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nycbound
November 6th, 2005, 01:36 AM
Quick question- I have been researching a move to NYC quite a bit and I think I have a pretty good understanding of what I can expect- can anyone comment on if this is a realistic scenario?

I work in the insurance industry in FL and am looking to relocate to NYC, preferably live in a 1bdrm or really nice Studio/alcove on the UWS (or UES if necessary, I want to be near Central Park). I figure w/my experience, I can probably land a job in the $70's- the higher the better. I won't keep a car, rent should be around 2k- $1800 would be better- and I don't have small children to support (only my wonderful college-bound son w/plenty of scholarships, to help out as needed). I want to be able enjoy the museums, theatre, good restaurants & unique shopping. I'll have a good-size savings to pull from- but don't want to rely on that to enjoy myself in NYC. I have been researching where to shop, etc- for best prices on things from food-to haircuts.

Can a real new yorker tell me if I am just dreaming or if my plan seems to be pretty realistic idea of how I can live in NYC? Anyone in the insurance industry w/any advice about my salary expectations would also be greatly appreciated. Thanks!

Okay- so it wasn't such a quick question...

nycbound
November 6th, 2005, 02:12 AM
It's not set in stone that I must be near CP, but there are many reasons that I would like to be: I want to be able to walk my dog, ride my bike, etc. I also want easy access to enjoy the concerts and performances that are put on in the park by the Lincoln Center, etc... Also, when my apartment starts to close in on me, I want to be able to get away to an open space.

ryan
November 6th, 2005, 03:05 PM
Can a real new yorker tell me if I am just dreaming or if my plan seems to be pretty realistic idea of how I can live in NYC?

Seems pretty realistic to me. Everyone wants to live near Central Park, L&O. I would only question someone who said specifically that they didn't.

nycbound
November 6th, 2005, 05:11 PM
I appreciate your feedback. I am looking at all areas of the city, but keep coming back to the UWS or UES being the logical pick for me, based upon my likes & needs- and I am just trying to figure out how realistic it is- from what I read, finding a good apt in either area, that is also w/in my price range- is no easy task.

nycbound
November 6th, 2005, 08:17 PM
By the way, has anyone gone thru Citihabitats for an apt? The apts listed seem very nice- I am wondering if there is any switch/bait going on?

foxx
November 7th, 2005, 01:48 AM
ok i know a bunch of people have posted stuff like this but i was just wondering some things,
i'm 21, working a crappy job that i hate and i live in upstate NY (way upstate, like, theres nothing here)
there is nothing for me here and i have a friend or two willing to move to the city with me. i love ny and its been a lifelong dream to move there, and right now i have no commitments or any reason not to try it out
how would i go about moving to the city, finding a job, etc, i need to know what steps to take
anything you could offer would be helpful,
thanks so much!

ryan
November 7th, 2005, 10:23 AM
People move here without much all the time, but you'll need a few thousand dollars in savings or credit, unless you have a good job lined up. You can move with a group into a small apt that is affordable until you have better jobs and know where you really want to live. Even if you don't have a specific profession, you can find work temping or through craigslist until you find something permanent. You just have to really want to live here to get through your first year because it can be a hard transition.

guinessanyone
November 7th, 2005, 11:50 AM
I have an great opportunity to move to NY. I have spent 6 months in North Carolina, 6 in Atlanta, 6 in St Louis and now i'm coming up on 6 in Jacksonville, Fla. Home is still West palm Beach, Florida. I've ridden out the hurricanes and they dont really panic me. Will a 90+k a year salary work for a mid 30's single guy - no kids. ideally i'd like to bank 24k before expenses. I would need a nice 1 bedroom with washer and dryer in the unit. I cant do the laundra-mat thing. I have a car, would like to keep it in the building.
I would be working in Yonkers.

What do you guys think of Yonkers?

What do NY'ers really think about some maniac and another big 911 type event? or the subway bag searches? that bothers me more than hurricanes.
(my neighbor - of 3 months, in a brand spanking new 2500 sq ft house- ran back to NY/NJ after hurricane jeanne, because of jeanne)

I drove east from yonkers into some older Irish neighborhood - seems kinda nice. After the Atlanta traffic disaster, I would prefer to stay close to work.Yeah its not NYC - Manhattan but I could do that on weekends.

Is the redevelopment of riverside yonkers working?

My dad mentioned Mt Vernon, I'm originally from jersey, my dad dated someone from there 50 yrs ago (yeah alots changed) just wondering.

thanks for any annd all replies.

Gedio
November 11th, 2005, 02:29 PM
How much would I need to lvie in Manhattan? I figure I can save about $40K to $50K before I go, and will be about 23-24 at the time. I plan to live about $1000-15000 apartment a month, shared or not shared, preferably shared though. How much would I need? I figured about $40K a year?

sthenri
November 14th, 2005, 09:04 PM
What about Staten Island? Safe compared to Jersey City, Brooklyn? I really need cat friendly, ground floor-I don't need to live right in the city since I am over 30!

Are landlords as demanding, in this area?

Thank you, Natalie

HarlemRep
November 30th, 2005, 01:16 AM
By the way, has anyone gone thru Citihabitats for an apt? The apts listed seem very nice- I am wondering if there is any switch/bait going on?

Hate to tell you, but we ALL do. Because we know others are. So everyone has to advertise cheap stuff (some exist/some don't). Alot of places like my agency ADVERTISE REAL APARTMENTS. I don't make crap up, but I can tell you that if I have a 1200 dollar studio, it's a TWELVE HUNDRED DOLLAR STUDIO. Don't get pissed at us when you see what that gets you.

CitiHabitats is a big company with alot of agents. I'm sure there are some crappy ones and some good ones there.

vagabond
December 1st, 2005, 08:41 PM
Hello all,
Just came across this site today and have been reading all sorts of interesting and helpful things. :) I was wondering if anyone could give me any kind of advice about moving to New York. Basically my story is that I will be graduating this year with a Major in English and a Minor in Film Studies. I have no idea what I want to do with my life at this point, but I am very interested in filmmaking, photography, and journalism. I am hoping to move to New York with a friend. I have never been to New York but I have always wanted to try out the big city life. It sounds silly, but most of what I know about New York is from movies or TV shows that are shot there...so in a way, I am sure I have a very romantic and naive view of things. So here are a few questions...if anyone has ANY advice, I would really appreciate it.

1) Would I be able to find an apartment in Manhattan (or somewhere right outside so I don't have to commute too far everyday) for 1000-1500 dollars? I really don't care how small the apartment is. I just want to live in a safe neightborhood. Bonuses would be near a grocery store and/or laundrymat. If you have the names of any neighborhoods, that would be great...

2) Is it realistic to think that I will be able to find an entry level job position in film or writing that can pay for half a months rent assuming the rent is between 1000-1500?

3) In your opinion, what makes New York such a great place to live? Why is it that people put up with things such as commuting, smog, crime, small apartments to live there? (again, I actually dont know much about New York, these just seem to be the stereotypical negatives of living there.)

