekend day-trippers,” said NJ TRANSIT Chairman and DOT Commissioner Kris Kolluri.

“When we opened the River LINE four years ago this month, we said that you could take the 34-mile trip for less than a gallon of gas. Today, you can take that trip for less than half the price of a gallon of gas,” said NJ TRANSIT Executive Director Richard Sarles. “We are pleased to report that ridership continues to grow as more and more residents of Burlington, Camden and Mercer counties discover the convenience and cost-effectiveness of making the River LINE part of their daily commute.”

Weekday gains were focused on trips to and from Trenton Station, where customers can make connections to Northeast Corridor rail service, as well as Amtrak and SEPTA trains. Under NJ TRANSIT’s fare policy, customers who have a weekly or monthly rail pass are able to ride the River LINE at no additional charge, simply by showing their pass. Monthly pass use was up 7.6 percent from last year.

Collectively, boardings at the two stations in Burlington increased 19.6 percent over the second quarter of FY07. Boardings at Delanco were up 18.9 percent.

The River LINE is entering its fifth year of service this month. Since the line opened on March 15, 2004, ridership has grown substantially as NJ TRANSIT made a series of service enhancements:

-Introduced 15-minute peak-period service in June 2004
-Enhanced Capital Connection bus service in Trenton to provide better connections with River LINE trains in June 2004
-Launched new early-morning service to Trenton from Florence and Roebling in September 2004, enabling customers to make earlier connections to Northeast Corridor trains
-Launched new early-morning service from Cinnaminson to Camden in January 2005
-Added early-morning trips from Burlington South and Burlington Towne Centre stations in September 2006 to create additional Northeast Corridor and PATCO connections
-Added a later (9:30 p.m.) Trenton departure in September 2006
-Added early-morning trips from Camden and Pennsauken stations in May 2007 to create additional Northeast Corridor and PATCO connections
-Launched late-night service to Route 73/Pennsauken in May 2007
-Several towns along the alignment are capitalizing on the economic value that a good public transportation system adds to existing nearby neighborhoods and to land suitable for mixed-use development in accordance with Smart Growth principles.

Among the initiatives recently launched are a Transit Oriented Development proposal at the Beverly-Edgewater Park Station and the redevelopment of a former industrial property in Bordentown. In addition, Riverside in January named an exclusive developer of land around Riverside Station, where housing, commercial and retail space is proposed. And earlier this month, Burlington City named a developer for a 20-acre parcel along the Delaware River and a short walk to River LINE service.

JCMAN320
April 24th, 2008, 10:41 AM
Move it! Pipe in Light Rail path
Extending Light Rail means moving pipe

Thursday, April 24, 2008
By RONALD LEIR
JOURNAL STAFF WRITER

NJ Transit's plans to extend the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail Transit System south to Eighth Street in Bayonne are already causing some headaches for the city.

An underground PSE&G natural gas pipeline that services a single industrial customer must be rerouted because it sits in the way of future supports for an elevated rail viaduct.

And officials predict that during the two months it's going to take to do the job, Bayonne residents and businesses in the area - Avenue E and West Eighth Street between Avenue C and East 12th Street - can expect periodic traffic rerouting and parking disruption.

Representatives of NJ Transit were expected to brief the Bayonne City Council on the plans at last night's caucus and promised to repeat the presentation at next week's meeting. Both presentations will be televised by Cablevision, as part of its regular city government coverage, to help get out the word to the public.

City spokesman Joseph Ryan said the city will post periodic updates on its Web site and will additionally alert the public with signs and other appropriate notices in the affected areas in advance.

[b]Work is scheduled to start next Wednesday. J. Fletcher Creamer & Son, of Linden, has been hired to install 1,350 feet of 12-inch-diameter steel pipe for $1.8 million, PSE&G spokeswoman Karen Johnson said. NJ Transit will pay for the work.[/v]

Johnson said the line being moved serves only one customer, Bayonne Plant Holdings, formerly known as Cogen Technologies, at the foot of East 23rd Street, and that when the line is being used, it accommodates 1,800 cubic feet of gas per hour.

"There'll be no interruption of service," Johnson said. "The old line will remain in service up to the point in time where we're ready to shift to the new line and then we'll just abandon the old line."

JCMAN320
May 3rd, 2008, 05:10 PM
Schumer calls for park and ride lot for bus riders

by Staten Island Advance Friday
May 02, 2008, 3:11 PM

Sen. Charles Schumer today called for the Port Authority to convert an empty lot at the base of the Bayonne Bridge in the Elm Park section of Staten Island into parking spaces for North Shore commuters.

Riders of the S89 bus have been competing with customers for parking in a 34-spot lot near a shopping center at the corner of Walker Street and Morningstar Road.

That lot was built in 2000 on land owned by the Port Authority for use by shoppers and restaurant patrons at the businesses across the street. Under an agreement forged at the time, according to the business owners, the merchants divide the annual $3,600 cost of insurance plus maintenance for the lot.

However, Port Authority officials recently ruled the lot is free and open to all, first come, first serve.

Business owners have complained that customers have no place to park and it is hurting business.

The S89 bus travels over the Bayonne Bridge to the Hudson-Bergen light rail system, linking the Hudson River cities in New Jersey. From the 34th Street station, Islanders can take advantage of the 15-minute ride to Jersey City and Hoboken PATH stations, where there are fast and easy connections to Midtown.

"If the Port Authority's lot was developed, over two-hundred commuters would be able to park and take the bus to the Bayonne transit hub, taking cars off the road, decreasing the amount of gas North Shore commuters need for their trip, and increasing demand for the extremely popular express bus," said Schumer.

JCMAN320
May 29th, 2008, 08:34 PM
NJ TRANSIT UNVEILS NEW ‘GO BUS’ SERVICE IN NEWARK AND IRVINGTON
Enhanced bus service begins April 7 along busy Springfield Avenue corridor

April 4, 2008
NJT-08-026

NEWARK, NJ — NJ TRANSIT gave local officials a sneak preview today of “Go Bus”—the state’s first “premium” local bus service—offering enhanced amenities and greater convenience to customers along the Springfield Avenue corridor beginning Monday, April 7.

The enhanced service, which was designed by and for customers, paves the way for Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) in the state.

NJ TRANSIT incorporated customer feedback into every aspect of the service—from the custom bus shelters and unique color scheme to the name “Go Bus” itself.

“With the introduction of its new ‘Go Bus’—which offers a streamlined service with fewer stops to help reduce travel time—NJ TRANSIT is making an important first step toward implementing bus rapid transit in New Jersey,” said U.S. Representative Donald M. Payne. “Improvements like these are key to updating the state’s bus network and giving our residents attractive public transportation options.”

“The new ‘Go Bus’ provides a premium level of service to customers along one of the busiest transit corridors in New Jersey,” said Transportation Commissioner and NJ TRANSIT Board Chairman Kris Kolluri. “This innovative approach to offering improved bus service is a first in the state and moves us toward improving mass transit on our roadways.”

“As a representative of this district, I recognize the vital role that access to convenient, affordable transportation plays in the daily lives of Newark and Irvington residents,” said State Senator Ronald L. Rice, who serves as Chairman of the Senate Community and Urban Affairs Committee. “The launch of this new, enhanced bus service marks an exciting start to a new era of public transportation in these communities.”

Following an opening ceremony at Irvington Bus Terminal, a special trip of the “Go Bus” operated along its route down Springfield Avenue to an inaugural ceremony at Newark Penn Station.

“Through ‘Go Bus,’ we are offering these communities a customer-focused service designed by the people who know best what works for them—the residents who live here and use the service,” said NJ TRANSIT Executive Director Richard Sarles. “As we work toward modernizing our bus service throughout the state, the Go Bus program will serve as a model for other heavily-traveled corridors and will give us a platform to add features associated with BRT systems.”

Serving the 4.8 mile corridor between Irvington Bus Terminal and Newark Penn Station, Go Bus will operate 16 trips each weekday along Springfield Avenue and Market Street, adding capacity to the corridor for customers of NJ TRANSIT’s existing No. 25 bus route.

“Involving the community has been a staple of my administration, and I applaud NJ TRANSIT for partnering with people who ride the buses to help develop this innovative service,” said Essex County Executive Joseph N. DiVincenzo, Jr. “Our county roads have a pivotal role in our transportation network, and I look forward to working with NJ TRANSIT, the City of Newark and the Township of Irvington to identify other opportunities to enhance our residents’ quality of life.”

“NJ TRANSIT’s new ‘Go Bus’ service is a major milestone in our efforts to revitalize the Springfield Avenue corridor as part of Newark’s urban transformation,” said Newark Mayor Cory Booker. “We are pleased that NJ TRANSIT has brought premium bus service along this heavily travelled route, which will improve the quality of life for all commuters and Newark residents.”

“We are excited to see the end result of working with NJ TRANSIT to deliver this new service to our residents,” said Irvington Mayor Wayne Smith. “The enhanced bus service is a welcome addition to our community.”

Designed with input from riders in the community at every stage, the new service showcases a unique identity and offers easily identifiable, enhanced bus stops and upgraded onboard amenities. To gather customer feedback, NJ TRANSIT conducted focus groups of current and potential customers on the No. 25 line, who selected the “Go Bus” name and helped to design every element of the vehicles and service.

“Our input was very important to NJ TRANSIT in developing this service,” said Go Bus Customer Representative Polly Adu. “Go Bus was created for customers by customers.”

Go Bus service will operate during weekday morning and evening peak hours, with buses departing Irvington Bus Terminal every 15 minutes from 6:30 a.m. to 8:30 a.m., and Newark Penn Station every 15 minutes from 4:05 p.m. to 6:05 p.m.

The service has 11 fixed “super stops” for faster trip times between Irvington Terminal and Newark Penn Station—approximately 21 minutes to Newark Penn Station and 22 minutes to Irvington Bus Terminal. Each stop outside the Downtown area is easily identified with a new weather-protected shelter in Go Bus green and blue. The bus will not stop at locations that are not designated for Go Bus.

Go Bus “super stops” are located at:

-Irvington Terminal
-Springfield Avenue at Maple Avenue
-Springfield Avenue at South 18th Street
-Springfield Avenue at South 10th Street
-Springfield Avenue at Bergen Street
-Springfield Avenue at Irvine Turner Boulevard
-Springfield Avenue at Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard
-Market Street at Washington Street
-Market Street at Broad Street
-Market Street at Mulberry Street
-Newark Penn Station

Using a dedicated fleet of five buses, Go Bus features onboard enhancements for added customer comfort such as custom-upholstered cushion seating, newly revitalized coaches and convenient hand straps. Each bus is clearly marked with the Go Bus logo and identifying color scheme.

Additional Go Bus customer benefits include:

-Enhanced station stops with new customer shelters, improved lighting, seating and passenger information displays
-Individually selected, specially trained customer-friendly bus operators
-Faster loading and unloading to speed trip time (enter front door/exit rear door)

On the first day of service, Monday, April 7, NJ TRANSIT ambassadors will be on hand at each of the Go Bus super stops to answer questions about the new Go Bus service. The ambassadors will give customers environmentally friendly re-usable shopping bags and bus pass-holders provided by Berkeley College, as well as an IDT phone card and discount coupons from local businesses.

“We are delighted to participate in the launch of this new service because it demonstrates a commitment to and investment in the residents of Irvington and Newark, and that matches our mission,” said Berkeley College Chairman Kevin L. Luing. Students will be able to make a convenient transfer at Market and Broad streets for bus service to the college.

The one-way fare for Go Bus is $1.35 (same as the current No. 25 and 25X lines for the same trip).

For complete information about Go Bus schedules, fares and onboard amenities, visit www.njtransit.com/gobus.

JCMAN320
May 29th, 2008, 10:19 PM
^^^ I personally don't feel that this will make much of a difference. The only way this would be considered "rapid transit" if the bus has it's own designated right-of-way. In this case it doesn't. It will share Springfield Avenue with the rest of vehicular traffic including the 25 and 25x. This "Go Bus" service is still subject to the same traffic jams, traffic lights, intersections, cars, etc.. that the 25 and 25x are subject to.

The only difference between the the Go Bus service and the 25 and 25x service is the color of bus, style of bus, new shelters, and limited service. Go Bus doesn't even hold anywhere near the same amount of passengers as light rail cars do. This doesn't even cut down on emissions; if it was hybrid or a "trolley bus" with overhead catanaries, it would be enviormentally friendly.

The only ways I see "Go Bus" being succesful without it's own designated right of way is two ways. First is if it's stops are spread far enough apart, which I can't tell because I've only been on Springfield Ave a few times so I'm not sure how far apart the stops are. Secondly is if Go Bus has it's own transponders that change the traffic lights in it's favor as it approaches intersections, the same way light rails do when they share surface streets. Other than that I see this being just a drop in the bucket instead of adding light rail to Springfield Ave.

I would be interested in other people's view points on BRT and if any other people have riden BRTs in other cities and their experiences.

JCMAN320
May 29th, 2008, 11:57 PM
I did some research throught Wikipedia, and it seems that the Go Bus service is similar to the Quick Bus service in Baltimore. Here is the link to the wikipedia link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/QuickBus

lammius
May 30th, 2008, 05:27 PM
The thing about Go Bus is that it's a "first step" toward developing a higher-strata transportation corridor there. What Go Bus does is shave time of the trip between Irvington Terminal and Penn Station. This route suffers from too-frequent stops, double-parked cars, the whole 9. Go Bus is essentially an express service. The next step is to introduce low-floor buses which make it easier to board and alight. There are concepts for this corridor that include center-median bus "stations," striping a bus lane, etc. These types of roadway configuration changes are real challenges because Springfield Avenue is a state highway, and NJDOT is not quick to try new concepts. The eventual goal is light rail on this corridor, but using BRT as a stepping stone.

brianac
June 2nd, 2008, 05:20 AM
In the Region | New Jersey
A Rail Line Generates New Life

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/06/01/realestate/01njzo-600.jpg Paul Hawthorne for The New York Times
20.6 MILES AND 23 STATIONS The Hudson-Bergen Light Rail offers passenger service in the Pavonia-Newport area of Jersey City and many other places.

By ANTOINETTE MARTIN
Published: June 1, 2008

HERE is what light rail has delivered to five formerly down-at-heels neighborhoods along the 20.6-mile system in northern New Jersey (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/classifieds/realestate/locations/newjersey/?inline=nyt-geo): more than 10,000 units of new housing, with a total property value surpassing $5 billion.

The opening and continued expansion of the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail system from 2000 to 2006 have greatly affected all 23 stops on the north-south line running through seven municipalities.

According to a new study from the Voorhees Transportation Center of Rutgers University (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/r/rutgers_the_state_university/index.html?inline=nyt-org), some station sites have already been reshaped by development; others are poised for the same treatment.

The detailed study focused especially on five of the station areas — those that researchers considered to have the most potential for development. They are Port Imperial in Weehawken; Ninth Street in Hoboken; the area between the Essex Street and Jersey Avenue stations in Jersey City; the Bergenline Avenue neighborhood of Union City and West New York; and the 34th Street area in Bayonne.

The rail line, originally designed to reduce traffic congestion up and down the Gold Coast, provides connections to the east-west PATH train service into New York City (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/classifieds/realestate/locations/newyork/newyorkcity/manhattan/?inline=nyt-geo) and Newark. It also connects to suburban commuter trains at Hoboken, ferry service at many points, six park-and-ride lots and a passenger elevator connecting West Hoboken with the Jersey City Heights neighborhood.

Along its route, the system has increased the mass transit ridership, improved the environment, spurred creation of businesses, bolstered property values and tax revenues, opened up employment opportunities and engendered a “fresh, emerging sense of place,” said the transit researchers, who were led by Martin E. Robins and Jan S. Wells.

“Acres and acres of old abandoned railyards, piers and industrial sites along the route have been transformed into compact residential, office and retail developments in pedestrian and transit-friendly environments,” the two wrote in the report. It was paid for with grants from the federal Environmental Protection Agency (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/e/environmental_protection_agency/index.html?inline=nyt-org) and New Jersey Transit (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/n/new_jersey_transit/index.html?inline=nyt-org).

