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Edward
October 3rd, 2004, 07:49 PM
This will be a sticky thread about New York Restaurants


New Restaurants
Per Se, Cafe Gray

Top Picks in Midtown
Alain Ducasse, Jean Georges, Masa, Per Se, Asiate, Aquavit, Atelier, Judson Grill, Le Bernardin, Town, L'Impero, Le Cirque 2000, Oceana, Olica, Sushi Yasuda

Top Picks in TriBeCa/SoHo/Village
Babbo, Spice Market, Gotham Bar & Grill, Bouley, Chanterelle, Danube, Fiamma Osteria, Honmura An, Next Door Nobu, Nobu

Dining with a View
Per Se, The View, Tavern on the Green, Rainbow Room, Nirvana, Terrace in the Sky

Waterfront Dining
River Cafe, Water's Edge, The Water Club

Pages on Wired New York
New York Restaurants (http://www.wirednewyork.com/restaurants/) page
Time Warner Center restaurants (http://www.wirednewyork.com/aol/time_warner_restaurants.htm) page
New York City Burgers (http://forums.wirednewyork.com/viewtopic.php?t=110) thread
New York PIZZA - What's the best? (http://forums.wirednewyork.com/viewtopic.php?t=77) thread
The very best restaurants (http://forums.wirednewyork.com/viewtopic.php?t=3128) thread
New York bagels (http://forums.wirednewyork.com/viewtopic.php?t=2219) thread

Websites
NY Metro (http://www.nymetro.com/restaurants/)
Citysearch (http://newyork.citysearch.com/section/restaurants/)
New York Times (http://www.nytimes.com/pages/dining/)
MenuPages (http://www.menupages.com/)
Delivery (http://www.delivery.com/)

Gulcrapek
October 3rd, 2004, 10:02 PM
La Villa Park Slope - very very very good Italian food. My sister works there summers and around Christmas and I've been there many times, not a less than great meal once.

http://www.addyourown.com/restaurant.php?rest_id=199&cat_id=1&city_id=2

BTW about the "bad service" comment: most likely attributable to a waitress who used to work there and liked pot a little too much. She's been gone for a while now.

TonyO
October 3rd, 2004, 10:35 PM
A good selection of restaurants can be booked for free online at

www.opentable.com

alejo
October 7th, 2004, 10:12 PM
if you would like to try something different, go to caracas arepa bar, on 7th street between 1st and avenue A, venezuelan food and a very special ambiance, you will feel that everybody there are friends with each other, and it's kinda of that.

ryan
October 26th, 2004, 09:18 PM
A bit more affordable than Nobu(!) is Red Bamboo (http://www.redbamboo-nyc.com/index.html), an excellent and stylish vegetarian/vegan place on West 4th at 6th Ave. It's tiny and crowded, but so new york, plus the food and service are really good. The site links to dragonfly, which has the same owners and is a good option for groups with veggies and carnivores... I also recommend walking down Cornelia Street in the West Village and just stopping in whatever spot looks most welcoming.

Also not to be missed is Rice to Riches (http://www.ricetoriches.com).

Hof
December 9th, 2004, 04:24 PM
The Upper West Side has a million good restaurants,especially along Columbus near the Museums.Try Lenny's for good Deli fare.Their sandwiches have recently shrunk,but they are still very original and very good.
McAleer's Pub on Amsterdam (bet.79th and 80th) features a British/Irish menu,sidewalk dining and authentic pub ambience,along with the omnipresent owner who is pure NY.Say the right things,make him laugh,he buys you a pint.
Right next door is a terrific Japanese place,whose name escapes me,but if you found McAleer's you've found the Japanese place as well.
Further West,The Manhattan Diner (B'way at 77th) serves humungous portions of excellent food at really cheap prices.I can't figure out how they stay in business,their prices are so low.Their menu is as big as the phone book.Ocassionally,I wake up from a dead sleep craving their cheesecake.
And there is always--at least before 10PM--Zabar's.Ocassionally,I wake up craving the entire store.
UWS is an untapped resource,foodwise.

thatshott
December 15th, 2004, 06:18 PM
I really like Citrella. Plus, if you catch them at the right time on Saturday - I 've run into several members of the Saturday Night Live cast and the people who are hosting for that week.

lightningboy
February 22nd, 2005, 07:32 PM
Blue Water Grill in Union Sq. was quite delightful. And correct me if I'm wrong but I think it's called La Spaghettori in The Villiage? Either way, MUCH better spaghetti and meatballs than down here in Ft.Lauderdale. Delicious. Must be the water.

fcombs
February 24th, 2005, 02:31 AM
I had heard and read that the Rainbow Room had closed. Is it still closed, or has it reopened? I don't care about eating there, but it's such a nice place to go and have a drink and end an evening out.

Thanks,

Faye

sunman
February 24th, 2005, 12:32 PM
Saw two restaurants on the list and wanted to share my experiences there.

The View -- not a bad view and could be entertaining to rotate. Rotation is slow and doesn't really bother much. Food there is attrocious. It is perhaps one of the worst places I ever dined in. Got ice cream for desert, it seemed to be straight from a freezer -- w/ little chunks of ice. No free water. You can buy sparkling or spring water for like $10/bottle. Our waiter was arrogant...unpleasant experience.

Tavern on the Green -- didn't like this place either. It is so overrated! Feels that it is alive only because of its reputation. Food is really good, though; but not extraordinary. Waiters are ok, but not really welcoming. I got a feeling that staff there looks down on people.
I could not possibly imagine that when I ordered tea for $4/cup I would get a brisk tea packet and a cup of hot water. I wasn't even given selection of teas! I expected a leaf tea from such a place...

sunman
February 24th, 2005, 12:35 PM
Also not to be missed is Rice to Riches (http://www.ricetoriches.com).

Rice to Riches is great. A bit pricey, but great nonetheless.

TonyO
March 3rd, 2005, 03:34 PM
NYTimes
March 2, 2005

In New York, the World Is Brought to Your Door

By ERIC ASIMOV

YOU can see them in any kind of weather and at almost any time of day. On bicycles that look sturdy enough to withstand a collision with a tank, the seats often wrapped in old plastic bags, they surge ahead through snow and rain, heat and, yes, especially gloom of night. No marble carving will ever exalt their heroic efforts, yet they are fixtures of almost any residential neighborhood in New York City. They deliver dinner, and sometimes lunch and breakfast, too. Yet within the reinforced bags dangling from their handlebars, the prepared dishes in their plastic, microwave-proof containers convey far more than a meal. They speak of the evolving stew of cultures that simmers throughout the five boroughs. They speak of the typical New Yorker's contradictory character: brash but overworked, stoic but requiring rewards, impatient but willing to wait. Most of all they embody what many New Yorkers regard as an inalienable right: to have meals of almost any conceivable sort delivered to their door, hot, fragrant and appetizing.

Each night tens of thousands of meals flow through the city's arteries. Chinese and pizza, of course, but also Indian, Thai, Turkish, French, Mexican, sushi - you name it, and it's delivered. Even some higher-end restaurants are beginning to deliver. When Marc Murphy opened Landmarc in TriBeCa early last year, he did not offer delivery. But Mr. Murphy soon found that his customers yearned for it, especially those with children.

"I'm a fan of people coming to a restaurant and having a meal, but I've come to terms with that," he said. "These people work all day, and

they pay a baby sitter, and they're not going to come home and then

go out to dinner."

Judging by the volume of menus crammed into kitchen drawers around the city, it may seem as if delivery food were as old a feature of New York as the Brooklyn Bridge. But it's a relatively recent phenomenon, becoming a significant part of the restaurant business only in the last 20 years or so.

"Chinese Food Places Vying on Delivery" was the headline for an article in The New York Times in 1983, in which the writer, Fred Ferretti, noted the increase in small Chinese restaurants around town, many promising speedy home delivery for the first time. "Takeout menus are stuffed into apartment-house mailboxes, piled on lobby furniture, thrown in heaps on lobby floors or shoved under doors," he reported. "The menus are elaborate, and they urge you to telephone for your instant banquet."

Why then? Back in the 1960's and early 70's Chinese restaurants like Uncle Tai's, David K's and Shun Lee Palace were popular Midtown destinations. But the economic crisis of the late 70's took its toll, and restaurateurs with fewer resources opened uptown in less expensive residential neighborhoods. "That's when delivery took off," said Michael Tong, whose Shun Lee Palace is the sole Midtown survivor of that glossier era.

Mr. Tong was against takeout food at first, feeling that he could not match the quality of what he served in the restaurant. But eventually he gave in. Now, he said, he does 500 delivery meals a night alone from Shun Lee West, his restaurant near Lincoln Center. "I have 15 people, a team, just working on delivery," he said.

New York's infatuation with home delivery parallels takeout's growth throughout the country in the last 25 years, yet receiving a superb southern Indian eggplant and ginger dish at your door conveys a different sense of citizenship than does driving to the nearest Boston Market to pick up a chicken.

New York's population density, particularly in Manhattan, makes it especially conducive to delivery. Harry Balzer, vice president of the NPD Group, a consumer research company based in Port Washington, N.Y., said that in 2004 residents of the New York region were almost 30 percent more likely to eat a takeout meal than people elsewhere. About 49 percent of restaurant meals sold in the New York area were takeout, as opposed to 38 percent in other places.

New York City kitchens are often not inviting places to cook, but lack of space is not the only reason for the rise of carryout, and it does not account for the national increase.

A more persuasive case can be made that the rise in takeout meals is a response to the numbers of women entering the work force since the 1960's. According to the Federal Bureau of Labor Statistics, the percentage of women in the civilian labor force rose to 56.3 in 2002 from 40.8 in 1970, an increase of about 38 percent. That leaves far fewer people with the time and energy to prepare the evening meal.

The 49 percent carryout figure for restaurant meals in the New York region does not separate the city from its suburbs, nor does it differentiate delivery meals from carryout meals, in which consumers take prepared meals away from restaurants, delis, groceries and the like. In the suburbs, or in sprawling cities like, say, Phoenix or Albuquerque, people think nothing of driving a few miles to pick up dinner.

"I think it's fair to say that New Yorkers use delivery more," Mr. Balzer said.

Delivery was at first the province almost exclusively of Chinese and pizza places, but soon small neighborhood restaurants of almost every ethnicity got in on the act, recognizing the need to compete.

In 1981, when Vijay Gupta opened Mughlai, an Indian restaurant on Columbus Avenue and 75th Street, delivery was not a consideration. He began delivery about a decade ago, he said, and it has skyrocketed in the last three or four years. "I think it has tripled," he said. "Now, 30 to 35 percent of my business is delivery."

Many restaurants, particularly those that opened without delivery in mind, have trouble nowadays keeping up with the demand. Delivery requires space for packing the meals, and people dedicated to the job. It means room for storing containers and the myriad condiments and cutlery that gets shoved into the bag.

"We could have much more business, but the kitchen is too small," said Gennaro Picone, who owns an Italian restaurant, Gennaro, on the Upper West Side. Mr. Picone has come to embrace delivery, but when he opened in 1997, he believed the service could give people the wrong idea about his restaurant. "Doing delivery was kind of like, you degrade your place," he said.

Perception is still an issue. Many restaurants do not want to take the chance that they will be judged on food that has sat in plastic containers for however long it takes to travel from kitchen to dining table. Others do not need the business. Those who live near Grocery, a small restaurant in Carroll Gardens, Brooklyn, ache for the day it begins delivery, but Charles Kiely and Sharon Pachter, the chefs and owners, say they have plenty of business already. So does Nice Matin on the Upper West Side.

Though most menu drawers are nonetheless still crammed to overflowing, those menus may one day go the way of the rotary phone. Web sites like www.menupages.com offer a tidier alternative, and new Web services are coming along with the hope of turning ordering into an online operation. SeamlessWeb, which has developed a business for corporate clients that allows them to order meals online, is poised this month to begin a residential service at www.seamlessweb.com. The company says it will allow consumers to order online directly from more than 600 restaurants. The virtual menu may point to a future of virtual restaurants, those constructed for the sole purpose of offering delivery service, without a storefront.

Mr. Murphy, of Landmarc in TriBeCa, said his focus has to be on the customers who actually come to his restaurant, but that he is trying to improve his delivery service. He said he now has one employee dedicated to taking orders and making sure everything is packed correctly. He sends his own house-made vanilla caramels with each order. And now, Mr. Murphy said, he is in pursuit of delivery's holy grail, the one tool that nobody has been able to get right.

"We're trying to find the right containers for delivering ice cream."

TLOZ Link5
March 3rd, 2005, 06:34 PM
I would like to recommend Ruby Foo's, one location of which I know of is 77th and Broadway. Great Pan-Asian cuisine with some "fusion" influences (try the calamari with the Thai peanut dipping sauce), wacky decor which includes Asian objets d'art (Chinese fans, Japanese noh masks, even some weapons), gregarious and competant wait staff. I think there's a location in Times Square, but it might be more expensive than the one on the Upper West Side. My sister loves this place so much that she tried to give it up for Lent...but didn't succeed.

Vikas Khanna
March 4th, 2005, 04:01 PM
Which other city can compare to New York when it comes to Restaurnats. The Quality, Price, Range, Standard, Creativity, Star Chefs and most Important the Diversification.
Bon Appetit! New York Style.

BrooklynRider
March 11th, 2005, 12:54 PM
A couple of great places for Home Cookin' / BBQ: Virgils, Blue Smoke (Higher End) Acme, Cowgirls Hall of Fame (Midrange) The Hog Pit (Lower End)

All excellent food!

MidnightRambler
March 11th, 2005, 06:51 PM
i just recently moved to new york for college and i'm on a really tight budget... does anyone know some good, inexpensive italian or chinese restaurants in greenwich village... specifically around 6th ave and 8th st?

nyc10
March 12th, 2005, 02:49 PM
How many restaurants are at that famous store?

Schadenfrau
March 14th, 2005, 01:20 PM
Midnight Rambler, there are some really great, cheap Italian places in the East Village. Creme Caffe on 2nd Avenue comes to mind.

kmistic
March 20th, 2005, 11:19 AM
any suggestions on places within walking distance to the new yorker hotel?

red screw
March 20th, 2005, 07:58 PM
I've got a trip to NYC a week Thursday for my girlfriends 30th and we're staying at the Wellington at 42nd.I'd love to know where I can I can go with her for an evening meal on her birthday,which is a Monday.Mid price range is the best for me but any suggestions would be good.Many thanks

TLOZ Link5
March 20th, 2005, 09:29 PM
nyc10: Macy's has a couple of eating places, particularly the Cellar Bar & Grill and the Cucina & Co. cafeteria, both of which are quite good.

kmistic: The New Yorker has three restaurants: La Vigna (Northern Italian), the Tick Tock Diner (24-hour diner), and the Café New Yorker (breakfast, lunch, espresso bar). There's a wealth of good, popular but moderately-priced restaurants along Ninth Avenue, one block to the west.

red screw: Best thing about the Wellington is location, location, location. There are two restaurants in-building that have gotten good reviews. The Wellington is partially refurbished, so you might get stuck with an unrenovated guest room; but the staff is for the most part reliable.

kmistic
March 21st, 2005, 09:50 AM
Sounds Great! We are celebrating our marriage so we want to have a nice meal. Perhaps i should have mentioned that in the first post. anyway, any suggestions on 9th ave. Btw, itialian food is our favorite, but we would like to leave the hotel.

TLOZ Link5
March 21st, 2005, 05:52 PM
Pietrasanta, Ninth Avenue and 47th Street, is very good. Not too pricey, especially for the Theater District. It's definitely crowded before showtime, so try and get reservations.

BrooklynRider
March 21st, 2005, 06:47 PM
any suggestions on places within walking distance to the new yorker hotel?

Hmmm - In my opinion, that's not a great location. There's a good steakhouse right across the street on 33rd at the base of Madison Square Garden. Niles used to be pretty good on 7th Ave at 30th Street. Keans Chophouse on 36th & 6th (a great 19th century Steakhouse - expensive). For burgers & beer, Mustang Sally's on 7th and 30th As well. You can walk down 8th Ave below 23rd Street and find lots of excellent places in Chelsea. Or, head up to Ninth Ave above 42nd Street for a nice selection of restaurants. Both 8th Ave in Chelsea & 9th Avew above 42nd offer a huge selection of restaurants in all prices ranges and cuisines. Also, Korea Town is on 32nd Street between Broadway & 5th for great Asian food & sushi.

BrooklynRider
March 21st, 2005, 06:58 PM
i just recently moved to new york for college and i'm on a really tight budget... does anyone know some good, inexpensive italian or chinese restaurants in greenwich village... specifically around 6th ave and 8th st?

There's a little Italian place called Piadina on West 10th Street off of Sixth Ave (east side of Sixth). Wonderful food & wonderful ambiance. The owner is prone to pour free wine too!

Good chinese - you can try Sammy's Noodles on 10th Street & Sixth Ave (west side of Sixth). Not too expensive.

If these are still too expensive, let us know and we redirect you.

BrooklynRider
March 21st, 2005, 07:00 PM
I've got a trip to NYC a week Thursday for my girlfriends 30th and we're staying at the Wellington at 42nd.I'd love to know where I can I can go with her for an evening meal on her birthday,which is a Monday.Mid price range is the best for me but any suggestions would be good.Many thanks

Any particular kind of food?

kmistic
March 21st, 2005, 07:01 PM
the menu at Pietrasanta looks great! thanks

BrooklynRider
March 21st, 2005, 07:03 PM
Sounds Great! We are celebrating our marriage so we want to have a nice meal. Perhaps i should have mentioned that in the first post. anyway, any suggestions on 9th ave. Btw, itialian food is our favorite, but we would like to leave the hotel.

I could recommend Cara Mia. I went there went it first opened and it was GREAT. Reasonably priced. It's on the east side of Ninth Ave up by 48th (I'm pretty sure). It has a red awning. Make reservations if you go.

kmistic
March 21st, 2005, 09:40 PM
hmm, that looks good too. Thanks BrooklynRider.

Loaded
April 5th, 2005, 12:06 PM
There's a restaurant on the upper west side caleld Fred's I think. It's named after a guide dog - they have great steaks.


Also McAleers is a great Pub / restaurant, had many a great meal in there last time I was over in NYC.

lotus71
June 3rd, 2005, 10:51 PM
an awesome restaurants in the upper east can be found at http://www.nyresidents.com

It's a site for new york residents but some great recommendations for NY newbies/visitors.

Most restaurants are located around normandie court.

Train Driver
June 15th, 2005, 10:46 AM
Well worth a visit is the 21 Club (http://www.21club.com/) on West 52nd.

Most people think its a private club but its just a regular restaurant with a great pedigree. Its appeared in loads of films from The Sweet Smell of Success to One Fine Day. They even used it for a scene for Sex in the City.

Originally a speakeasy it has a secret wine cellar hidden behind a wall that has a secret mechanism to open - now its a private dining room which is just wild.

The Bar Room restaurant is the place to eat with a ceiling covered in all sorts of toys and crazy things.

The food is really terrific and not cheap, but if you go for lunch or the early evening dining menu its really affordable and a great experience. Even if you don't fancy dinner its worth popping in for drinks at the bar.

NewYorkYankee
July 10th, 2005, 08:39 PM
Does anyone know any good restaurants near the Roosevelt Hotel area? (45th and Madison) What is this area like? Shops, restaurants, NOISE, etc? We've never stayed in the middle of Midtown before.

NewYorkYankee
July 10th, 2005, 09:21 PM
It wasnt a joke, I like Starbucks. Thanks!

pianoman11686
July 11th, 2005, 12:08 AM
Does anyone know any good restaurants near the Roosevelt Hotel area? (45th and Madison) What is this area like? Shops, restaurants, NOISE, etc? We've never stayed in the middle of Midtown before.