Those are my main questions for right now...but I am sure more will come up. I actually only got the idea in my head to move to New York about a week ago, but I honestly haven't been able to stop thinking about it. In a way, I just want to move there without a clue about anything...but from the little I have learnt so far, it seems that I should have some kind of plan. Again... Thank you ahead of time to anyone who answers this.

Schadenfrau
December 1st, 2005, 08:55 PM
Honestly, if you're looking to work in the arts, you'd be much better off living with a roommate right now.

Unless you've got great experience or attended a spectacular school, entry-level work in the arts will pay 30K or less. On second thought, even if you've got the first two, it's still a tough battle. But that really doesn't mean it's not worth it.

Would you be willing to take temp work? Have you set up interviews? If not, you might want to do that first.

And to answer your questions about NYC liveability: most people put up with it because after some time, you can't imagine living anywhere else. Commuting doesn't take so long (20 minutes for me), I've never given a thought to smog, crime is really not bad, and my apartment is just right for someone who can't afford much furniture. But keep in mind I'm a happy camper when speaking about not being able to afford things. That's why people put up with New York City.

ryan
December 2nd, 2005, 12:47 PM
Vagabond-

1 - for your price range, you'd do better in Brooklyn (I like Greenpoint, sounds like it might work for you), or Queens (start looking in Astoria or Jackson Heights and work to cheeper, less hip areas). There's lots of other, cheaper places to live, but those areas are (relatively) affordable meccas for post-grad folks like yourself.

2 - I think it's realistic to find an entry-level job that would pay half the rent on a <$1500 place. You'll need roommates (though I had a friend who found a small, nice studio in Greenpoint for $800 incl.)

3 - You need to visit NYC - and not just the touristy parts. You should walk around neighborhoods you could afford to live in (like those above) at different times of day and night to see if you are comfortable. TV & movies show a very distorted NY where broke college grads live in fabulous apts that only the very affluent can afford. You will pay a lot for what will seem like a dumpy apartment by non-nyc standards.

No one lives here for the cheap housing - it's the career opportunities (not just money, but interesting, creative work), culture (you'll love the film options - really more and standard of living from the rest of the country, so come see it to make an informed choice.

vagabond
December 2nd, 2005, 05:53 PM
Thank you Schadenfrau and Ryan for your quick replies. To Ryan- in response to what you said about how I should come and visit New York first....once again the issue of money arises. Currently, I am living on the west coast, and as much as I would like to visit New York before moving there, it seems to make more sense financially to keep the money I would use to fly there (for the visit) and save it for the actual move. I am hoping to move to New York at the end of the summer and should have about 5,000 saved up by then. That leads me to my next question...Does anyone know what time of year the most apartments become available?...Is there any best time to find one lol?! Also, this question is directed at anyone who has moved to New York without already having secured an apartment. For those of you who didn't know anyone in the city, where did you stay while you were hunting for an apartment...at a hotel? Also, how long did it take you to find an apartment...this is question is geared more towards people who didn't use a broker.

Empty_Pockets
December 6th, 2005, 10:18 PM
Lots of good thoughts in this forum. For those interested, I've got plenty more here (http://www.emptypocketsnyc.com/About.htm). It's possible to move to NYC on a budget like my wife & I did a few years ago. Difficult, but possible.

antinimby
December 6th, 2005, 11:29 PM
As an inspiration, there are plenty of stories of now-celebrities that came to NY with no money and hit it big.
Madonna came to NY from Bay City, Michigan in the early 80's with something like $50 in her pocket. ;)

ryan
December 7th, 2005, 12:44 AM
Lots of good thoughts in this forum. For those interested, I've got plenty more here (http://www.emptypocketsnyc.com/About.htm). It's possible to move to NYC on a budget like my wife & I did a few years ago. Difficult, but possible.

Fascinating angle, selling a product to a broke audience...

raymond
December 7th, 2005, 11:12 AM
does anyone know where i can rent a single room in maybe Q-boro or Brooklyn? cuz i am gonna be by myself for a minute and i am applying for a few jobs here and there but if someone can let me know if there is a place i can get a rented room i would appreciate it. i would like to see if i could pay weekly or monthly (like $50-$125 a week, or no more than $500 a month) if possible, i know theres gotta be a few spots out there like dat cuz im not renting an apt its just a room.

lofter1
December 7th, 2005, 11:50 AM
Madonna came to NY from Bay City, Michigan in the early 80's with something like $50 in her pocket. ;)
Back then $50 would last you a month.

Nowadays it'll last you about 20 minutes ...

raymond
December 7th, 2005, 12:19 PM
I have an great opportunity to move to NY. I have spent 6 months in North Carolina, 6 in Atlanta, 6 in St Louis and now i'm coming up on 6 in Jacksonville, Fla. Home is still West palm Beach, Florida. I've ridden out the hurricanes and they dont really panic me. Will a 90+k a year salary work for a mid 30's single guy - no kids. ideally i'd like to bank 24k before expenses. I would need a nice 1 bedroom with washer and dryer in the unit. I cant do the laundra-mat thing. I have a car, would like to keep it in the building.
I would be working in Yonkers.

What do you guys think of Yonkers?

What do NY'ers really think about some maniac and another big 911 type event? or the subway bag searches? that bothers me more than hurricanes.
(my neighbor - of 3 months, in a brand spanking new 2500 sq ft house- ran back to NY/NJ after hurricane jeanne, because of jeanne)

I drove east from yonkers into some older Irish neighborhood - seems kinda nice. After the Atlanta traffic disaster, I would prefer to stay close to work.Yeah its not NYC - Manhattan but I could do that on weekends.

Is the redevelopment of riverside yonkers working?

My dad mentioned Mt Vernon, I'm originally from jersey, my dad dated someone from there 50 yrs ago (yeah alots changed) just wondering.

thanks for any annd all replies.


well i was born in Yonkers dats my hometown Yo i love YOnkers im thinking about moving back up there its 2 miles north of da uptown, I lived next to Oakland Cemetery, theres alot of nice areas in YOnkers, espeically northern and some parts of eastern YOnkers, but its been a minute since i been up there but yea u cant go wrong with NOrthern YOnkers,

raymond
December 7th, 2005, 12:23 PM
Back then $50 would last you a month.

Nowadays it'll last you about 20 minutes ...
Dont forget Mariah she came from LOng I to live in da city after graduating from high school with another roomate they slept on the floor with matresses.

SouthernGentNYC
December 7th, 2005, 11:42 PM
I'm moving to Chelsea: W 20 and 7th Ave. Any tips of best areas for on-street parking in the area? Parking rules? Inexpensive lots?

ablarc
December 8th, 2005, 06:39 AM
I'm moving to Chelsea: W 20 and 7th Ave. Any tips of best areas for on-street parking in the area? Parking rules? Inexpensive lots?
Your best bet: get rid of your car.

Rent a nice new car for that monthly trip out of the city; inside the city you don't need a car.