Light-rail ridership was found to have risen fastest over the years of operation at three neighborhoods with PATH stations: Newport in Jersey City (the state’s busiest light-rail station); downtown Hoboken; and Exchange Place in Jersey City.

Mr. Robins suggested in an interview that New Jersey’s light-rail line was becoming a “national showcase” for other regions looking to spur transit-oriented development and “smart growth.” Indeed, the national Council of State Governments recently cited New Jersey, along with California and Massachusetts (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/great-homes-and-destinations/destinations/new-england/index.html?inline=nyt-geo), as models for other states interested in transit-friendly projects.

Mr. Robins directed the protracted public-private effort to create the New Jersey system from 1988 through 1994. He noted that those residing in the tens of thousands of new units within walking distance of light-rail stops — and others due to open at Liberty Harbor North and Gull’s Cove in Jersey City — now have an easier alternative than driving for getting to work, going shopping or taking in a show.

The Jersey City planner Robert Cotter, one of many local officials, planners and light-rail riders who contributed to the study, told the researchers that he was increasingly seeing vacant spaces in parking areas set aside for employees at office buildings in his city.

Yet Mr. Robins — like Jamie Lefrak, a principal of the Lefrak Group, builder of the Newport residential/office/retail complex — expressed amazement that the light rail was ever built. “We established a route through what were essentially fallow areas,” he said, using a more genteel term for stretches that Mr. Lefrak described as “places most people would not want to go.”

The light-rail passage in turn attracted developers to rehabilitate those places, while providing new mobility for the large, mostly immigrant, community already established in Union City, which has relatively few car owners.

Census figures rank Union City, perched atop the Palisades, above Hoboken, as the most densely populated city in the country.

“When the station was built at Bergenline Avenue,” Mr. Robins said, “it was very meaningful for the people there. Not only was the commute time to jobs in New York and New Jersey chopped by as much as 75 percent, but they suddenly had a convenient way to get to the shopping mall at Newport.”

He called Union City’s turnaround one of the most heartening results of his work on the creation of the system.

Mr. Lefrak noted that many people from Union City now come to work at Newport via light rail. It’s clean and quiet, he said, and it costs $1.90 for a ticket.

The next step, Mr. Lefrak added pointedly, would be for the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/p/port_authority_of_new_york_and_new_jersey/index.html?inline=nyt-org) to build an intermodal connection between the PATH and the light rail at Newport, so transfers could be made within a single building. That has long been part of Port Authority plans, but Mr. Lefrak said he saw the project as having been all but abandoned since the 2001 terrorist attacks, which redirected effort and money toward a rebuilt PATH system feeding into a new World Trade Center complex.

Mr. Robins also recalled frustration with New York transit officials — in his case, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/m/metropolitan_transportation_authority/index.html?inline=nyt-org), which resisted calls from New Jersey planners to set up bus lines from western Staten Island (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/classifieds/realestate/locations/newyork/newyorkcity/statenisland/?inline=nyt-geo) to Exchange Place after the PATH station was built, and after a number of companies moved their operations from downtown Manhattan (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/classifieds/realestate/locations/newyork/newyorkcity/manhattan/?inline=nyt-geo) to the New Jersey waterfront in the late 1990s.

“Staten Islanders traditionally held a lot of those jobs that were moved,” he said, “and their only way to follow the jobs was with a fairly horrendous automobile commute.”

After the light-rail station opened in Bayonne opposite Staten Island, large numbers of commuters began driving there and catching the train. In 2003, the M.T.A. did institute bus service, and “ridership exploded” at the 34th Street station in Bayonne.

Now, the east side of Bayonne looks as though it may be the next target of major new development, including 6,700 residential units and lots of cultural space.

The prospective site is a military ocean terminal that was closed some years ago. Bayonne finds itself well positioned to attract developers, Mr. Robins noted, because the 34th Street station and another at 45th Street provide convenient access to the site.

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/01/realestate/01njzo.html?ref=realestate

Copyright 2008 (http://www.nytimes.com/ref/membercenter/help/copyright.html) The New York Times Company (http://www.nytco.com/)

JCMAN320
June 3rd, 2008, 01:02 AM
Great find Brianac! It truly is amazing how the Hudson Lightrail has evolved. It truly is an excellent mass-transit system that has won national awards and recognition for it's development and ability to develop smart growth. It is remarkable how in just over 8 years time, our light-rail line has developed into an intergral part of everyday life here in Jersey City and Hudson County.

A quote from NJTransit's site: "Traveling both on city streets and along separate rights of way, HBLR is the first public transit project in the nation to use the Design, Build, Operate and Maintain (DBOM) construction methodology. In September 2000, NJ TRANSIT was awarded the American Public Transportation Association's prestigious "Innovation Award" for use of the DBOM methodology."

With it's one mile extension to 8th Street in Bayonne currently u/c, once the extension is complete the system will be 21.6 miles long with 24 stations. Even the MTA has recognized it's importance and added the first New York City Bus to the 34th Street station in Bayonne. Another addition to the 34th Street station will eventually be a PCC "hertiage car" route from 34th St. along the Penninsula At Bayonne Harbor to the Royal Carribean Cruise Terminal that will link the new developments on the penninsula with the rest of Bayonne and Hudson County.

There are three other extensions that seem likely in the near future, and one very far off:

First would be the extension to the Meadowlands Sports Complex, which seems very likely. They are currently mid-way through the construction of the rail spur of the Pascack Valley Libe into the heart of the complex that looks to be completed mid 2009. After that NJTransit most likely would like to have the HBLR extend from Tonnelle Ave. in North Bergen through Secaucus, with a stop at Mill Creek Mall and Harmon Meadow Shooping Center developments, across the Hackensack River and west along Paterson Plank Rd. and south along Route 120 into the new Meadowlands S.C. station.

Secondly, I feel, would be the Secaucus Junction Extension/Journal Square Extension. I say both because I don't know which will be perferred. There is no doubt that Jersey City WANTS this extension along 6th St. coupled with Embankment becoming an elevated park. Where it goes beyond 6th St. is the question. We all have heard about the Secaucus Junction where from 6th St., it would swing right go through the abandoned Bergen Arches, to Secacus Junction. All of this with stops along the way.

Now what I have seen on JC1TV, is a planning board meeting with a route from 6th St. into Journal Square Transit Center, aka JSQ PATH Station. It would feature the light-rail along 6th St., similar to Essex St, with a rehabiliated Embankment with elevated park. Stops apparently would be at Jersey Ave. and Newark Ave. Now from there it would cross Newark Ave., veer left and go up onto the embankment where the PATH tracks are and go into JSQ. Now this where it gets really interesting, there would be a parking type building beneath the Turnpike just below the PATH tracks where people drving into the city would have direct axcess off the Turnpike to this parking structure where there would be a lightrail stop between Newark Ave and JSQ. So people would just park hear and not drive on a city street. Very ambitious, I will try and keep an ear out on this information. Sure to be more to come!!

Third would be a half mile extension of the West Side Ave. line across West Side, over Route 440, and to the Liberty Harbor styled new development at the former Honeywell site on 440. There is a light-rail stops in the plans for the new neighborhood and in the renderings. This development looks like it may take 10 years to complete with no construction on it beginning until 2010 maybe after once the site is cleaned up and capped. This extension will happen, just a long way off

The way way far off extension, would be the light-rail across the Bayonne Bridge to Staten Island. BTW it would be across a new Bayonne Bridge most likely and my yet to be born children might be in highschool before this is ever realized lol.

Well praise had turned into extensions talk is done. Lol. Thanks for readin. :)

brianac
June 3rd, 2008, 09:43 AM
I have never actually ridden the light rail but it looks good.

I came across it last year when I got off the NY Ferry at Lincoln Harbour, Weehawken, and was walking south to the Hoboken 14th. street ferry pier.

I think these light rail systems are the thing for the future.

z22
June 3rd, 2008, 12:05 PM
JCMAN, don't forget there is an extension from Jersey City to Newark in the vision. I remember reading a while back that it was projected to be completed in a couple of decades from now!

JCMAN320
June 3rd, 2008, 08:57 PM
^^^Your right that why I think the Journal Square Extension will be chosen for the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail because it will eventually be extended along the PATH route to Newark Penn Station and hook up with the Newark Light Rail. Same way the NYC Subway started as sperate subway companies and lines in the boroughs and unified to become one subway system; this will happen when the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail and Newark Light Rail are joined into one light-rail tansit system. I can't wait. :)

lammius
June 7th, 2008, 11:35 AM
There is also the proposal (in EIS phase now) to extend passenger service NORTH from the Tonnele Ave station in North Bergen up to Tenafly, either by extending the HBLR system or running DMU trains between Tonnele and Tenafly (would force a transfer at Tonnele for people continuing south toward Hoboken, JC).

http://northernbranchcorridor.com/

JCMAN320
June 7th, 2008, 02:21 PM
Iammius that would basically be a seprate line. NJTransit wants DMU to save on costs of building a new track line with catanaires and substations. DMUs can run on freight tracks and also this new line would go through THE Tunnel into Penn Station. This line will not be a part of the HBLR.

JCMAN320
June 11th, 2008, 08:06 PM
NJ Transit moves toward seizing properties for light rail

by Ronald Leir Wednesday June 11, 2008, 7:40 PM

NJ Transit has started condemnation proceedings to take two pieces of privately owned land it needs to extend its Hudson-Bergen Light Rail Transit System south to Eighth Street in Bayonne.

The agency, which has the power of eminent domain to take land for a public interest, is asking the state Superior Court to clear the way for it to acquire the properties at a fair price.

One of the properties NJ Transit needs is a 1.16-acre tract now occupied by a Burger King and an STS Tire & Auto Center, on the south side of West Eighth Street off Avenue C. That's where the agency plans to put its new Light Rail station and a small parking lot, according to papers filed with the court.

Based on an appraisal by BRB Valuation and Consulting Services, of Freehold, NJ Transit has placed the value of the property at $2,550,000 and has deposited that amount in a special account with the court.

ALD Realty of Bayonne owns the property, and ALD principal David Terry yesterday characterized the agency's proposed purchase price as "substantially below what the property is worth."

Terry said he has not been served with the condemnation notice, but that negotiations with NJ Transit have broke down.

NJ Transit is also looking to buy a 3,000-square-foot parcel that is a portion of the former Pagano supermarket site, just west of a Dunkin' Donuts, on the south side of Eighth Street and just west of Avenue C.

It is proposing to buy it for $154,800 from the owner, Marl Associates, LLC, of New York. Marl principal Asher Lipman couldn't be reached yesterday.

The matter is scheduled to be heard Aug. 1 by Hudson County Assignment Judge Maurice J. Gallipoli, sitting in Jersey City. The Princeton law firm of Hill Wallack is representing NJ Transit.

JCMAN320
August 1st, 2008, 07:19 PM
Clearing way for Light Rail to push south to 8th St.

Friday, July 25, 2008

NJ Transit will soon begin work to extend the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail Transit System to Eighth Street from its current southern terminus at 22nd Street in Bayonne.

The George Harms Construction Co., of Farmingdale, will start the job "in August or September" and it will take approximately two years to complete, said Bayonne spokesman Joseph Ryan.

The exact start date depends on how soon Harms gets all necessary approvals and permits from various city and state agencies, officials said.

NJ Transit officials and Harms have begun preliminary discussions with city police, building department staff, the city engineer and the Mayor's Office about construction plans, Ryan said.

The City Council is expected to consider a traffic plan for the project when it meets on Aug. 13, he said.

RONALD LEIR

Triborough
August 4th, 2008, 09:40 AM
In an ideal world, they would extend it to Staten Island, possibly to the Ferry Terminal. That would definitely improve regional mobility. I am sure that there is at least some of the old Staten Island Railroad right of way that could probably be used for it.

NYatKNIGHT
August 4th, 2008, 04:08 PM
I can tell you for sure there has been at least a preliminary study to do just that (because I did some of the work on it). Few proposals have so much going for it. The ROW is fine, though I seem to remember an issue with the shoreline in places. The biggest obstacle may be that the Bayonne Bridge is in need of replacement (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=9389). Also, in a perfect world there would be ample funds for worthy transit projects (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=2959&page=15).

STT757
August 4th, 2008, 05:44 PM
First thing's first, the decision on whether to replace or raise the Bayonne bridge needs to be made. The current bridge has room for Light Rail on the outside of the roadway, it was designed to accommodate additional lanes or a trolly type rail.

If they replace the bridge they would need to make the same accommodations for a Light rail.

If it ever does cross over into Staten Island two spurs would be preferred, one along the existing North Shore RR ROW to St.George. Another to the a Park n Ride near the Staten Island mall.

NYatKNIGHT
August 4th, 2008, 05:52 PM
^The North Shore option also went west from the Bayonne Bridge for all the people who work at the Howland Hook Marine Terminal.

Don31
August 5th, 2008, 12:29 AM
^The North Shore option also went west from the Bayonne Bridge for all the people who work at the Howland Hook Marine Terminal.

How many people work at the New York Marine Terminal (as its now called)? I wouldn't think its enough to justify extending a light rail to there from the east. And how many employees would come from that direction? And remember, the new Goethals Bridge (one of my projects) will have space reserved for a future light rail as well.

NYatKNIGHT
August 5th, 2008, 09:43 AM
I don't know the number offhand, but apparently enough people work there to include in a preliminary analysis where all options are studied. The goal as you know is to provide alternate transit options for as many as possible and since the tracks are already there perhaps it's worth it.

Nice to know Goethals is providing space for light rail, as it should. One of my former projects, the Newark Light Rail, had a proposal to extend down to Elizabeth and Port Elizabeth, and eventually connect with the proposed Union County Light Rail, which then could connect with the Goethals.

STT757
August 5th, 2008, 11:36 AM
Nice to know Goethals is providing space for light rail, as it should. One of my former projects, the Newark Light Rail, had a proposal to extend down to Elizabeth and Port Elizabeth, and eventually connect with the proposed Union County Light Rail, which then could connect with the Goethals.

They could consider PATH or NJ Transit also to cross the Goethals to Staten Island.

Triborough
August 6th, 2008, 12:35 AM
They could consider PATH or NJ Transit also to cross the Goethals to Staten Island.

My understanding is that light rail is cheaper than commuter trains or subways. It also might be better suited for someplace lower density like Staten Island.

JCMAN320
September 30th, 2008, 11:42 AM
House transportation chair to get tour of light rail, Hudson County

by The Jersey Journal
Tuesday September 30, 2008, 10:57 AM

The chairman of the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure will tour the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail today with federal and local officials as part of a push to highlight the need to spend money on mass transit.

Rep. Jim Oberstar, D-Minn., will receive briefings from state Trasnportation Commissioner Kris Kolluri, Port Authority of New York and New Jersey Commissioner Tony Coscia and others about not only public transit but also roads, bridges and other infrastructure.

JCMAN320
December 2nd, 2008, 08:38 PM
Free shuttle service to Light Rail station for North Bergen residents on way

by The Jersey Journal Tuesday December 02, 2008, 10:08 AM

Starting next week, North Bergen will offer its residents free shuttle service to the Light Rail station at 51st Street and Tonnelle Avenue, the township announced in a press release.

Mayor Nicholas J. Sacco will announce the pilot program at a news conference at the station tomorrow at 11:30 a.m. Hudson County Executive Tom DeGise, NJ Transit officials and Hudson County Transportation Management Association (TMA) representatives arte expected to take part.

The shuttle service, with two routes and multiple pick-up times, will provide free transportation to commuters who may have difficulties accessing mass transportation, officials said in the press release. The program is scheduled to begin December 8.

The service consists of two buses with 18 seats each, and will only be available to North Bergen residents and will operate during critical peak hours, from 6 a.m. to 8 a.m. and from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m.

stache
December 3rd, 2008, 07:06 AM
JCMAN do you have any more details about this or a link?

JCMAN320
December 4th, 2008, 11:41 AM
Stache here is a link to North Bergen's website: http://www.northbergen.org/, there is a shuttle bus schedule.

stache
December 4th, 2008, 03:26 PM
Thanks JCMAN, if you run across a map I would appreciate a heads up. Does this shuttle kind of go towards Meadowlands?

JCMAN320
January 6th, 2009, 04:54 PM
Hey Stache sorry didn't get back to you sooner, I have not found a map or anything yet.