Lots of retail, lots of noise, and lots of places to eat. If you like a good steakhouse, I've been to Morton's, which I believe is down the block or one block south. There's so many other places to eat, especially around Grand Central. Walk the streets and stumble into a place that looks good, that's the best approach.

pianoman11686
July 11th, 2005, 08:36 PM
I suggest getting a bagel for breakfast. Nothing is better than a fresh, warm New York bagel with cream cheese. Mmmmmmmm. I don't know where there's a bagel place in that neighborhood, but I know there a lot on the east side in the upper 40's and lower 50's. Ess-a-Bagel, I believe it's called, is on 51st and 1st. Voted Best New York Bagel at some point. Also, check this (http://newyork.citysearch.com/bestof/results/2)out.

viggor
July 24th, 2005, 04:51 PM
Hi to all,

soon I'm visiting great NYC, I'm staying in a hostel on the western side of Bowery, can some one recommend something cheap/decent place to eat breakfast and lunch. Budget for this trip is not so big, and prices in NYC are :D. so I need any help. thanks.

Edward
September 7th, 2005, 12:15 AM
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/09/07/dining/07openings.html
September 7, 2005
A Tasting Menu of Restaurants to Come
By FLORENCE FABRICANT

The meatpacking district is expanding. Hotel restaurants show tremendous vitality. There will be more sushi than ever. This is a snapshot of New York's new restaurant scene for this fall and beyond. The count of new restaurants is more than 60. Most are at new sites, not replacing failures, and they will add more than 5,000 seats to a city that already has at least a million.

Maybe because of that, just about everyone is playing it safe. French and Italian places are represented, but most of the food is contemporary market-driven American or Mediterranean, often wine-friendly, wood-grilled and perhaps touched with French, Asian or Italian sensibilities. Greek restaurants are in play, and of course steakhouses are on the list. Charlie Trotter will offer seafood at the Time Warner Center. Banking on the appetite for huge Japanese restaurants are Ninja, Morimoto and a second Megu.

Sirio Maccioni's soap-operatic move of Le Cirque from the New York Palace notwithstanding, hotels all around Manhattan are still fertile ground for dining. "The hotel has to support the restaurant, you get a much longer lease, and with rooms upstairs you have some guaranteed clients," said Geoffrey Zakarian, who is complementing Town in the Chambers with Country in the Carlton. Kurt Gutenbrunner has opened Thor in the Rivington on the Lower East Side. By spring the renowned chefs Joël Robuchon of France and Gordon Ramsay of England should be in hotels here.

But the focus remains on the meatpacking district, last year's hot destination. Like a thick, juicy steak too big for the plate, it is seeping west and north, along 10th Avenue. Del Posto, which may replace Babbo as the flagship in the Batali-Bastianich empire, is one of seven new restaurants there. But Sascha Lyon, one of the new players, is not concerned. "It's fantastic," he said. "A hundred years ago some newspaper wrote about the Gansevoort Market and the intense energy in the neighborhood. That's what this area was always about. The more the merrier."
Sooner Rather Than Later

The following restaurants are scheduled to open in the next few weeks.

Cafe B With Bruno Jamais, the owner of Bruno Jamais Restaurant and Supper Club, as a new partner, the owners of Barbalùc have renamed their restaurant, dressed it up and hired Matteo Siliberti from Milan to prepare Mediterranean dishes: 135 East 65th Street, (212) 774-1999.

Cercle Rouge David Féau, who was the last chef at Lutèce, will open his own boutique restaurant with a raw bar and a French bistro menu that also offers the chef's interpretation of New England clam chowder and chicken wings: 241 West Broadway (White Street), (212) 226-6252.

Cookshop Vicki Freeman and Marc Meyer of Five Points in NoHo are about to add their rustic seasonal American food to Chelsea, where a grill, a rotisserie and a wood-burning oven will flavor the ingredients: 156 10th Avenue (20th Street), (212) 924-4440.

Country If your idea of a country place is Versailles, then you will be right at home in Geoffrey Zakarian's balconied, silver-trimmed and ornamented dining room. David Rockwell's design was inspired by the 1907 Beaux-Arts décor of the Carlton hotel, once the Seville. The prix fixe menu of market-driven American fare will be served family style. Doug Psaltis, who worked for Alain Ducasse, is the chef: 90 Madison Avenue (29th Street), (212) 889-7100.

The Diner More heavy duty than the average diner, this new spot, with inventive retro food, is backed by Marc Packer (Tao and Bolzano) and was designed by Morris Nathanson (Bolzano): 44 Ninth Avenue (14th Street), (212) 627-2230.

D'Or Ahn This warmly modern 50-seat place owned by Lannie Ahn and serving Rachel Yang's Korean food is next to Tia Pol. It's the second spot on the block whose owner and chef are both women: 207 Tenth Avenue (22nd Street), (212) 627-7777.

Earl Monroe's Restaurant Riverbank State Park, overlooking the Hudson River, is the stunning setting for this spacious restaurant with a terrace. Christopher Faulkner, formerly the sous-chef at Town, will combine cuisines that are typical of Harlem and are long on seafood. The dining room becomes the Pearl Club for late-night jazz: Riverside Drive at 145th Street, (212) 491-1500.

Eat with Your Bear Hands Cafe This cafe in the Build-a-Bear Workshop store will welcome children, adults and stuffed animals with little hot dogs, chicken nuggets, sandwiches, salads and desserts: 565 Fifth Avenue (46th Street), (212) 871-7080 or (800) 560-2327.

Fatty Crab Adding another restaurant with Asian street food to the meatpacking district, Zak Pelaccio will be the chef at this 32-seat spot, named for one of his favorite places in Kuala Lumpur. He will remain in charge of 5 Ninth: 643 Hudson Street (Horatio Street), (212) 352-3590.

Ginger Michelle Jean, who set Butter in NoLIta in motion, is opening this Chinese restaurant emphasizing healthful recipes by James Marshall, formerly at China Grill: 1400 Fifth Avenue (116th Street), (212) 423-1111.

Jefferson Grill Simpson Wong has reopened with a menu of tasting plates to mix and match: 121 West 10th Street, (212) 255-3333.

Jimmy's Jimmy Carbone, the former owner of Patio Dining, is opening a pint-size rathskeller with hearty European food and beers on draft. He will do the cooking: 43 East 7th Street, (212) 982-3006.

Jovia A town house is the setting for Thalia and Stephen Loffredo's latest venture. Josh DeChellis of Sumile will create an American menu with an Italian accent: 135 East 62nd Street (no telephone yet).

Loft Part lounge, part Mediterranean, this fills a gap in a restaurant row that is becoming increasingly Mexican: 505 Columbus Avenue (84th Street), (212) 362-6440.

Mo Pitkin's House of Satisfaction This spot, which just opened, combines Latino and Jewish dishes, offers entertainment and might be worthy of attention for its manischevitini, a near-cosmopolitan made with Manischevitz wine instead of cranberry juice: 34 Avenue A (Second Street), (212) 777-5660, extension 21.

Ninja New York This $3.5 million Japanese newcomer has an executive chef, Michinobu Okamoto, leading a dozen chefs from Japan. The labyrinthine setting is designed to replicate a mountain village. Waiters in ninja garb will serve food that fuses Japanese with an international grab bag, some on tasting menus that go to $200: 25 Hudson Street (Duane Street), (212) 274-8500.

Rosa Mexicano The former America has been converted to the third Rosa Mexicano, the second with a water wall: 9 East 18th Street, (212) 533-3350 after Sept. 26.

Royal's Downtown Alex McWilliams will shop at the Greenmarket for his seasonal menu: 215 Union Street (Henry Street), (718) 923-9866.

Thor Kurt Gutenbrunner's food is not strictly Austrian at this restaurant, which has just opened in the Rivington Hotel, 107 Rivington Street (Ludlow Street), (646) 253-6700. Mr. Gutenbrunner is also expanding his services at the Neue Galerie on the Upper East Side, where he runs Café Sabarsky, adding Café Fledermaus on the lower level. It is to open in time for the gallery's Egon Schiele exhibit, which starts Oct. 21: 1048 Fifth Avenue (86th Street).
Later Rather Than Sooner

Restaurant owners have the best of intentions when they announce an opening date, but everything from Con Edison inspections, Landmark Commission approval, hiring and training staff members, even deciding on a name, can interfere. Most of the following will roll out later in the fall, but a few may not see customers until well into 2006.

Agata & Valentina's Food Bar Taking cafeteria dining to another level, this handsome room, originally a bank, will have at least six different food stations for food prepared to order, plus waiter service for drinks and desserts: 1513 First Avenue (79th Street).

American Masala Suvir Saran and Hemant Mathur, the chefs and owners of Devi, will open this spot for quick Indian food with an American accent, like ribbon fries with lamb burgers: 60 Pearl Street (Broad Street). Ammos Jack Trantides, who owns Ammos Estiatorio in Astoria, Queens, has joined Christos Christou to offer a Greek spot with seafood by the pound: 52 Vanderbilt Avenue (45th Street).

Artemis A Greek steakhouse is named for the goddess of hunting: Holiday Inn Martinique, 33rd Street and Broadway.

Barbounia A riff on the cooking of Greece and also of Italy, Croatia and Turkey will happen in a room with an open kitchen: 250 Park Avenue South (20th Street).

BG A dining room and bar overlooking Central Park will open on Bergdorf Goodman's seventh floor: 754 Fifth Avenue (58th Street).

Blue Ribbon Sushi Bar & Grill Bruce and Eric Bromberg will take their successful SoHo formula uptown to the West Park Hotel, which is being renovated by Jason Pomeranc, who developed 60 Thompson: 308 West 58th Street.

Bouchon Bakery Thomas Keller's bakery, cafe and wine bar on the third floor of the Time Warner Center, is to open early next year: Time Warner Center at Columbus Circle.

Buddakan For now, this pan-Asian import from Philadelphia has Angelo Sosa, formerly of Yumcha, consulting: 75 Ninth Avenue (16th Street).

Café d'Alsace With this uptown bistro, the restaurateur Simon Oren is moving from the South of France, where his Marseille and Nice Matin are rooted, and offering classics like choucroute garnie: 1695 Second Avenue (88th Street).

Andrew Carmellini Mr. Carmellini, the former chef at Café Boulud, will shift from French to Italian for this new 90-seater owned by MARC of London and designed by Tony Chi, with a generous outdoor patio. The name is a work in progress: 41 Madison Avenue (26th Street).

Centovini Nicola Marzovilla, an owner of I Trulli, and the owners of Moss will open a wine bar with casual food next door to Moss Gallery: 25 West Houston Street (Greene Street).

Charlie Trotter's The long-awaited New York debut of the renowned Chicago chef is not likely to occur before February, but a seafood venue is promised: Time Warner Center at Columbus Circle.

Chinatown Brasserie Josh Pickard, the owner of Time Cafe, is converting the cafe's generous space, including the downstairs that was Fez, into a Chinese restaurant. His partner is John McDonald, with whom he owns Lever House and Lure Fishbar: 380 Lafayette Street (Great Jones Street). Colors Restaurant Next month, former employees of Windows on the World will open an employee-owned restaurant (like René Pujol in the theater district), with an American menu infused with global influences and an international wine list, all in homage to the restaurant that was destroyed with the World Trade Center. The design will evoke the Art Deco period of the 1939 World's Fair: 417 Lafayette Street (Astor Place).

Craftsteak Tom Colicchio's steakhouse takes up residence where Frank's left off: 85 10th Avenue (16th Street).

Dani Don Pintabona is opening this Mediterranean place with Sicilian-accented food: 333 Hudson Street (King Street).

David Burke at Bloomingdale's David Burke, the chef and partner in David Burke and Donatella, will open a full-service coffee and wine bar with light food on one side of the store's new 59th Street entrance. On the other side will be takeout with a few seats for sandwiches, soups and desserts: Bloomingdale's, 59th Street between Lexington and Third Avenues.

Del Posto With a high-end classic Italian menu and Mark Ladner as chef, this collaboration between Mario Batali and the Bastianich family will have a luxurious dining room with balcony tables. The idea is old-school, fancy Italian dining. The rest of the 22,000 square feet of space will be a lower-level banquet hall and wine area. It will also have valet parking: 85 10th Avenue (16th Street).

Jean Denoyer Mr. Denoyer, a restaurateur, has not named his French brasserie, nor has he named a chef. But he does know the décor will be Art Deco: 35 Rockefeller Plaza (50th Street).

European Union Pan-European pub food by Anne Burrell, who worked with Mario Batali, will be served in a setting that includes an outdoor cafe: 235 East Fourth Street.

Gordon Ramsay The Michelin three-star chef from London is to open a restaurant and a cafe in the Rihga Royal hotel: 151 West 54th Street.

Iacopo Across the street from his restaurant, Falai, Iacopo Falai plans a bakery and cafe to showcase his original talents as pastry chef: 79 Clinton Street (Rivington Street).

Kellari Taverna Stavros Aktipis has taken over the Torre di Pisa space and will open a contemporary Greek place: 19 West 44th Street.

L'Atelier de Joël Robuchon at the Four Seasons This approximate copy of Mr. Robuchon's successful Paris restaurant will replace Fifty Seven Fifty Seven in the Four Seasons Hotel, with seating at a counter, where reservations are not necessary, and table service: 57 East 57th Street.

Le Cirque This restaurant, which has dropped "2000" from its name, will most likely open early in 2006. There will be a main dining room, a wine bar, a lounge and private dining on two levels in what is known as the Bloomberg building: 1 Beacon Court (58th Street and Lexington Avenue).

Maroons Harlem Arlene Weston, who owns Maroons in Chelsea, will take her blend of Southern and Jamaican food uptown to a spacious dining room designed by Glen Coben: 300 West 145th Street.

Megu at Trump World Tower A smaller version of the TriBeCa behemoth will have the requisite ice Buddha and a complex menu: 845 United Nations Plaza (47th Street).

Mint Former Devi and Café Spice chefs will provide a contemporary spin to curries, regional specialties from Goa and dishes from the tandoor: 150 East 50th Street.

Morimoto Stephen Starr and Masaharu Morimoto, an Iron Chef and former Nobu sushi master, are opening an elaborate restaurant, a branch of their place in Philadelphia: 88 10th Avenue (16th Street).

Noodle Bar The name tells it all in this spot that Quentin Danté, an owner of Yumcha, expects to be open in October, replacing a pizzeria with a soccer theme: 26 Carmine Street (Bleecker Street).

Pair of 8's A restaurant and wine bar with an emphasis on food and wine pairings, will have food by Bill Peet, formerly of Lutèce and Café des Artistes, in the kitchen: 568 Amsterdam Avenue (88th Street).

Palá Pizza All sorts of pizza technology is going into this place, which will pride itself on its crust and its Roman-style ingredients: 198 Allen Street (Stanton Street).

Parea Thank this Greek spot for Manhattan's first honey room, a Greek-style dessert and coffee bar with jars of preserved fruits and honeys on display. Before dessert there will be classics like souvlaki from a menu that emphasizes organic ingredients: 36 East 20th Street.

Peacock Alley This venerable restaurant is to reopen Nov. 1 with Cedric Tovar as executive chef. A $5.5 million facelift will not obliterate the room's Art Deco lines: Waldorf-Astoria hotel, Park Avenue at 50th Street.

Porcão This Rio-based churrascaria has an outpost in Miami. The name, in Portuguese, means big pig, but it's appropriately pronounced "poor cow." Hunks of meat sliced tableside reign: 360 Park Avenue (26th Street).

Sascha A working bakery with an emphasis on old-fashioned sweets, a cafe and fine dining upstairs are the parts being brought together by Sascha Lyon, formerly of Pastis. He plans New York food with ethnic touches suggestive of Eastern Europe. The site, a former packing house whose owners are Mr. Lyon's partners, retains much of its original structure, with new glass and ironwork detail: 55-61 Gansevoort Street (Ninth Avenue).

STK A steakhouse partner for One Little West Twelfth around the corner is to open this winter with Kersten Eggers, who worked with David Burke, interpreting steakhouse fare from across America: 26 Little West Twelfth Street (Ninth Avenue).

Telepan Bill Telepan, formerly of Judson Grill, will be opening a place of his own for market-fresh cooking: 72 West 69th Street.

Tocqueville This restaurant will move into more spacious and elegant digs a few doors west in November: 1 East 15th Street.

24 Prince A restaurant, cafe and lounge that expects to offer comfort food: 24 Prince Street (Mott Street).

Gab
September 18th, 2005, 04:37 PM
Who knows a nice buffet in NYC?

domp
September 22nd, 2005, 02:38 PM
any restaurants where its more fun like being able to cook your own pizza or meal or something like that??

Schadenfrau
September 22nd, 2005, 02:43 PM
Woo Lae Oak is a Korean restaurant with grills on the table.
http://www.woolaeoaksoho.com/html/index2.htm

As for the buffet question, New York isn't really a buffet kind of town.

TLOZ Link5
September 22nd, 2005, 03:21 PM
Cacio e Pepe, on Second Avenue between 11th and 12th Streets, is a Roman-style Italian restaurant. Interesting but tasty food, good service, and reasonable prices.

(Try the green tomato strudel with basil sorbet for dessert :D)

Gab
September 23rd, 2005, 01:18 PM
Is there an all you can eat buffet in NYC?

Schadenfrau
September 23rd, 2005, 03:35 PM
Yes, at the Hari Krishna ashram in Brooklyn.

What sort of food are you looking for, Gab? And why a buffet?

Gab
September 23rd, 2005, 04:58 PM
I will just go during the sunday feast in the Hare Krishna temple on Schermerhorn street. It can be a chinese buffet or anything else. I like so many kind of food. A buffet because I like to get get so many choice. I've been in that temple because I know several devotee in Montreal and somebody picked me up to get in NYC. I won't come back in NYC with the stupid driver who really pissed me off when I came back in Montréal. I told him turn right or left when he had to turn and I went straight instead. What an idiot.

Schadenfrau
September 23rd, 2005, 05:04 PM
I was just kidding about the Hare Krishnas.

You're really selling yourself short by eating at a buffet, as far as I'm concerned. There are plenty of great, cheap restaurants.

Gab
September 23rd, 2005, 05:07 PM
What is the best Chinese buffet?

michelle1
October 19th, 2005, 08:55 AM
Foley's Fish House, Swordfish Palermo, 7th Ave & 48th St
excellent!

Gab
November 1st, 2005, 09:17 PM
Thank you Michelle, next time I cross the border I'll come to that restaurant.

Schadenfrau
November 2nd, 2005, 01:43 PM
That's not a Chinese buffet, Gab. I think Michelle is just commenting on that restaurant.

I don't think I've ever heard of a Chinese buffet in the city.

NYatKNIGHT
November 2nd, 2005, 01:59 PM
There is one, and it's not bad - authentic even, I was the only non-Chinese person there when I went. But I can't give the exact address. It's down around Centre Street and Broome. If I pass by I'll get better info. Still, I prefer a good restaurant any day. New Green Bo on Bayard Street is quite good.

jfazrh
December 5th, 2005, 02:32 PM
....and where ist the best roast prime of rib (au jus) being served in Manhattan????? Appreciate recommendations. Thks

OmegaNYC
December 12th, 2005, 10:42 AM
Go to Lambardi's the best pizza on earth. Bummer is you have to buy the whole pie. But eating one slice. You might eat the whole thing.:p

ryan
January 16th, 2006, 08:18 PM
NYC Restaurants that have given me food poisoning:

Sea Thai (in Williamsburg. 3 times in a row, shame on me)
Pax
Burger Heaven

antinimby
January 31st, 2006, 05:05 AM
BISON BAR-BISTRO

By STEVE CUOZZO
http://www.nypost.com/realestate/comm/62577.htm

January 31, 2006 -- Realty Check

TED Turner lost his clout at Time Warner, but he's having revenge of a sort: he's opening a restaurant this fall in the Time & Life Building, home to magazines including Time and People.