And more than that you don't need the expenses and the hassles: expensive storage, getting up early to move your car, the dings and scratches, the parking tickets, the high cost of insurance, the time wasted stuck in traffic, the endless trips around the block looking for a space, the occasional broken window left by the homeless guy who spent the night in your car...

Lisa-artist
December 9th, 2005, 02:27 PM
Hi there - I've been trawling through this site and looking for info as my partner and I are moving to NY in March next year, we currently live in Chelsea, SW London.

We've just spent a weekend in NY, but still unsure of what area is best for us; so hoping for some advice from local New Yorkers...

My partner has an international business and I'm an artist, age early 30's. My partner travels often, so he needs to be able to get from wherever we live to airports easily. We are looking at probably around $3-$5000 per month and wish list includes: modern, 2 beds, large living, views, outdoor terrace, near to park or safe area for jogging, easy access to subway/trains and airports, possibly a parking space, vibrant area with restaurants/bars in vicinity.

I will also be looking for studio space, preferably shared studios with other artists; or an industrial building in chelsea that I can set up as studios/gallery.

Any help/advice would really be appreciated. Really excited about our move as NY is such a vibrant and exciting city and we met so many fantastic people on our recent trip!

Thanks heaps

ryan
December 9th, 2005, 03:05 PM
Lisa-artist, with your budget, you could just live in chelsea. Unless you need a break from the art scene, it meets all of your criteria except access to airports (no place is better than another, unless you want to live in Queens). Shared studio space will be easy to find on craigslist or through networking. Good luck (though I don't think you'll need much with all that budget)

TonyO
December 9th, 2005, 03:27 PM
Lisa, I agree with Ryan, Chelsea is a good fit for you. Also, it is right near the A train, which services JFK. Penn Station, which is also on the west side, services Newark airport through NJTransit.

Lisa-artist
December 16th, 2005, 07:13 PM
Thanks for your advice, speaking of that general area, someone else had suggested Hoboken, which is of course just across the river from Chelsea. Does anyone have any comments on Hoboken?

MidtownGuy
December 17th, 2005, 10:38 AM
no Lisa, forget Hoboken.It may be just across the river, but it is a different world from chelsea.If you want to experience living in New York, it really does have to be IN New York. And don't let any Jersey people tell you different. There is a reason the rent is half over there.

Scraperfannyc
December 17th, 2005, 11:49 AM
I lived in Hoboken a couple of years ago. It's definitely NOT NYC. It's a gentrified poor middle class factory town that still has the look of an ugly factory town. It was when I was there like one giant college dorm fraternity, always loud and always drunk on bad beer. Restaurnts generally have bad food and serve bad beer, with few exceptions. The night life, class and culture, everywhere you go is pretty much entirley jersey college kids drunk out of their minds. Mosty Jersey people living there.

ryan
December 17th, 2005, 10:33 PM
Lisa, if you're looking outside of Manhattan, given all that you posted above, you would be better off looking to Brooklyn, where you could afford a very nice space in great neighborhoods. Much hipper/stronger art communities than in Jersey. Again, though, with your budget you can pull off Chelsea just fine.

Lisa-artist
December 18th, 2005, 09:34 PM
Thanks again for all your input, definately great to hear from people who know NYC. I think we'll have to visit again and check out Chelsea or Brooklyn.

Take care and happy holidays:)

BPC
December 19th, 2005, 12:25 AM
Hoboken ugly? Hoboken is a lovely place, and it has a real small-town feel, yet it is just short ferry or path ride to Manhattan. A lot more accessible to Manhattan than Brooklyn. Now, if aesthetics are not important to you, then Chelsea is the place to be. Chelsea was once a slum, and the architecture still reflects that, but it is convenient to most places. It will be a lot more expensive than Hoboken, however, and not nearly as nice. As for the night-life, the drunken kids conglomerate in both places, so it's a wash.

ryan
December 19th, 2005, 03:20 AM
It [chelsea] will be a lot more expensive than Hoboken, however, and not nearly as nice. As for the night-life, the drunken kids conglomerate in both places, so it's a wash.

I, uh, respectfully disagree. I don't hate on Hoboken, but to say it's better than chelsea is irrational jersey pride. And, this is about a neighborhood for an artist to live in.

BPC
December 19th, 2005, 11:40 AM
I, uh, respectfully disagree. I don't hate on Hoboken, but to say it's better than chelsea is irrational jersey pride. And, this is about a neighborhood for an artist to live in.

I live in Battery Park City now and I grew up in Illinois, so I am hardly filled with "Jersey pride," irrational or otherwise. I did live in Hoboken for a couple of years after school, however, and found it to be a charming place. That being said, I didn't say Hobken was "better" than Chelsea, I said it was better looking, which I would think to be fairly well beyond dispute.

TonyO
December 19th, 2005, 11:50 AM
I have friends in Hoboken and it is not the NYC experience, so if you are looking for that - steer clear of Hoboken. Its a decent area, but definately the post-frat-crowd.

As far as whether its better looking that Chelsea, that is in the eye of the beholder.

NY Hopeful
December 21st, 2005, 07:21 PM
Hi all,

I am trying to figure out the least expensive way to move into the city without having a roommate when I move. I've looked at places to share on craig's list and potential roommates from roommate websites, but I am curious if anyone has any thoughts on these forums....Is this a safe way to locate a roommate? I know I obviously will have to use common sense and screen people, but I'm thinking this will be the best way for me to find someone in a similar situation. Does anyone have any other ideas? I don't really know anyone in NYC, and I'm sure I won't be able to afford a 1 bdrm starting out....that would be a dream! Thank you for your help, this forum is great!

Mandi

ryan
December 21st, 2005, 08:21 PM
I've looked at places to share on craig's list and potential roommates from roommate websites, but I am curious if anyone has any thoughts on these forums....Is this a safe way to locate a roommate?

yup. Seems intimidating, but this is how everyone I know does it (after they try to network)

aussienicole
December 22nd, 2005, 02:41 AM
Hello all-

Im moving to the city at the beginning of January, and am currently in the middle of an apartment hunt. I have only been able to go into the city once so far to look at apts, as I am currently living and working in Maryland.

On my last trip to the city, I found an apt on W 105th btw Riverside Drive and West End Ave. that I really liked. Of all the places I looked at, this one had the most charm and provided me with the most amenities for my buck.

My concern is the location. What I have been able to gather through research online, the area is not really considered morningside heights, but it does not often get lumped in as a "happening" part of the UWS either. I know that New Yorkers have a tendency to make up nicknames for their neighborhoods, and while I think some of them are quite silly, I can't seem to find a category or nickname for this block of the UWS north of 96th st. but south of morningside heights and harlem. is this no mans land, not worthy of a nickname or any attention?

I am young with no kids, and a dog. Is this a good place to live? I dont need to be right in the thick of things, but I also don't want to pay Manhattan prices just to feel like I'm living in Queens. My visit was too brief to get a really good sense of the area.