Portion of Ave E to be closed for Light Rail extension work

Tuesday, January 06, 2009
By RONALD LEIR
JOURNAL STAFF WRITER

As it embarks upon phase two of extending the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail from 22nd Street to Eighth Street in Bayonne, NJ Transit announced yesterday that starting tomorrow Avenue E between Linnet Street and Broadway will be closed to vehicular traffic for 4 1/2 months.

At the same time, a section of Eighth Street between Broadway and Avenue C - which had been closed to traffic - will reopen, restoring several metered parking spaces on the block, officials said.

General contractor Harms Co. has completed the first stage of the $58.4 million construction project with the installation of columns and foundations supporting steel columns for a viaduct, said NJ Transit spokeswoman Courtney Carroll.

The upcoming phase will focus on construction of the viaduct that will stretch from West 11th Street to the future station at West Eighth Street.

"We'll be building four columns, installing underground foundation and utilities, doing some road shifting, overhead concrete work, and steel installation to support the overhead track when it goes in," Carroll said.

NJ Transit started the job last April and anticipates the new station will be finished sometime next year. "So far, the job is going on schedule and on budget," Carroll said.

JCMAN320
January 6th, 2009, 05:02 PM
Light Rail extensions called smart $$$ use

Tuesday, January 06, 2009
By CHARLES HACK
JOURNAL STAFF WRITER

And yes, all politics - and infrastructure projects - are local.

Hudson County bigwigs said yesterday they want some of the federal stimulus package money the president-elect and Congressional leaders are cobbling together to pay for an extension of the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail system within Jersey City and on into Bergen County.

At a press conference organized by Sen. Robert Menendez to urge passage of an estimated $775 billion stimulus package, County Executive Tom DeGise, said extending the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail would be a prime candidate for some of those funds.

DeGise wants the Light Rail extended from North Bergen to the 4.8 million-square-foot Meadowlands Xanadu entertainment and sports complex in East Rutherford.

The Jersey City Redevelopment Agency is also in negotiations with NJ Transit to extend the Light Rail from the West Side Avenue Station across Route 440 to a redevelopment zone on the Hackensack Riverfront.

The new station would link the Jersey City waterfront and North Hudson to a planned 100-acre development with 8,100 residential units, 1 million square feet of office space and 600,000 square feet of retail space.

"We are not talking about throwing money into the wind hoping for a economic miracle," Menendez said at the Duncan Avenue press conference.

"We are talking about smart investments and the types of local projects and programs that actually fuel our economy and help create the economic conditions necessary for an economic turnaround."

JCMAN320
January 30th, 2009, 02:20 AM
NJ Transit to bring back the Northern Branch

Tuesday, January 27, 2009
BY TOM DAVIS
NorthJersey.com
STAFF WRITER

NJ Transit plans to spend up to $800 million to bring rail service -- along with 10 train stations and hundreds of parking spaces -- to North Jersey towns historically underserved by commuter trains.

Whether it's diesel trains that rumble or electric trolley-like cars that whistle through communities from North Bergen to Tenafly will determine the cost, as well as how many commuters can get onboard.

The goal is to reopen the Northern Branch line, which now handles freight, to pull at least 8,100 commuters off the state's congested roadways each day.

The 11-mile rail line will have as many as 10 stations — three in Englewood alone — as well as parking spaces for commuters.

"You had passenger rail service there 40 years ago. Those communities grew up on commuter lines," said Charles Ingoglia, the Northern Branch's project manager.

Facing a weak economy, officials have hinted at a desire to go with what they believe will be a more cost-effective diesel-powered train — despite strong public support to extend the electrified Hudson-Bergen Light Rail line.

The plans were outlined in an environmental impact statement recently submitted to the Federal Transit Administration for its review. NJ Transit hopes to make a choice by the end of the year.

Even with fluctuating gas prices, NJ Transit says the diesel option is cheaper — $620 million versus $800 million for electric — because it would require no overhead electrical work that powers the light rail.

"Things like that are taken into consideration," Ingoglia said. "The diesel would also not include work that would be an eyesore to the community."

Transportation advocates say communities along the line also will benefit by allowing residents to take quick local trips to go shopping.

"There are tons of downtowns there," said Zoe Baldwin, spokeswoman for the Tri-State Transportation Campaign. "You're going to see development go up in value."

But critics, citing the real possibility that fuel costs will rise again, believe the diesel fuel prices will eventually make the service as costly as the light rail line. They also said the diesel-powered line will cause more pollution and pull fewer people off the roads.

Diesel critics also note the electric light rail line would draw more revenue because the service could carry three times as many passengers: 2,400 trips for diesel compared with 8,100 a day for electric.

"It's a no-brainer," said Al Papp, director of the New Jersey Association of Rail Passengers. "You know gasoline prices are going to go up. If you're planning a system for 100 years, I would definitely go with the electric option."

Others say the large number of stations and parking lots serving fast-moving trains will destroy the region's last bastion of peace and solitude — and bring down local property values.

Under the plan, parking lots with as many as 550 spaces could be located in communities such as Leonia and Tenafly, whose old-fashioned, well-preserved downtowns can't support the additional parking and traffic, officials say.

Leonia Councilman Anthony Puzzo said he's worried that a potential 550-space parking lot in the area of Overpeck County Park will eat up what little green space is left in Bergen County.

"There's also a concern about traffic and the impact of trains coming through the town at rush hour," he said.

E-mail: davist@northjersey.com

ablarc
January 30th, 2009, 06:56 AM
"There's also a concern about traffic and the impact of trains coming through the town at rush hour," he said.
So build a multi-story garage with ground floor retail for homeward-bound commuters' shopping convenience.

scrollhectic
January 30th, 2009, 12:53 PM
So build a multi-story garage with ground floor retail for homeward-bound commuters' shopping convenience.

Agreed! With a little creativity, multi-story garages can be built without being eyesores and having ground floor retail is good land use.

I don't fully understand the objections raised against public transportation. I live in Livingston and work in West New York. If there were a light rail line that would take me to Newark or JC, I'd be on in in a heartbeat. There's already a light rail stop right next to my job. It would be so convenient. I also think that connecting the Newark Light Rail to the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail should be taken into serious consideration. As well as connecting the PATH to Newark Airport, but alas, politics stand in the way of progress. What's new!

JCMAN320
January 30th, 2009, 04:13 PM
^^Well the the Port Authority is doing a feasibility study into extending the PATH to NWK Airport. I don't knw if they are still are considering it given that the PANYNJ is spending so much money on the new Hudson River Tunnel into NYPenn. I also agree that the NWK LR and HBLR should be connected but unfortunately I don't see that happening for decades.

JCMAN320
January 30th, 2009, 08:14 PM
NJT must finish what it started

Friday, January 30, 2009

NJ Transit plans to go ahead with the Bergen County part of the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail Transit System (HBLRTS) made news again with the submission of an environmental studies report that was submitted to the Federal Transit Administration.

The twist in the story is that NJ Transit is trying to opt for diesel trains instead of the electric-powered modern trolleys that now run on the Hudson County part of HBLRTS. The main reason for diesels - once the arguments that the chugging trains are supposedly cleaner than their heavy polluting ancestor is brushed aside - is that it is a cheaper line to build.

It is claimed that a mostly one-track diesel line on most of what was once the Northern Branch would cost $620 million compared to $800 million estimated for an electric rail system.

On its face, Hudson County would not be involved in what seems to be a Bergen County debate but look a little closer and it affects Hudson. The idea of the light rail was to tie together communities along the line that would be for their economic and environmental benefit. NJ Transit is abandoning that mission.

Hudson County's economy can only benefit from close transportational ties with its neighbors. Just as Hudson dreams of making light rail connections with Staten Island, it should feel the same way with Bergen County. A seamless light rail connection would add another 10 stations reaching as far north as Englewood and Tenafly, by way of Ridgefield, Palisade Park and Route 4.

Parts, service and maintenance would be uniform and cheaper for the two-county line. Even more importantly there would be better mobility. A report in The Record, a Bergen County publication, noted that light rail would be able carry three times as many passengers than diesel each day. With President Obama's administration looking to fund public works and transportation projects, local legislators should make the argument that an electric light rail extension would fit the bill.

This newspaper argues that NJ Transit should just finish the HBLRTS as planned - with electric trains.

JCMAN320
September 8th, 2009, 10:41 PM
NOW ARRIVING: PASSENGER RAIL FOR BERGEN COUNTY

NJT-09-076
July 18, 2009

RIDGEFIELD, NJ — Governor Jon S. Corzine and Congressman Steve Rothman announced today that they are teaming up to deliver passenger rail to Bergen County with an extension of light rail service.

Joined by NJ Senator Loretta Weinberg, Assemblyman Gordon Johnson, Bergen County Executive Dennis McNerney, and Ridgefield Mayor Anthony Suarez, as well as other state and local officials, the announcement came after the conclusion that another long-studied rail technology being advanced by NJ TRANSIT did not offer a practical alternative for Bergen residents in the near term.

“The time has come to put the Bergen in Hudson-Bergen Light Rail. The twin facts that NJ TRANSIT has settled on a mode of service and Governor Corzine is here pledging his personal support for the Northern Branch gives me renewed hope that the dream of passenger rail will be realized for Bergen County,” said Rothman.

“We can no longer wait for emerging technologies that make the perfect the enemy of the good. Light rail will enable thousands of Bergen residents to get to work on the Waterfront, or make easy connections to PATH and ferries into Manhattan,” said Corzine.

Bergen light rail will provide significant environmental benefits, including reduced carbon emissions, taking 8,500 cars off the road each day. The Hudson-Bergen Light Rail system has been a catalyst for economic development and a national light rail transit model with nearly 45,000 passenger trips daily, with a 24th station under construction at 8th Street in Bayonne.

NJ TRANSIT submitted a Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) to the Federal Transit Administration last year that studied both light rail and re-emerging Diesel Multiple Unit (DMU) types of equipment. However, in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis, the only manufacturer of DMUs that met American safety standards for operating in mixed freight/passenger territory filed for bankruptcy. A global search for another manufacturer that could meet strict Federal Railroad Administration safety requirements led NJ TRANSIT Executive Director Richard Sarles to conclude recently that the possibility of new DMUs rolling off the production line is several years away at best.

“The seismic shift in the economy has impacted many sectors, including the rail manufacturing industry,” said Sarles. “We understand the Governor and Congressman want us to move forward with a proven approach expeditiously and we are declaring the preference for light rail as part of the federally-required process for building the project.”

Sarles also acknowledged the Federal Transit Administration’s efforts to advance multiple NJ rail projects, noting that NJ TRANSIT has received the Record of Decision for the Mass Transit Tunnel; the MOS FONSI for the Lackawanna Cutoff; completed environmental review for the Edison Station Parking Expansion Project, the Lower Hack Bridge Phase II project, and HBLR’s Danforth Interlocking project over the last several months.

“We appreciate the leadership of FTA Administrator Peter Rogoff and hard work of the Regional Administrator and staff to continue to effectively move many projects forward at once,” said Sarles.

FTA’s release of the revised Northern Branch DEIS will trigger local public hearings as soon as this fall. The hearings will give communities along the planned service route an opportunity to raise any additional issues that need to be incorporated into
NJ TRANSIT’s service plan. NJ TRANSIT expects preliminary engineering to begin in 2010.

“With the support and cooperation of the relevant federal agencies, we expect to put shovels in the ground in Bergen County in 2011,” said Corzine.

At full operating capacity, the light rail service is planned to operate from early morning through late evening hours, seven days a week, with trains departing every 6-12 minutes in the peak travel periods. A trip from the northernmost portion of the line will take 21 minutes to Tonnelle Avenue, 25 minutes to Port Imperial for ferries to New York, and 37 minutes to Hoboken for PATH and NJ TRANSIT commuter rail connections.

“I commend the Governor and Congressman Rothman for their personal leadership in advancing a light rail system that we can build now,” said NJ Senator Loretta Weinberg. “Light rail will offer a welcome alternative to congested roadways with frequent, fast, and affordable trips that cost less than a gallon of gas.”

Light rail ridership is estimated to be about 24,000 passenger trips daily. While the cost estimate for extending light rail has not yet been finalized, preliminary estimates set the price at about $800 million to $900 million. The Northern Branch project is included in the joint long-range capital program of the NJ Department of Transportation and
NJ Transit, benefitting from a mix of federal and state Transportation Trust Funds.

JCMAN320
September 16th, 2009, 05:30 PM
NJ TRANSIT APPROVES STUDY OF LIGHT RAIL EXTENSION
Will explore extending line from West Side Avenue Station across Route 440 in Jersey City

September 16, 2009
NJT-09-099

NEWARK, NJ — The NJ TRANSIT Board of Directors today approved a study that explores the feasibility of extending Hudson-Bergen Light Rail service farther west in Jersey City.

The Board approved a $251,000 contract with AKRF, Inc., for consultant services in support of the first phase of an alternatives analysis for the extension of the light rail line. The line would extend from its current western terminus at West Side Avenue Station across Route 440 to a redevelopment zone along the Hackensack Riverfront.

“Light rail has already proven to support economic development goals, reduce traffic on city streets and increase personal mobility for residents,” said U.S. Representative Albio Sires. “The funding I secured for this study presents an opportunity to link transportation planning with local land use planning, extending these benefits into new neighborhoods.”

A new station would link the Jersey City waterfront and North Hudson to new residential, commercial and retail development the municipality is planning approximately one-half mile west of West Side Avenue Station.

“This study will enable us to examine the potential for improved transit options near the redevelopment and existing residential areas along Route 440,” said Transportation Commissioner and NJ TRANSIT Board Chairman Stephen Dilts. “An extension of light rail to this area would both support the development and address traffic congestion along the heavily-used Route 440 and secondary roads.”

The alternatives analysis will mark the first step in the federal environmental process for an extension. Among the specific items that will be evaluated are potential alignments, station planning, park and ride locations, operational needs, cost estimates and integration with redevelopment.

“We appreciate Congressman Sires’ leadership in getting funds for this study,” said NJ TRANSIT Executive Director Richard Sarles. “Our hard-working delegation in Congress has continually secured the funds necessary to keep the system moving forward.”

Hudson-Bergen Light Rail opened in April 2000, connecting 12 stations along the first seven miles of the system—from 34th Street in Bayonne and West Side Avenue to Exchange Place. Later that year, additional stations were opened at Pavonia/Newport, Harborside Financial Center and Harsimus Cove.

In September 2002, NJ TRANSIT opened the Hoboken Terminal light rail station, providing intermodal connections to commuter rail, trans-Hudson ferry, PATH and bus service. The 22nd Street Station in Bayonne opened in November 2003, followed by the expansion of service north to 2nd Street and 9th Street in Hoboken and Lincoln Harbor in Weehawken in September 2004.

NJ TRANSIT opened its newest stations—Tonnelle Avenue in North Bergen and Bergenline Avenue in Union City—in February 2006, which also marked the start of full service to Port Imperial Station in Weehawken.

In October 2008, construction began on a one-mile extension from the current southern terminus at 22nd Street to a new 8th Street Station in Bayonne.

JCMAN320
October 22nd, 2009, 07:37 PM
Port Authority announces $344M in signal system upgrades for PATH train system

By Mike Frassinelli/The Star-Ledger
October 22, 2009, 7:00PM

http://media.nj.com/ledgerupdates_impact/photo/path-trainjpg-c4cc7814d4397433_large.jpg
Elizabeth Lara/For The Star-Ledger
A July photo of a PATH train sitting at the Journal Square station in Jersey City.

The Port Authority today authorized $344 million worth of contracts to replace obsolete mechanical train controls on the century-old PATH rail system with a new signal system that is expected to save time for riders.

The signal project, eventually projected to cost $580 million and be completed in 2017, is part of a $3.3 billion plan to modernize the entire PATH (Port Authority Trans-Hudson) system over the next 10 years.

In addition to the new signal system, improvements include replacing the oldest rail cars in the country with a new 340-car fleet by 2011, and the providing real-time train arrival information. Twenty one of the new cars are already in service.

The changes are designed to help increase the ridership capacity by 20 percent on the PATH system, which has 43 miles of track, 13 stations and attracts 230,000 riders a day.