The first New York branch of Ted's Montana Grill, a family-friendly national chain founded by Turner and George McKerrow Jr., will open on the tower's north side at 110 W. 51st St.

Alan Stein, leasing honcho for building owner the Rockefeller Group, emphasized that unlike some chains bearing a celebrity name, Ted's is really owned by Turner: "His name is on the lease."

Stein said the 6,000 square-foot space had been vacant for some time.

"We were looking for the right tenant," he said. Ted's Montana will be between bustling brasserie Cité and a new TV sports studio under construction on the avenue side.

Turner was repped by Lansco president Alan Victor, who said of the eatery chain, "There's a lot of bison on the menu. Ted owns the largest bison herd in the world."

Asked whether Turner might take satisfaction out of putting his name on the ground floor of a Time Warner flagship address, Victor said, "It was really the location that drove the deal, but maybe he also said, in your face, guys — I'm opening in your building."

Ted's Montana had "a lease out since 2004" at the vacant northwest corner of Sixth and 57th, Victor said, "but it ruptured because we couldn't get along with the landlord." That space remains vacant.

He said the asking rent at Time & Life was $110 a foot — far less than space fronting on the avenue itself — but declined to say what final terms were.

jdenman
February 23rd, 2006, 02:37 PM
Will be staying near E 42nd and 2nd ave...and need suggestions for breakfast during the week. I figure we'll be on our way to Grand Central, so anything that's on the way would be a bonus.

Thanks!

antinimby
May 3rd, 2006, 01:58 AM
By Steve Cuozzo - New York Post

Now, about this Hawaiian Tropic Zone restaurant/lounge opening in September at 729 Seventh Ave. at 49th Street, where David Burke will serve as consulting chef:

It turns out the 16,000 square-foot, 290-seat jumbo, first reported on Page Six last winter, will be leased from a real estate holding company controlled by Dennis Riese.

Adam Hock, president of HT NYC, which is spending $11 million to build "The Hottest Place on Earth" on the former Houlihan's site, declined to discuss rent. But he estimated the value of the Riese-owned retail condominium at around $30 million.

Hock has tapped designer Jeffrey Beers to create the three-level space, meant to simulate the "lush, hot and colorful" tropics. A centerpiece will be an 18-by-13-foot video wall where constantly changing images will "reflect variations on the tropic theme."

Burke said, "It sounds theme-y, but it won't be like the Hard Rock. The average check will be $60-$80 - it won't be pineapple spare ribs."

Hock has a global licensing arrangement with sun-lotion giant Hawaiian Tropic. Beauty-pageant winners chosen by the lotion line will serve as "table concierges" to take orders in the restaurant.

http://www.nypost.com/realestate/comm/67818.htm

Gunslinger
May 10th, 2006, 09:50 AM
Hi Guys
Staying in Chelsea (around 9th Ave & West 20th)

Any recommendations for restaurants - fairly open minded about cuisines - american, chinese, italian, japanese or anything else, will to try most things - (except steamed jelly-fish) and might be tempted to give that a go if I'd drunk enough

BrooklynRider
May 10th, 2006, 12:38 PM
Chelsea Grill for burgers!

BrooklynRider
May 10th, 2006, 12:39 PM
....and where ist the best roast prime of rib (au jus) being served in Manhattan????? Appreciate recommendations. Thks

I like Dylan Prime on Laight Street.

BrooklynRider
May 11th, 2006, 10:36 PM
"Fresh" is a great restaurant too - in Tribeca.

Ninjahedge
May 12th, 2006, 09:33 AM
Nyo Nya in Chinatown is good for Malaysian. Good prices too.

Shoot, I wish I remembered the names to half the places I have been to down there!!!

Oh, for after-dinner drink, "Double Happiness" is very nice. It is a little hidey-hole around the corner from NyoNya.....

amaluu729
July 21st, 2006, 11:02 AM
A bit more affordable than Nobu(!) is Red Bamboo (http://www.redbamboo-nyc.com/index.html), an excellent and stylish vegetarian/vegan place on West 4th at 6th Ave. It's tiny and crowded, but so new york, plus the food and service are really good.

Ooh - I've been here! It was nice and the ambiance was great ... it's probably more enjoyable for folks that used to eat meat and miss it, vs. those of us who have never eaten meat. Lots of "meat substitute" items, like vegetarian wings & whatnot. But it was definitely a good experience.

My best dining experience in NYC so far has been Fratelli Ristorante in Little Italy. The people were so nice/friendly/warm ... and the food was excellent. Just a little place I stumbled upon by accident (I actually walked in because the employees/owners standing outside were so sweet and welcoming, I felt too guilty to just walk by - well, thank god I DID go in ... it was awesome) ... also good for folks like me that can't afford the fancy-schmancy places! :)

kliq6
July 21st, 2006, 04:32 PM
Fratelli is one of the better, with Da Nico, in Little Italy

mariusmellebye
July 25th, 2006, 12:51 PM
this looks like a nice restaurant :-) it´s called "230 Fifth"

http://static.flickr.com/62/198077946_d9f4baa687_o.jpg

video: http://www.vidocity.com/player.asp?ID=166

lofter1
August 7th, 2006, 07:39 PM
Terrific website for NYC restaurants: Savory New York (http://www.savorynewyork.com/wiki/Main_Page)

shocka
August 17th, 2006, 10:35 AM
My site for restaurants.. not just NYC but has alot of NYC spots

http://www.realityimpaired.net

eddhead
August 17th, 2006, 11:40 AM
A couple of great places for Home Cookin' / BBQ: Virgils, Blue Smoke (Higher End) Acme, Cowgirls Hall of Fame (Midrange) The Hog Pit (Lower End)

All excellent food!

I am a little late with this, but if you like Virgil's (and i do) try Daisy Mae's for take-out and delivery in Clinton

eddhead
August 17th, 2006, 11:42 AM
Cheap good digs..

Yeah Shang Hai Delux... best "Juicy Pork Buns" (yes better than Joe Shang Hai's and New Green Boe) and the ever popular Great New York Noodletown

Also for Dim Sum, I favor Goldn Unicorn

eddhead
August 17th, 2006, 11:50 AM
Some recommendations, all on Mulberry:

Il Fornaio, not fancy but good.. like eating in your italian grandma's kitchen

Pellegrinos, a little more upscale, but not over the top ... great service too

ll Cotile - take your italian mom there.. they'll call her senora and she'll eat it up!! great food too!!

ryeler
August 17th, 2006, 11:55 AM
One of my faviurite New York restaurants is Nobu. Best Sushi in New York. (But there are Nobu's else where in the world [London, Paris, Milan, L.A.] That's my pick.

-ryeler

shocka
August 17th, 2006, 12:51 PM
One of my faviurite New York restaurants is Nobu. Best Sushi in New York. (But there are Nobu's else where in the world [London, Paris, Milan, L.A.] That's my pick.

-ryeler


I have never dined at Nobu, I have been meaning to, but for sushi I loved Jewel Bako.

Schadenfrau
August 17th, 2006, 01:10 PM
I was actually disappointed by Nobu. I've had better sushi from hole-in-the-wall places in midtown.

eddhead
August 17th, 2006, 05:36 PM
I was actually disappointed by Nobu. I've had better sushi from hole-in-the-wall places in midtown.

2 places on the UES that are outstanding.. Poke (BYOB) and Sushi of Gari

ryeler
September 23rd, 2006, 09:03 PM
I have eaten at Nobu's besides New York, and I actually liked New York's the least. None the less it was still good

Capn_Birdseye
October 27th, 2006, 06:25 AM
On my last visit to NY a group of 8 of us went to the Gotham Bar & Grill, really impressed, great food!

Blue Water Grill, didn't like. Sat upstairs, cramped, poor service, and later, back at the hotel I felt ill.

Union Square Cafe - great, had the best rack of lamb ever!

Candela's - went on a quiet night, only half-full, food ok.

Anyone got any thoughts on Tribecca Grill, or indeed any others.

ablarc
November 1st, 2006, 07:21 PM
^ The Odeon Cafe, West Broadway, Tribeca.

An institution.

Schadenfrau
November 1st, 2006, 08:11 PM
I love the Odeon, but the food really isn't the best. It's a must for all fans of the 80s lit Brat Pack, though.

shocka
January 17th, 2007, 11:03 PM
Just added Docks Oyster Bar East to my site.. really enjoyed it friday night.

http://www.realityimpaired.net

fairy1
January 18th, 2007, 11:10 AM
Apologies if this has been said anywhere else...
im looking for a "typical " american diner that does a good new york breakfast near-ish times square.

TonyO
January 18th, 2007, 11:33 AM
This is a great comparison between LA and NY restaurants and culture...

The Taste Of the West
BY JENNIFER LEUZZI
January 17, 2007
URL: http://www.nysun.com/article/46808

"All cities are B cities compared to New York," chef Mario Batali said.

Yet Mr. Batali opened a restaurant in Los Angeles after finding success with Babbo and other Italian restaurants in New York. He opened Mozza, an outpost of his casual downtown spot Otto, in November in Los Angeles. He said the main reason he opened Mozza was to collaborate with his friend and business partner, Los Angeles chef Nancy Silverton.

Mr. Batali is not the only chef to be lured to Los Angeles in recent years. Chefs Tom Coliccio, Laurent Tourondel, and Gordon Ramsay have all said they plan to open L.A. outposts this year. Meanwhile, chef Masa Takayama relocated his restaurant Ginza Sushi-ko from Beverly Hills to Columbus Circle, renaming it Masa.

The differences between the cities are in the details. Jeffrey Chodorow has an Asia de Cuba in both cites. Though both earn $12 million a year, check averages are higher in Los Angeles. The L.A. restaurant is only busy on the weekend, while New York is bustling six days a week. In New York, Masa serves more sushi and fewer cooked preparations than in Los Angeles. Mr. Takayama said New Yorkers eat faster and don't socialize with their neighbors at the counter.

Car culture and geography have a great impact on Los Angeles dining. "I'd heard about it, but who knew?" Mr. Batali said. At Mozza, wine sales are about 30% less than at Otto, which Mr. Batali attributes to the fact that 80% of his California customers drive to the restaurant. Cheap valet parking is mandatory. "I remember the uproar when Spago raised valet to $6," Mr. Chodorow said. "In New York City that's like a tip!"

Los Angeles is so sprawling that a restaurant is less likely to draw diners from outside its immediate neighborhood. "In New York, TriBeCa residents can get excited about a mid-level opening in Park Slope, but in L.A. this happens much less frequently," the founding editor of the widely read restaurant blogs Eater and EaterLA, Ben Leventhal, said. "Especially since driving is so unavoidable, the focus there is on your neighborhood."

Easy travel and the increase in bicoastal careers have created a national customer base for the restaurant business. Mr. Batali said 30% of the clientele at Mozza also regularly eat at Otto. Mr. Takayama still has weekly regulars at Masa who live in Los Angeles, and Mr. Chodorow said he often sees the same people on both coasts.

Sometimes the same formula works in both cities. Michael McCarty has been running a restaurant on each coast since 1988, when he opened Michael's in Midtown. The original Michael's opened in Santa Monica in 1979. He typically spends 10 days on the West Coast and four days here. "They're like fraternal twins," Mr. McCarty said of his restaurants. "They look, sound, and feel the same, but have separate personalities."

The top food ranking in the latest Zagat restaurant survey of Los Angeles is held by Matsuhisa, Nobu Matsuhisa's first restaurant. Here, it's the French seafood palace Le Bernardin. Mr. Matsuhisa has held one of the top two spots for the past 10 years in L.A., while high-end European restaurants are rare there. "There are no French restaurants left in L.A.," columnist and contributing editor at Gourmet magazine, Colman Andrews, said. "It just doesn't interest people."

In the December issue of Gourmet, Mr. Andrews wrote about the closing of the last great French restaurant in Los Angeles, L'Orangerie, comparing it with the reopening of Le Cirque in New York. After 28 years in Los Angeles, the proprietors of L'Orangerie, Gérard and Virginie Ferry, decided to sell the restaurant, acknowledging that fine and formal were no longer what people wanted. It was purchased by Mr. Matsuhisa and Robert De Niro and will reopen in drastically different form this spring.

Los Angelenos want comfort more than formality. "Even though it's changing, in New York there's still a dress code," Mr. Andrews said. In Los Angeles, "there are people who spend more on a pair of jeans than a suit. It's not a question of money."

In an interesting twist, L'Orangerie chef Christophe Bellanca is the newest staff member at Le Cirque. He said the difference between the two restaurants is that everything about Le Cirque is bigger: It has five times the number of seats, more critics to please, and a clientele with a more sophisticated palate. And for a French chef, the possibility of Michelin stars is hard to resist. The French guidebook has yet to rate restaurants in L.A.

"New York has special meaning to people," Mr. Andrews said. "It's still the big city." Success here begets success elsewhere. In New York, Mr. Takayama was able to create a second restaurant, Bar Masa, which he said he may expand its operation to London and Las Vegas, which his success in California would not necessarily have led to. It seems the restaurant industry in New York is bigger and better — for now. "They are the two most important cities in the country. New York faces Europe, and Los Angeles faces Asia," the founder and publisher of the Zagat Survey, Tim Zagat, said. "With Asia's growing power, from China and the region, L.A. will eventually become the number one city in 20 to 25 years."

Front_Porch
January 18th, 2007, 12:41 PM
im looking for a "typical " american diner that does a good new york breakfast near-ish times square.

The Westway Diner on Ninth Avenue.

ablarc
January 18th, 2007, 03:41 PM
"They are the two most important cities in the country. New York faces Europe, and Los Angeles faces Asia," the founder and publisher of the Zagat Survey, Tim Zagat, said. "With Asia's growing power, from China and the region, L.A. will eventually become the number one city in 20 to 25 years."
What exactly does this mean?

TonyO
January 18th, 2007, 05:13 PM
What exactly does this mean?

He's saying that he thinks LA will overtake NY in global significance in 20-25 years because of its proximity to China.

I thought it was a provocative statement, but it is from a guy who sells restaurant guides. He is based in NY and has a strong following here already, so is it posturing for LA? Maybe.

Either way, it would take an amazing change in Los Angeles population, banking power, and more for it to surpass NY.

krulltime
January 19th, 2007, 12:03 AM
What exactly does this mean?

It means that he is very optimistic about progress in Los Angeles and in China. :rolleyes:

Scraperfannyc
January 19th, 2007, 12:17 PM
This is a great comparison between LA and NY restaurants and culture...

The Taste Of the West
BY JENNIFER LEUZZI
January 17, 2007
URL: http://www.nysun.com/article/46808

"All cities are B cities compared to New York," chef Mario Batali said.

Yet Mr. Batali opened a restaurant in Los Angeles after finding success with Babbo and other Italian restaurants in New York. He opened Mozza, an outpost of his casual downtown spot Otto, in November in Los Angeles. He said the main reason he opened Mozza was to collaborate with his friend and business partner, Los Angeles chef Nancy Silverton.

Mr. Batali is not the only chef to be lured to Los Angeles in recent years. Chefs Tom Coliccio, Laurent Tourondel, and Gordon Ramsay have all said they plan to open L.A. outposts this year. Meanwhile, chef Masa Takayama relocated his restaurant Ginza Sushi-ko from Beverly Hills to Columbus Circle, renaming it Masa.

The differences between the cities are in the details. Jeffrey Chodorow has an Asia de Cuba in both cites. Though both earn $12 million a year, check averages are higher in Los Angeles. The L.A. restaurant is only busy on the weekend, while New York is bustling six days a week. In New York, Masa serves more sushi and fewer cooked preparations than in Los Angeles. Mr. Takayama said New Yorkers eat faster and don't socialize with their neighbors at the counter.

Car culture and geography have a great impact on Los Angeles dining. "I'd heard about it, but who knew?" Mr. Batali said. At Mozza, wine sales are about 30% less than at Otto, which Mr. Batali attributes to the fact that 80% of his California customers drive to the restaurant. Cheap valet parking is mandatory. "I remember the uproar when Spago raised valet to $6," Mr. Chodorow said. "In New York City that's like a tip!"

Los Angeles is so sprawling that a restaurant is less likely to draw diners from outside its immediate neighborhood. "In New York, TriBeCa residents can get excited about a mid-level opening in Park Slope, but in L.A. this happens much less frequently," the founding editor of the widely read restaurant blogs Eater and EaterLA, Ben Leventhal, said. "Especially since driving is so unavoidable, the focus there is on your neighborhood."

Easy travel and the increase in bicoastal careers have created a national customer base for the restaurant business. Mr. Batali said 30% of the clientele at Mozza also regularly eat at Otto. Mr. Takayama still has weekly regulars at Masa who live in Los Angeles, and Mr. Chodorow said he often sees the same people on both coasts.

Sometimes the same formula works in both cities. Michael McCarty has been running a restaurant on each coast since 1988, when he opened Michael's in Midtown. The original Michael's opened in Santa Monica in 1979. He typically spends 10 days on the West Coast and four days here. "They're like fraternal twins," Mr. McCarty said of his restaurants. "They look, sound, and feel the same, but have separate personalities."

The top food ranking in the latest Zagat restaurant survey of Los Angeles is held by Matsuhisa, Nobu Matsuhisa's first restaurant. Here, it's the French seafood palace Le Bernardin. Mr. Matsuhisa has held one of the top two spots for the past 10 years in L.A., while high-end European restaurants are rare there. "There are no French restaurants left in L.A.," columnist and contributing editor at Gourmet magazine, Colman Andrews, said. "It just doesn't interest people."

In the December issue of Gourmet, Mr. Andrews wrote about the closing of the last great French restaurant in Los Angeles, L'Orangerie, comparing it with the reopening of Le Cirque in New York. After 28 years in Los Angeles, the proprietors of L'Orangerie, Gérard and Virginie Ferry, decided to sell the restaurant, acknowledging that fine and formal were no longer what people wanted. It was purchased by Mr. Matsuhisa and Robert De Niro and will reopen in drastically different form this spring.

Los Angelenos want comfort more than formality. "Even though it's changing, in New York there's still a dress code," Mr. Andrews said. In Los Angeles, "there are people who spend more on a pair of jeans than a suit. It's not a question of money."

In an interesting twist, L'Orangerie chef Christophe Bellanca is the newest staff member at Le Cirque. He said the difference between the two restaurants is that everything about Le Cirque is bigger: It has five times the number of seats, more critics to please, and a clientele with a more sophisticated palate. And for a French chef, the possibility of Michelin stars is hard to resist. The French guidebook has yet to rate restaurants in L.A.

"New York has special meaning to people," Mr. Andrews said. "It's still the big city." Success here begets success elsewhere. In New York, Mr. Takayama was able to create a second restaurant, Bar Masa, which he said he may expand its operation to London and Las Vegas, which his success in California would not necessarily have led to. It seems the restaurant industry in New York is bigger and better — for now. "They are the two most important cities in the country. New York faces Europe, and Los Angeles faces Asia," the founder and publisher of the Zagat Survey, Tim Zagat, said. "With Asia's growing power, from China and the region, L.A. will eventually become the number one city in 20 to 25 years."