Any advice on the positive or negative side of things would be greatly appreciated on this area. I would love to hear from anyone who lives here, or spends alot of time here. Please fill me in on what I hope to be my new home! Thanks in advance :)

ablarc
December 22nd, 2005, 09:04 AM
aussienicole, you picked a great place to live; don't worry about a doggone thing. I lived on both 106th and 108th, and I was happy as a lark. And that was in the bad old days.

You'll be in a nice neighborhood with a big variety of stores, an easy walk to Columbia, and express subway service from 96th Street. Riverside Park is an extra bonus; you'll be able to organize weekend volleyball games with your friends. And your dog will love it.

Congratulations!

NY Hopeful
December 22nd, 2005, 03:12 PM
Thanks ryan....at least I know someone out there has tried this before and it's worked!

scottish2
December 25th, 2005, 08:02 PM
Hi

My wife and I are considering getting a condo in Manhattan. Does anyone know of a good website for searching for Manhattan condos? Have found some but most have a limited inventory of condos.

TIA
Dave

Schadenfrau
December 26th, 2005, 11:08 PM
Did you include co-ops in your search?

scottish2
December 26th, 2005, 11:11 PM
Well we're very hesitant about co-ops though the more we look the more we find that it maybe inevitable but looking at straight condos without the co-op if this is possible in Manhattan as most we find are co-op. :confused:

Schadenfrau
December 27th, 2005, 01:44 PM
Most apartments for sale in NYC are co-ops. Is there any particular reason you'd prefer a condo? I do think that co-ops get a bad rap.

ebrigham
December 27th, 2005, 02:11 PM
If you have a subscription to the New York Times online, it has a great centralized listing of property for sale in NYC (searchable by coop, condo and many other parameters). If you don't have one, I would get one. Or you can go to the individual RE firms' websites - corcoran, prudential douglas elliman, etc etc.

MrSpice
December 27th, 2005, 02:18 PM
New York Times real estate on the web lists most offerings frmo major real estate companies. Or, you can go to those listings directrly on their web sites: Douglas Elliman, Corcoran, Brown Harris Stevens, Bellmarc, Warburg Realty, etc.

Some of these peolpe that try to steer you toward coop are either rich (nothing's wrong with that -:) or don't know what they are talking about.
You cannot buy a co-op unless you have a lot of money saved up. Not only most good co-ops require a 25% downpayment, but they also normally require you to have a lot of liquid assets after closing approximately equal to 2-3 years of mortgage payments + maintenance. Therefore, in order to buy a 1-bedroom coop for 600K, you may have to have up to 300K in liquid assets. Not to mention the co-op board approval process that can be a pain in the neck, but most importantly it takes valuable time. That's why many people like you (and me) want to buy a condo where all you need is 10% down + closing costs.

Your only remaining options are no-board approval co-ops which are mostly pretty bad (at least the ones I saw) or a so-called cond-op which is coop with condo rules. But there are very few of those available in the city.

gerry
December 27th, 2005, 08:48 PM
hi im an 20 year old irish man hoping to move to new york in april but looking at some of these threads im now having second thoughts! i have never been to college but i have my leaving cert done.(graduated from high school),and im a bit scared about the price of new york and im wondering that would a fella like me get any job whatsoever in ny i would take any job as long as the pay would get me food and pay the rent? also if you could tell me where do most of the irish people live and do the look after there own? please any information help or views is greatly appreciated!

BPC
December 28th, 2005, 12:12 AM
hi im an 20 year old irish man hoping to move to new york in april but looking at some of these threads im now having second thoughts! i have never been to college but i have my leaving cert done.(graduated from high school),and im a bit scared about the price of new york and im wondering that would a fella like me get any job whatsoever in ny i would take any job as long as the pay would get me food and pay the rent? also if you could tell me where do most of the irish people live and do the look after there own? please any information help or views is greatly appreciated!

The area around Fordham University in the Bronx has a great Irish neighborhood (I forget the name, if it even has one). Lots of great Irish bars and hangouts. A real safe, friendly, reasonably-priced, fun place. Or at least it was ten years ago when my friend used to live there and we would hang out. My friend worked as a Legal Aid attorney, which pays not much more than minimum wage in this town, yet he could afford a decent enough place. Of course, the real estate boom might have hit that 'hood, so someone who knows more about the Bronx can probably tell you more.

bella216
December 28th, 2005, 10:05 AM
im a 21 year old student nurse, ill be done with school in June 2006 and i plan on moving to NY after that. I know ill probably be trying to get a place in Brooklyn, those apt's seemed to be in my price range (850-900).. Could someone please tell me about any hospitals, nursing homes, medical offices in the Brooklyn area and where in brooklyn would be a good place to try to live. Even maybe a place near the subways that would take me into manhattan if I found work there. THANKS!!!!! :)

Schadenfrau
December 28th, 2005, 12:00 PM
I haven't seen an Irish neighborhood near Fordham, but there are lots of Irish people in Woodlawn in the Bronx. There are lots of Irish in Woodside, Queens, as well.

scottish2
December 28th, 2005, 12:59 PM
Hi

Sorry for late reply we're redoing our floors and it's a nightmare lol.

Yeah reason we wanta condo over co-op is it's less of a hassle. Finances not really an issue but just looking for options up there for when the time comes as it won't be in next couple years most likely but maybe in 5-10 we'll do it and want to start watching property prices and such now so we're set when the time does come.

BPC
December 28th, 2005, 02:30 PM
I did some Googling for Gerry. This according to Fordham's web site:

"To the Northwest of campus are the Bedford Park and Norwood areas, still relatively safe and heavily Irish, and now, like Little Italy, with a growing Slavic and Albanian population. If you like Irish pubs and music, Katonah Avenue is a good place to start. Katonah, lined with numerous pubs that feature live music on the weekends, is the spine of the Woodlawn section of the Bronx, an Irish enclave nestled between Woodlawn Cemetery and the Yonkers' border."

http://www.fordham.edu/Academics/Colleges__Graduate_S/Graduate__Profession/Arts__Sciences/Services__Resources/For_Students/Graduate_Student_Ass/Hand_Book/Resources_for_Living_13075.html

gerry
December 28th, 2005, 06:07 PM
what kind of jobs do the irish in that area have because im thinking that they would have top jobs would they? just basic labour is it bcp?

BPC
December 28th, 2005, 10:41 PM
Gerry, New York is an expensive place, and even the Bronx is not immune to the housing boom, but that neighborhood, at least when I used to visit it, was honest working class folks. The Irish with the bucks live in all of the same places that all the other rich folks live -- Tribeca, Scarsdale, UES, Armonk, etc. Please make sure you have some starter savings (ie, at least 3-4 months living expenses) before coming to NYC. There are plenty of decent-paying jobs for smart, hard-working persons without college degrees, but it takes time and money to get set up here.

movin_on_up
December 30th, 2005, 10:14 AM
Hello Everyone (You wonderfully helpful people)

I am a 22 y/o female from FL, a finance major graduating in the upcoming semester and will be moving to NY in June or so. I have been reading the thread it seems you all are very knowledgable on NY and so I thought I would ask you for some advice.
I am not in any way (well maybe a little) using you all as my personal broker, but I was hoping you could tell me about Clinton Hills Brooklyn. I have a potential roommate their, but I don't know much about the area.