The new signal system will allow trains to run closer together, saving time and increasing capacity.

"By modernizing basically the traffic control for trains, we’re able to run the trains at more efficient intervals," said Anthony Coscia, chairman of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey. "That gives the system itself 20 percent more capacity."

He said passengers will find the trains more efficient and comfortable.

"During peak times, when people are on PATH trains and they’re crowded, instead of being in very crowded trains that have old systems for information, for air conditioning, for ventilation, for safety and security measures, now we have a modern system that will be able to accommodate more passengers," Coscia said.

The largest signal system contract awarded today — $321 million — went to the Siemen’s Team for the design, manufacture and installation of the technology and removal of the old system.

In addition, Booz, Allen, Hamilton Inc. of McClean, Va., won a $21 professional management contract to help oversee the project, and a $2 million contract was awarded to the Rail Safety Consulting LLC, of Pittsford, N.Y., for an independent assessment and certification of safety standards for the project.

Michael DePallo, PATH director and general manager, called the signal project "a critical component in the modernization of PATH’s system."

The computerized system will have a complex set of monitors in the trains that are synchronized with equipment in the tracks to create safety buffer zones between trains.

An automatic speed override will automatically slow down trains that are traveling too fast, keeping them at a safe distance and preventing derailments, DePallo said.

Nexis4Jersey
November 13th, 2009, 09:56 PM
what I don't understand is why we have to wait till 2011 to put shovels in the Ground for the next Light Rail extension project , to me they should fast track it , so we can put them in Next year , we need jobs now. and Transit, i think it would be a great idea to put fast track this now:D

scrollhectic
November 19th, 2009, 04:41 PM
NJ TRANSIT APPROVES STUDY OF LIGHT RAIL EXTENSION
Will explore extending line from West Side Avenue Station across Route 440 in Jersey City

September 16, 2009
NJT-09-099.

When will they link the Hudson-Bergen line with the Newark light rail? And when oh when will they extend either the PATH or the light rail to the airport?

JCMAN320
November 23rd, 2009, 10:27 PM
Study: Hudson-Bergen Light Rail beneficial to environment

By Melissa Hayes/The Jersey Journal
November 23, 2009, 12:30PM

http://media.nj.com/hudsoncountynow_impact/photo/light-rail-jersey-cityjpg-0428b0a5c349b5a9_medium.jpg
J. ALAN HAMILL / THE JERSEY JOURNAL
The Hudson Bergen Light Rail is seeing more riders and reducing pollution according to an environmental study released at a press conference at Exchange Place in Jersey City today.

U.S. Rep. Albio Sires and Jersey City Mayor Jerramiah T. Healy joined transportation and environmental groups to release a study on the Bergen-Hudson Light Rail today at Exchange Place.

The study, conducted by Environment New Jersey, shows that commuters riding the light rail saved 3.4 million gallons of gas, or the amount 6,000 cars would use in a year.

According to the study nearly 16 million people rode the light rail in 2008, an increase of about 13 percent over 2007. That's up from 6 million riders in 2004.

"Each time someone rides the Hudson Bergen Light Rail, they are voting with their feet to make New Jersey more energy independent," said Rober McCulloch, transportation advocate for Environment New Jersey. "Congress should heed these voters and invest more in public transportation, which will increase our energy independence and reduce global warming pollution."

Officials said 43,000 people ride the Hudson Bergen Light Rail every day, including 5,000 who use the Exchange Place stop.

Jersey City received a $500,000 federal grant to study extending the light rail to West Side Ave. and a proposed development at the former Honeywell site on Route 440.

John Leon, senior director of government and community relations for New Jersey Transit, said the agency also hopes to expand the light rail into Bergen County. Despite the line's name, the Hudson Bergen Light Rail only serves Hudson County.

Newarkguy
January 5th, 2010, 08:23 PM
When will they link the Hudson-Bergen line with the Newark light rail? And when oh when will they extend either the PATH or the light rail to the airport? New Jersey is not interested in extending the HBLR to Newark. Nor the path extension to Newark Liberty International Airport. Newark the 9th largest us city in 1916 poulation 440,000 was condemned to eternal unimportance by political boundary strangulation on purpose by New Jersey's anti city expansion "home rule" laws of 1917. This law gave towns such as teterboro population 20, belleville pop.2,000 ,tavistock golf course(it is a town of 5 even today!!) equal powers as Newark 400,000 ,Jersey City365,000, and camden 120,000.as well as Paterson 140,000. This made annexation impossible because the tiniest suburbs had more regional political clout in Trenton to this day than the cities. New Jersey passed this law to prevent Camden,Newark, Paterson as well as Elizabeth, Jersey city from becoming gigantic american cities of over 1 million. New Jersey, the anti city forces argued, was to remain a sleepy bedroom community of NY and Philly workers!! We dont want a big Newark in our backyards!!(nimby)The Greater Newark plan was in motion to annex all Essex county. Major Banks and business groups as well as wall st. (which considered moving the NY stock exchange to Newark ) Expected Nj state legislature to expand Newark territory to accomodate 1million "Newarkers" by 1940. Instead Trenton suburban politicians outnumbered the urban ones 2-1, passed an alternative bill to strangle the cities in their present 1800's boundaries. Newark's tiny 23sq. mile area and population of 290,000 today is nothing compared to New York's 8 million. New Yorks heavyweight politicians will never allow path to go to Newark airport if it benefits Newark. Port authority (dominated by NYC)is a NY/Nj agency and nothing is done if one state objects! Extending HBLR to Newark benefits Newark, Not NYC, a no no in NJtransits mind. Njt's mission is to provide commuter rail servive to Penn station NY. NJ transits line just HAPPEN to cross Newark. NJT's refusal to build the NERL or the Newark Light rail's Newark-Paterson line along the old EL newark branch (as if no one would go to Newark fro paterson and vice versa)shows Newark is no interest to them. Jersey City is SOOO lucky now to be where it is. Newark may have the best transportation crossroads, but no matter how delicious the pizza ingredients...it wont cook if the oven is off. NYC's shadow over Newark turns that economic oven off!

Nexis4Jersey
January 5th, 2010, 09:57 PM
I doubt a line to Newark form the HBLR system , will happen in the next 10 years. As for the PATH Ext to EWR , i beleave that will happen 2-6 years. PATH isn't NJT , an EWR Ext would really benefit the System. NJT is planning to build a Newark - Paterson Light Rail Network in the next 4-10 years. Also a New Brunswick LRT & BRT lines.

~Corey

jdbarber
January 5th, 2010, 10:52 PM
The decline in New Jersey's urban centers has little to do with the annexation of surrounding suburbs. It has much more to do with racial tensions on the 1960s and 70s and the trend of suburbanization in the entire country following WWII. As Newark Guy states the Population was 440,000 in 1916 and 290,000 today. The number of people in the downtown core would still have sharply decreased even if Newark had annexed neighboring towns. It happened in cities all over the midwest and north east. Newark's decline was not because it was overshadowed by NYC.

The assertion that the Port Authority services on benefit NY disproportionately is way off. How would thousands of people in New Jersey get to their jobs in NYC everyday with out use of the Lincoln, Holland, GWB and the PATH. Next time your at one of these crossing check the license plates, there are a lot more people from Jersey using these crossings than NYers. Hoboken and downtown JC have revitalized solely because they are near Path Stations. You dont hear about Gentrification in Union City or West New York. No one in Manhattan cares if they live by a Path station.

Newark Guy, As for your claim that NJT is only interested in serving NYCs, last time I checked the Hudson Bergen Light rail run by NJT has no connection to NYC and does nothing to benefit the other side of the river.

jdbarber
January 5th, 2010, 10:56 PM
I doubt a line to Newark form the HBLR system , will happen in the next 10 years. As for the PATH Ext to EWR , i beleave that will happen 2-6 years. PATH isn't NJT , an EWR Ext would really benefit the System. NJT is planning to build a Newark - Paterson Light Rail Network in the next 4-10 years. Also a New Brunswick LRT & BRT lines.

~Corey

All of this ideas have been floated by orgs such as the Regional Plan Association and other planning agencies but none are happening in the near future.

West Hudson
January 5th, 2010, 11:35 PM
As someone who works with the Port Authority, I can tell you that the extension of the PATH to EWR won't happen anytime soon. The next big thing to be constructed by the PA is a substation in Harrison for the PATH. Until that is built, the new Harrison PATH station is on hold. The design phase is complete for the substation, but design work has stopped on the new PATH station. The extension of the Grove Street platform hasn't even gone into the design phase yet, so that's also quite a ways off...

stache
January 6th, 2010, 01:17 AM
I for one am in Manhattan and am glad to be a block from a PATH station.

66nexus
January 7th, 2010, 05:26 PM
NJ's home rule tradition is the fault of NJ...and NJ only.

NYC's growth doesn't necessarily stump Newark. The problem is, no towns in NJ want to merge.

It wouldn't make sense for PATH to extend to EWR when NJTransit already connects to it. The same way a LightRail connecting Newark to HBLR is redundant because of PATH

BUT:

Let's say JC and Newark reach critical mass then redundant lines may be necessary...just like another tunnel to Manhattan (ATRC) would be beneficial.

jdbarber
January 7th, 2010, 08:32 PM
The Light Rail is planned to extend a stop past West Side Avenue to the other side of Route 440. It will serve the Bayside redevelopment.

http://www.bayfrontjerseycity.com/index2.html

Nexis4Jersey
January 9th, 2010, 12:31 AM
NJ's home rule tradition is the fault of NJ...and NJ only.

NYC's growth doesn't necessarily stump Newark. The problem is, no towns in NJ want to merge.

It wouldn't make sense for PATH to extend to EWR when NJTransit already connects to it. The same way a LightRail connecting Newark to HBLR is redundant because of PATH

BUT:

Let's say JC and Newark reach critical mass then redundant lines may be necessary...just like another tunnel to Manhattan (ATRC) would be beneficial.

It would make sense , so that you wouldn't have to switch, to go to Jersey City or Manhattan form EWR. New Jersey Station at the airport is more for the region not to really go to Manhattan unless u switch at Newark Penn to the PATH. This connection can really solve the Manhattan bound traffic to the Airport. Yes NJT has plans that are one hold now to connect Downtown Newark to the Airport via Light Rail but thats at least now another decade away.

66nexus
January 9th, 2010, 05:33 PM
It would make sense , so that you wouldn't have to switch, to go to Jersey City or Manhattan form EWR. New Jersey Station at the airport is more for the region not to really go to Manhattan unless u switch at Newark Penn to the PATH. This connection can really solve the Manhattan bound traffic to the Airport. Yes NJT has plans that are one hold now to connect Downtown Newark to the Airport via Light Rail but thats at least now another decade away.

The advantages of PATH to EWR are nothing compared to cost and they'd most likely be using NEC lines anyway.

The majority of the traffic bound for Manhattan are daily commuters.

What real benefit does a LightRail from DT Newark to EWR provide? Newark Penn is the major train station for DT Newark and already connects to EWR.

stache
January 9th, 2010, 08:56 PM
So you have to transfer twice.

JCMAN320
February 1st, 2010, 11:46 PM
PATH Train will receive an $321 million upgrade from a German-based tech firm-led group

By The Jersey Journal
January 20, 2010, 9:47AM

http://media.nj.com/hudsoncountynow_impact/photo/pathjpg-366d3524959956cf_medium.jpg
PATH Train

Siemens AG, a Germany-based industry, announced that its leading a consortium that signed a $321 million contract with Port Authority Trans-Hudson to automate and improve the PATH rail system.

The improvements are expected to increase the passenger size from 240,000 per day to 250,000.

Siemens plans to implement Communication-Based Train Control, which will reduce intervals between trains and, in turn, allow more trains to use the same track.

Installing the technology on the 100-year-old PATH system will increase safety and reliability and reduce maintenance costs on the routes that connect the World Trade Center and Herald Square in Manhattan with Jersey City, Newark and Hoboken in New Jersey.

Other participants in the consortium include Daidone Electric of Newark and Aldridge Electric of Libertyville, Ill.

http://www.nj.com/hudson/index.ssf/2010/01/path_train_will_receive_an_321.html

stache
February 1st, 2010, 11:54 PM
I hate waiting to transfer at Journal Square.

JCMAN320
February 12th, 2010, 08:06 PM
Bridge to carry pedestrians over road at Port Imperial is, for now, in limbo

Friday, February 12, 2010
By KARINA L. ARRUE
JOURNAL STAFF WRITER

http://media.nj.com/hudsoncountynow_impact/photo/bridge1jpg-4e8acc7b691c8f84_large.jpg
Reena Rose Sibayan/The Jersey Journal
The pedestrian bridge spanning Port Imperial Boulevard in Weehawken from the Light Rail Station to the NY Waterway Ferry terminal is still unfinished after more than four years.

WEEHAWKEN - Hudson County has its own "bridge to nowhere." While it doesn't connect any remote islands, it appears to be just as much of a boondoggle as the proposed $398 million Alaska span that became synonymous with wasteful spending.

A pedestrian bridge adjacent to the Port Imperial Light Rail station in Weehawken has been unfinished for at least four years - and no one's sure when it will be completed.

The elevated walkway - with the Light Rail station on one side and a bus stop and the NY Waterway ferry terminal on the other - would allow pedestrians to traverse Port Imperial Boulevard safely above three lanes of traffic.

Construction on the walkway began before the Light Rail station opened in October 2005, but a set of stairs and an elevator on the east side have yet to be constructed.

Gus Villalobos, 56, of Union City, who takes the Light Rail at 49th Street to the Port Imperial Station before crossing the street at a nearby traffic light, said "it would be nice not to have to wait (for the lights to change)."

A spokeswoman for New Jersey Transit said that the completion of the walkway is tied to development in Weehawken, but Mayor Richard F. Turner says that the joint project between NJ Transit and Roseland Property was stalled due to the slumping economy.

The projected cost of the walkway was $8 million five years ago, NJ Transit spokesman Dan Stessel said.

Turner said the walkway bridge was to be built by NJ Transit in two phases, and the first had to be completed before the Light Rail went up or the construction would have required shutting down electric lines and disrupting the Light Rail system at Port Imperial for six months.

But in addition to money woes, the second phase was stalled because of changes in the design, said Joseph Gurkovich, vice president of development at Roseland Property.

Gurkovich said Roseland is in negotiations with NJ Transit about the design that was modified because it didn't fit in with the design of a public garage Roseland plans to build on a parcel of land adjacent to the bridge.

"It needs to look like they weren't built separately," said Gurkovich. Once negotiations are complete, a new shell will be built around the abutment of the bridge that will match the five-level garage.

From there, it would take four to six months for the staircase and elevator to be constructed, and about 18 months for the garage, which will service mostly ferry customers, he said.

Nexis4Jersey
February 13th, 2010, 12:01 AM
Yea , everytime i see that , i always wondered why it wasn't finished it seemed odd , and now to hear why , that just makes me angry that its a tiny reason. I guess they wait till someone gets killed crossing Port Imperial Boulevard. Another thing i'm angry about is the intersection at the end of Port Imperial Boulevard near the Helix , why wasn't that fixed , when they put they Light Rail in?

~Corey

Nexis4Jersey
February 21st, 2010, 12:54 AM
What do you guys think about my Light Rail plan for around New Jersey.:D

http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?ie=UTF8&hl=en&vps=1&jsv=207a&oe=UTF8&msa=0&msid=106428077390771295791.000480149d560cc0de790

~Corey

ForestHillsGardens
February 22nd, 2010, 06:41 PM
What do you guys think about my Light Rail plan for around New Jersey.:D

http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?ie=UTF8&hl=en&vps=1&jsv=207a&oe=UTF8&msa=0&msid=106428077390771295791.000480149d560cc0de790

~Corey

Hi Corey, MegaBus aka Kevin from NYCTF here, :D. I relly like your North Jersey Light Rail Plan in ways.