That stands for LA. I hate LA. But San Franciso has the highest overall average Zagats rating and I would bet it has more concentration of French Restaurants and French influence than NYC. I would say instead of NYC delis, you will find crepe places with salads, sandwiches, and breakfist foods. I would say about half of the restaurants in a majority of the neighborhoods in San Francisco are either French or have strong French influence. Also, most people do not drive to these restaurants. It is much more like NYC in this sense. In San Franciso, the restuaruant culture is fresh local ingredients (just picked or just caught and organic is what they all try to do to a large extent). There are also alot of sophisticated restaurants too. Per Se was opened up by a Chef who lives and works in the the Bay Area.

TonyO
January 19th, 2007, 12:58 PM
That stands for LA. I hate LA. But San Franciso has the highest overall average Zagats rating and I would bet it has more concentration of French Restaurants and French influence than NYC. I would say instead of NYC delis, you will find crepe places with salads, sandwiches, and breakfist foods. I would say about half of the restaurants in a majority of the neighborhoods in San Francisco are either French or have strong French influence. Also, most people do not drive to these restaurants. It is much more like NYC in this sense. In San Franciso, the restuaruant culture is fresh local ingredients (just picked or just caught and organic is what they all try to do to a large extent). There are also alot of sophisticated restaurants too. Per Se was opened up by a Chef who lives and works in the the Bay Area.

SF has great restaurants, you are correct. However this article was a comparison on not only cuisine but culture and global significance of each city.

NY has 14,590 restaurants as of 2002 (Census), SF has 4,375 (SFCVB). The quality of restaurants in SF is, on average, probably higher. But that would only be because NY is huge comparatively and the demographics in SF are less skewed. There is no competition when it comes to diversity of the cuisine itself, NY wins out easily.

Scraperfannyc
January 19th, 2007, 02:36 PM
SF has great restaurants, you are correct. However this article was a comparison on not only cuisine but culture and global significance of each city.

NY has 14,590 restaurants as of 2002 (Census), SF has 4,375 (SFCVB). The quality of restaurants in SF is, on average, probably higher. But that would only be because NY is huge comparatively and the demographics in SF are less skewed. There is no competition when it comes to diversity of the cuisine itself, NY wins out easily.

Well, if we want to compare the restaurant scene of NYC and San Francisco,here is my take. I'm a real big foodie!

First, these two cities have the most interesting dining scenes in the country. They have some similarities, but they also have some differences.

NYC is alot about scene and being scene. Also, many chef's in NYC come from abroad, and frequently, well known chefs will open up their first US based restaurant in NYC. The chef's use sophisticated techniques and sauces. It's about big business. There is more fame and glamour to be found in NYC. New York is about attitude. A true New Yorker believes nothing compares to New York.

I will tell you more about San Francisco now that I live there. It is less about the scene, and more about fresh quality and healthy ingredients. The climate in this region (which is similar to Italy and southern france) accounts for the nations tastiest produce wines, and olive oils. This is also where the whole organic scene started. Much of the meet meat used is organic and from grass fed animals, and most of the seafood is wild and not farm raised. The majority of supermarkets and coffee shops out in the san francisco neighborhoods (outiside tourist trap junk food traps) are mostly organic. Neighborhoods have held protests when a starbucks tries to open a new branch. Some of the best restaurants in this area are outside of san francisco, especially in Napa Valley region. In wine country, the meats and vegtables are farmed raised, and the produce is picked just before being used for cooking. It is similar to Lyon, France.

In regard to the census you mentioned, NYC includes the 5 boroughs and this includes over 300 square miles in comparison to San Francisco's is 47 square miles. Manhattan is only 23 square miles, although it has a higher concerntration of restaurnats and this is where most of the best known restaurants are.

In regard to the diversity, I don't really see much of a gap. Within 10 blocks of where I live, I can find, French places, Japan Town (which includes Japanese French fusion), Little Saigon, Middle Eastern, Middle Eastern Fusion, Italian, Pan Asian, Mexican (you get more authentic mexican food here), chinese, African French fusion, Californian, Steakhouses, Prime Rib Houses, Seafood places, Organic Wild Game restaurants, High End French, Crepe houses, Chocolate cafes, great Thai Places, Peruvian French Fusion, English Tea houses, regular tea cafes, many wine bar cafes, bagel cafes, etc. There is even a place called the East Coast West Coast Deli with Fresh made Pastrami within 5 blocks from me. And there is even a place called Escape from New York Pizza.

Scraperfannyc
January 19th, 2007, 02:36 PM
SF has great restaurants, you are correct. However this article was a comparison on not only cuisine but culture and global significance of each city.

NY has 14,590 restaurants as of 2002 (Census), SF has 4,375 (SFCVB). The quality of restaurants in SF is, on average, probably higher. But that would only be because NY is huge comparatively and the demographics in SF are less skewed. There is no competition when it comes to diversity of the cuisine itself, NY wins out easily.

Well, if we want to compare the restaurant scene of NYC and San Francisco,here is my take. I'm a real big foodie!

First, these two cities have the most interesting dining scenes in the country. They have some similarities, but they also have some differences.

NYC is alot about scene and being scene. Also, many chef's in NYC come from abroad, and frequently, well known chefs will open up their first US based restaurant in NYC. The chef's use sophisticated techniques and sauces. It's about big business. There is more fame and glamour to be found in NYC. New York is about attitude. A true New Yorker believes nothing compares to New York.

I will tell you more about San Francisco now that I live there. It is less about the scene, and more about fresh quality and healthy ingredients. The climate in this region (which is similar to Italy and southern france) accounts for the nations tastiest produce wines, and olive oils. This is also where the whole organic scene started. Much of the meet meat used is organic and from grass fed animals, and most of the seafood is wild and not farm raised. The majority of supermarkets and coffee shops out in the san francisco neighborhoods (outiside tourist trap junk food traps) are mostly organic. Neighborhoods have held protests when a starbucks tries to open a new branch. Some of the best restaurants in this area are outside of san francisco, especially in Napa Valley region. In wine country, the meats and vegtables are farmed raised, and the produce is picked just before being used for cooking. It is similar to Lyon, France.

In regard to the census you mentioned, NYC includes the 5 boroughs and this includes over 300 square miles in comparison to San Francisco's is 47 square miles. Manhattan is only 23 square miles, although it has a higher concerntration of restaurnats and this is where most of the best known restaurants are.

In regard to the diversity, I don't really see much of a gap. Within 10 blocks of where I live, I can find, French places, Japan Town (which includes Japanese French fusion), Little Saigon, Middle Eastern, Middle Eastern Fusion, Italian, Pan Asian, Mexican (you get more authentic mexican food here), chinese, African French fusion, Californian, Steakhouses, Prime Rib Houses, Seafood places, Organic Wild Game restaurants, High End French, Crepe houses, Chocolate cafes, great Thai Places, Peruvian French Fusion, English Tea houses, regular tea cafes, many wine bar cafes, bagel cafes, etc. There is even a place called the East Coast West Coast Deli with Fresh made Pastrami within 5 blocks from me. And there is even a place called Escape from New York Pizza.

TonyO
January 20th, 2007, 11:10 AM
NYC is alot about scene and being scene. Also, many chef's in NYC come from abroad, and frequently, well known chefs will open up their first US based restaurant in NYC. The chef's use sophisticated techniques and sauces. It's about big business. There is more fame and glamour to be found in NYC. New York is about attitude. A true New Yorker believes nothing compares to New York.

For some restaurants, yes. Del Posto, Morimoto, Nobu in midtown: these are all restaurants that fit what you are talking about. But NY is much more dynamic than that. There are many different restaurants for the many different customers here. For instance, I am into restaurants that fit into shoeboxes with different cuisine. There are many downtown where I live. There are many restaurants with the one-main-dish style like dumplings, arepas, empanadas, non-mexican burritos. There are just too many neighborhoods and too many restaurants (and too little time and money) to visit them all.


I will tell you more about San Francisco now that I live there. It is less about the scene, and more about fresh quality and healthy ingredients.

Here as well, but probably less on average than SF which has a much more finicky public overall. These places are abundant here but not 'required' because for every customer who places a high value on organic/health food there are 10 customers who will overlook/don't care.


The climate in this region (which is similar to Italy and southern france) accounts for the nations tastiest produce wines, and olive oils. This is also where the whole organic scene started. Much of the meet meat used is organic and from grass fed animals, and most of the seafood is wild and not farm raised.

But we're talking about the city itself. NY's immediate region has no Napa/Sonoma nor the mega-farms with ideal weather, but it has pockets of local producers that supply the high-end chefs.


The majority of supermarkets and coffee shops out in the san francisco neighborhoods (outiside tourist trap junk food traps) are mostly organic. Neighborhoods have held protests when a starbucks tries to open a new branch.

This is not necessarily a plus in my opinion and points to the power of the finicky there that is as much of a hinderance as it is a positive. NY has the idealism of SF but it's "check" is the power of money.


Some of the best restaurants in this area are outside of san francisco, especially in Napa Valley region. In wine country, the meats and vegtables are farmed raised, and the produce is picked just before being used for cooking. It is similar to Lyon, France.

Again, we're talking about the cities themselves.


In regard to the census you mentioned, NYC includes the 5 boroughs and this includes over 300 square miles in comparison to San Francisco's is 47 square miles. Manhattan is only 23 square miles, although it has a higher concerntration of restaurnats and this is where most of the best known restaurants are.

A good reason why this comparison is apples-oranges. But its Saturday, so I have the time. :)


In regard to the diversity, I don't really see much of a gap. Within 10 blocks of where I live, I can find, French places, Japan Town (which includes Japanese French fusion), Little Saigon, Middle Eastern, Middle Eastern Fusion, Italian, Pan Asian, Mexican (you get more authentic mexican food here), chinese, African French fusion, Californian, Steakhouses, Prime Rib Houses, Seafood places, Organic Wild Game restaurants, High End French, Crepe houses, Chocolate cafes, great Thai Places, Peruvian French Fusion, English Tea houses, regular tea cafes, many wine bar cafes, bagel cafes, etc. There is even a place called the East Coast West Coast Deli with Fresh made Pastrami within 5 blocks from me. And there is even a place called Escape from New York Pizza.

There is a very good restaurant diversity in SF. But here, a Peruvian restaurant is owned, operated, staffed (and visited) by Peruvians.

Scraperfannyc
January 20th, 2007, 02:57 PM
For some restaurants, yes. Del Posto, Morimoto, Nobu in midtown: these are all restaurants that fit what you are talking about. But NY is much more dynamic than that. There are many different restaurants for the many different customers here. For instance, I am into restaurants that fit into shoeboxes with different cuisine. There are many downtown where I live. There are many restaurants with the one-main-dish style like dumplings, arepas, empanadas, non-mexican burritos. There are just too many neighborhoods and too many restaurants (and too little time and money) to visit them all.



Here as well, but probably less on average than SF which has a much more finicky public overall. These places are abundant here but not 'required' because for every customer who places a high value on organic/health food there are 10 customers who will overlook/don't care.



But we're talking about the city itself. NY's immediate region has no Napa/Sonoma nor the mega-farms with ideal weather, but it has pockets of local producers that supply the high-end chefs.



This is not necessarily a plus in my opinion and points to the power of the finicky there that is as much of a hinderance as it is a positive. NY has the idealism of SF but it's "check" is the power of money.



Again, we're talking about the cities themselves.



A good reason why this comparison is apples-oranges. But its Saturday, so I have the time. :)



There is a very good restaurant diversity in SF. But here, a Peruvian restaurant is owned, operated, staffed (and visited) by Peruvians.

Hmm, downtown Manhattan is my favorite dining area in NYC. 9 out of 10 times, I would head downtown in Manhattan to eat while I was there.

Anyways, looks like we can agree that S.F. and Manhattan are more comparable than L.A. and Manhattan. We can just as easliy point out the similarites (e.g., they both deliver). Both places can easily wow your tastebuds. Here is a neighborhood to neighborhood matchup:

Rich Upper East Side (Close to Park) = Pacific heights (Snobby)
Not so Rich Upper East side (Away from Park) = Russian Hill
Rich Upper West Side (Close to Park) = Nob Hill
Not Rich Upper West Side = Hayes Valley (theatre, Opera, great mix of dining, etc.)
Midtown = Financial District (both concentrated buildings
lower east side = Mission District
East Village = Asbury Haight (Asbury is even more funky!)
The Main village = North Beach (also little Italy) and Marina District and Cow Hollow
Soho/tribeca/Meatpacking = South of Market (Both Lofty, Industrial, and great lofty like restaurants, night clubs and shops.
New West Village (along the water) = South Beach
Queens = Richmond District
Chinatown = chinatown
And there are more neighborhoods in each city, but I'll stop here.

Back to diversity though, there is diversity in S.F. that most people from the outside do not know about. Particularly in the Richmond district, and to a lesser extent, the Mission district. The Richmond is a large section and is similar to diversity as queens. Nobody really talks about the Richmond, and it is not advertised, but they do have very good restaurants. The Mission is also large and is like the lower east side/east village in a sense with a large latino and yuppie population, great Mexican food, rising star chefs opening new restaurants, fancy botique shops, and new developments galore. True, the peruvian restaurant I mentioned (Fresca in Pacific Heights) is in a predominately well heeled white neighborhood, but it is owned and operated by Peruvians.


The article you first posted I felt was not really true in the sense that CA is not all about L.A., L.A., in my opinion, is much less comparable to NYC than S.F.

Chow

shocka
January 21st, 2007, 02:16 AM
Apologies if this has been said anywhere else...
im looking for a "typical " american diner that does a good new york breakfast near-ish times square.


Any dinner I have been to by Times Square has been horrible in my opnion.. I also lived in Astoria where I agree wtih many; has the best diners in NYC!

tdp
January 23rd, 2007, 04:54 PM
Terrific website for NYC restaurants: Savory New York (http://www.savorynewyork.com/wiki/Main_Page)

Thanks Lofter1 - This website is going to be a great help.
It's certainly worth trawling through some of these 'sticky' threads!

ManhattanKnight
January 23rd, 2007, 06:55 PM
^Thanks from me, too, Lofter – I hadn’t seen that one before. It’s too bad that this guide, like every other one I’ve ever looked at, lacks adequate information about whether restaurants are accessible to persons with physical disabilities. My roommate uses a wheelchair, as do several of our friends. The absence of information about restaurant accessibility means that we usually avoid restaurants in which one of us has not already eaten or scouted out in advance.

Zagat’s used to have a list of "wheelchair accessible" restaurants, but it dropped that feature at least 5 years ago. And a "wheelchair accessible" or "not accessible" rating, without more, doesn’t provide enough information to be useful. The Times restaurant reviews have recently begun giving the kinds of specifics that are needed. I.e., "Entrance at street level and restrooms wheelchair accessible but tables very closely spaced" or "One step at entrance and restroom inaccessible."

Asking a restaurant about its accessibility is problematic. Last year, my roommate and I ate at a well-known, large restaurant near Carnegie Hall. Since I knew that it’s located atop a platform 5 steps up from street level, I asked about its wheelchair accessibility when I called for our reservation and was assured that it was accessible. It was a very cold evening when we arrived at the bottom of those steps only to find nothing indicating how a wheelchair user could enter the place. I walked around the corner and spotted an elevator from the sidewalk to the platform level. We entered the elevator, shut the door and pushed the "up"button. Nothing happened. No intercom to contact anyone either.

Back to the 5 steps. I went in and spoke with someone who seemed to be in charge. He told me that he could try to find someone to carry "your friend" up the stairs or we could go around the block (in the opposite direction from the broken elevator) where we’d find a ramp.

The ramp was there, all right, but when we got to the top of the platform, we discovered that the only path from there to the restaurant led through the lobby of an office building unrelated to the restaurant, past a security checkpoint, and back outdoors to the platform.

Very cold and late, we got inside the restaurant, but it was so packed that a number of patrons had to stand up and move their chairs to enable us to pass on the way to our table.

Not a good way to start an enjoyable evening.

Front_Porch
January 23rd, 2007, 10:48 PM
sucks that you don't know what you're getting into. My dad was in a chair for about a year, and it was tough.

According to my Michelin guide, accessible in NYC includes:

'inoteca (LES)
Gobo (Greenwich Village)
Mandarin Court (Chinatown)
Artisanal (Murray Hill)
Five Front (Dumbo)
Picholine (Lincoln Center)
Taste (UES)
Fresh (Tribeca)
Bann Thai (Forest Hills)
Le Zie 2000 (Chelsea)

Hope that helps.

ManhattanKnight
January 24th, 2007, 01:13 PM
^Thanks. Some information is better than none, but simply categorizing a restaurant as "accessible" or "not accessible" is not enough, without knowing the source of the rating (the restaurant or the author of a guidebook) and what it means in practical terms. My roommate, for example, can easily get up or down a step or two at a restaurant's entrance but won't be able to use an interior passage or steps that are too narrow for his chair. Some people will care if a restroom's accessible; others won't. Today's Times review of the newly- (or almost-) reopened Waverly Inn gives the necessary specific details: "Street-level side entrance from Waverly Place to the back garden. Entire restaurant on one level. Accessible restroom."

In a city with as many restaurants as NYC, there isn't an overall shortage of accessible ones (even though I'd estimate that fewer than half are), but a big problem identifying them.

Front_Porch
January 24th, 2007, 05:03 PM
Well, the next time I go somewhere chair-friendly, I'll post.

manhattanbars
February 16th, 2007, 01:25 PM
I like the restaurant City Hall at 131 Duane St. I own www.manhattanbars.com (http://www.manhattanbars.com) where you can share your experiences in New York. I also like to stay and eat at the Hudson Hotel in midtown. Hope that helps!!

lofter1
February 16th, 2007, 02:10 PM
Hmmmm ^^^ :confused: :( :confused: :mad: :confused:

Please CONSIDER THIS (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showpost.php?p=74231&postcount=9)

MrsL.G.2006
March 9th, 2007, 05:49 PM
Can anyone recommend a restaurant that provides entertainment / live music and good food and also caters for children?

gebebop
April 11th, 2007, 02:48 PM
Does anybody know a good spanish (from Spain) restaurant?

kliq6
April 11th, 2007, 03:43 PM
Solera, East 53rd street

gebebop
April 11th, 2007, 03:50 PM
Places where you can eat well and cheaply.

gebebop
April 11th, 2007, 03:51 PM
I have one suggestion. It is "el gran castillo de Jaguar" in Prospect Park. It is so cheap, so good, a little bit dirty, but very authentic.

Schadenfrau
April 11th, 2007, 03:56 PM
Casa Mono, definitely.

Shoine
April 18th, 2007, 02:08 AM
Hi everybody !
I'm a foreign student living in Rockord, IL for the school year.
I'm going on a trip to New York early in June, and I'm looking for a good and cheap (between $7-10 would be great) place to have breakfast (or brunch ? I don't know exactly the difference) around my hotel. It is on 34th Street and 8th Avenue !
The New Yorker Hotel is the name of the hotel actually.
Thank you very much !

Punzie
April 18th, 2007, 05:25 AM
Does anybody know a good spanish (from Spain) restaurant?

Casa Mono, definitely.

I ate at Casa Mono and I heartily second this recommendation.:)

More info on Casa Mono:

http://newyork.citysearch.com/profile/39242213/new_york_ny/casa_mono.html

Shoine
April 21st, 2007, 08:44 PM
Hi everybody !
I'm a foreign student living in Rockord, IL for the school year.
I'm going on a trip to New York early in June, and I'm looking for a good and cheap (between $7-10 would be great) place to have breakfast (or brunch ? I don't know exactly the difference) around my hotel. It is on 34th Street and 8th Avenue !
The New Yorker Hotel is the name of the hotel actually.
Thank you very much !