Just in case she doens't work out....I figure I will start off (salary wise) some where in the mid $40k's or so and I definitely am looking for a roommate, so what are some pretty nice, busy, with lots of 20-somethings and things to do palces for 1/2/3 bedrooms that I should look in to. Also, on that note, how much should I pay for rent at the $40K rate?

I truly appreciate at your response and help (in advance ;))

Ciao

julian734
January 2nd, 2006, 07:09 AM
Hey can anyone give me an idea of how much utilities(electric, water, gas) would run in a studio or 1bdrm in the city? I realize it depends on usage but I am wondering if the rates are much higher than other parts of the US....Thanks - Joe

scottish2
January 2nd, 2006, 07:25 AM
Good question Joe I too would be interested to find this out. My case would be more for a 2 bedroom or smaller. Depends whats available if and when we decide to move.

lofter1
January 2nd, 2006, 09:31 AM
My electric bill for a 2 bedroom place (somewhat skewed as I pay for my own hot water heater, which accounts for ~ 30% of the bill) used to run ~ $100 - $125 / month in the winter and $150 - $200 / month in the summer (2 air conditioners -- sometimes even higher when we have a brutally long heat wave).

But for the last two months of 2005 I see that my electric bill is 50% higher than the same period last year, with comparable electric kilowatt/hour usage per month.

Schadenfrau
January 2nd, 2006, 11:04 AM
I'm not much help, as my utilities have been included in my rent for years, but I can tell you that I've never heard of anyone paying for water, and most people don't pay for gas.

ManhattanKnight
January 2nd, 2006, 04:11 PM
Hey can anyone give me an idea of how much utilities(electric, water, gas) would run in a studio or 1bdrm in the city? I realize it depends on usage but I am wondering if the rates are much higher than other parts of the US....Thanks - Joe

My "level billing" rate for electricity only (1 BR, 2 ACs, no gas service at all) is $161/month. The "actual" usage is slightly lower during cool months and considerably higher ($250-400) during the hottest ones.

ECTO-1
January 2nd, 2006, 05:24 PM
Where do YOU live, Schad? We've gotten a water bill since I've been growing up. Ain't no utility that I know of given for free in this city no more, if there ever was.

Schadenfrau
January 2nd, 2006, 05:47 PM
My landlords have always picked up the bill for the building. I just asked a friend if he's ever received a water or gas bill in the city and he hasn't, either. He lives in Chelsea.

The only bill I've ever received in my 12 years here is electricity. I guess it just depends on the building.

ryan
January 2nd, 2006, 06:23 PM
I thought NY State Law required landlords of multi-unit dwellings to pay the bill so water authorities did not have to meter individual apartments. I've never heard of anyone receiving a water bill unless they owned or rented a separate house.

ECTO-1
January 2nd, 2006, 10:17 PM
Well, my 'rents only took over our building recently, but I know growing up I've heard mention of water bills before then.

ryan
January 3rd, 2006, 01:13 AM
Well, my 'rents only took over our building recently, but I know growing up I've heard mention of water bills before then.

If you're not old enough to pay your own bills, you are probably not in a position to give adults advice on the subject.

ECTO-1
January 3rd, 2006, 10:35 AM
You get the wrong impression, Bunky. They're the only building owners I know. What, you don't consider where you grew up your house anymore? I'm closing on 30 happily married in my own place with every freakin' bill you can possibly imagine, thank you very much. I'm still waiting for the day they start billing us for air.

ryan
January 3rd, 2006, 11:17 AM
Well, fair enough, but you still didn't clarify the utility question at all.

NYatKNIGHT
January 3rd, 2006, 02:39 PM
Studio/1 bedroom is about $50-$100 per month depending on the month.

(Oh, and this isn't ECTO-1, the avatar stealer)

ECTO-1
January 3rd, 2006, 10:05 PM
Hey, not my fault they only got 3 pages of avatars to choose from.

I live in an apartment and pay water. That clarify any?

lofter1
January 3rd, 2006, 10:51 PM
I live in an apartment and pay water.
Where and how much / month?

Emma06
January 7th, 2006, 11:44 AM
Hi

Im a newbie here. I will be finishing college in April here in Ireland. I am studying Computer Science. The course I am doing doesn't really specialize in any particular area of Computing; just web design, programming, e-business/e-commerce, HCI and Networking.

Anyway, I am really hoping that when I finish I can go somewhere that I can get a good job with good pay and somewhere reasonably nice to live.
I've been looking for a long time at New York and it really appeals to me, problem is I just can't seem to find a website that specializes in New York Computer jobs, that don't look for like 5 years of experience. I am looking to join a company as a Junior and learn as I go along.

Does anyone have any advice for me? Or if there are people here who have moved to NY for a Computer job, how did they go about doing it?
I've found places with jobs in New Jersey and other places but I don't know where they are and how safe they are and how to find somewhere to live.

I hope someone can help.

Emma :)

MidtownGuy
January 7th, 2006, 09:30 PM
hi Emma, it might be worth trying craigslist.org, select New York City, and you will see listings for jobs as well as other things. A quick peek just now turned up a lot of listings.

Emma06
January 8th, 2006, 06:49 AM
Thanks MidtownGuy!

lofter1
January 8th, 2006, 06:53 PM
Yikes ... 36% Rate Hikes!!!

Con Ed Raises Rates
NY 1
January 08, 2006

http://www.ny1.com/ny1/content/index.jsp?stid=1&aid=56156 (http://www.ny1.com/ny1/content/index.jsp?stid=1&aid=56156)

Con Edison customers across the region brace for sticker shock as the electrical company announces higher rates for January.

Rates will be 36 percent higher than a year ago, meaning the average owner of a two-bedroom home using 300 kilowatt hours a month will see a $13 hike on their bill.

Larger homes using 500 to 1000 kilowatt hours will pay an extra $43.

A Con Ed spokesman says the cold weather and a natural gas market made unstable by disasters like Hurricane Katrina are to blame for the rate hikes; the utility is dependent on the market, so it pays what the customer pays.


Copyright &#169; 2005 NY1 News. All rights reserved.

lizzied2003
January 8th, 2006, 07:51 PM
Hi all,
My husband is looking for a place to live sunday throught thurday/fri. that is close to the city (within 25 miles) and easy access if we want to come visit. Presently we are looking at the city of new rochelle as it is close to amtrack and our permanent residence in RI is near train. I'd love any input or suggestions if you can think of a better place. Currently we are looking for a 'community' sort of residence where if the kids come they can reasonably walk to town or my husband can go for a run after work. Any suggestions for similar neighborhood closer to city gratefully accepted
Thanks to all.