However the loop lines I feel is not needed, as well as the Gold Coast Services should all be able to connect to Hoboken Terminal, Newark Service all end at Newark Terminal while the Paterson Passaic corridor should have two more extensions - one serving Teaneck and one serving Paramus shopping district (Garden State Plaza). While certain lines should not follow commputer rail lines because it would be dubbed 'useless'. And certain lines should be combined to save service. I'll post in a later date when I figure out my proposals to share.

stache
February 23rd, 2010, 01:17 AM
Looks good to me -

Nexis4Jersey
February 23rd, 2010, 08:23 AM
Hi Corey, MegaBus aka Kevin from NYCTF here, :D. I relly like your North Jersey Light Rail Plan in ways.

However the loop lines I feel is not needed, as well as the Gold Coast Services should all be able to connect to Hoboken Terminal, Newark Service all end at Newark Terminal while the Paterson Passaic corridor should have two more extensions - one serving Teaneck and one serving Paramus shopping district (Garden State Plaza). While certain lines should not follow commputer rail lines because it would be dubbed 'useless'. And certain lines should be combined to save service. I'll post in a later date when I figure out my proposals to share.

Why would it be needed , alot ppl in the NJ Gold Coast , go up & down JFK , so some sort of Rail service will be needed over the coming decades to relive congestion. whether underground which would be the most expensive & best choice or above ground to replace or lessen the stress on the Bus lines. Not all services need to go to Hoboken , some can go to Journal SQ & others to Fort Lee. The Newark service would either end @ Broad Street Station or Newark Penn , they would be the 2 key points. Another line should go up further to service the Hudson River Condo area of the NJ Gold Coast , becuz River Road is starting to become a bottleneck.

~Corey

scrollhectic
February 23rd, 2010, 10:01 AM
What do you guys think about my Light Rail plan for around New Jersey.:D

http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?ie=UTF8&hl=en&vps=1&jsv=207a&oe=UTF8&msa=0&msid=106428077390771295791.000480149d560cc0de790

~Corey

Wouldn't it be great if the light rail system was that developed? For the most part, I like it... especially the Broad St. line in Newark. The loops are a little confusing though. I could imagine trying to transfer to another line and looking at that map and being completely confused. There should be a way to have terminus stations and still hit all the areas you highlighted in your map. What I also think would be great is a light rail line down So. Orange Ave connecting to the So. Orange Train Station as well as a line down Springfield Ave connecting to the Maplewood Train Station. And maybe the continuation of the Newark light rail along Bloomfield Ave all the way to downtown Montclair.

ForestHillsGardens
February 23rd, 2010, 10:39 PM
@Nexis4Jersey
Well, I do hope the 'loop-lines' would not be like too short, more like the length of the Newark Light Rail Broad St. Line. As well as the loops should include at least one main terminal (e.g. Newark Loop 1 Terminal at Newark-Penn Station.)

Second, these light rails should 'inter-connectable' Which as an example means the Fort Lee Lines should connect to the Paterson Lines around Paramus and the Hobokon Lines around Tonnelle Ave. for the ease of ride

And, I agree with your other proposals. These systems will greatly benefit the Northern Jersey Communities.

@ScrollHectic:
I agree with you, at least if the new light rail lines does not become to competitive with Commuter Rail and Bus lines.

66nexus
February 24th, 2010, 05:31 PM
I particularly like the line that parallels rt. 1&9, hell...I'd use it.

NYatKNIGHT
February 25th, 2010, 11:37 AM
The Northern Branch line that would terminate in Tenafly could go even farther north through Closter and Northvale right on up to Rockland County. That section of northeastern Bergen County (called Northern Valley) has no commuter rail at all - though it once did.

Interesting graphic:

Number Who Commute by Auto to the Central Business District

http://www.streetsblog.org/wp-content/uploads/2006/12_4-10/nyc_auto_commuter_numb.jpg


Percent Who Commute by Auto to the Central Business District

http://www.streetsblog.org/wp-content/uploads/2006/12_4-10/nyc_auto_commuter_pct.jpg

http://www.streetsblog.org/2006/12/08/where-do-manhattan-auto-commuters-come-from/

JCMAN320
September 23rd, 2010, 10:16 PM
Yea , everytime i see that , i always wondered why it wasn't finished it seemed odd , and now to hear why , that just makes me angry that its a tiny reason. I guess they wait till someone gets killed crossing Port Imperial Boulevard. Another thing i'm angry about is the intersection at the end of Port Imperial Boulevard near the Helix , why wasn't that fixed , when they put they Light Rail in?

~Corey

Work has begun in Weehawken to ease road access to waterfront from Boulevard East

Wednesday, September 15, 2010
By JEAN-PIERRE MESTANZA
JOURNAL STAFF WRITER

http://media.nj.com/hudsoncountynow_impact/photo/baldwin2jpg-c288686363329ad9_large.jpg
Reena Rose Sibayan/The Jersey Journal
Baldwin Avenue in Weehawken will be expanded from two lanes to five lanes as part of the waterfront project.


WEEHAWKEN - Construction started last week on a $4.1 million federally funded infrastructure project to ease access to the Weehawken waterfront from Boulevard East.

"It is long overdue," said Weehawken Mayor Richard Turner. "It will make access to the waterfront safer and easier."

Wednesday's groundbreaking ceremony, attended by U.S. Sen. Robert Menendez, U.S. Rep. Albio Sires and County Executive Tom DeGise, marked the start of the project, which is to be completed within a year, Turner said.

The project will expand the number of lanes on Baldwin Avenue from two to five, while Port Imperial Boulevard and Waterfront Terrace will be connected to make one road with four lanes, Turner said.

Roughly 2,200 feet of new roadway, including sidewalks and curbs, will be created, as well as 3,000 feet of new storm water drainage, and a 90-foot extension of the Hudson River Walkway.

The project is being funded by two federal grants - a 2001 Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act grant for $2.5 million and a 2005 Transportation Equity Assistance Grant for $1.6 million, according to a press release.

Turner said the town has wanted to improve access to the waterfront for about 20 years. Land had to be purchased from several property owners to make the project possible. He emphasized that no town money was used to purchase the properties.

http://www.nj.com/news/jjournal/weehawken/index.ssf?/base/news-0/1284531939308300.xml&coll=3

JCMAN NOTE: The waterfront walkway section will connect the Weehawken Walkway and Hoboken Walkway at Weehawken Cove.

JCMAN320
September 24th, 2010, 01:17 PM
NOW ARRIVING: PASSENGER RAIL FOR BERGEN COUNTY

NJT-09-076
July 18, 2009

RIDGEFIELD, NJ — Governor Jon S. Corzine and Congressman Steve Rothman announced today that they are teaming up to deliver passenger rail to Bergen County with an extension of light rail service.

Joined by NJ Senator Loretta Weinberg, Assemblyman Gordon Johnson, Bergen County Executive Dennis McNerney, and Ridgefield Mayor Anthony Suarez, as well as other state and local officials, the announcement came after the conclusion that another long-studied rail technology being advanced by NJ TRANSIT did not offer a practical alternative for Bergen residents in the near term.

“The time has come to put the Bergen in Hudson-Bergen Light Rail. The twin facts that NJ TRANSIT has settled on a mode of service and Governor Corzine is here pledging his personal support for the Northern Branch gives me renewed hope that the dream of passenger rail will be realized for Bergen County,” said Rothman.

“We can no longer wait for emerging technologies that make the perfect the enemy of the good. Light rail will enable thousands of Bergen residents to get to work on the Waterfront, or make easy connections to PATH and ferries into Manhattan,” said Corzine.

Bergen light rail will provide significant environmental benefits, including reduced carbon emissions, taking 8,500 cars off the road each day. The Hudson-Bergen Light Rail system has been a catalyst for economic development and a national light rail transit model with nearly 45,000 passenger trips daily, with a 24th station under construction at 8th Street in Bayonne.

NJ TRANSIT submitted a Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) to the Federal Transit Administration last year that studied both light rail and re-emerging Diesel Multiple Unit (DMU) types of equipment. However, in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis, the only manufacturer of DMUs that met American safety standards for operating in mixed freight/passenger territory filed for bankruptcy. A global search for another manufacturer that could meet strict Federal Railroad Administration safety requirements led NJ TRANSIT Executive Director Richard Sarles to conclude recently that the possibility of new DMUs rolling off the production line is several years away at best.

“The seismic shift in the economy has impacted many sectors, including the rail manufacturing industry,” said Sarles. “We understand the Governor and Congressman want us to move forward with a proven approach expeditiously and we are declaring the preference for light rail as part of the federally-required process for building the project.”

Sarles also acknowledged the Federal Transit Administration’s efforts to advance multiple NJ rail projects, noting that NJ TRANSIT has received the Record of Decision for the Mass Transit Tunnel; the MOS FONSI for the Lackawanna Cutoff; completed environmental review for the Edison Station Parking Expansion Project, the Lower Hack Bridge Phase II project, and HBLR’s Danforth Interlocking project over the last several months.

“We appreciate the leadership of FTA Administrator Peter Rogoff and hard work of the Regional Administrator and staff to continue to effectively move many projects forward at once,” said Sarles.

FTA’s release of the revised Northern Branch DEIS will trigger local public hearings as soon as this fall. The hearings will give communities along the planned service route an opportunity to raise any additional issues that need to be incorporated into
NJ TRANSIT’s service plan. NJ TRANSIT expects preliminary engineering to begin in 2010.

“With the support and cooperation of the relevant federal agencies, we expect to put shovels in the ground in Bergen County in 2011,” said Corzine.

At full operating capacity, the light rail service is planned to operate from early morning through late evening hours, seven days a week, with trains departing every 6-12 minutes in the peak travel periods. A trip from the northernmost portion of the line will take 21 minutes to Tonnelle Avenue, 25 minutes to Port Imperial for ferries to New York, and 37 minutes to Hoboken for PATH and NJ TRANSIT commuter rail connections.

“I commend the Governor and Congressman Rothman for their personal leadership in advancing a light rail system that we can build now,” said NJ Senator Loretta Weinberg. “Light rail will offer a welcome alternative to congested roadways with frequent, fast, and affordable trips that cost less than a gallon of gas.”

Light rail ridership is estimated to be about 24,000 passenger trips daily. While the cost estimate for extending light rail has not yet been finalized, preliminary estimates set the price at about $800 million to $900 million. The Northern Branch project is included in the joint long-range capital program of the NJ Department of Transportation and
NJ Transit, benefitting from a mix of federal and state Transportation Trust Funds.

newstracker: LIGHT RAIL LINE TO USE ELECTRIC CARS

Friday, May 7, 2010
Last updated: Friday May 7, 2010, 1:26 PM
Herald News

WHAT'S NEW: NJ Transit plans to use trolley-like electric cars along the Northern Branch line to link Bergen County to the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail system. The $800 million project will serve 24,000 daily commuters and provide alternatives for commuters in Tenafly, Englewood, Ridgefield and other communities after it breaks ground in 2012.

BACKGROUND: For years, the expansion into Bergen County was mired in bureaucracy. Delays first occurred when local officials couldn't agree on a route. NJ Transit and critics then debated whether the line would be electric or serve diesel trains — and, more importantly, how the project will be funded. Last year, Governor Corzine and NJ Transit agreed to move forward with light rail and connect it to the Hudson-Bergen line.

QUOTE: "The light rail lines are investments — they're the essence of transit-oriented development. That's what it's all about. As time goes on, those facilities will generate economic development. That economic development will generate ridership." — James Weinstein, NJ Transit executive director

WHAT'S NEXT: NJ Transit is awaiting the federal government's approval of an environmental impact statement for the project, which officials hope will happen this year. Construction will begin two years after Federal Transit Administration approval. The project is expected to be completed by 2015.

— Tom Davis

http://www.northjersey.com/news/hudson/hudson_county_news/93048079_newstracker__LIGHT_RAIL_LINE_TO_USE_ELECT RIC_CARS.html

Newarkguy
September 24th, 2010, 04:39 PM
Meanwhile, the much earlier proposed NERL(Newark Elizabeth area rail link) is not even on blueprint!! Its ridiculous that NJ ignores the mass transit needs of Newark's inner suburbs and neighborhoods. The Newark light rail subway only serves the Roseville ,and Silver lake neighborhoods in northern Newark.Belleville's south is clipped by the service,and Bloomfield is actually the maintenance yard,with Grove Street station there.Why not use the abandoned remainder of Erie Lackawanna railway's Orange branch right of way in east Orange to access the deeper wealthier Springdale area? what about Vailsburg? Or Irvington?,Weequahic?Hillside?Clinton hill?kennilworth or Springfield? By using historic Newark roadway rights of way, along with portions of the rahway valley right of way, Newark light rail can extend to Summit and Cranford!!

JCMAN320
October 23rd, 2010, 07:47 PM
NJ Transit testing light-rail train to Bayonne's new Eighth Street station before opening stop to the public
Published: Saturday, October 23, 2010, 10:05 AM
Toni-Ann Cerbo/The Jersey Journal

http://media.nj.com/bayonne_impact/photo/8865034-large.jpg
Journal file photo
The Eighth Street Hudson-Bergen Light Rail Station in Bayonne is shown here under construction on Aug. 4.

Starting Monday, NJ Transit will begin running its modern electric trolley between the 22nd and Eighth Street Hudson-Bergen Light Rail stations in Bayonne.

NJ Transit will conduct the train tests for 10 to 12 weeks on the light-rail tracks between those two stations throughout the day, Mayor Mark Smith said.

Commuters are advised the trains going to and from the Eighth Street Station, the newest stop on the line, has yet to open will be not be available for passengers during the test period. They should continue to use other stations.

NJ Transit has not announced when the Eighth Street station will open.

http://www.nj.com/bayonne/index.ssf/2010/10/nj_transit_testing_light-rail.html

JCMAN320
January 19th, 2011, 10:55 PM
Opening date set for new light rail station at southern end of Bayonne

Published: Wednesday, January 19, 2011, 6:34 PM Updated: Wednesday, January 19, 2011, 7:17 PM
By Charles Hack/The Jersey Journal

http://media.nj.com/hudsoncountynow_impact/photo/9207550-large.jpg
Jersey Journal file photo
The long-awaited Eighth Street light rail station in Bayonne is set to open on Jan. 31.

The new Eighth Street Hudson-Bergen Light Rail station that will bring downtown Bayonne within a 17-minute rail commute of Downtown Jersey City is set to open Jan. 31, NJ Transit said this afternoon.

The ribbon cutting at the brand-new station is scheduled for 11 a.m. with James Weinstein, NJ Transit executive director, and local, state and federal officials on hand, NJT spokesman Dan Stessel said.

NJ Transit expects to be a running regular service to and from the station by mid-afternoon, he said.

The new station, part of a $100 million light rail expansion project, will be the southernmost point on the line, connecting to 22nd Street in Bayonne.

During peak periods from 6:45 a.m. to 8:30 a.m. weekdays, trains are scheduled to run an average of every 10 minutes, Stessel said. Off-peak and weekends trains run closer to an average of every 20 minutes.

The journey from Eighth Street Station to Exchange Place, which connects with the PATH train to Newark and the World Train Center, takes 17 to 20 minutes, officials said.

"This is very convenient travel option for passengers who want to make a connection to PATH trains at Exchange Place," Stessel said.

One weekdays the trains will leave the station from 5:11 a.m. to 1:09 a.m. and weekends from 6:09 a.m. with the last train leaving at 1:24 a.m., according to the schedule.

The last train will be scheduled to arrive at the station at 2:35 a.m. seven days a week.

Earlier this month, officials floated the idea of continuing the light rail from Eighth Street across the Bayonne Bridge to Staten Island and said they will study the possibility.

Currently, the light rail extends through Bayonne and Jersey City into Hoboken, Weehawken and Union City with the terminus at Tonnelle Avenue and 51st Street in North Bergen.

http://www.nj.com/hudson/index.ssf/2011/01/opening_date_set_for_light_rai.html

scrollhectic
January 19th, 2011, 11:16 PM
Opening date set for new light rail station at southern end of Bayonne

Published: Wednesday, January 19, 2011, 6:34 PM Updated: Wednesday, January 19, 2011, 7:17 PM
By Charles Hack/The Jersey Journal

http://media.nj.com/hudsoncountynow_impact/photo/9207550-large.jpg
Jersey Journal file photo
The long-awaited Eighth Street light rail station in Bayonne is set to open on Jan. 31.