Nobody ?

media35
April 21st, 2007, 08:53 PM
go to menupages.com, easy to navigate and lots of reviews on all types of eating establishments in Manhattan and Brooklyn

BPC
April 22nd, 2007, 01:05 PM
Nobody ?

Your right next to Korea Town. Lots of great places to eat there. Ask your hotel for directions.

clubBR
May 7th, 2007, 04:22 AM
Korea Town restaurants mostly cater lunch and dinner. For a light breakfast, try eating different types of sweetend bread called Bbahng at Koryodong or Cafe Muse on 32nd St. Its gooooooooood

http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=2872&page=2

Boycey
July 14th, 2007, 01:09 PM
The Pershing Square brasserie at 90 E. 42nd (under the Park Avenue Viaduct) does great breakfasts. Whether you're after a fry-up or something a little more simple such as pancakes you won't be disappointed. I've never been for an evening meal before but I hear they're very good in that department too. Highly recommended. :)

Capn_Birdseye
August 6th, 2007, 08:53 AM
On my last visit we went to Extra Virgin 259W 4th St. in Greenwich village and had a really great brunch. Would recommend.

http://nymag.com/listings/restaurant/extra-virgin/

piedleger
October 17th, 2007, 10:03 AM
Hi,

Five us are over from London to celebrate a friend's 30th birthday and we'd like to go out for a celebratory meal one night (probably Saturday). Budget of around $80/head inc service and drinks. Any recommendations?

Preferably not too far off of some decent night spots and pretty central (some of the group staying in Lower Manhatten and others near Central Park).

Thanks!!!

J

pricedout
October 26th, 2007, 08:03 AM
Try to get a table at the Bread Bar at Table. Upscale but reasonable. Interesting Indian food, small plate style. Some people really don't like it because it's not traditional. I like it.

If you're willing to go a bit further downtown (where I think the best reasonalbly priced food is) you might try Stanton Social, Peasant, Apizz, Pylos, Gnocco, I Coppi, Mermaid Inn, Red Cat, Pearl Oyster Bar. You can look up their menus on menupages.com and see if they suit.

Have fun.

brianac
October 26th, 2007, 11:16 AM
Check this out.

http://www.smithandwollensky.com/new_york.htm

voodoochild
November 2nd, 2007, 11:16 AM
I know that you have all heard of this but my favorite restaurant in NYC is CARMINE'S NYC (the one uptown..not in the theater dist.) I love the food there and the service.

NOW..if you want a more intimate atmosphere you must try East of 8th. It is on 8th Ave and 23rd St. The menu caters to all likings and the food is absolutely phenominal! I also like that in the back outside they have it tented and heated in the winter so you can eat out there. Very pretty and fast friendly service. A definite date place.:)

brianac
November 2nd, 2007, 11:35 AM
"^"
Can you smoke in the back outside.

Here in the UK the pubs have erected 3 sided tents outside to accomodate the smokers.

BrooklynRider
November 3rd, 2007, 01:21 PM
Smoking is banned in all restaurants and just have smokers take it to the sidewalk. Hopefully, the next level ban - smoking outside public buildings - will be enacted.

Liverpool Alan
November 22nd, 2007, 09:01 PM
Shulas restauraunt 270west 43rd St @ 8th.

went in february didnt need to eat again untill june.
Amazing place great steaks great service
(pricey but worth it)

LEGEND-K
January 23rd, 2008, 03:32 AM
is there any place i can find some real chinese meal? spicier the better.

i can handle KFC or pizzahut or some,but not for all three meals,i'm guessing there could be a china town arround there?

NYatKNIGHT
January 23rd, 2008, 12:20 PM
Yes, Chinatown covers many blocks and you will not have a problem finding Chinese food there or anywhere in the city.

Chinatown (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=8349)

lofter1
January 23rd, 2008, 07:58 PM
What was the POLL in this thread for?

MidtownGuy
January 23rd, 2008, 08:29 PM
I paid a second visit to Paprika in the East Village, really good Italian food.
Nice atmosphere, cozy, hip, friendly and attentive staff. Homemade pasta. Interesting people, I highly recommend it.

nyc_obsessed
March 2nd, 2008, 09:25 AM
I love Paesano's of Mulberry St. Awesome Authentic Italian!! Great reasonable prices too! I go there whenever I am in the city. I also am obsessed with Rice to Riches. It is like a 5-10 minute walk from Mulberry St. IT HAS THE BEST RICE PUDDING!!!!!!!!!!!! :D

Bob
May 3rd, 2008, 10:14 AM
What a terrific surprise...Bond 45 restaurant on 45th at Times Square. The neon sign was simply dazzling, the best new sign in many years! It looked like something straight out of the 1930s, or that it had jumped from Radio City Music Hall to here. A real work of art, not just some monstrous TV set. So my wife and I checked out the interior, and here again the theme continued with a beautiful art deco interior. I spoke with one of the floor managers who said the art deco was done on purpose, and they brought in some professional set designers to give it a patina to make it look its alleged age...brilliant.

Now let's get down to the food. My wife had an octopus salad, which she liked. I had a pasta dish; the pasta was slightly undercooked but the seasoning was very good and made for a good meal. Service was excellent. The wine list was decent.

This place doesn't need much improvement, but I would suggest that Bond 45 add the following to its menu:

Garlic or wasabi mashed potatoes
Macaroni & Cheese
Spaghetti with plain tomato sauce

Bond 45: we liked it. The show begins on the sidewalk.

Sunnygirl
June 15th, 2008, 05:01 AM
I am sorry, this question is going to be vague... but I haven't been to NYC in several years (pre 9/11). However, I will be in the city at the end of the month, and was just thinking about this dinner that I used to go to somewhere on the upper east side, that had huge - I mean huge muffins that they would slice in half and grill up with butter.

I know... not the most healthy sounding, but they sure were good. However, for the life of me, I just can't remember the name of the place or exact location... any new yorkers able to help me out? It would be greatly appreciated.

Also, I will be staying on the upper west side (88th & Riverside)... any recommendations for good restaurants in the area?
:)

brianac
June 15th, 2008, 06:52 AM
I can't help you with your Upper East Side question, but I'm sure someone will.

Upper West Side eating places.

Manhattan Diner, Broadway at 77th. great breakfast, great strawberry cheescake and a pretty decent menu.

Barney Greengrass, Amsterdam Avenue at 86th. great sandwiches.

H & H Bagels Broadway at 81st. really good fresh bagels, you could get fillers for them at Zabars next door and have a picnic in Riverside Park.

There are hundreds of eating places on the Upper West Side, check out the menu's HERE (http://www.menupages.com/restaurants.asp?areaid=3)

Sunnygirl
June 15th, 2008, 07:41 AM
That's a great site... thanks.

I also found this site, while looking around online...

http://167.153.150.32/RI/web/index.do;jsessionid=3D16B2434E13AFC783E1E451DB2316 64?method=goldenAppleList

You can check the health inspections for restaurants in NYC... pretty helpful... although, sometimes a little gross :rolleyes:

brianac
June 15th, 2008, 07:56 AM
Thanks for the site link.

Enjoy your visit.

.pulchritudinous.
June 19th, 2008, 08:03 AM
Serendipity3: I went here last year when I was visiting New York with a friend after seeing the movie (Serendipity). To be completely honest, it's not worth it. The area was extremely crowded, due to the fact they have the shop as soon as you enter the restaurant. It took quite a long time for even those that reserved seating to be seated. While the staff was friendly, it was hard to get their attention, and if you did, it took an even longer time to return whatever you had just requested. The "Frozzzen Hot Chocolate" that they are so famous for could be bought at a Starbucks for half the price. It was decent food but extremely overpriced. (Mainly because of its status.) I wouldn't recommend it unless you were dieing to go eat there, and even then, I don't think I'd recommend it.

There was this Mexican restaurant, and I'm not even sure if it's still there, since it was about three years ago since I ate there. It was in the surrounding area of Grand Central Station, right down the road. It had theeee best chimichangas, in my opinion. If I ever figure out the name and the exact location, I'll be sure to post it.

NewYorkDoc
June 19th, 2008, 11:35 AM
^ Your description of Serendipity is correct.

The Benniest
June 21st, 2008, 01:29 PM
Restaurants Prepare for Big Switch: No Trans Fat
By ANEMONA HARTOCOLLIS (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/h/anemona_hartocollis/index.html?inline=nyt-per)
Published: June 21, 2008

Say you are given a choice of two cookies. One is made with butter, the other with partially hydrogenated vegetable oil. Both have the same amount of calories from fat. Which do you choose?

If you picked the butter cookie, you can keep eating. But the one made with P.H.V.O., as it is known in the trade, is forbidden come July 1, when the final stage of the New York City health department’s ban of artificial (but not naturally occurring) trans fat in restaurant food goes into effect.

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/06/21/nyregion/21trans_650.jpg
Ozier Muhammad/The New York Times
Paul Haye of Christie’s Jamaican Patties of Brooklyn with a tray of his coco bread.

Such is the complicated — some say culturally biased — world of trans fat regulation. Old-fashioned Crisco has been outlawed in the interest of reducing heart disease because of its so-called industrial fat content (though there is a new replacement on the market), but many of the ingredients your grandmother warned you about — including butter, palm oil and lard — are back in style and completely legal.

New York City has officially embraced the mantra that natural is better, forcing restaurants and other commercial food purveyors to add baked goods to fried foods among those that must be free of trans fat or risk fines up to $2,000.

To calm the fears of restaurateurs that their business may suffer, city officials have set up a veritable trans fat industrial complex in the 18 months since the ban was announced.

They created a Trans Fat Help Center, complete with telephone hotline and Web site, notransfatnyc.org (http://notransfatnyc.org/), and hired a former senior editor for Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia, Laura Stanley, to run it. Ms. Stanley, who is paid through a three-year $650,000 contract with the hospitality management school at the Brooklyn-based New York City College of Technology, has conducted a series of workshops for food preparers on how to adapt.

The city’s health department has also enlisted the American Institute of Baking, based in Kansas, to perfect trans fat-free bulk recipes for chewy chocolate cookies (trans fat-free shortenings tended to make the cookies too crispy), durable pie crust and other comfort foods, to prove to skeptics that the textures and “mouth feel” they love can be accomplished without trans fats. The institute tested oils, shortenings and margarines from six manufacturers to analyze the color, crumb, mouth feel and the way they cut and taste in recipes for pie crusts, croissants, Danish, layer cakes, pound cakes, cookies and sweet buns, until Ms. Stanley was satisfied that the results would convince restaurants that they could make the transition.

Since New York announced its trans fat ban, officials from about a dozen other cities, including Boston, Philadelphia and Seattle, have called the Trans Fat Help Center for advice in implementing their own bans.

Ms. Stanley, a trim, disarmingly frank woman in her 40s with a culinary degree and a pedagogic streak, is a tireless campaigner for her cause and has made a habit of dropping into restaurants as she travels around the city.

One recent day, after going to a nearby gym to work out, she dropped in on Paul and Jackie Haye, owners of Christie’s Jamaican Patties, a storefront shop in Prospect Heights, Brooklyn. Mr. Haye said that when he received a health department bulletin about eight months ago outlining the impending ban and attendant penalties, he considered reverting to lard but was wary, because lard “has high cholesterol, so we try not to mess with it.”

Since he received the bulletin, Mr. Haye, 47, has converted his Jamaican beef patty dough, coco bread, rock cake and other recipes he inherited from his uncle — who began the business 40 years ago — from BBS shortening (it’s partially hydrogenated) to a trans fat-free shortening sold by Admiration Foods, which he found at Restaurant Depot, a popular food service supply company. He said in a recent interview that the transition has been easier than he expected: customers seem not to have noticed any difference.

Executives at the city’s bigger bakeries and chains have also gotten to know Ms. Stanley personally. Stuart Zaro, president of Zaro’s New York Bakery, described her as a kind of kitchen psychotherapist to whom he could express a few good-natured gripes.

He recalls complaining to her about what he estimates as a 20 percent increase in cost to bake without trans fats, as well as the clerical work involved in documenting his company’s conversion to the holy grail of trans fat-free baking.

Bakeries like his must now fill out “spec sheets” for each recipe, listing ingredients by weight from heaviest to lightest, along with the trans-fat content, for, say, German chocolate cake. Small amounts of partially hydrogenated vegetable oil, shortening or margarine, less than half a gram per serving, are permitted.

The ingredient lists are for city inspectors, not the public. For a bakery that makes as many items as Zaro’s, “it’s going to be like the size of ‘War and Peace,’ ” Mr. Zaro said.

Mr. Zaro said the toughest recipe to adapt to the new regime had been chocolate chip cookies, which were too hard at first, but “we got it done and it’s done.”

Another chain, Panera Bread, found that making crispy strudel without trans fat was so hard they just took it off the menu, said Scott Davis, the company’s chief concept officer.

Mr. Zaro said that his bakers had always used butter as well as shortening and margarine in products like croissants, muffins, cakes and cupcakes, and that when they removed trans fat they might have added a bit more butter.

“You can pick your poison, I guess that’s what it comes down to, although butter tastes so good,” he said, good humoredly.

Ms. Stanley acknowledged that many of the city’s most upscale bakeries used lots of butter, which carries its own hazards. “But they’re French!” she said, playfully.

The city’s embrace of butter and other natural but highly saturated fats, like palm oil, is among the most controversial aspects of the ban. There have been some complaints about palm oil, Ms. Stanley said, because while trans fat retains its plasticity at a variety of temperatures, palm oil shortening can become either too hard at cold temperatures or too soft and even runny at warm ones.

“Down the line, we’re going to see more shortening on the market that does not have that problem,” she predicted.

Two of the alternatives recommended on the city health department’s trans fat Web site — Clear Valley All Purpose Shortening and Crisco All-Vegetable Shortening — have 25 percent saturated fat. And they are at the low end of the scale. The city also lists several palm-oil based products, like Superb All Purpose Palm Shortening and Ventura Pastry Margarine, that contain 50 percent or more saturated fat (pure butter is 64 percent saturated fat).

The goal of manufacturers has been to keep the saturated fat levels equal to or lower than the combined saturated and trans fat level in the artificial products they are intended to replace, according to Robert Earl, senior director for nutrition policy with the Grocery Manufacturers Association.

City officials defend the switch. Dr. Sonia Angell, director of the city’s cardiovascular disease prevention and control program, said it would be highly impractical for the city to try to regulate naturally occurring saturated fats. Besides, she said, “We act on the evidence that we have, and the evidence is that gram for gram, trans fat is worse for you than saturated fat.”

Others say the scientific evidence is less than clear-cut, though.
Dr. Robert H. Eckel, a professor of medicine who specializes in cardiology and endocrinology at the University of Colorado (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/u/university_of_colorado/index.html?inline=nyt-org) in Denver, said he was concerned that New Yorkers might feel so virtuous eating trans fat-free foods that they would overlook the dangers of saturated fats, which also contribute to obesity and heart disease.

Dr. Eckel hailed New York’s efforts to reduce trans fat but said the American Heart Association (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/a/american_heart_association/index.html?inline=nyt-org), of which he is a former president, “is concerned about substituting trans fats with shortenings that are high in saturated fat.”

“It’s not a matter of which is better or which is worse,” he explained. “The American Heart Association is concerned with both types of fats.”

Dariush Mozaffarian, an assistant professor of medicine and epidemiology at Harvard, said last week that some research suggested that trans fats may change the metabolism of fat cells, making people put on more dangerous abdominal weight. Dr. Mozaffarian said that given a choice between a cookie made with butter and one made with artificial trans fats, he, like New York’s health department, would take the butter.

“I may be a rogue cardiologist for saying that, but I think the science supports it,” he said. “That being said, I’d rather have vegetable oils than butter. That shouldn’t be missed, either.”

During a recent lecture for food preparers, Ms. Stanley echoed Dr. Mozaffarian, telling her audience of day-care providers that saturated fat was better than artificial trans fat because it is natural. The point was not lost on one participant, who asked whether coconut oil was an acceptable substitute.

“It’s 90 percent saturated fat,” Ms. Stanley said, cringing.

The woman was unfazed. “We use it in rice and peas in the Caribbean,” she said. “I love it.”

Copyright 2008 New York Times Company

MidtownGuy
June 21st, 2008, 02:33 PM
The Jamaican place in the picture is great, I've had their veggie patty with coco bread many times. Yum.:)

Personally I use olive oil, or pure natural butter. What was good enough for my 96 year old grandmother is good enough for me.

Sunnygirl
June 21st, 2008, 02:46 PM
I was dying to go to Serendipity too.... until I read their health inspection report.... now, NOT SO MUCH !!!

The Benniest
July 6th, 2008, 12:25 PM
Restaurants Prepare for Big Switch: No Trans FatJunior's, Magnolia and other top bakeries over new trans fat limit

Friday, July 4th 2008, 10:30 PM

The shell-encased treats at two of the city's top bakeries tested well above the Health Department's trans-fat limit that went into effect Tuesday, according to lab results commissioned by the Daily News.

Veniero's, the popular East Village eatery where one cannoli contained trans-fat levels four times above the city limit, vowed Friday to pull the shells from the shelves until the supplier it deals with bans the bad-for-you fat.

"I want to thank you for alerting me," owner Robert Zerilli (http://www.nydailynews.com/topics/Robert+Zerilli) said.
Veniero's wasn't alone.

The taboo fat was also found in a cannoli at Ferrara (http://www.nydailynews.com/topics/Ferrara)'s in Little Italy (http://www.nydailynews.com/topics/Italy), a chocolate cupcake at Magnolia Bakery in Greenwich Village (http://www.nydailynews.com/topics/Greenwich+Village), a croissant at Sarabeth's on the upper West Side and a strawberry cheesecake at Junior's in Brooklyn (http://www.nydailynews.com/topics/Brooklyn).

"I'm blown away by this," said Ernesto Lepore (http://www.nydailynews.com/topics/Ernesto+Lepore), president of Ferrara's. "I don't understand why trans fat is turning up."

Under Health Department rules, a serving of food can't contain more than .5 grams of trans fat, an unhealthy substance that can clog arteries and cause heart disease.

http://www.nydailynews.com/img/2008/07/05/amd_venieros-bakery.jpg
Famed East Village Veniero's Pasticceria &
Caffe served up a cannoli that was over the
limit for trans fat.

The ban began on fried foods a year ago and extended to baked goods on Tuesday.

That's when the Daily News bought the favorite baked treats and delivered them for analysis to Alliance Technologies (http://www.nydailynews.com/topics/Alliance+Technologies) in New Jersey (http://www.nydailynews.com/topics/New+Jersey).

The five items were scanned for oil, which was extracted to determine how much trans fat was in the sample. The results were shocking.

A Veniero's cannoli contained 2.1 grams of trans fat but Zerilli believed the shells he bought from a Brooklyn-based supplier were free of it. The baker later told him the switch was being made over this weekend, well within the city's three-month grace period.

"I can control what I make, but when you buy something from a supplier, you depend on them," he said yesterday. "I'm taking all the cannoli shells off the shelves now ... I'm not here to break the law."

The other trans-fat contents ranged from .9 grams at Ferrara's to 5.3 grams at Junior's. The Junior's sample was far larger than the rest - about four slices of cheesecake - and the percent of trans fat for the item was 1.6%.

"We're going to do our own independent testing and if it turns out there is trans fat then of course we'll modify our recipe to comply with the code," said a Junior's spokesman.

Butter-loving owners at Sarabeth's and Magnolia Bakery were howling that the findings were incorrect.

"How can that be when there is only butter in it [the croissant]?" asked Sarabeth Levine (http://www.nydailynews.com/topics/Sarabeth+Levine), owner of Sarabeth's on the upper West Side.

Indeed, butter and other dairy products include trace amounts of natural trans fat. The tests cannot determine whether the trans fat found was man-made - like margarine - or natural.