SthrnCmfrt
January 10th, 2006, 09:54 PM
Hi all

Im gonna try my hand at asking for your opinions. I want to move to new york and have wanted to move for a long time. I want to know what you people think is realistic for me. Im going be finishing my masters degree in civil engineering at north carolina state university. One of my professors says he has spent some considerable time in nyc and says with my qualifications I could get a job around 65 - 70k a year. Also with that salary I have about 20k in a savings account. So now you know where im at as far as money is concerned. I would prefer to live in manhattan, not in any particular neighborhood...I guess if I had to choose a general area, anywhere from the upper east/west side and south, i know thats a broad range but I dont want to be choosey. I also would like to have a roomate for a while. Im really opened minded about the people and places around me so im not one of those people that want to live near other certain people. It actually sounds good...ive lived in the conservative south for too long so im exicited to be around different people. I dont have bad spending habits either. I guess the only thing I really spend a lot of money on is going out to dinner but I only do that once or twice a week. I also love music and like to go see different shows. So what do you guys think is a good rent price range and neighborhood for me is? Oh and sorry if this was a little too long. I wanted to be a little more descriptive so I could get a fair answer.

lofter1
January 10th, 2006, 11:54 PM
Going out to dinner in Manhattan can easily run well over $50 / per person -- and without much effort can go upwards to $100 each (including meal, drinks, dessert, tip, tax) ...

Ninjahedge
January 11th, 2006, 08:53 AM
Hi all

Im gonna try my hand at asking for your opinions. I want to move to new york and have wanted to move for a long time. I want to know what you people think is realistic for me. Im going be finishing my masters degree in civil engineering at north carolina state university. One of my professors says he has spent some considerable time in nyc and says with my qualifications I could get a job around 65 - 70k a year.

Lets stop right there.

If you do not have any experience, you will NOT get that salary.

Take that from a guy with a Masters in Civil Engineering from Stanford.

Going rate is about 40K a year starting.


Also with that salary I have about 20k in a savings account. So now you know where im at as far as money is concerned. I would prefer to live in manhattan, not in any particular neighborhood...I guess if I had to choose a general area, anywhere from the upper east/west side and south, i know thats a broad range but I dont want to be choosey. I also would like to have a roomate for a while. Im really opened minded about the people and places around me so im not one of those people that want to live near other certain people. It actually sounds good...ive lived in the conservative south for too long so im exicited to be around different people. I dont have bad spending habits either. I guess the only thing I really spend a lot of money on is going out to dinner but I only do that once or twice a week. I also love music and like to go see different shows. So what do you guys think is a good rent price range and neighborhood for me is? Oh and sorry if this was a little too long. I wanted to be a little more descriptive so I could get a fair answer.

You can live in Manhattan, but most of the guys at our office live in Queens and Brooklyn. The city is just TOO expensive for any place with space.

If you are willing to cram yourself into an apartment slightly larger than a dorm room, you could probably make ends meet with a modest ammount of overhead left.

Just do not be dissapointed when job offers come back considerably below what your professor told you. (Unless you have several years experience, or a family member at the company you are being hired at. Even so, starting salaries just are NOT that high here.)

MrSpice
January 11th, 2006, 10:46 AM
Emma: How do you plan on getting a work permit to work in the US? I think it's much easier to find a job in the computer science field here once you have some experience. Ireland now has a booming IT sector. If I were you, I would find a job at one of the large multinationals in Ireland, get some good experience, then you can land a job here in New York in the financial sector where you can get a decent pay and be able to afford New York prices.

Emma06
January 11th, 2006, 12:02 PM
Well yeah I was thinking also that I should get a good job here and earn some good money before I make the move. But I hope by this time next year I will have it all sorted out!

Thanks for the response Spice

SthrnCmfrt
January 11th, 2006, 12:37 PM
See, thats what I thought, I found somewhere that told me about 48k was the median for entry level civil engineering jobs. I even showed this to my professor and he just claims that I can make more. He must have made a mistake somewhere, maybe comparing me to someone he knows that has been working for 10 to 15 years in the field. I guess I should just take a trip to new york and see for myself. Also, for anyone that doesnt know and are still in school, NYU has a thing called "spring in new york" (i think thats it) where you can apply to take a semester at NYU and experience the city. I wasnt aware of this at all until recently. I wish I had known this before, I would have jumped all over that chance.

PavementMustard
January 11th, 2006, 12:58 PM
hey sthrn, im planning on transfering to ncsu, and like you I also want to move to nyc, maybe we could help each other out?? I also know that I want to do something in engineering but I havent decided on which field, I think im leaning towards electrical/computer...but the reason im here, what are the biggest industries in nyc? I mean, if I chose to be an engineer, which field would have the most job opportunities? And the jobs available in engineering vs other industries? I have tried to find this info in other places but everything seems kind of vague. Im not basing my education on a move to new york but it would help me make a better decision

Im sorry if there is another board for questions like this...im a newbie

ourman
January 13th, 2006, 03:13 PM
I must be nuts. I'm a freelance writer and I'm planning to move to NYC with three kids. Two are in elementary school, with the oldest about to hit 6th grade next year. Are the public schools as bad as I hear? Do you have to pay out the nose to live somewhere with decent public schools? Do you know of any lists or ratings sites where I can browse the better schools, and look for a place in that area? I don't have to be in the city everyday so commuting isn't such a big problem, but my wife definitely wants to live in an urban environment.

nicksinif
January 14th, 2006, 03:11 PM
What is a co-op? What is the difference between a co-op and a condo?
much more freedom with a condo

Ninjahedge
January 17th, 2006, 10:06 AM
I must be nuts. I'm a freelance writer and I'm planning to move to NYC with three kids. Two are in elementary school, with the oldest about to hit 6th grade next year. Are the public schools as bad as I hear? Do you have to pay out the nose to live somewhere with decent public schools? Do you know of any lists or ratings sites where I can browse the better schools, and look for a place in that area? I don't have to be in the city everyday so commuting isn't such a big problem, but my wife definitely wants to live in an urban environment.


I don't know.

If I were you I would also look into the surrounding boroughs that have easy transportation to the city itself.

Hoboken is pretty nice, although the schools there SUCK (I live there now, they are getting better as the people start living there longer with their kids instead of moving out when they are about 2yo....)

As for NYC schools, some suck, some are quite nice. There are also target schools for later in their scholastic career, but you have to start looking for testing and the like to get them into those schools.


It is neat that your wife wants to move here, but just be prepared for teh increased "stress index" of a lot of basic things. If you can handle that change, there is so much more that the city has to offer in many other areas.


GL!

ryan
January 17th, 2006, 11:54 AM
I must be nuts. I'm a freelance writer and I'm planning to move to NYC with three kids.

You should look at real estate listings first and figure out where you can afford to live. It's easy to say the Upper West side has great public schools, but not very helpful if you can't afford it. There are good schools and bad, but it varies neighborhood to neighborhood - roughly related to the general wealth of that area.

We also not be the best forum to answer this question. I don't see a lot of parents posting/not a lot of insight into quesitons like yours.

BPC
January 17th, 2006, 10:31 PM
I must be nuts. I'm a freelance writer and I'm planning to move to NYC with three kids. ... I don't have to be in the city everyday so commuting isn't such a big problem, but my wife definitely wants to live in an urban environment.