The new Eighth Street Hudson-Bergen Light Rail station that will bring downtown Bayonne within a 17-minute rail commute of Downtown Jersey City is set to open Jan. 31, NJ Transit said this afternoon.

The ribbon cutting at the brand-new station is scheduled for 11 a.m. with James Weinstein, NJ Transit executive director, and local, state and federal officials on hand, NJT spokesman Dan Stessel said.

NJ Transit expects to be a running regular service to and from the station by mid-afternoon, he said.

The new station, part of a $100 million light rail expansion project, will be the southernmost point on the line, connecting to 22nd Street in Bayonne.

During peak periods from 6:45 a.m. to 8:30 a.m. weekdays, trains are scheduled to run an average of every 10 minutes, Stessel said. Off-peak and weekends trains run closer to an average of every 20 minutes.

The journey from Eighth Street Station to Exchange Place, which connects with the PATH train to Newark and the World Train Center, takes 17 to 20 minutes, officials said.

"This is very convenient travel option for passengers who want to make a connection to PATH trains at Exchange Place," Stessel said.

One weekdays the trains will leave the station from 5:11 a.m. to 1:09 a.m. and weekends from 6:09 a.m. with the last train leaving at 1:24 a.m., according to the schedule.

The last train will be scheduled to arrive at the station at 2:35 a.m. seven days a week.

Earlier this month, officials floated the idea of continuing the light rail from Eighth Street across the Bayonne Bridge to Staten Island and said they will study the possibility.

Currently, the light rail extends through Bayonne and Jersey City into Hoboken, Weehawken and Union City with the terminus at Tonnelle Avenue and 51st Street in North Bergen.

http://www.nj.com/hudson/index.ssf/2011/01/opening_date_set_for_light_rai.html

A study to continue to Staten Island? Is there a study to connect the HBLR to the Newark Light rail? Maybe the Port Authority would have a tantrum over that idea.

JCMAN320
February 1st, 2011, 11:53 PM
NJ TRANSIT OPENS NEW 8TH STREET LIGHT RAIL STATION IN BAYONNE
Grand opening ceremony precedes start of revenue service

January 31, 2011
NJT-11-003

NEWARK, NJ —NJ TRANSIT Executive Director James Weinstein joined local, state and federal officials today at the grand opening of the new 8th Street Station in Bayonne, welcoming Hudson-Bergen Light Rail service to a new neighborhood and kicking off inaugural service on the recently completed one-mile extension.

As part of the opening ceremony, a special light rail train operated from 34th Street Station in Bayonne, carrying local officials and dignitaries along the new segment of the line, over the viaduct and into the elevated 8th Street Station. Following welcoming remarks from Bayonne Mayor Mark Smith, area leaders such as U.S. Senator Robert Menendez and U.S. Representative Albio Sires highlighted the benefits of the new station for local residents.

“Projects like 8th Street would not be possible without state support,” said Weinstein. “The $672 million dedicated to NJ TRANSIT as part of Governor Christie’s new Transportation Capital Plan will ensure that we can continue to invest in these types of critical transit infrastructure projects.”

“The light rail system is a model of how to link communities with transportation options to encourage economic development, ease traffic congestion, reduce pollution, and reduce our dependence on oil,” said Senator Menendez. “The 8th Street extension in Bayonne will further connect people and opportunities, putting employment, education, and recreation within easy and affordable reach.”

“Since opening nearly 11 years ago, the light rail line has benefited Hudson County and the region by providing mass transit opportunities for our residents,” said Congressman Sires. “I am pleased that this latest expansion of the light rail system will provide greater mass transit access for the residents of Bayonne.”

In April 2008, the NJ TRANSIT Board of Directors awarded a $58.4 million contract to George Harms Construction, Inc. of Howell, NJ, for work to extend the light rail line one mile from its previous southern terminus at 22nd Street. The project included the design and construction of foundations, viaduct structure, track work, intersection improvements, a new station building, landscaping, lighting and customer amenities.

Construction work on the project began in October 2008. From the elevated 22nd Street Station, the light rail tracks were extended south, hugging the existing Conrail right-of-way along Avenue E. A viaduct was built to carry light rail vehicles over local streets to an elevated platform at the new 8th Street Station, which features an elevator and stairs between street and platform levels.

“Hudson-Bergen Light Rail is much more than a transportation system—it is an engine of economic development for the region, creating jobs during its construction, and now serving as the vehicle of choice for thousands who live and work here as they use the system for their daily commute,” said FTA Regional Administrator Brigid Hynes-Cherin. “It has also been a shining example of the good things that can happen when government agencies, communities, legislators and stakeholders work together.”

“The Hudson-Bergen Light Rail system continues to serve as a model for transit agencies across the nation, driving economic growth, transit-friendly development, and connecting residents with jobs, education and recreational activities,” said Assembly Transportation Chairman John S. Wisniewski.

“With the opening of 8th Street Station, Bayonne residents now have a station that they can walk to, eliminating the need to drive and park at 22nd Street or 34th Street stations,” said NJ TRANSIT Executive Director Weinstein. “Designed with community input in mind, this is truly a neighborhood station, one that is sure to quickly become a part of the fabric of the City as it connects riders to Waterfront destinations, NJ TRANSIT rail and bus services, trans-Hudson ferries and PATH trains.”

As a result of community meetings, the station was constructed at Avenue C and 8th Street, with architecture reminiscent of the old Central Railroad of New Jersey (CNJ) station that once stood near the site.

“This new station at 8th Street expands a vital north-south transportation option for Hudson County and the region,” said Hudson County Executive Thomas A. DeGise. “Whether traveling between Bayonne and North Bergen, or taking advantage of connections to trans-Hudson services, light rail has become the preferred choice for many residents.”

“The new 8th Street Station will extend the reach of the light rail system to the nearby Bergen Point neighborhood, providing walkable access to a vital transportation option,” said Mayor Smith. “Our community is proud to welcome this new, modern station that is so reminiscent of the classic station that once stood in its place.”

“I am thrilled that I can stop commuting from Hoboken by auto since the light rail now has a station within walking distance of my workplace,” said Principal Mary Tremitiedi of the Holy Family Academy, which is located about two blocks away from the 8th Street Station. “Many of my students are looking forward to using the new station for travel to and from school as well.”

The new 8th Street Station was designed as a “walkable” station for Bayonne residents. The station also features a “Kiss and Ride” area with 10 short-term parking spaces for customers who wish to get dropped off at or picked up from the station.

Two new bus stops at the station will facilitate intermodal connections between light rail and bus service for customers of the No. 81 Bayonne-Jersey City and No. 120 Bayonne-Downtown New York bus routes.

The new station also features three impressive art installations created by regional artists who were commissioned through NJ TRANSIT’s Transit Arts Program. The largest piece of artwork, a mural titled “Bayonne: Port City of Homes and Industry,” was painted by artist Richard Haas to adorn the entire open station entrance. The mural captures the essence of Bayonne, depicting local community storefronts, residential homes, architecture, scenes from the Waterfront and the famous Bayonne Bridge.

Upstairs, the elevated station platforms feature art glass windscreens created by artist Trevor Wilson. Titled “Silver Stain and Light,” the windscreens are comprised of glass blocks that underwent a silver stained glass paint application and etching process to achieve a unique transparency that interacts with the changing light.

Outside the station building, the plaza area features a stainless steel sculpture titled “Locomotion,” created by artist Tom Nussbaum. The sculpture uses images of wheels from locomotives that were historically significant in the development of the railroad.


8th Street Station Quick Facts

Length of extension: one-mile
Total project cost: $100 million
Funding: federal and state sources
Construction timeline: Oct. 2008 – Jan. 2011
Number of HBLR stations: 24
Project elements: station building, elevated platforms, track work, viaduct, landscaping, lighting, customer amenities



About Hudson-Bergen Light Rail

Hudson-Bergen Light Rail provides more than 40,000 weekday trips between 24 stations in Bayonne, Jersey City, Hoboken, Weehawken, Union City and North Bergen. The system provides a vital link between waterfront destinations, NJ TRANSIT rail and bus routes, PATH trains and trans-Hudson ferry services.

The one-way adult fare on Hudson-Bergen Light Rail is $2.10. Discounted unlimited monthly passes are available for $64. Children, senior citizens and passengers with disabilities save 50 percent or more at all times. In addition, NJ TRANSIT customers holding a monthly or weekly rail pass, or a bus pass for two or more zones, can ride the system at no additional charge simply by displaying their pass.

http://www.nj.com/news/index.ssf/2011/01/nj_transit_opens_bayonne_8th_s.html

http://www.njtransit.com/var/var_servlet.srv?hdnPageAction=HBLR8thStreetTo

http://www.njtransit.com/tm/tm_servlet.srv?hdnPageAction=PressReleaseTo&PRESS_RELEASE_ID=2662

Nexis4Jersey
February 2nd, 2011, 12:02 AM
NJ TRANSIT OPENS NEW 8TH STREET LIGHT RAIL STATION IN BAYONNE
Grand opening ceremony precedes start of revenue service

January 31, 2011
NJT-11-003

NEWARK, NJ —NJ TRANSIT Executive Director James Weinstein joined local, state and federal officials today at the grand opening of the new 8th Street Station in Bayonne, welcoming Hudson-Bergen Light Rail service to a new neighborhood and kicking off inaugural service on the recently completed one-mile extension.

As part of the opening ceremony, a special light rail train operated from 34th Street Station in Bayonne, carrying local officials and dignitaries along the new segment of the line, over the viaduct and into the elevated 8th Street Station. Following welcoming remarks from Bayonne Mayor Mark Smith, area leaders such as U.S. Senator Robert Menendez and U.S. Representative Albio Sires highlighted the benefits of the new station for local residents.

“Projects like 8th Street would not be possible without state support,” said Weinstein. “The $672 million dedicated to NJ TRANSIT as part of Governor Christie’s new Transportation Capital Plan will ensure that we can continue to invest in these types of critical transit infrastructure projects.”

“The light rail system is a model of how to link communities with transportation options to encourage economic development, ease traffic congestion, reduce pollution, and reduce our dependence on oil,” said Senator Menendez. “The 8th Street extension in Bayonne will further connect people and opportunities, putting employment, education, and recreation within easy and affordable reach.”

“Since opening nearly 11 years ago, the light rail line has benefited Hudson County and the region by providing mass transit opportunities for our residents,” said Congressman Sires. “I am pleased that this latest expansion of the light rail system will provide greater mass transit access for the residents of Bayonne.”

In April 2008, the NJ TRANSIT Board of Directors awarded a $58.4 million contract to George Harms Construction, Inc. of Howell, NJ, for work to extend the light rail line one mile from its previous southern terminus at 22nd Street. The project included the design and construction of foundations, viaduct structure, track work, intersection improvements, a new station building, landscaping, lighting and customer amenities.

Construction work on the project began in October 2008. From the elevated 22nd Street Station, the light rail tracks were extended south, hugging the existing Conrail right-of-way along Avenue E. A viaduct was built to carry light rail vehicles over local streets to an elevated platform at the new 8th Street Station, which features an elevator and stairs between street and platform levels.

“Hudson-Bergen Light Rail is much more than a transportation system—it is an engine of economic development for the region, creating jobs during its construction, and now serving as the vehicle of choice for thousands who live and work here as they use the system for their daily commute,” said FTA Regional Administrator Brigid Hynes-Cherin. “It has also been a shining example of the good things that can happen when government agencies, communities, legislators and stakeholders work together.”

“The Hudson-Bergen Light Rail system continues to serve as a model for transit agencies across the nation, driving economic growth, transit-friendly development, and connecting residents with jobs, education and recreational activities,” said Assembly Transportation Chairman John S. Wisniewski.

“With the opening of 8th Street Station, Bayonne residents now have a station that they can walk to, eliminating the need to drive and park at 22nd Street or 34th Street stations,” said NJ TRANSIT Executive Director Weinstein. “Designed with community input in mind, this is truly a neighborhood station, one that is sure to quickly become a part of the fabric of the City as it connects riders to Waterfront destinations, NJ TRANSIT rail and bus services, trans-Hudson ferries and PATH trains.”

As a result of community meetings, the station was constructed at Avenue C and 8th Street, with architecture reminiscent of the old Central Railroad of New Jersey (CNJ) station that once stood near the site.

“This new station at 8th Street expands a vital north-south transportation option for Hudson County and the region,” said Hudson County Executive Thomas A. DeGise. “Whether traveling between Bayonne and North Bergen, or taking advantage of connections to trans-Hudson services, light rail has become the preferred choice for many residents.”

“The new 8th Street Station will extend the reach of the light rail system to the nearby Bergen Point neighborhood, providing walkable access to a vital transportation option,” said Mayor Smith. “Our community is proud to welcome this new, modern station that is so reminiscent of the classic station that once stood in its place.”

“I am thrilled that I can stop commuting from Hoboken by auto since the light rail now has a station within walking distance of my workplace,” said Principal Mary Tremitiedi of the Holy Family Academy, which is located about two blocks away from the 8th Street Station. “Many of my students are looking forward to using the new station for travel to and from school as well.”

The new 8th Street Station was designed as a “walkable” station for Bayonne residents. The station also features a “Kiss and Ride” area with 10 short-term parking spaces for customers who wish to get dropped off at or picked up from the station.

Two new bus stops at the station will facilitate intermodal connections between light rail and bus service for customers of the No. 81 Bayonne-Jersey City and No. 120 Bayonne-Downtown New York bus routes.

The new station also features three impressive art installations created by regional artists who were commissioned through NJ TRANSIT’s Transit Arts Program. The largest piece of artwork, a mural titled “Bayonne: Port City of Homes and Industry,” was painted by artist Richard Haas to adorn the entire open station entrance. The mural captures the essence of Bayonne, depicting local community storefronts, residential homes, architecture, scenes from the Waterfront and the famous Bayonne Bridge.

Upstairs, the elevated station platforms feature art glass windscreens created by artist Trevor Wilson. Titled “Silver Stain and Light,” the windscreens are comprised of glass blocks that underwent a silver stained glass paint application and etching process to achieve a unique transparency that interacts with the changing light.

Outside the station building, the plaza area features a stainless steel sculpture titled “Locomotion,” created by artist Tom Nussbaum. The sculpture uses images of wheels from locomotives that were historically significant in the development of the railroad.


8th Street Station Quick Facts

Length of extension: one-mile
Total project cost: $100 million
Funding: federal and state sources
Construction timeline: Oct. 2008 – Jan. 2011
Number of HBLR stations: 24
Project elements: station building, elevated platforms, track work, viaduct, landscaping, lighting, customer amenities



About Hudson-Bergen Light Rail

Hudson-Bergen Light Rail provides more than 40,000 weekday trips between 24 stations in Bayonne, Jersey City, Hoboken, Weehawken, Union City and North Bergen. The system provides a vital link between waterfront destinations, NJ TRANSIT rail and bus routes, PATH trains and trans-Hudson ferry services.

The one-way adult fare on Hudson-Bergen Light Rail is $2.10. Discounted unlimited monthly passes are available for $64. Children, senior citizens and passengers with disabilities save 50 percent or more at all times. In addition, NJ TRANSIT customers holding a monthly or weekly rail pass, or a bus pass for two or more zones, can ride the system at no additional charge simply by displaying their pass.

http://www.nj.com/news/index.ssf/2011/01/nj_transit_opens_bayonne_8th_s.html

http://www.njtransit.com/var/var_servlet.srv?hdnPageAction=HBLR8thStreetTo

http://www.njtransit.com/tm/tm_servlet.srv?hdnPageAction=PressReleaseTo&PRESS_RELEASE_ID=2662

100 million is too much for what they built , should have built more.... They should have created a mini Mall in the station below.....sigh. I smell some corruption going within NJT....

JCMAN320
February 2nd, 2011, 12:05 AM
100 million is too much for what they built , should have built more.... They should have created a mini Mall in the station below.....sigh. I smell some corruption going within NJT....

Look at how elaborate the station is. Also take into account the cost of the elevated viaduct. Not saying no cost over runs happened but this wasn't just your run of the mill station. The station was designed to make a statement and bring back the old Jersey Central station that was there.