Health Commissioner Thomas Frieden (http://www.nydailynews.com/topics/Thomas+Frieden) said the agency focus is on artificial trans-fat, but he noted, "Just because something doesn't have artificial trans-fat doesn't mean it's a health food. It means it doesn't have an artificial product in it that is going to make you more likely to have a heart attack."

The Health Department won't test food in various bakeries; instead, it will check for trans fat by looking at ingredient labels.

Also, officials will not punish bakeries if they find more than .5 grams of trans fat, as long as it is natural trans fat, from sources such as butter.

Copyright 2008 New York Daily News

The Benniest
July 7th, 2008, 12:09 AM
Information about this year's Restaurant Week has been released at NYVisit.com:

http://nycvisit.com/restaurantweek/

Book now!

Fenella Fudge
July 31st, 2008, 09:59 AM
I've booked us in to The View for a meal on our 2nd night but having just read a bad review I'm thinking of changing it.

Anyone else think the food is terrible?!

fitnessyl33
July 31st, 2008, 10:43 AM
i would have loved to go to Bubba Gump Shrimps, but unfortunately it was too packed. ...did you know that they assign the tables via lottery system? that's too crazy, but i guess they have some good shrimps :)

The Benniest
July 31st, 2008, 02:53 PM
I guess it depends on what Bubba's you went too. If it's the Times Square Bubba Gump, I can definitely believe that. Every time I walked by, it seemed to be PACKED. I'd much rather get a hotdog or pretzel at a stand than wait in line for that long to eat something I can get at home. ;)

pacz
August 7th, 2008, 12:19 PM
I've booked us in to The View for a meal on our 2nd night but having just read a bad review I'm thinking of changing it.

Anyone else think the food is terrible?!

The food is sub-par, I would just go for drinks.

gmlefty
October 8th, 2008, 08:21 PM
I will be in Astoria Queens the next two nights and was looking for a couple good restruants.
Something less than $50 a meal.
Steaks or Italian food?
Any suggestions?
I am from Ohio and do not know area well but have a car.

Also, will be in Manhatten tomorrow night for dinner.
Any suggestions around broadway??
THX
Greg

The Benniest
January 19th, 2009, 03:23 AM
So I've become next to addicted to MTV's new show "The City" (http://www.mtv.com/ontv/dyn/the-city/series.jhtml), starring The Hills' Whitney Port.

While watching the various episodes, I'm constantly mentally logging the many many restaurants that make appearances and the areas in New York City where I have been and visited. So I've put together a list of restuarants that MTV names IN the show, and was wondering if anyone wanted to give their opinion on all of them or just a few that you've been too and ate at? Much appreciated!

---

Nero (Meat Packing District) (46 Gansevoort St)
Cornelia St. Cafe (West Village) (29 Cornelia St)
Philippe (Midtown) (33 E 60th St)
Brass Monkey Bar (Meat Packing District) (55 Little West 12th St)
The Stanton Social (Lower East Side) (99 Stanton St)
Cafe Noir (SoHo) (32 Grand St #A)
Tenjune (Meat Packing District) (26 Little W 12th St) (I'm sure this is a 21+ club, but whatever)
Extra Virgin (West Village) (259 W 4th St)
The Smith (East Village) (55 3rd Ave)
Caffe Falai (SoHo) (265 Lafayette St)
The Diner (Meat Packing District) (44 9th Ave) (seen this place, but never been)
Los Dados (Meat Packing District) (73 Gansevoort St)
Il Bastardo (Chelsea) (191 7th Ave)

---

OKAY! So that was more restuarants than I expected to type out, but whatever... :) If you have any opinions about any of the restaurants above, anything would be helpful for planning my July trip this summer.

Thanks so much!
Ben

Ninjahedge
January 19th, 2009, 09:58 AM
Don't bother with the Meat Packing district.

There are only a few places left that are still the "original" or anything close to it, all the others are trendy overpriced "look at me" palaces.....

You are better looking for places NOT on television! Look for the ones that they do not go to on the show, but you still see them walk past...

Bronxbombers
January 19th, 2009, 09:07 PM
I will have a meal at Robert DeNiro's restaurant in New York City. Does anyone know where Robert DeNiro's restaurant is in which boruogh in New York City?

GreenwichBoy
January 19th, 2009, 10:32 PM
^^^ Tribeca Grill 375 Greenwich Street

Ninjahedge
January 20th, 2009, 10:02 AM
Right near that fancy-scmancy Sushi place I believe..... Noh? I forget the name.

There is also a pretty good, and expensive, Greek restaurant right nerby as well.

Lots of stuff, but not for the light of wallet.

.pulchritudinous.
February 25th, 2009, 01:58 AM
I do have to make a recommendation: Bogota Bistro. It's located in Park Slope Brooklyn... right on restaurant row, I guess it's called. Fantastic food if you like Central and South American food.

Anyone else ever been here?

NYC_2011
March 2nd, 2009, 04:19 PM
My wife and I are going to NYC for the first time in the 1st week of June this Summer. Our anniversary is during that week as well and we plan that's the only time we want to do any special type of fine dining. Other than that for the remainder of the week, just eating at regular cool places since we are there more for the city and learning about all the areas cos we plan on moving there in about 2-3 years.

For our anniversary night, any recommendations on a scenery type of restaurant but for under 100 bucks total for 2 people? It can go over 100 if that includes tips and taxes, I'm fine with that but don't know which restaurants are for nice scenery (not necessarily high rise buildings, I know those are extrememly expensive) and would like to visit there websites to check out there menus for pricing.

Any help would be appreciated. Thanks everyone!

meesalikeu
July 16th, 2009, 09:01 PM
So I've become next to addicted to MTV's new show "The City" (http://www.mtv.com/ontv/dyn/the-city/series.jhtml), starring The Hills' Whitney Port.

While watching the various episodes, I'm constantly mentally logging the many many restaurants that make appearances and the areas in New York City where I have been and visited. So I've put together a list of restuarants that MTV names IN the show, and was wondering if anyone wanted to give their opinion on all of them or just a few that you've been too and ate at? Much appreciated!

---

Nero (Meat Packing District) (46 Gansevoort St)
Cornelia St. Cafe (West Village) (29 Cornelia St)
Philippe (Midtown) (33 E 60th St)
Brass Monkey Bar (Meat Packing District) (55 Little West 12th St)
The Stanton Social (Lower East Side) (99 Stanton St)
Cafe Noir (SoHo) (32 Grand St #A)
Tenjune (Meat Packing District) (26 Little W 12th St) (I'm sure this is a 21+ club, but whatever)
Extra Virgin (West Village) (259 W 4th St)
The Smith (East Village) (55 3rd Ave)
Caffe Falai (SoHo) (265 Lafayette St)
The Diner (Meat Packing District) (44 9th Ave) (seen this place, but never been)
Los Dados (Meat Packing District) (73 Gansevoort St)
Il Bastardo (Chelsea) (191 7th Ave)

---

OKAY! So that was more restuarants than I expected to type out, but whatever... :) If you have any opinions about any of the restaurants above, anything would be helpful for planning my July trip this summer.

Thanks so much!
Ben

haha i live in the mp neighborhood and have been to almost all of these places at least once. if youy are talking food over the scene then they are all uniformly mediocre and overpriced. i mean really, consider the show you heard about them from!

The Benniest
July 19th, 2009, 04:21 PM
Haha, true I guess. :rolleyes:

Derek2k3
October 6th, 2009, 10:11 AM
Michelin bestows 3-star honor on East Side gustatory great Daniel and chef Daniel Boulud

BY Jim Farber
DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER

Tuesday, October 6th 2009, 4:00 AM

http://www.nydailynews.com/lifestyle/food/2009/10/06/2009-10-06_daniels_3star_boon_michelin_bestows_honor_on_e_ side_gustatory_great.html#ixzz0TA2iuPJR


They serve raisins from Iran, coffee from Rwanda and halibut baked in Himalayan rock salt - as long as you're ready to shell out roughly $200 per person.

But all those exotic and pricey ingredients at Restaurant Daniel just paid off big-time with a rare three-star rating awarded by the admired and feared Michelin Guide, out Tuesday.

For the first time in its 16-year history, the esteemed French eatery on the upper East Side - whose idea of a "recession" prix fixe goes for $98 - will breathe the heady three-star air shared by only four other New York dining halls: Jean Georges, Le Bernardin, Masa and Per Se.

Michelin bestows its highest star designation on restaurants that feature "exceptional cuisine, worth a special journey."

"Daniel has been visited eight times by eight different inspectors," explains Michelin Guides Director Jean-Luc Naret. "When you arrive at three stars, they must be excellent all the time."

As for the most awarded individual chef of the year, it's Michael White, whose Alto earned two stars (signifying "excellent cuisine, worth a detour"), while his Convivio and Marea snagged one star each.

Not every big-name foodie fared so well this year. Alain Ducasse's Ardour was slapped down from two stars to one, as was Mario Batali's Del Posto. Other establishments docked a star include Cru, Allen & Delancey, Fiamma, Fleur de Sel and JoJo. Batali's Babbo, which lost its single star last year, wrestled it back this time.

Several brand-new restaurants bolted out of the gate with good ratings, including Corton - Drew Nieporent's French place in Tribeca - which earned two stars, and Minetta Tavern in Greenwich Village, which earned one. Nearly all the starry places can be found in Manhattan, though Dressler, Peter Luger's and The River Cafe are in Brooklyn.

While every one of the top rated dining spots will run you at least $100 a person, Michelin includes a separate category known as Big Gourmand Restaurants, which charge $40 or less for two courses and wine. They range from Anthony Bourdain's Les Halles to a tiny new vegetarian place in the East Village with the unappetizing name Dirt Candy.

jfarber@nydailynews.com

http://www.nydailynews.com/lifestyle/food/2009/10/06/2009-10-06_daniels_3star_boon_michelin_bestows_honor_on_e_ side_gustatory_great.html#ixzz0TA2eZhOH

Merry
October 16th, 2009, 07:21 AM
October 15, 2009

A Reprieve for Tavern on the Green

By Glenn Collins

Preventing a mid-December shuttering of Tavern on the Green (http://topics.nytimes.com/topics/reference/timestopics/organizations/t/tavern_on_the_green/index.html), a federal judge said Thursday that the landmark restaurant in Central Park — which filed for bankruptcy last month — will be able to remain open during the lucrative Christmas season and accept restaurant and party reservations through New Year’s Eve.

The current operators of the restaurant had threatened to lay off all of its more than 400 employees in December unless its landlord, the Parks Department, permitted it to remain past the expiration of its operating license at midnight on Dec. 31. The operators, the LeRoy family, said they needed additional time to auction and remove fixtures, artwork and furnishings it says are worth more than $8 million.

Judge Allan L. Gropper said from the bench in United States Bankruptcy Court in Manhattan that “I’d like to see the restaurant stay open,” adding that allowing “two weeks to a month” in January would be “a reasonable transition period.”

The city’s Law Department had suggested such an extension on Wednesday, saying in a court filing that it would benefit the restaurant, its creditors and “the visiting public and the city as a whole.”

Keith N. Costa, Tavern’s bankruptcy lawyer, said “we are completely satisfied with the result,” referring to the judge’s statements from the bench.

The future operator of the restaurant, Dean J. Poll, who runs the Boathouse in Central Park, had opposed any extension, saying he was considering closing the restaurant — and letting go of its employees for two years during renovations — if he couldn’t take over the license immediately on Jan. 1. In August, the city awarded him the new 20-year license to operate Tavern.

“The judge made clear that a transition for a very brief time was understandable,” said Barry B. LePatner, Mr. Poll’s lawyer, adding: “We remain confident that we will reach an amicable agreement among all parties so that Mr. Poll’s stewardship of the renovated facility can begin as soon as possible.”

John Turchiano, a spokesman for the New York Hotel Trades Council, which represents the restaurant’s workers, said that “we are delighted with this turn of events, which insures that anyone wishing to visit Tavern on the Green before the end of the year will be accommodated.”

On Monday Tavern on the Green Limited Partnership, the current operating company, asked for a temporary restraining order in bankruptcy court to enable management to occupy the restaurant for 90 days in the new year, claiming Tavern and its creditors needed time to present, auction and pack up its current artwork and fixtures. In court Thursday a lawyer for Tavern said that Christie’s and Sotheby’s had advised that a three-month period was required.

But in a Wednesday court filing, the city countered that the auction of Tavern’s fixtures need not take three months, since potential buyers could be given a sale catalog of available items and then invited into the restaurant during December to view potential purchases, for a scheduled auction “on a specific date in January, 2010,” the filing said. It added that “there is no reason why the auction or disposition cannot be successfully completed in early to mid-January” and the restaurant vacated “by no later than Jan. 31.”

Judge Gropper also said that he hoped the restaurant would continue to be called Tavern on the Green, though he didn’t rule on the issue. After he took over the license in 1973, Warner LeRoy trademarked the name and through the years his family expended legal fees to defend the trademark, which it says is worth $19 million, and therefore an asset that could appease some of Tavern’s creditors.

But on Friday the city said it will take legal action to own the right to the Tavern trademark. It is expected to argue that a license holder had no right to claim the name Tavern on the Green, which the restaurant has had since 1934 when Robert Moses was the parks commissioner.

http://dinersjournal.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/10/15/a-reprieve-for-tavern-on-the-green/

Merry
November 14th, 2009, 09:59 PM
A "Grand Park" Critic Speaks Out

Yesterday, we posted a story about Jesse Hartman's continuing struggle to open "Grand Park," a glass-enclosed restaurant on Grand Street. In June, Community Board 3 agreed to support his application for a liquor license.

But because Hartman and his prospective landlord, the Seward Park Housing Corp., have been in protracted lease negotiations, he must ask CB3 for an extension. A Seward Park Co-op resident, Ernest Marshall, will be coming to the board's SLA Committee Monday night to oppose Hartman's plan.

In a phone conversation a short time ago, Marshall told me he does not want to see any more bars or restaurants serving liquor in the vicinity of the co-op. "It's not a night club neighborhood - it's a quiet, peaceful neighborhood," he said. In a letter distributed to all Seward Park residents, Marshall questioned why the co-op would "support an establishment that has the capability of converting to a bar/disco." He also expressed concern about opening a restaurant near a high school (the Seward Park campus is on the next block) and asked why the restaurant, described in CB3's resolution as "family friendly," needs a liquor license and has asked to stay open past 11pm.

Seward Park President Michael Tumminia has emphasized that, although negotiations are continuing, Hartman does not have a signed lease for the retail space, 365 Grand Street. Marshall said he has not discussed the matter with anyone on the co-op's board of directors.

Yesterday, Hartman said he called Marshall and they spoke for a few minutes before Marshall abruptly hung up the phone. Marshall said today he found Hartman "rude and argumentative," and that he politely ended the conversation.

http://www.thelodownny.com/leslog/2009/11/a-grand-park-critic-speaks-out.html#more



The Battle for "Grand Park" Rages On




http://www.thelodownny.com/.a/6a01127920a5dc28a401287599f307970c-500pi (http://www.thelodownny.com/.a/6a01127920a5dc28a401287599f307970c-pi)

Preliminary architectural sketches depicting "Grand Park's" proposed glass-enclosed backyard




Jesse Hartman's six-month long quest to open a dramatic, glass-enclosed restaurant on a desolate stretch of Grand Street takes him back to Community Board 3's SLA Committee next week. Back in June, the Community Board signaled its approval for"Grand Park's" liquor license. But lease negotiations with Hartman's landlord are still not completed, and CB3's approval was only good for six months. So, on Monday, he must go before the SLA Committee for an extension.

Complicating matters, Hartman has a new nemesis: Seward Park Co-op resident Ernest Marshall (the space is located in a shopette owned by the co-op). He has been sliding letters under the doors of the complex's 1700 apartments, urging his neighbors to oppose "Grand Park's" liquor license. In May, during his initial appearance before CB3, a small number of residents derailed Hartman's application due to concerns about late night noise. After meeting with opponents in the neighborhood and drawing up sound-proofing plans, he satisfied their concerns, and prevailed before the board one month later. Marshall was not part of the group opposing "Grand Park" over the summer.




In his letter, Marshall notes that, in the past, he and "other cooperators have bonded together to eliminate bars, discos and nightclubs similar to those north of Delancey Street. We all know how destructive these establishments are to residential neighborhoods." The letter said he had been in contact with Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver's office about his concerns.

During his CB3 presentation, Hartman explained that he wanted to open a fine-dining restaurant, not a night club. The interior space, in a strip of retail stores just east of Essex Street, is quite small. Hartman intends to build a glass-enclosed structure in the restaurant's backyard.

Hartman enjoyed strong support from several residents, including Linda Jones, the moderator of a Seward Park message board. In the past day, she posted a note encouraging other supporters of "Grand Park" to attend Monday night's meeting. The space is owned by the co-op, which has stepped up efforts in recent months to lease multiple vacant storefronts it owns.

Michael Tumminia, the president of the Seward Park Housing Corp., says negotiations are still ongoing with Hartman, as well as with other potential tenants. Both he and Hartman said they could not discuss the details.
In a conversation with The Lo-Down this morning, Hartman did say he has taken on new partners. Declining to reveal their identity just yet, he said they run "numerous respected restaurants worldwide and are well-funded."

The previous tenant, Isabella's Oven, closed (rather spectacularly) earlier this year, following a rent dispute with the co-op. Hartman said he tried contacting Marshall to discuss his concerns but he "hung up the phone abruptly."

Monday's meeting begins at 630pm, at the JASA.Green Residence, 200 East 5th Street (at Bowery).

http://www.thelodownny.com/leslog/2009/11/the-battle-for-grand-park-part-trois.html#more

Merry
January 1st, 2010, 12:06 AM
Lights Going Out at Famed N.Y. Eatery

By SUZANNE SATALINE

The trademark dazzling chandeliers at New York City's Tavern on the Green restaurant will go dark after New Year's Eve.

The eatery, known for its Central Park address, is a victim of the recession and competition. Its closing has touched off a flurry of litigation, as the owners seek protection in bankruptcy court from a host of creditors, including a family member, a cookbook publisher, food contractors and a union pension plan. The owners, members of the LeRoy family, also have asked a federal court judge for rights to the name of the restaurant, a request the city is fighting.

Tavern, with 2008 sales of $33 million, was the second-highest-grossing independent restaurant in the country, according to Reed Business Information, behind the Tao Las Vegas Restaurant and Nightclub. But Tavern's sales slipped by nearly $4 million from 2007 to the end of 2008.

View Slideshow (http://online.wsj.com/article/SB126221150578610901.html?mod=googlenews_wsj#)

"The Tavern's heyday had probably come and gone. It had lost some of the luster some time ago," said Adrian Benepe, New York City's parks commissioner.

Tavern lost its license with the city this summer, when officials chose to award a contract in the space to rival restaurateur Dean Poll, operator of the Boathouse Café, another Central Park eatery. Mr. Poll has promised to inject $25 million of his own money to renovate the Tavern space, reopening in the spring, his lawyer said.

Tavern promptly filed for bankruptcy. Jennifer Oz LeRoy, chief executive of the restaurant, and daughter of its creator, said in a statement that the filing hinged on two factors: "The extreme financial distress brought on by the current financial crisis and the City of New York's decision not to renew our lease." She couldn't be reached for further comment.

City officials said they were impressed with Mr. Poll's track record and expect the city to make more money under the new business arrangement.

The city took in 3.5% of the gross receipts at the Tavern, or at least $1 million a year. At the Boathouse, Mr. Poll turns over 16%, or a minimum of $1.1 million a year of his gross receipts, a parks spokesman said. The new percentages haven't been decided upon, a spokeswoman said.