I hope your wife has a steady paying job or you come from family money. Otherwise, your children are going to have bigger problems than mediocre public schools, like having to eat cat food. Only a handful of freelance writers in this town make enough to live in the City and support a family.

PavementMustard
January 18th, 2006, 12:19 AM
Ok, I just want to know...for the past 5 or 6 months I have had an obsession with living in NYC, I cant do anything about it now though since im in college but I told this to a guy I work with who used to live in Brooklyn. I told him that I wanted to live in Manhattan and he asked me why there? I didnt really know the answer. So many people seem to want to live in Manhattan and not in the other boroughs. I want to know if I were to move to the City, would there be a big difference in how it would "feel" to live in say Queens or Brooklyn as opposed to Manhattan? Is there huge difference or just a subtle difference?

MidtownGuy
January 18th, 2006, 12:44 AM
There is a HUGE difference. I lived in outer boroughs and now in Manhattan and I can be more spontaneous now with my activities.
That being said, it is sometimes impossible to find an acceptable apartment in Manhattan if your budget is tight.

Ninjahedge
January 18th, 2006, 08:58 AM
There is a HUGE difference. I lived in outer boroughs and now in Manhattan and I can be more spontaneous now with my activities.
That being said, it is sometimes impossible to find an acceptable apartment in Manhattan if your budget is tight.

It is also hard to be "more spontaneous with [your] activities" when you are on a tight budget.

No cash, no fun.


Also, Manhattan is also known as the place where many live, but few can actually save up enough to move out and about. There are so many people in teh city living paycheck to paycheck that it is not funny.

Anyone have any stats on that?

Marta Liz
January 23rd, 2006, 12:47 PM
Hi all!
I just joined. Was delighted to find this forum through image search on Google - took me to the wonderful pics of Coney Island here. *grin*
Actually I will be working there in the summer and I am looking for a cheap place to stay for 2 people (my friend and me - we're both girls, students) in the area. I tried portals like Easyrent, but those only have ads for Manhattan and other areas of Brooklyn. Could somebody recommend something to me, maybe? We're looking for something small and cheap and not too far from Coney Island, so the lower part of Brooklyn, I guess... but I heard that Sheephead's Bay (did I get it right?) is not too good of a neighborhood (crime?), so maybe not there...

Anyway, greetings everybody

Marta Liz

ASchwarz
January 23rd, 2006, 12:57 PM
Sheepshead Bay is extremely safe. It is probably safer than most suburbs. There are no iffy areas anywhere in that specific part of Brooklyn.

Sheepshead Bay has good restaurants along Emmons Avenue and near the Sheepshead Bay B/Q train station. It's a bustling community, with a large concentration of Russians, Jews, South and East Asians and Italians.

Keep in mind that Sheepshead Bay has a different feel than Manhattan or Brownstone parts of Brooklyn. It's a seaside neighborhood filled with upwardly mobile immigrants and some old-timers.

Parts of the neighborhood are getting expensive (the waterfront and new construction condos can be very expensive) but you can still get a cheap rental in a decent building.

julian734
January 25th, 2006, 11:54 PM
I am Planning a move to NYC in a couple of years. I will be running a service oriented businees for the school system. Trying to be well prepared and doing alot of research.....I dont want to sound like I'm Living in "tv land" but just how real is the presence of organized crime these days if at all? I mean Is Tony Soprano and his crew gonna shake me down for protection money?? :confused:

lofter1
January 26th, 2006, 12:29 AM
hmmmmm...

maybe, but only if you try to open some competition for the Bada Bing ...

julian734
January 26th, 2006, 12:37 AM
I am Planning a move to NYC in a couple of years. I will be running a service oriented businees for the school system. Trying to be well prepared and doing alot of research.....I dont want to sound like I'm Living in "tv land" but just how real is the presence of organized crime these days if at all? I mean Is Tony Soprano and his crew gonna shake me down for protection money?? :confused:

I meant to add that I am searching out any business owners out there....it sound funny to some i guess but i gotta find out if its something to worry abt...Thanks Guys

guest
January 30th, 2006, 04:03 PM
I'm kinda worried that all communication stopped on this thread when this guy mentioned the mafia .... I wonder how many peopleare getting whacked as we speak!

TLOZ Link5
January 30th, 2006, 04:31 PM
...

That's all I could really muster.

bluegreyeyes
January 30th, 2006, 06:53 PM
i am hoping to move to brooklyn in april... i'm 23 and don't have an actual job yet. i'll be looking into paralegal work, as i'll have a certificate in the end of february... i have intern experience at a LI law firm. i can't imagine anyone paying me more than $40k a year. that said, my parents are obviously willing to cosign my apartment, however, my dad retired last year and i'm not sure his yearly income would be 70-80x my monthly rent (assuming my rent would be around $1000). would he still be able to cosign or no? if not, am i basically screwed?

antinimby
January 30th, 2006, 09:15 PM
Hey bluegreyeyes, R-O-O-M-M-A-T-E-(S).
And since you're not that far away on LI, why don't you come into the City and see for yourself. Nothing beats seeing the neighborhoods first hand.

bluegreyeyes
January 31st, 2006, 12:12 PM
Hey bluegreyeyes, R-O-O-M-M-A-T-E-(S).
And since you're not that far away on LI, why don't you come into the City and see for yourself. Nothing beats seeing the neighborhoods first hand.


well i do have 2 friends that are planning on moving into an apartment in the west village. they are dead set on it. anyway, i have a dog (black lab, around 60 or so lbs.) and i really can't afford more than $1000/mo. the two of them are willing to share a room b/c one has a boyfriend so she basically lives at his apt... she'll never be around. but they only want to spend $800-900 / month each.

basically, if a 2 bedroom in the west village allowed dogs was available for $2600-2900, i'd be golden. but thats not even realistic, is it? what do west village apts 2 bdrms go for?

scrow9
February 1st, 2006, 03:24 PM
Hi,

First of all I hope I am posting this in the right forum and thread, couldn't find a way to start a new conversation so I just replied to the last posting I could find. Also, I apologize for the length of this post as well.

So here's the deal:

I've most recently lived in LA where I worked as a Web Project Manager, making a base salary of 85K. I'm single, about to turn 45 and I know that moving to the Big Apple would be a big change for me, maybe even a great adventure. Never been to New York but I am interviewing for a job near Rockefeller Plaza so I guess that's called "midtown."

So my concerns are:

* affordability/cost of living and
* lifestyle.

Okay, 85K in LA sounds like a lot but believe me it doesn't go too far with rents being what they are BUT New York is even worse, from what I understand it's 40 percent more expense to live in New York than LA but salaries are only 4% higher on average (source is Salary.com)

If I accept a job in New York paying 85K, am I totally screwed? In other words, how much should I ask for...the online calculators say something like $124K. What kind of lifestyle in New York would 85K support?

Now, where to live? At first I was thinking not to bring my car but to sell it before leaving since it's so expensive to maintain a car in NY. But on the other hand, I was thinking what if I decide to move out to CT and take the train in?....arrrggg so confusing.