Nexis4Jersey
February 2nd, 2011, 03:28 AM
Look at how elaborate the station is. Also take into account the cost of the elevated viaduct. Not saying no cost over runs happened but this wasn't just your run of the mill station. The station was designed to make a statement and bring back the old Jersey Central station that was there.

I still don't see it , the PATH extension to EWR is longer and using 2 tracks the whole way. This is shorter and isn't entirely double tracked....and the station isn't all that big , sure its a viaduct but still its single tracked. I smell corruption here....

JCMAN320
February 2nd, 2011, 04:03 AM
It's not single tracked its double. It has to allow to trains in each direction dude. The whole system is double tracked.

stache
February 2nd, 2011, 04:16 AM
Oh but he's a railfan. He knows everything!

JCMAN320
February 2nd, 2011, 06:02 PM
NJ Transit Picks Favored Plan for Extending Light Rail on Jersey City’s West Side; Public Meeting Set for Tonight
By Jon Whiten • Feb 2nd, 2011 • Category: Blog, News

http://www.jerseycityindependent.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/Screen-shot-2011-02-02-at-11.02.53-AM.png
The proposed route for a light rail extension over Route 440.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

NJ Transit has picked its preferred plan for extending the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail (HBLR) across Route 440 to the Hackensack River and what will eventually become the Bayfront development, and the agency is holding another public open house meeting on the project tonight at New Jersey City University (NJCU).

The agency has done in-depth studies of four possible configurations to bring mass transit connections to the western waterfront of the city. It will be recommending Alternative 1A, a $171.6 million plan that extends the rail line from the West Side Avenue station to just one station, at Bayfront. The trip between the two stations would take 1 minute and 50 seconds, and the agency is recommending this plan because it provides direct service to Bayfront, avoids impact on existing HBLR operations and “provides transit benefit to the western waterfront at a lower cost than Alternative 1C.”

That plan, 1C, would extend the line to Bayfront, but with two stops — one terminus at Bayfront, and one in between, just east of Route 440. That project would be more expensive than NJ Transit’s preferred one, and could “pose schedule risks” if service disruptions were to occur.

The other two plans are both cheaper than the one NJ Transit will recommend, but neither brings a rail line all the way into the Bayfront development, an ambitious vision for the former Honeywell site that calls for the creation of a “work where you live” community comprising 4,000 to 8,600 residential units and between 750,000 and 1.2 million square feet of commercial space, as well as more than 20 acres of open space.

The Alternative 1D would end the light rail extension just east of Route 440, and run a pedestrian bridge over the highway into Bayfront. The Transportation Systems Management (TSM) Alternative wouldn’t extend the light rail at all, but would instead introduce a shuttle bus system connecting the West Side Avenue station, NJCU’s West Campus, Bayfront and Society Hill.

“The TSM Alternative would improve access for future residents of the western waterfront, but it would be inconsistent with the approved Bayfront plan and would attract far fewer new riders than the light rail alternatives,” NJ Transit says in a fact sheet.

NJ Transit is accepting public comments on the report through February 15. To download the draft report, or for more information on the project, click here. To submit comments, email feedback (at) hblr440aa.com.

THE DETAILS

Hudson-Bergen Light Rail Route 440 Extension Open House; Wednesday, February 2 from 5 to 8 pm; NJCU’s Gothic Lounge, 2039 Kennedy Boulevard. Feel free to stop in anytime between 5 and 8; a short presentation by NJ Transit will begin at 6:30 pm.

Here is more infroamtion about the report:
http://www.hblr440aa.com/link.php?link=Documents_761

http://www.jerseycityindependent.com/2011/02/02/nj-transit-picks-favored-plan-for-extending-light-rail-on-jersey-citys-west-side-public-meeting-set-for-tonight/

Nexis4Jersey
February 2nd, 2011, 06:30 PM
It's not single tracked its double. It has to allow to trains in each direction dude. The whole system is double tracked.

The Viaduct is single tracked......

http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5251/5406025524_52148fd5df_b.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/42178139@N06/5406025524/)
DSCN0352 (http://www.flickr.com/photos/42178139@N06/5406025524/) by Nexis4Jersey09 (http://www.flickr.com/people/42178139@N06/), on Flickr

http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5011/5406028144_beaa1fe7a3_b.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/42178139@N06/5406028144/)
DSCN0362 (http://www.flickr.com/photos/42178139@N06/5406028144/) by Nexis4Jersey09 (http://www.flickr.com/people/42178139@N06/), on Flickr

lammius
February 2nd, 2011, 06:57 PM
Although there's a single track on the viaduct, is it possible that a 2nd track could be laid later? I haven't been down there to look, but is there any room on that viaduct? A single track over the viaduct is fine for the present operating scheme, but it seems silly to me that the possibility of adding a 2nd track wouldn't have been planned, considering all of the "buzz" about future extensions to SI. If there's no capacity for a 2nd track, a twin viaduct would have to be constructed. :eek:

Maybe NJT is hoping the PANYNJ would pick up the bill for that as part of a future SI extension. :p

JCMAN320
February 2nd, 2011, 07:31 PM
Wow Nexis my bad I was wrong about that. I hadn't seen it yet from the tracks just from the street I just assumed that it was double tracked like the rest of the system. Why the hell would they make the WHOLE damm system double tracked with dozens of interlockings but after 22nd St make it single track all the way to 8th St. It limits the frequency between to and from 8th St!! WTF?? Makes no sense!

Even the plans from Westside Ave. to Route 440 show its double tracked vaiduct the whole way!!

Newarkguy
February 7th, 2011, 02:58 AM
Its single track because the freight railroads Chessie(csx) and Norfolk Southern under Conrail s assets refused to provide room in their rail yard to njtransit for double tracking.Also,Bayonne did not want to lose any homes and busineses to an expanded ROW. Go to google earth and see for yourself.

JCMAN320
May 14th, 2011, 11:00 PM
Light Rail Extension to Jersey City’s West Side Gets Push Forward from NJ Transit
By Jon Whiten • May 11th, 2011 • Category: Blog, News

http://www.jerseycityindependent.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/Screen-shot-2011-02-02-at-11.02.53-AM.png
The proposed route for a light rail extension over Route 440.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

NJ Transit’s board of directors today adopted a plan to extend the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail (HBLR) across Route 440, and authorized its submission to the North Jersey Transportation Authority (NJTPA) for designation and inclusion in the agency’s Long Range Regional Transportation Plan, which would make the project eligible for federal funds.

NJ Transit has been studying the extension since September 2009. Under its plan, 0.7 miles of new light rail track would be laid along an elevated viaduct from the West Side Avenue station, across Route 440 to the northern end of Jersey City’s massive proposed Bayfront redevelopment project, where there would be a new station constructed. The trip between the two stations would take 1 minute and 50 seconds, and NJ Transit officials have estimated the cost of construction at $171.6 million in 2010 dollars, and $213.9 million in 2017 dollars — the expected mid-point of actual construction.

New Jersey transportation commissioner James Simpson, who is also board chair of NJ Transit, says the extension “would both support the development and address traffic congestion along Route 440 and secondary roads.”

Mayor Jerramiah Healy says his administration is “pleased and thankful” that NJ Transit is pushing the extension forward.

“This extension would not only connect our city from east to west, but it would also further our administration’s goal of creating Smart Growth urban communities, more mass transit, and a cleaner environment by reducing congestion,” the mayor says.

http://www.jerseycityindependent.com/2011/05/11/light-rail-extension-to-jersey-citys-west-side-gets-push-forward-from-nj-transit/

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[b]NJ TRANSIT ADVANCES LIGHT RAIL EXTENSION PROJECT
Locally Preferred Alternative selected to extend line from West Side Avenue Station across Route 440 in Jersey City

May 11, 2011
NJT-11-016

NEWARK, NJ — The NJ TRANSIT Board of Directors today advanced a project that would extend Hudson-Bergen Light Rail service farther west in Jersey City. The project would help support Jersey City’s planned development on the Newark Bay waterfront while easing traffic congestion along the busy Route 440 corridor.

“The selection of a Locally Preferred Alternative (LPA) is the next step toward improving transit options near the redevelopment and existing residential areas along the heavily-used Route 440,” said Transportation Commissioner and NJ TRANSIT Board Chairman James Simpson. “An extension of light rail to this area would both support the development and address traffic congestion along Route 440 and secondary roads.”

Following NJ TRANSIT’s completion of an alternatives analysis to explore the feasibility of a western light rail extension across Route 440, the Board adopted a Locally Preferred Alternative and authorized its submission to the North Jersey Transportation Authority (NJTPA) for designation and inclusion in the agency’s Long Range Regional Transportation Plan. The project must be included in the NJTPA’s Long Range Plan in order to be eligible for federal funding.

“A westward extension of the light rail from West Side Avenue would provide customers with ready access to light rail service from the busy Route 440 corridor,” said NJ TRANSIT Executive Director James Weinstein. “Today, customers in this area must access the light rail system via side streets.”

NJ TRANSIT began the alternatives analysis in September 2009, marking the first step in the federal environmental process for an extension. Among the specific items evaluated were potential alignments, station planning, operational needs, cost estimates and integration with redevelopment.

Under the LPA, the project would include construction of a 0.7-mile, two-track extension of the light rail system from the existing West Side Avenue Station across Route 440 to the northern end of a redevelopment zone along the Hackensack Riverfront. The extension would be constructed entirely on an elevated viaduct and would include a new center-island platform station.

The new station would link the Jersey City waterfront and North Hudson to new residential, commercial and retail development the municipality is planning approximately one-half mile west of West Side Avenue Station.

Since opening 11 years ago, Hudson-Bergen Light Rail has driven economic development along its corridor, transforming underutilized tracts of land for productive use through the construction of mixed-use buildings, including office space and housing built near light rail stations.

About Hudson-Bergen Light Rail

Hudson-Bergen Light Rail provides more than 40,000 weekday trips between 24 stations in Bayonne, Jersey City, Hoboken, Weehawken, Union City and North Bergen. The system provides a vital link between waterfront destinations, NJ TRANSIT rail and bus routes, PATH trains and trans-Hudson ferry services.

The one-way adult fare on Hudson-Bergen Light Rail is $2.10. Discounted unlimited monthly passes are available for $64. Children, senior citizens and passengers with disabilities save 50 percent or more at all times. In addition, NJ TRANSIT customers holding a monthly or weekly rail pass, or a bus pass for two or more zones, can ride the system at no additional charge simply by displaying their pass.

Hudson-Bergen Light Rail opened in April 2000, connecting 12 stations along the first seven miles of the system—from 34th Street in Bayonne and West Side Avenue to Exchange Place. Later that year, additional stations were opened at Pavonia/Newport, Harborside Financial Center and Harsimus Cove.

In September 2002, NJ TRANSIT opened the Hoboken Terminal light rail station, providing intermodal connections to commuter rail, trans-Hudson ferry, PATH and bus service. The 22nd Street Station in Bayonne opened in November 2003, followed by the expansion of service north to 2nd Street and 9th Street in Hoboken and Lincoln Harbor in Weehawken in September 2004. NJ TRANSIT opened its northernmost stations—Tonnelle Avenue in North Bergen and Bergenline Avenue in Union City—in February 2006, which also marked the start of full service to Port Imperial Station in Weehawken.

In January 2011, NJ TRANSIT launched service on a one-mile extension from the previous southern terminus at 22nd Street to a new 8th Street Station in Bayonne.

About NJ TRANSIT

NJ TRANSIT is the nation's largest statewide public transportation system providing more than 895,000 weekday trips on 240 bus routes, three light rail lines and 12 commuter rail lines. It is the third largest transit system in the country with 165 rail stations, 60 light rail stations and more than 18,000 bus stops linking major points in New Jersey, New York and Philadelphia.

http://www.njtransit.com/tm/tm_servlet.srv?hdnPageAction=PressReleaseTo&PRESS_RELEASE_ID=2675

Marv95
May 17th, 2011, 12:08 PM
I like how they can find funding to extend the HBLR past 440 but can't find the funds to extend the NLR--or NCS--down to City Hall stopping at the PruCenter.

Nexis4Jersey
May 17th, 2011, 01:18 PM
I like how they can find funding to extend the HBLR past 440 but can't find the funds to extend the NLR--or NCS--down to City Hall stopping at the PruCenter.

Its Amazing how that happens isn't it , or the badly planned Bergen - Passaic LRT which would cost less but serve more.

Newarkguy
May 17th, 2011, 06:21 PM
Wealthy/business nj for the most part,has written off Newark. Newark with its reverse racist ghetto majority,constantly blocks development that may spur gentrification. Now that we have Mayor Booker,its a recession! I think Jersey City with its awsome skyline,path and tunnel connections,as well as substatial wealthy white and asian population is being prepared to take Newark's place as NJ's largest city by skyscraper housing density. Newark will be where they throw all the section 8 undesirables. A reservation for low income housing! Metro Homes (rip) and Cogswell gave up on Newark!!! This is why NERL was proposed before HBLR and yet NERL still does not exist,while HBLR is constantly expanding. One city dynamic,the other controlled by poverty pimps with a toothless mayor who hints he may not stay!

Nexis4Jersey
May 17th, 2011, 07:53 PM
Wealthy/business nj for the most part,has written off Newark. Newark with its reverse racist ghetto majority,constantly blocks development that may spur gentrification. Now that we have Mayor Booker,its a recession! I think Jersey City with its awsome skyline,path and tunnel connections,as well as substatial wealthy white and asian population is being prepared to take Newark's place as NJ's largest city by skyscraper housing density. Newark will be where they throw all the section 8 undesirables. A reservation for low income housing! Metro Homes (rip) and Cogswell gave up on Newark!!! This is why NERL was proposed before HBLR and yet NERL still does not exist,while HBLR is constantly expanding. One city dynamic,the other controlled by poverty pimps with a toothless mayor who hints he may not stay!

Well i hate to add race into this but the only white people who ride the HBLR are from Bayonne , you rarely see the Jersey City or Hoboken white people riding it....ikno the use the bus system more then LRT. So its amazing how many extensions this system is getting , mostly minorities ride it.... Off peak and Weekends the HBLR is the ghetto LRT , full of poor black and Hispanic kids who take it to Newport and do watever they do in the Mall. Jersey City is nice and all , but what about the Riverline , i guess NJT doesn't have enough $$$ for that promised West Trenton Extension or more sidings? What happened to the Bergen - Passaic LRT , there were several Developments banked on this line and Paterson was hopefully to revitalize the Eastern side. The Starter line with 8 stations would only cost 150 million $$$ , although Bergen County wants 6 more stations....so that cost could rise.... What happened to the New Brunswick LRT ? At this rate i think the state should allow private invest like Aussieland or Canada allows which gets more built and takes pressure of the Govt..... I think NJT only cares about the so called Majority that commutes to Midtown and NJ Gold Coast , while the rest of us suffer from congestion and neglected infrastructure.

ASchwarz
May 17th, 2011, 10:14 PM
Well i hate to add race into this but the only white people who ride the HBLR are from Bayonne , you rarely see the Jersey City or Hoboken white people riding it....ikno the use the bus system more then LRT.

That's not true at all. Plenty of white folks ride HBLR. I'm on it all the time, usually to and from Exchange Place, and it seems very white to me.

And what is all this nonsense from some forumers about race anyways? NJ Transit is a state agency. You really think they inject race into their funding discussions? LOL.

And these "conspiracy theorists" re. Newark, Blacks and Light Rail are too much. Newark Light rail has had significant expansion in recent years, so what's the explanation for that?

And the Newark Light Rail generally runs through Hispanic areas, not Black areas. Heck, it terminates in a white area, and not even in Newark city limits.

Nexis4Jersey
May 17th, 2011, 10:53 PM
That's not true at all. Plenty of white folks ride HBLR. I'm on it all the time, usually to and from Exchange Place, and it seems very white to me.

And what is all this nonsense from some forumers about race anyways? NJ Transit is a state agency. You really think they inject race into their funding discussions? LOL.

And these "conspiracy theorists" re. Newark, Blacks and Light Rail are too much. Newark Light rail has had significant expansion in recent years, so what's the explanation for that?

And the Newark Light Rail generally runs through Hispanic areas, not Black areas. Heck, it terminates in a white area, and not even in Newark city limits.