The restaurant lists hundreds of creditors in its bankruptcy filings, including meat sellers, uniform companies and credit concerns. The largest creditor is a bank, owed $6 million for a line of credit and a mortgage on a warehouse.

Also owned money is Kay LeRoy, wife of founder Warner LeRoy, who loaned $1.9 million to the Tavern. A cluster of benefit and pension funds managed by the New York Hotel and Motel Trades Council, which represents the Tavern's 400 employees, says it is due at least $1.7 million.

Meanwhile, the parties are fighting over what is seen as the restaurant's most valuable asset: its name. The city has sued Tavern, as well as LeRoy Adventures Inc., an operating concern, in federal court in Manhattan, hoping to stop the family from using the restaurant's moniker in future ventures.

Tavern has countersued, saying that Mr. LeRoy trademarked the name, which is now appraised at $19 million. City officials say if that was done, it was done so illegally and that the restaurant space, created in Central Park by legendary parks commissioner Robert Moses, was called Tavern on the Green as far back as the 1930s.

"The city had a succession of concessionaires," said Gerald Singleton, senior counsel for the city. "The LeRoys are one in a long line. They didn't own the premises."

The LeRoys received the license for the site in 1974 and opened their restaurant two years later. It overlooks what was historically a sheep grazing area, and was known for its gaudy décor and mirrored walls. Zagat rates Tavern's décor 25 out of 30 but its food a 15, calling it "pedestrian American fare."

With the restaurant facing its demise, though, diners snapped up all tickets, priced as high as $129 a person, for the New Year's dinner, at which the restaurant plans to serve foie gras, lobster bisque, roast venison and filet mignon.

Suzanne Tobak, a senior director with the Actors Fund, a social services nonprofit, said she was last there in November, for the opening-night party for the revival of the Broadway show "Ragtime," which is closing, too. A party there, she said, "was iconically New York."

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB126221150578610901.html?mod=googlenews_wsj

Merry
January 7th, 2010, 11:54 PM
History of Tavern on the Green being sold, piece by shiny piece

Joanna Molloy

http://assets.nydailynews.com/img/2010/01/07/alg_crystal_room.jpg
The Crystal Room at the Tavern on the Green.

http://assets.nydailynews.com/img/2010/01/07/amd_tavern_monkey.jpg

Items from the closed New York restaurant will be up for sale Jan. 13 and 14 at Guernsey's auction of Tavern on the Green's treasures.

http://assets.nydailynews.com/img/2010/01/07/amd_tavern_steer.jpg

John Lennon loved Tavern on the Green. So did Michael Jackson, Madonna and the Yankees, but former owner Warner LeRoy cared more about dazzling regular New Yorkers.

"It wasn't about celebrities for Warner," Michael Desiderio, COO of LeRoy Adventures, said yesterday, as workers dismantled the magic, prism by prism.

"No matter who you were, you walked into the Crystal Room and you said, 'Wow!' He was a visionary."

The Baccarat chandeliers there are tagged for sale, as are the Tiffany lamps, the Venetian mirrors, the silver candelabra.

It all goes on the block Wednesday as Guernsey's auction house puts up for sale some 980 lots.

"There are no minimum bids set, so everyone has a chance," says Guernsey's owner Arlan Ettinger.

"Warner created this in 1973, when people didn't even feel safe jogging in Central Park," Desiderio said. "He put millions into it."

For years, it was the top-grossing restaurant in the country, with some 650,000 visitors annually. It might have become "touristy" for hipster flipsters, but for many, it was the place to come and have Prime Rib Au Jus and Cherry Blossom. John Lennon and his son Sean celebrated their joint birthdays there.

"We had one young lady whose christening we did, then her sweet 16, then her wedding," Desiderio said. "What's sad is, people won't have those traditions now."

When the LeRoy family's lease came up, the city put it out for bid, and gave it to Dean Poll, who runs the Boathouse.

Among the treasures ready to go are a 12-foot-tall carved wooden bear, two huge elk, copper monkeys with hats, weather vanes of harness racers, pianos - grand, of course - and a Wurlitzer with Sinatra's "Witchcraft."

The grandson of Harry Warner who grew up on the Warner Bros. back lot and frolicked on the set of "The Wizard of Oz," which his father, Mervyn LeRoy, produced, LeRoy was a showman.

Michael Jackson had his party here after his comeback concert at Madison Square Garden.

"It was the night before 9/11," recalls LeRoy aide-de-camp Shelley Clark. "The concert hadn't gone so well, and Michael was late. Whitney Houston was here, bone-skinny, and Marlon Brando, so fat ...

"Michael wanted the garden set up like a carnival, with games people could play, but Michael didn't want people to eat till he came .... He was very late.

"That munchkin song was driving people to near madness. [Photographer] Patrick McMullan said, 'You've got to shut up the munchkins!' There was a cluster of glory-era Hollywood divas, Ann Miller, Janet Leigh, Rhonda Fleming ... in gowns and jewels. They plopped down and said, 'We're old! We need to be fed!'"

Now, bidders wander the rooms, which look like Xanadu in the last scene of "Citizen Kane."

Only LeRoy was never bitter - and if there's a "Rosebud" object, it's the green chandelier.

"Green was special for Warner," Ettinger says. "Just like from the Emerald City."


http://www.nydailynews.com/ny_local/2010/01/07/2010-01-07_emerald_city_slipping_away_from_us_piece_by_shi ny_piece.html#ixzz0bzPA7QJb

Merry
January 14th, 2010, 02:36 AM
Judge to the LeRoys: It’s All Yours, Almost

By GLENN COLLINS

The donnybrook over the Wormy Chestnut Wood, a legal battle between New York City and the family of the restaurateur Warner LeRoy, is over. And just in the nick of time.

A day before the three-day auction of some 25,000 items from Tavern on the Green, a federal bankruptcy judge ruled late Tuesday that a valuable 3,800-square-foot trove of rare chestnut wall paneling belongs to the LeRoys, who ran Tavern until their license from the Parks Department expired on Dec. 31. The judge said it could be sold in the three-day auction of items from Tavern that begins Wednesday in the shuttered landmark restaurant in Central Park.

The proceeds will go to satisfy some $8 million owed to more than 450 creditors of Tavern, which was padlocked early New Year’s Day. Tavern’s owners had filed for bankruptcy after the city declined to renew their license.

The judge, Allan L. Gropper of the United States Bankruptcy Court in Manhattan, ruled on more than a dozen items — including the wood paneling in the restaurant’s Chestnut room — that are worth as much as $200,000, in a dispute between the city and the family of Mr. LeRoy, who took over Tavern in 1976.

All but one of the disputed items — the steel frame of the restaurant’s iconic canopy — were awarded to the LeRoys, and therefore can be placed in the auction that is being mounted by Guernsey’s Auction House.

The dispute turned on the interpretation of the contract between Tavern’s landlord — the city — and the family of Mr. LeRoy, the impresario who reinvented Tavern in 1976 and made it one of the nation’s highest-grossing restaurants until it succumbed to changing tastes and the economic meltdown last year. Mr. LeRoy’s family continued operating the restaurant after he died in 2001 at age 65.

Judge Gropper ruled that the provisions of a 25-year licensing agreement signed by the city and the LeRoys in 1985 held that most of the disputed items could not be defined as “fixed equipment,” meaning restaurant inventory that could not be removed without “irreparably damaging” the premises. Therefore the LeRoys had the right to auction them off as assets.

Howard Friedman, deputy chief in the city law department’s contracts and real-estate division, commented that “while we are disappointed with the judge’s ruling, and considering all legal options,” he said, “the dispute was over only a few items, and should not prevent the city from moving forward with the planned transition.”

Norman N. Kinel, the lawyer for the unsecured creditors’ committee, said he was “very pleased” with Judge Gropper’s decision, calling it “well-reasoned.”

Mr. Kinel added that the committee was of the opinion that the city “continues to engage in unnecessary, time consuming, expensive and largely frivolous legal battles against Tavern on the Green and its creditors,” he said.

But in court the city’s lawyers have rejected suggestions that the landlord’s claims are frivolous, saying that the city is entitled to ownership of its own park property — the restaurant — and the Tavern on the Green name, which was bestowed on the restaurant in 1934 by the parks department.

The city has conferred a new 20-year operating license for Tavern, starting this year, to Dean J. Poll, operator of the Boathouse restaurant in Central Park.

The judge ruled that after testimony at a Monday hearing, it was “clear that the chestnut paneling could be removed without irreparably damaging the physical condition of the premises.” The wormy chestnut paneling is not actually currently infested, but was cut from blighted trees and is fashionable for its rusticity. Some 3,800 square feet of it, custom carpentered for Tavern’s Chestnut room and its corridors, sheathes the restaurant walls.

Although the city had argued in court that the removal of the paneling would irretrievably damage “the quality of the space,” Judge Gropper chided the city, noting that the parks department had solicited new Tavern operators last year who would propose a new décor for the restaurant.

“Since the city seems to desire a change in the quality of the space, it is particularly inappropriate for it to claim” that removal of the paneling “would damage the old décor,” Judge Gropper ruled.

Among the other disputed items that Judge Gropper ceded to the LeRoys are a 40-foot-long mural painted on canvas that adorns the walls of Tavern’s Park Room; the restaurant’s red canopy, with its Tavern on the Green logo; decorative plaster and wooden figures affixed to the ceilings of Tavern’s Crystal Room and Terrace Room; stage lighting, disco lighting and six banquettes in the Tavern’s upstairs bar.

However, the judge said that there was “no clear testimony that the metal frame” of the Tavern canopy could be easily removed, and since it is part of the exterior of the building, which is landmarked, “under the circumstances,” the judge wrote, the city’s “right to the metal frame is sustained.”

http://dinersjournal.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/01/13/judge-to-the-leroys-its-all-yours-almost/

Merry
April 16th, 2010, 07:28 AM
I hope nothing happens to the building itself.


Empire Diner to close soon

BY SCOTT STIFFLER

It’s official. After good faith negotiations with their landlord fell through, Chelsea’s Empire Diner will close its doors on May 15. (Chelsea Now archive photo)

Your prospects for finding good food, good company and a pleasantly dependable routine on 10th Ave. jut got a little dimmer. This week, Empire Diner made it official: After good faith negotiations with their landlord fell through, the much-loved (and photographed) diner will soon close its doors.

Speaking to Chelsea Now on April 6th, proprietor Renate Gonzalez confirmed “May 15th is our last day of operations. We have lost our lease.” The news, given to her by the landlord’s attorney, came as an unpleasant surprise. Gonzalez: “We had a meeting. We thought we renegotiated and agreed to another ten-year lease; we shook hands. The day before Christmas, we got a message from his attorney that he had singed a lease with somebody else; another restaurant.”

The imminent closing has weighed heavily on Gonzalez ever since; but until now, she’s opted not to go public with the news. “It’s just too emotional. The regulars come in here and break out in tears; and a month and a half is enough to deal with that.”

For Gonzalez, not coming to the diner every day means not only the loss of her livelihood, but the loss of a community where she’s a known face (if not a known name): “I walk down the street and even those who don’t know me by name call me the Empire Diner lady. It’s going to be hard for me not to come to 10th Ave. and 22nd Street. There are people in this neighborhood I’ve known for so long. I’ve known mothers when they were pregnant whose children are in college now.”

Empire will go out with a bang on May 16th—when the diner hosts a party for its longtime customers and friends. The owners and staff hope to be back soon at a nearby location—but so far haven’t found the right place for the right price.

The Empire Diner is located, at least for now, on 210 10th Avenue. Call 212-243-2736 or visit www.empire-diner.com (http://www.empire-diner.com/)

http://www.chelseanow.com/articles/2010/04/15/news/doc4bbe60ba93add435115765.txt

Merry
May 20th, 2010, 06:49 AM
The End of the Empire

By Leon Neyfakh

One night in 1976, a group of four young men walked into the Empire Diner on 10th Avenue and 22nd Street and asked for hamburgers. It was clear they'd never been there before.


"I told them we didn't make hamburgers, that we had some other stuff," said Carl Yorke, then 23, a novice actor who spent four months waiting tables at the Empire during the weird little diner's first year of operation.



The young men, who looked like "hormone-driven Jersey boys," were not pleased. What kind of backwards diner didn't serve hamburgers?



"They looked around, and they went, 'Oh, ****! This place is full of fags!' And the place just emptied out," said Mr. Yorke. "This brawl broke out on the sidewalk. And these guys, the customers of the Empire Diner—they may have been gay, but they weren't pussies."



Mr. Yorke, who had just moved to New York from San Francisco, ran into the basement and grabbed a shovel—not to fight, but to protect his face from a disfigurement that would have ended his fledgling acting career. Eventually the brawl died down, and one of the Empire's owners, a chubby, handsome guy in his late 20s named Richard Ruskay, ducked inside. A tear on his preppy sweater indicated that he had gotten in the mix, and the look on his face said he was deeply thrilled about it.



"He immediately started looking in the mirror," Mr. Yorke recalled. "He'd gotten hit in the eye, and he couldn't wait for it to turn black. He really wanted a shiner!"



In 1992, Richard Ruskay died of AIDS at the age of 44, and shortly thereafter the restaurant was sold by its sole surviving co-founder to two longtime employees: executive chef Mitchell Woo, who'd been there since 1980, and general manager Renate Gonzales, who started on the graveyard shift in 1986. The Empire chugged along for almost two decades under their leadership—mellowing out somewhat as Chelsea changed around them and turning, eventually, into a major tourist attraction that drew celebrities like Kate Winslet, Ethan Hawke, and Julia Roberts.



At midnight this past Saturday night, the Empire served its last meal after operating continually for 34 years. Due to a severe rent hike by the landlord, the diner lost its lease and will be taken over by the Gotham City Restaurant Group, the company that also owns Coffee Shop in Union Square.



It is tempting to say that the passing of the Empire Diner marks the end of an era in New York, that it's yet another symptom of the city losing its soul. But the truth is more complicated than that, as the Empire was always already a whimsical, nostalgic place, and never a holdover from more "authentic" times. The diner was meticulously designed by young people—some of whom worked at MoMA!—to appeal to other kids their age who sought a taste of the blue-collar eating experience but wanted to get it while hanging out with other artists, actors and writers like themselves. It is this built-in nostalgia that allowed the Empire to survive for 34 years, even as Chelsea changed from a wasteland, to a center of gay life, to the world capital of contemporary art.



The kids who went to the Empire during the late 1970s, when it first opened, genuinely thought they were the coolest kids in New York City. They loved the Empire because it wasn't just a diner but an elegant, Art Deco-inspired reenactment of one. Converted by Ruskay and his partners, Carl Laanes and Jack Doenias, from an old greasy spoon originally built in 1946, the Empire sported flashing lights along its chrome exterior, black tabletops, candles, live piano music and a menu that didn't have anything so obvious or clichéd as "hamburgers" on it.



"That would have been too predictable, too obvious," Mr. Yorke said. "The Empire Diner was like a fantasy land where you could pretend to be a Buddy Can You Spare a Dime character in a '30s movie, but eat like you were a guest in Dinner at Eight. And the Dinner at Eight crowd would never have hamburgers."



Ruskay loved a charming gimmick. He was a fantasist-entrepreneur—part Wonka, part Sevigny—who was always coming up with ideas for New York establishments that involved some kind of unusual, witty quirk. At the eponymous restaurant on the Upper West Side he co-owned, there were no menus, and customers had to order the one dish that was being served. At the 50's-inspired Tex-Mex place in Chelsea he co-founded in 1982, waiters walked around in black leather pants. The clothing store he helped start in 1979, N.Y. Jock, Inc. featured dressing rooms outfitted with working showers and exercise machines. He had one idea—this one never materialized—to open a restaurant in Times Square where customers could only use one bill to cover their entire check and would not be offered change, meaning everything on the menu cost either $1, $5, $10, $20, etc.



During the early years of the Empire—before AIDS came in 1981, before families moved to the neighborhood, before the warehouses west of 10th Avenue were taken over by the galleries—the Empire was a mecca for hipsters and gay men, who would go there early in the morning after hours spent dancing at clubs in the Village. It got so busy at 3, 4, 5 o'clock in the morning, that a group of friends ready to sober up after a night at the Spike or the Eagle's Nest—the two leather bars by the river—might find themselves having to wait 45 minutes for a table.



It was, by all accounts, really fun. The lighting made everyone look great, and people had sex in the bathroom all the time. There were drag queens on roller skates and transvestites with beautiful skin. Two of the regulars were a pair of beefy fellows who would dress up in police uniforms, trick guys they liked into thinking they were under arrest and take them home with them on their motorcycle. It was a boozy, druggy scene, inflected as much by its surroundings in scary, out-of-the-way Chelsea as it was by the winking design that marked its interior.



The night the restaurant opened for business, Ruskay and his partners threw an all-night party that drew an overflow crowd of hundreds. Nineteen seventy-six was a leap year; the party started at 6 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 28, and kept going till breakfast the next morning. Someone dressed in a King Kong costume tromped around on the roof, theatrically swatting the air and circling the model of the Empire State Building that is still planted there today. There were actors, writers, musicians, artists, you name it—plus drag queens and lots of guys from the leather bars, some coming up from the Village and others coming down from uptown.


James Newman, a handsome Columbia grad who had recently quit his job in the Egyptian wing of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, was on piano that wild first night. Over the course of about many hours, the Westchester-bred 28-year-old cycled through each of the 20 songs he knew on the 1930 Steck piano in the corner. At one point, he said, he turned around and saw Leonard Bernstein over his one shoulder and Aaron Copland over the other. No one could hear him play through the racket. "It was like a barnyard," the 62-year-old said on Monday. "People kept coming in, and we were like, 'There's no more room!' It was like a Marx brothers movie. It was the beautiful, the ugly, the good, the bad—everyone was here."



It was late afternoon, and Mr. Newman was seated at a table outside of the Empire while now former employees wearily put things into boxes. The day before, the diner had hosted a big all-day party for friends and old Empire staff; hundreds of people showed up. Feelings of resentment toward the landlord who had raised the rent were openly aired by ex-waiters and waitresses as they held forth about their years at the diner and rifled through piles of old Polaroids.



Mr. Newman remembered how he had decided to rent a room around the corner the day he heard that Ruskay was opening Empire. Ruskay, in his late 20s then, had recently proven his talents as a promoter and restaurateur as the co-founder—and namesake—of a superhip late-night establishment on the Upper West Side. Ruskay's is said to have attracted local residents like Harold Brodkey, as well as celebrities like John Lennon and Andy Warhol, who knew they could go there without being bothered by fans. Thanks in part to this pedigree—as well as its location on a strange, dangerous block in Chelsea dotted with gas stations and traveled mainly by trucks carrying nuclear waste—Ruskay's new venture was the object of intense hype in New York's gay community, as well as among the creative types who self-identified as the city's young intelligentsia.



Actor Keith McDermott was 26 and living uptown with his boyfriend at the time, the novelist Edmund White, when he learned about Empire and applied to work as a waiter there. His interview with Ruskay, he said, reminded him of auditioning for a major Broadway play.



"It was like a casting call," Mr. McDermott said by phone on Monday night. "It was a lot of people making appointments and coming in over a couple of days, and it was all these hip young people trying to get work there. As I remember, Ruskay did hire really appealing young people. Any other waiting job I went in for, I didn't want, really. This one I remember thinking, 'I hope I can get this.'"



Mr. McDermott didn't get the job. One guy who did was Mr. Yorke, who claims to be the Empire Diner's first waiter ever—a designation he is sure some would contest. "The staff was very impressed with itself," said Mr. Yorke. "We thought we were more important than the famous people who came in. We were attracting people like Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel! We were hot!"



The routine for Mr. Yorke—who was not gay, and kept it a secret from customers and the rest of the staff so that he wouldn't lose tips—consisted of an 11:30 p.m. arrival, followed by a quick dinner alongside a group of customers who tended, at that hour, to be very well dressed and well behaved. "Then they'd all go away," he said, "and then suddenly, at 3 a.m., having gone out and gotten ****ed up at one of these bars, they'd be back in there with their costumes on. It was like Halloween every night."


Mr. Newman, the piano player, remembers the debauchery being pretty extreme.

"We were all high!" he said. "I would turn around any given night and I'd have a friend with a foot-long line of cocaine saying, 'Oh, this is for you, enjoy.'" Most of his tips, he said, came in the form of drugs, and he was regularly taking hash, opium, mescalin, acid, and magic mushrooms while on the job. "Playing on mushrooms," he said, "was really hard."


The neighborhood at that time was rough, and despite the illegal things that might have been going on inside the Empire, its clientele as well as its flashy aesthetic made it a target for local gangs of kids, who stoned the windows and sometimes attacked patrons on their way home.



"There were several gangs who were based in the projects along Ninth Ave, and they had a special hatred for gays," Edmund White recalled. "Gays trying to get out of the West Village, where many of them lived, and going up to those leather bars, would wear whistles around their necks and then blow on them to call each other if they were attacked. I remember a bunch of kids pursuing me down the street with a baseball bat."


Mr. White, who now lives in an apartment just a few blocks from the diner, was among the revelers Mr. Yorke probably saw walk in during that first year.

“The leather bars wouldn’t really get going until midnight, and then you’d get hungry at three or four in the morning,” he said. “You could actually have sex in back rooms at those bars, so it wasn’t that you were going to take someone home and then get something to eat. You would have already had sex several times and then you could go there.”


The novelist Felice Picano would drop by after nights at Studio 54 and the Flamingo.



"It looked like 8 p.m. anywhere else!" he said. "Cabs would pull over, limos would pull over, people would fall or stumble out. There would be drag queens, there would be people in costumes from parties, there would be people in tuxedoes and dinner dress. We'd be there in A-shirts, guinea tees and jackets."



They would eat breakfast.



"They used to have terrific omelets—three-egg omelets—and all our drugs would have worn off so we wanted to put something in our bodies," said Mr. Picano. "A boyfriend of mine referred to it as the Vampire Diner, which is what we ended up calling it because we'd only be there early in the morning."

THE PARTY COULDN'T last forever. The 1980s saw the neighborhood grow less dangerous and more residential. Rents skyrocketed; single occupancy apartments were converted into co-ops. Tailors, florists, specialty grocers, restaurants and other small businesses sprouted, and families moved in. Meanwhile, gay life in Chelsea—and everywhere else—was shaken to its core by the arrival of AIDS.



"Everything slowed down in the '80s," said Charles Kaiser, the author of The Gay Metropolis. "By 1985, I would say gay nightlife was about 50 percent of what it had been 10 years earlier. It was a really grim, depressing time."



This inevitably changed the character of the Empire, to the point where the novelist Ann Beattie—who moved to Chelsea in 1980—thought of it as a fun neighborhood place to pass by on her evening stroll because there were always people sitting outside who wanted to pet her dog.



"It wasn't extremely fashionable, to tell you the truth," Ms. Beattie said of the '80s Empire. "You probably would have gone to Café Central if you wanted to be fashionable. If you wanted to plop down for a cup of coffee, you'd go to the Empire."



Not that the diner had been deserted by the glamorous creative types who had made it such a hot spot when it first opened. "You'd see actors in there late at night; you would see photographers," said Ms. Beattie, who set a few scenes of her forthcoming novella, Walks With Men, at the Empire Diner in 1980.



Nor had it lost its edge, according to Ms. Gonzales, who found some of what went on at the diner pretty shocking when she started in 1986.



"I saw some really weird stuff going on here," she said, sitting at one of the tables in front of the restaurant on Sunday evening. "You know, a woman coming in with her boyfriend on a leash. On a leash! And he had to sit on the floor instead of the chair. It took me a little while to get used to it—I would say, 'Oh my God, look what walked in!'

But after a while, it just becomes part of the Empire Diner. It became a lot calmer after a few years."



That was when the art world came.



In 1987, the Dia Center for the Arts opened on 22nd Street, foreshadowing the arrival of the hundreds of art galleries that would start moving into the neighborhood en masse during the late 1990s. With them came a new era for the Empire, as art dealers started going there with clients—often bringing their slides—and ordering food from them at lunchtime. A 1998 Talk of the Town piece in The New Yorker written by Deborah Solomon called it a "glitz-free, gemutlich place" that was taking its turn as the art world's designated hangout, just as the Cedar Tavern, Max's Kansas City and the Odeon had done in decades past.



Ms. Solomon closed the piece with a quote from "eighties art star" Sandro Chia, who lent his name to the Odeon's Steak au Poivre dish but had since become a vegetarian. Asked what dish he would name after himself at the Empire, Mr. Chia responded, "Probably cornflakes with low-fat milk."



The implication was, of course, that the Empire—and New York City along with it—had gone soft. And when you hear stories about the old days—about how a masochist cut himself to ribbons in the bathroom and came out "smiling like a Cheshire cat," for instance, or how James Newman would flirt with straight girls at the counter while playing the piano by staring at them through a mirror—it's easy to feel like you missed out on something that can never happen in your city again. But is there no comfort in knowing that even in the late 1970s, kids in New York were angsty enough about the times they were living in that the coolest place they could think to go for fun was the ironic, defiantly ahistorical Empire Diner?



At the party on Sunday, waiters who worked at the Empire during the 1990s reminisced and paid tribute to the restaurant.



"For me, what was really cool and interesting is the fact that the Empire was constant—through all the years, it never wavered," said David Saunders, who now designs gift baskets. "The area changed, the galleries came. But the Empire was still here."



As the sun started to set, the party dwindled, and people started to look really sad. One woman, who worked the night shift at the Empire while training to be a makeup artist, looked like she was about to cry.



"It's part of life," said a long-haired young guy named Thomas Simon, a former waiter who plays guitar in a band. "We have to roll with the punches, ride the wave, you know?"

http://www.observer.com/2010/culture/end-empire

JanetJay
July 1st, 2010, 08:35 PM
Thought I better give a plug for vegetarians. My favorite places to eat are Zen Palate http://www.zenpalate.com and the Sanctuary on first and 1st in the lower east village. don't think they have a website.

tededge80
August 30th, 2010, 08:56 AM
Hi guys and gals, I live in the UK and I am getting married in Central Park in June 2011. I am currently looking for a good restaurant for us to go to after the wedding ceremony and have a meal. There will be 12 of us in total. Any ideas of restaurants for this type of thing??

lofter1
August 30th, 2010, 11:09 AM
What part of Central Park?

There's a newish restaurant on the upper floors of the Museum of Art & Design (MAD) at 2 Columbus Circle overlooking the Park; I hear the food is good (but pricey).

meesalikeu
August 30th, 2010, 01:53 PM
Hi guys and gals, I live in the UK and I am getting married in Central Park in June 2011. I am currently looking for a good restaurant for us to go to after the wedding ceremony and have a meal. There will be 12 of us in total. Any ideas of restaurants for this type of thing??

hello and congrats.

you'll find a lot of excellent nyc info on this forum, but unfortunately not food -- i guess wiredny cant be everything for everybody!

i'd highly rec you ask your question here also where you will find the best local food-focused advice:

http://chowhound.chow.com/boards/18

if you want to browse some menus and basic info i find menupages indispensible:

http://www.menupages.com/

finally, there of lots of sites that give you the scoop on whats new, etc. in the nyc restaurantworld such as:

http://nymag.com/

http://ny.eater.com/

http://www.gayot.com/restaurants/search-in-new-york.php


that said, obviously you want them to be able to handle a group but it depends on what else you are looking for, ie., if you are 20somethings calle ocho near the natural history museum would be fun, if you want all american food maybe vince & eddies? depends on you -- i hope this helps, enjoy your big day and good luck!

ablarc
August 30th, 2010, 02:17 PM
http://nymag.com/listings/restaurant/cafe-sabarsky/menus/main.html

ablarc
August 30th, 2010, 02:21 PM
http://online.wsj.com/article/NA_WSJ_PUB:SB1000142405274870358940457541770382366 8796.html

Merry
November 6th, 2010, 06:01 AM
It's not just the ivy. That faux stone is awful.


IvyGate: Did This Ugly Restaurant Just Ruin Greenwich Village?

November 5, 2010, by Joey Arak

http://ny.eater.com/uploads/2010_04_rabbitinmoon.jpg

Two new Greenwich Village restaurants have taken the curious step of adorning their facades with fake ivy, and in both cases the neighbors aren't pleased (http://ny.eater.com/archives/2010/10/oopsies.php), this being a historic district and all. Regarding Rabbit in the Moon at 47 West 8th Street, a restaurant that may or may not be a total shitshow (http://ny.eater.com/archives/2010/08/imterviews_robert_sietsema_on_rabbit_in_the_moon.p hp), the Landmarks Preservation Commission has determined that the ivy must come down or be replaced with the real thing. But that's not enough to appease the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation (http://www.gvshp.org/_gvshp/index.htm). Cat fight!

In addition to the ivy, Rabbit in the Moon made other alterations, such as the balcony area and faux-stone facade that makes the place look like some sort of shire house. This work was carried out without LPC approval, and last month the owners went in front of the commission to seek retroactive approval for the illicit renovations. The commissioners said no to the ivy and asked the owners to work with the LPC staff to come up with a proposal to modify the balcony area and change the facade material. The ivy will probably stick around until a new plan is in place. Commence outrage!

Andrew Berman, executive director of the GVSHP, is upset by what he feels is the LPC going easy on the owners. In a letter fired off to the LPC, he writes, "The Commision runs the risk of encouraging and rewarding blatant violations of the law, and approving and introducing into one of the city's largest and oldest historic districts a grotesque and entirely inappropriate alteration." Will Rabbit in the Moon set a dangerous precedent of building owners renovating first and asking questions later? The LPC doesn't think so. They tell us that the owners have received a violation, and if they don't address the changes LPC wants made, they could be fined $5,000 per day.

http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2010/11/05/ivygate_did_this_ugly_restaurant_just_ruin_greenwi ch_village.php#more

lofter1
November 6th, 2010, 11:43 AM
As this looks now from the street it's pure kitsch. The 'evidence' points to an owner who totally flouted both the law and regulatory instructions that were intended to keep things in line.

Given the current state of 8th Street, with random storefronts and signage all about, this one only stands out as another bit of disconnected stuff to catch your eye. Not saying that this stretch should be turned into a row of totally conformist faux historical storefronts, but some consistency of style & materials should be the aim. 8th Street could be an attractive strip of lively retail & eateries (as opposed to the downtrodden area it's turned into over the past 15 years as so many of the shoe & clothing stores have moved to bigger spaces to the east on Broadway and up Sixth Avenue). The trick is have the LPC regulate in a way that does not overburden owners so that good upgrades are less likely.

Merry
December 6th, 2010, 07:39 AM
Trademark Battle Over Iconic Diner as New Owners Near Opening

A judge reportedly declined to dismiss a trademark lawsuit over the famed “Empire Diner” on Tenth Avenue.

By Olivia Scheck

http://s3.amazonaws.com/sfb111/image_xlimage_2010_04_R9004_empire_diner_.jpg
Empire Diner was shuttered last spring, after 34 years serving Chelsea residents and visitors.
(Flickr / Professor Bop)

MANHATTAN — A legal battle is cooking over naming rights for Chelsea’s shuttered landmark eatery, Empire Diner, the New York Daily News reported.

Owners of the building, which was featured in the opening montage of Woody Allen’s “Manhattan” in addition to several other films, leased the space to The Gotham City Restaurant Group last spring.

http://s3.amazonaws.com/sfb111/story_lrgimage_2010_12_R7401_Trademark_Battle_Over _Empire_Diner_As_New_Owner.jpg
The silver replica of the Empire State Building,
which once sat atop Chelsea's Empire Diner,
has gone missing, according to the New York Daily News.
(Flickr/Kevin H.)

But the diner’s former operators, Executive Chef Mitchell Woo and General Manager Renate Gonzalez, reportedly claim that the name of the iconic New York restaurant belongs to them. Woo and Gonzalez filed a trademark suit in Manhattan Federal Court last April, and on Friday a judge declined to dismiss the case, according to the News (http://www.nydailynews.com/ny_local/2010/12/05/2010-12-05_feud_over_empire_diner_in_chelsea_heats_up_as_b oth_sides_lay_claim_to_the_iconic.html).

Charles Levinson, owner of the building, located on Tenth Avenue between West 22nd and 23rd Streets, has also filed a countersuit, seeking merchandising and franchise rights for the famed diner, which was frequented by Barbara Streisand and Madonna, the paper said.

Despite the pending legal battle, Levinson and representatives of the Gotham City Restaurant Group, who own Union Square hotspot Coffee Shop, say the new “Empire Diner” will open in the coming weeks, according to the News.

But even if the diner does open with legendary Empire Diner name, it may have to do so without the iconic Empire State Building model that once sat on the diner’s roof. The silver statue is nowhere to be found, the News reported.

http://www.dnainfo.com/20101205/manhattan/trademark-battle-over-iconic-diner-as-new-owners-near-opening#ixzz17KYqRoSt

brianac
January 26th, 2011, 06:42 PM
January 26, 2011, 5:24 pm

Trump Says He and Union Have a Deal on Tavern on the Green

By GLENN COLLINS (http://dinersjournal.blogs.nytimes.com/author/glenn-collins/)

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2011/01/26/dining/dj-tavern/dj-tavern-articleInline.jpgAssociated Press
Tavern on the Green in better days.

Donald J. Trump (http://topics.nytimes.com/topics/reference/timestopics/people/t/donald_j_trump/index.html?scp=1-spot&sq=donald%20j.%20trump&st=cse) and the head of the powerful union that represented the 400 workers at Tavern on the Green say they have come to an agreement that could revive the shuttered landmark restaurant (http://dinersjournal.blogs.nytimes.com/tag/tavern-on-the-green/) that is now home to a food-truck court and a visitor center.

Mr. Trump, never reticent about his ambitions, said that if New York City granted him the license to run Tavern he would spend $20 million of his own money to rebuild it so it would be “the highest-grossing restaurant on the planet.’’ Neither he nor the union’s leader, Peter Ward, president of the Hotel and Motel Trades Council, would reveal specifics of the agreement. But Mr. Trump said “the contract allows me to offer the highest level of service and quality.”

Reaching a deal with Mr. Ward has been a crucial stumbling block to reopening the once-glittering restaurant after its previous operator, the LeRoy family, declared bankruptcy and closed it on New Year’s Day of last year. The city owns the restaurant in Central Park and had given the operating license to Dean J. Poll, operator of the Boathouse in the park. But Mr. Poll lost the right to run the restaurant after he failed to reach agreement with the union, a necessary condition for his license.

For the plans to go forward for a future “Trump on the Green,” the developer would have to get the New York City Parks Department to grant him the operating license. And yesterday, the city did not leap into Mr. Trump’s arms.

The parks department deferred to City Hall and Jason Post, a spokesman for the mayor, said, “The city is not ready to announce any future plans for Tavern on the Green and has not had any discussions with possible restaurant operators.”

Mr. Ward, who has signed hotel contracts with Mr. Trump for decades, said the five-year labor agreement “is a fair deal and gives him everything he needs to create a great new restaurant.”

“Everyone wants this to happen,’’ Mr. Trump said, “and nobody else but me can do it, because I’m the only one who has the money.”

Tavern’s abiding absence, along with the loss of Windows on the World and the Rainbow Room, has left a gap in the city’s major-events scene, diminishing the city’s celebratory feeling for both residents and the tourists who visit. Last May, the mayor announced that the city would solicit new Tavern proposals “from anyone that wants to reopen it as a restaurant.” But the city never formally sought new operators, given the continuing recession. The city will have to decide whether it could designate Mr. Trump as the operator, or whether the license would have to be put out to bid. Mr. Trump said that if that happened he would submit a bid.

He said the agreement with Mr. Ward was not a publicity stunt and that if the city quickly approved his plan, he could reopen Tavern in 2012, “and the Trump cachet would enable it to instantly become a world-class destination.”

Mr. Trump likened his plans for Tavern’s rapid comeback to his resuscitation of the Wollman Skating Rink — which he still operates — and his renovation of the decrepit Central Park carousel, which he began operating last year.

A key issue for the city would be Mr. Trump’s plan to reconstruct the Crystal Room, the 350-seat ornament with its heritage chandeliers that was torn down last August. It had brought the restaurant more than $6 million a year in revenues, according to its former operator, and was built in 1976 by Warner LeRoy when he took charge of Tavern. Last year, the city said that the removal of the Crystal Room returned the Tavern building to its original design as a sheepfold when it was built in the 1870s.

The restoration of the original building had been lauded last fall by Douglas Blonsky, president of the Central Park Conservancy. The nonprofit organization, which helps manage the park, contributed $200,000, in the form of plantings, pruning and the removal of shrubbery at the eastern margin of the building. Mr. Blonsky declined to comment on Mr. Trump’s grand vision.

Contract negotiations between Mr. Ward and Mr. Trump, which Mr. Trump said he initiated, have gone on for months. “I’ve known Peter a long time and had Peter’s union in many of my hotels,” Mr. Trump said.

Mr. Ward has worked for the union for 32 years, and has said he got to know Mr. Trump in the late 1970s when the developer and the Pritzker family renovated the former Commodore Hotel on East 42nd Street into the Grand Hyatt New York Hotel. Later Mr. Trump bought the Plaza Hotel, where Mr. Trump “was good to deal with,” Mr. Ward said last year.

It was also at the Plaza where Mr. Ward and Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg forged a relationship in 2005, when the mayor successfully intervened during a clamorous confrontation between Mr. Ward’s union and the then-new owners of the Plaza Hotel, who sought the landmark’s sweeping conversion to condominiums and stores.

The mayor was able to broker a compromise that preserved nearly half the hotel rooms and kept the jobs of more than a third of the Plaza’s 900 hotel workers. And although Mr. Trump no longer owns the Plaza, Mr. Ward’s union represents workers in the Trump International Hotel on Central Park West and his Trump SoHo New York on Spring Street.

The city’s original request for Tavern bidders had specified that the new operator come to agreement with the union, and Mayor Bloomberg cited the failure of Mr. Poll to do so as the reason for suspending the fruitless negotiations last May.

Mr. Ward said that his agreement with Mr. Trump allowed for the rehiring of former Tavern workers, some of whom have been unemployed since it closed. “It’s not only the workers — reopening Tavern would mean more money for the city. It would be a win-win situation.”

Mr. Trump said of his deal with the union that “the economic consequences of the union contract won’t be a consideration since the restaurant will be such a huge success.”

http://dinersjournal.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/01/26/trump-says-he-and-union-have-a-deal-on-tavern-on-the-green/

Ninjahedge
August 3rd, 2011, 12:47 PM
Bump and a request.

Ed, i was looking for a site that would give some recommendations for cheap eats in the city.

The problem is, they all use a universal filter that does not differentiate between breakfast, lunch and dinner. So while a $8 burger might be cheap, a $8 turkey sandwich is not (and they are both considered "cheap" by sites like MenuPages).

If there are any threads that go into good cheap places for lunch or takeout, it would be welcomed!!!! (if there is already one here, I could not find it. "cheap" is in too many threads even when combined with "lunch" and "food"!!)

TIA!