Actually off peak and anyone living in Jersey City could tell you....that HBLR is mainly used by ghetto thugs.... Idk , what i was trying to say......but i think race plays into the expansions / investments that NJT does.... The Newark LRT has only expanded twice since 2000 , but look at the HBLR its been expanded over 6 times....and more too come. Why not invest more in the Newark network? I think it does have to do with Race , or i could be over reacting? Although now that i look at it more it might have to with Wealth rather then Race , which explains the lack of planning / funding for the Bergen - Passaic LRT , or West Trenton Riverline extension.... And a ton of station upgrades to richer areas , but not poor or middle class areas.... I think NJT has to explain itself , since the Majority of its users are poor or Middle Class , but those 2 groups don't seem to be getting the expansions or upgrades.

Whats this Proposed Canal Crossing station on the HBLR between Liberty state Park and Danforth Ave?

Newarkguy
May 18th, 2011, 02:02 AM
:)My point was'nt that NJT wont build in minority areas, rather, NJT will build where they see an economic future. Where development is moving ahead.

As for Ashwarz's statement that NLR runs thryu Black and Hispanic areas...well, that's a consequence of white flight. Morris canal was transformed into the subway in 1930's Newark was 75% white. The entire route was white, consisting of Irish and Italian neighborhoods, especially Roseville. No conspiracy theory The anti white/gentrification neighborhood groups are just fact.

Some folks can be as Politically Correct and play innocent deny all you want. No resdential developments have sprung up along the NLR route after all these decades. It runs thru the central(University Heights) and west (lower Roseville)wards.

In fact Newark refused to extend the subway southward because of prejudice against Blacks already dominating old 3rd ward,the Clinton Avenue and Elizabeth ave. corridor.And this was in the 1930s.

Significant expansion? A 6 block extension is not a major expansion. NLRwas not expanded twice. Just once, in simultaneous phases Broad street 6 block extension as well as a new Bloomfield vehicle storage yard were built. NLR was extended only because there was no room in Newark for a light rail maintenance yard. We got lucky with theGrove street extension.

Sid
May 18th, 2011, 02:24 AM
This extension won't mean much if they don't reverse the service cuts from 2010. Service frequency on HBLR was never very good, but it's just terrible now, with each of the three routes only running every 30 minutes after 8PM on weekdays, and only two of the three routes running at all on weekends. They even reduced frequency on weekdays before 8PM.

Newarkguy
May 18th, 2011, 02:29 AM
Is this why they run as coupled pairs? Im used to seeing long HBLR trains(2 cars) ,but I've never seen a double car NLR trainset.

Marv95
May 18th, 2011, 12:53 PM
And these "conspiracy theorists" re. Newark, Blacks and Light Rail are too much. Newark Light rail has had significant expansion in recent years, so what's the explanation for that?
Under a half mile on street level dealing with traffic isn't what I call "significant expansion". It's been 5 years since the debut; why has nothing been built at any of these stations? Don't use the economy as an excuse; the market crashed in 08.

Nexis4Jersey
May 18th, 2011, 05:02 PM
I think if the Newark Light Rail connected to Wateseeing Ave station , then we would have see a massive Urban Renewal effort underway in Bloomfield , Northern part of Newark.... I think its a shame they didn't extend it to Watsessing ave ,they missed a few big areas for redevelopment.

Marv95
May 18th, 2011, 05:09 PM
Well Branch Brook Commons was built a couple of years ago across from the station, some actually sold out: http://www.bbcommons.com/project.htm

66nexus
May 18th, 2011, 07:38 PM
Newark and JC's systems are apples and oranges. JC is denser and there is a lot more commuter traffic heading into NY. Newark has more of a regional connect w/ NY, JC's network ties it nearly directly to NY.
Newark and JC are just setup differently (in almost every imaginable way).

While buses aren't preferred, Newark is definitely covered.

Additionally, I can't imagine why development would 'spring up' along the NLR route given the fact that a significant portion of the route is already 'claimed'. I fail to see how this is a measure of success of the route. Why not look at ridership?

PS: the NLR coverinhg the North/Central wards I believe has nothing to do w/ race.

Newarkguy
May 18th, 2011, 09:20 PM
While most downtown stations on NLR/CITY SUBWAY serve colleges, there is opportunity for residential development around norfolk street station. With Central ave as a midrise residential w sidewalk retail corridor. If they could ever demolish the collapsed county jail that will chase any developer away.
Another area is around Orange street station, with Orange street as potential redevelopment corridor. Same for the track portion adjacent to the Branch Brook Park in Upper Roseville, and Silver Lake area shared between Newark and Belleville.

66nexus
May 19th, 2011, 01:26 PM
There is certainly room for some development, but I think the track around the dorms on/near central ave would still most likely involve the colleges because some of those areas just aren't as desirable for standalone development. If they can get the colleges on board, I think that will bring the area up a little more (the way it did slightly when they built Univ Cent)

JCMAN320
August 9th, 2011, 03:36 AM
NJ TRANSIT ADVANCES PENNSAUKEN TRANSIT CENTER PROJECT
Intermodal facility will directly link River Line and Atlantic City Rail Line customers for the first time

July 13, 2011
NJT-11-032

NEWARK, NJ — A project that will create a direct link between River Line light rail and Atlantic City Rail Line (ACRL) service advanced today, as the NJ TRANSIT Board of Directors approved construction of the second and final phase of the Pennsauken Transit Center, which will offer convenience and new travel options to South Jersey customers when completed.

“By connecting South Jersey’s two rail lines, this new facility will expand the reach of these individual services, providing customers with convenient access to a much broader array of travel destinations,” said Transportation Commissioner and NJ TRANSIT Board Chairman James Simpson.

The Board authorized a $13.8 million contract with Terminal Construction Corporation of Wood-Ridge, NJ, for construction of Phase II of the Pennsauken Transit Center, including platforms, a parking lot, drainage improvements and customer amenities.

“The Pennsauken Transit Center will make the State’s rail and light rail service an even more attractive travel option for southern New Jersey residents,” said NJ TRANSIT Executive Director James Weinstein. “In addition, the new facility will enhance the interconnectivity of the overall NJ TRANSIT system, as customers may connect from the River Line in Trenton to Northeast Corridor rail service to New York and points in between.”

The transit center is being built in two phases along Derousse Avenue where the ACRL crosses above River Line tracks.

Phase I, which broke ground in October 2009 and is currently underway, covers River Line elements of the project, including construction of a 200-foot platform with 60-foot canopy to protect customers boarding light rail trains. The work is being performed under a separate $2.1 million contract awarded to Northeast Remsco, Inc., of Farmingdale, NJ, with ARORA and Associates, PC, of Lawrenceville, NJ, providing design services. The contract also includes installation of infrastructure and conduit for communications, security and ticket vending machines, grading, drainage, lighting and public art.

In Phase II, two 300-foot-long, high-level platforms will be built on either side of the elevated ACRL tracks, with a 100-foot canopy on each platform. Two sets of stairs will be constructed, as well as two elevators to provide access to customers with disabilities. The second phase also includes construction of a 280-space parking lot, a dedicated bus drop-off/pick-up area, drainage improvements, installation of a passenger communication system and a restroom facility, as well as resurfacing, curbing and lighting improvements to Derousse Avenue.

The approximately $32 million Pennsauken Transit Center will create or sustain hundreds of jobs and will for the first time provide thousands of customers with direct transfers and access to all stations on both lines.

The new facility will provide Atlantic City Rail Line customers with direct access to the River Line, with connections in Camden to PATCO rail and NJ TRANSIT bus service to Philadelphia, and in Trenton to NJ TRANSIT Northeast Corridor rail service to New York. River Line customers will gain direct access to Atlantic City, Philadelphia and all intermediate ACRL stations.

Construction of the overall project is expected to be completed in late 2012 and open for service in early 2013.



About NJ TRANSIT

NJ TRANSIT is the nation's largest statewide public transportation system providing more than 895,000 weekday trips on 240 bus routes, three light rail lines and 12 commuter rail lines. It is the third largest transit system in the country with 165 rail stations, 60 light rail stations and more than 18,000 bus stops linking major points in New Jersey, New York and Philadelphia.

http://www.njtransit.com/tm/tm_servlet.srv?hdnPageAction=PressReleaseTo&PRESS_RELEASE_ID=2691

Merry
February 8th, 2012, 01:24 AM
High Line Hopes in Jersey City

By HEATHER HADDON

http://si.wsj.net/public/resources/images/NY-BL733_JCHIGH_G_20120206170716.jpg
A rendering of a potential plan for the Sixth Street Embankment in
Jersey City has walkways and bike paths. [Roman Pohorecki]

After a seemingly endless legal battle, Jersey City is on the verge of getting its own version of Manhattan's High Line.

An abandoned elevated railway known as the Sixth Street Embankment has been the subject of a litigious preservation effort for more than a decade. Local groups and city officials want to transform the half-a-mile long stone structure into a grassy, landscaped park with skyline views, spanning Jersey City's gentrifying neighborhoods.
The park is also envisioned as an important link in a greenway spanning the East Coast.

Now, after a federal judge ruled against a developer blocking the park, a settlement that would hand control of the railway to Jersey City has been drafted and is awaiting approval.

"This has been an epic legal struggle," said William Matsikoudis, the Jersey City municipal attorney, who estimated the city has spent more than $500,000 in legal fees on the battle. "We're one step away from a settlement that will provide a world-class amenity for the people for Jersey City."

http://si.wsj.net/public/resources/images/NY-BL734_NYJCHI_G_20120206180617.jpg

So far, the settlement has been tentatively approved by two of the three main litigants: Jersey City officials and Steve Hyman, a Manhattan investor who purchased the embankment from Consolidated Rail Corp. for $3 million in 2003 to knock it down and build housing. The city sued Conrail for making the sale, and Mr. Hyman, in turn, sued the city.

Under the terms of the settlement, the city would pay Mr. Hyman $7 million and Conrail would chip in $13 million to settle all the pending litigation, according to people familiar with the matter. Conrail would get development rights along the edges of the embankment, which could yield at least 300 housing units potentially valued at $10.5 million, other people familiar with the matter said.
The Jersey City Council is set to vote on the settlement Wednesday, and it appears likely to pass, said Councilman Steven Fulop, a project proponent.

The last remaining obstacle is Conrail, which is still examining the deal and wants a "number of open items" addressed, said Kevin Coakley, a partner at Connell Foley, who is representing the company. He wouldn't elaborate. "Conrail is hopeful a settlement can be achieved," he said.

Mr. Hyman, who has spent millions of dollars on the court cases, has signed the settlement, said one of his attorneys, Daniel Horgan. "Everybody wants it over with," said Mr. Horgan. "We would like everybody else to sign on it."

Even with Conrail's approval, the Jersey City version of the High Line may be a long way from reality. Initial construction could begin next year, Mr. Matsikoudis said, but designs haven't been finalized for the 110-year-old structure, formally known as the Harsimus Stem Embankment. The city would likely hold a design competition.

Still, hopes are high. It is "equal to or better than New York's High Line," said city Mayor Jerramiah Healy in a statement.

The sandstone-and-granite structure rises to 27 feet at its highest point and once carried Pennsylvania Railroad freight trains along seven tracks to the Hudson River waterfront. Conrail took over the embankment in the 1970s, but rail traffic ceased and nature took over. Ivy covers the walls and the structure is now a regular way station for monarch butterflies migrating from Canada to Mexico.

Early ideas to transform it into a park include landscaping the trees and plants already growing on top. A meandering walking trail and a bike path are possibilities along the 100-foot wide embankment, which is wider than the High Line, said Stephen Gucciardo, president of the Embankment Preservation Coalition, a volunteer group formed to save the historic relic.

Advocates want a "grand entrance" to the park's eastern section, while the western section would return to ground level and connect to the Bergen Arches, a railroad tunnel that runs through the Palisades.

The abandoned tunnel feels remote despite the highways and development around it, said Mr. Gucciardo. "It's like coming upon some kind of Mayan temple that has been overgrown. It's lost in time," he said.

The dream for advocates is to connect the embankment to the 2,600-mile East Coast Greenway, a trail that is under development from Maine to Florida. In New Jersey, 20% of the 93-mile trail is complete, said Rails to Trails, an advocacy group that promotes trails along railways.

The saga over the Sixth Street Embankment began in 1998, when former Jersey City Mayor Bret Schundler decided to knock it down for housing.

There was an outcry from residents, who in 1999 succeeded in getting the embankment added to the State Register of Historic Places. The City Council voted in 2004 to take it over for a 6.5-acre park by eminent domain.

The city sued Conrail in 2005 for selling the land to Mr. Hyman, who then filed a dozen separate suits over myriad issues involving the land.

Settlement negotiations got a shot in the arm Friday when the U.S. Court of Appeals rejected Mr. Hyman's case and backed the city.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970204136404577207602302461274.html

Hamilton
February 25th, 2012, 01:12 PM
^^^That's bad news. Parks are nice, but Jersey City needs housing and it needs transit. A park is basically the least efficient use of this land.

ASchwarz
February 25th, 2012, 08:50 PM
^^^That's bad news. Parks are nice, but Jersey City needs housing and it needs transit. A park is basically the least efficient use of this land.

I agree. Bad move by JC. It needs more density and transit. Doesn't need more open space.

And you can't just replicate the High Line. High Line works because it's in a hyper-desirable neighborhood, and received hundreds of millions in donations and govt. cash.

At least the air rights can be transferred for nearby development, so Jersey City hasn't totally blocked new construction. You'll still see growth along the viaduct.

macmini
February 25th, 2012, 08:56 PM
^^^That's bad news. Parks are nice, but Jersey City needs housing and it needs transit. A park is basically the least efficient use of this land.

JC has plenty of transit and there are one to many undeveloped lots that are being used as parking downtown to use this space for housing.

Nexis4Jersey
February 25th, 2012, 10:30 PM
JC has plenty of transit and there are one to many undeveloped lots that are being used as parking downtown to use this space for housing.

It needs more East - West Routes , the PATH is already at capacity during rush hr...

JCMAN320
February 26th, 2012, 12:20 PM
I consider the brownstone neighborhoods of Hasimus Cove and Hamilton Park very desirable.

There was an earlier proposal by the City to have the HBLR turn west and go along part of 6th St, similar to Essex St, below the Embankment then up into the Bergen Arches out to Secaucus Jct. iDK what happened to that; now it will be just the park it seems like.

I'm thrilled with JC having our own High Line, but I felt the combined proposal was the best option.

Nexis4Jersey
April 4th, 2012, 12:23 AM
The RiverLINE

Delanco

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7235/6884955338_ec7eee3615_b.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/42178139@N06/6884955338/)
DSCN2922 (http://www.flickr.com/photos/42178139@N06/6884955338/) by Nexis4Jersey09 (http://www.flickr.com/people/42178139@N06/), on Flickr

Rancocas Creek Bridge

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7037/7031055153_347934d961_b.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/42178139@N06/7031055153/)
DSCN2974 (http://www.flickr.com/photos/42178139@N06/7031055153/) by Nexis4Jersey09 (http://www.flickr.com/people/42178139@N06/), on Flickr

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7101/6884969988_3bbeef7fbe_b.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/42178139@N06/6884969988/)
DSCN3044 (http://www.flickr.com/photos/42178139@N06/6884969988/) by Nexis4Jersey09 (http://www.flickr.com/people/42178139@N06/), on Flickr

Riverside

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7248/7031061125_bc67241560_b.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/42178139@N06/7031061125/)
DSCN3034 (http://www.flickr.com/photos/42178139@N06/7031061125/) by Nexis4Jersey09 (http://www.flickr.com/people/42178139@N06/), on Flickr

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7207/7031061149_3d8139cc50_b.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/42178139@N06/7031061149/)
DSCN3035 (http://www.flickr.com/photos/42178139@N06/7031061149/) by Nexis4Jersey09 (http://www.flickr.com/people/42178139@N06/), on Flickr

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7203/7031064769_1444a7ca79_b.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/42178139@N06/7031064769/)
DSCN3041 (http://www.flickr.com/photos/42178139@N06/7031064769/) by Nexis4Jersey09 (http://www.flickr.com/people/42178139@N06/), on Flickr


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R-qNFM6EAIo