If I should decide to live somewhere in the city...what areas should I look at? Ideally I would like a 2 BR, 1Bath but I can be flexible on that somewhat. Safety is a concern but so is finding affordable housing. Midtown rents that I've found advertised online are around $2,500 and go UP from there for a 2BR, does that sound right to you?

So if living directly in Midtown is out, what parts of the city should I look at that are within good commute distance? To give you some guidance, I'd like to find a little neighborhood that has a Starbucks, big bookstores, video stores, movie theaters and shopping all within a reasonable distance...is that realistic? So the area I would look for would have a young feel to it. I enjoy film (both watching and creating my own video and motion graphic projects), am kinda "artsy" in many respects but let's face it...I'm middle aged - not a youngster anymore. In fact, I might like to take some film, art or design classes while there.

Also, dating opportunities will be very important but I don't expect to go to a lot of bars, first of all I don't drink and also I hate to be around cigarette smoke, not sure if smoking in bars in NY is allowed or not.

Should I decide not to live directly in the city, what areas would you recommend? I've heard CT mentioned as well as areas of NY outside of the big city. The train from CT into the city is about 45 minutes one way, is that right?

I would guess if I go that route then I WILL need to either bring my car or get a new one out there, another expense either way.

Okay, I'm obviously rambling at this point and could use whatever crumbs of info you care to share. Have mercy!

Steve

MrSpice
February 1st, 2006, 04:18 PM
scrow9: Here are my thoughts one by one:

1) I think you can get a better deal than 85K in Manhattan. You can get 85K + guaranteed bonus, I think. I don't know what your experience is like, but I would think you can get 10-20K more than in LA. If you're moving so far, you should at least get a decent raise.

2) New York is a congested city. If you want to live in Manhattan where all the action is, you have to pay dearly (a nice 1-bedroom for rent will cost you 2400-2700 per month). But there are other options. You can live in Queens or Brooklyn (Brooklyn has nice areas like Greenpoint, Park Slope, Carrol Gardens, Williamsburg is getting very popupar) but your commute will be longer (35-50 min by subway). If you decide to live in Manhattan, the most convenient area that is accessible from Midtown is Upper East Side. You can find better-priced apartments in the area of 87-95th streets between 3rd and 1st avenues. in Midtown, the rents are a bit higher than in the Upper East Side area that I mentioned and there's not much nightlife - it's primarily a business area where most people work, not live. Midtown is accessible from Upper East side via a fast 4 and 5 trains (10-15 min). But those trains are filled like a can of sardines - that's why they are building a new 2nd avenue line that will be ready in 2012. What is also nice about living on Upper East Side is that you can walk to Central Park when it's not too cold. A decent real 2-bedroom would cost you at least 3200 in Manhattan. If the apartment is in the nice building with a doorman, elevator, etc. it's more expensive. If it's a walk-up building without elevator and doorman, it will be 300-500 cheaper.

http://newyork.craigslist.org/cgi-bin/search?areaID=3&query=&catAbbreviation=nbs&subAreaID=1&group=H&bedrooms=2

I think dating opportunities are abundant on Upper East side. 2nd, 3rd and 1st avenues are lined with bars, restaurants and cafes.

3) Monthly parking will cost you at least $325-350/month in Manhattan and at least $220 in a nice area of Brooklyn. I personally think it's worth it because I love my car and love to drive on weekends. I live in a more remote area of Brookly now and pay $150 for parking. But it's not as nice, the commute is long and you won't feel like you're in New York.

MrSpice
February 1st, 2006, 04:29 PM
http://www.manhattanliving.com/neighborhoods.cfm#n5

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Upper_East_Side

scrow9
February 1st, 2006, 04:41 PM
Yes, I hope to get more than 85K just so that I can afford these rents, whew!

On the Google map it looked like Brooklyn was quite a distance away from where I would work, Rockefeller Plaza...but I know maps can be misleading.

Upper East Side sounds nice IF I can find something affordable. Does an ad like this one for $2,500 seem to good to be true?

http://newyork.craigslist.org/mnh/nfb/130432211.html

MrSpice
February 1st, 2006, 04:57 PM
scrow9: two things:

1) Don't look at the map. I live at the very end of Brooklyn almost as far from Manhattan as you can think of. But the express train brings me to Midtown in 50 minutes. You can get from Astoria in Quens to Midtown in 20-30 minutes. Minhattan is where all the action is. It seems like you don't know much about the city yet, have not been there. Try to get some extended living arangement/long term hotel initially, possibly close to the city in New Jersey like this hotel:

http://www.extendedstayamerica.com/minisite/?hotelID=749

and see what area you like, look at apartments and neighborhoods.

2) You cannot say anything about the apartment by looking at the ad like this. Some people spend months trying to find a good apartment. Some decide to use a broker in spite of the broker fees since brokers often have better apartment. You really need to spend time and look at different apartments and see what you like. Once you sign a lease and move in all your stuff, it's difficult and costly to change. I would that a 2-br for 2500 on upper east side is not very nice. There should be a catch since many people pay 2500 for 1-bedroom and many 1-br in nice high-rise buildings with doorman go for close to 3000/month.

scrow9
February 1st, 2006, 05:01 PM
scrow9: two things:

...It seems like you don't know much about the city yet, have not been there.

Yeah, you can say that again!

MrSpice
February 1st, 2006, 05:08 PM
scrow9: One other thing to know about Upper East Side is that you can walk 5-10 blocks north and end up in a much worse area. Say, on 92nd and 93rd Streets there are beautiful buildings with doorman and restaurants outside. On 86th Street, there are lots of shops and 2 movie theater. But once you cross the 96th Street and it's a different world with public housing projects. It's not as dangerus as before. But so you know - anything above 96th Street is much cheaper and should not be considered. But even on 95th and 96th street there are several luxury high-rises.

One other thing - make sure you live withing walking distance to subway. Don't listen to anyone who says you can just take a bus to subway because buses run really slowly in this city. Subway access is a must in this town.

scrow9
February 1st, 2006, 10:26 PM
Thanks for that additional information, I see now from the map that, as you say, I should stay away from the "upper half" of Central Park, at least on the East side.

Well by the end of the week I should have a better feeling if this job is going to be offered or not, at least I should know if I'm still in the running which I think I am. I know the company has had problem getting staff to move from LA to NY, so that gives me a little bit of negotiation leverage.

heyjude
February 2nd, 2006, 12:21 AM
My husband is an attorney and has interviewed with a great firm / Rockefeller Ctr. We hope to be in NYC before school starts fall 06. (with 5 yr old daughter & 3 yr old son.)

We currently live on nearly 1/2 acre in Urban Houston (you'd die if you knew how cheap!). We've traveled to NYC many times for business & pleasure, but moving there is going to be much different, I'm sure. I don't mind downsizing - I'm kind of worn out keeping up with our current place:o

After MUCH research, I'm looking at the following areas and would appreciate any input, but especially from users with families.

QUEENS: Astoria, LIC, Sunnyside, Forest Hills Garden

BROOKLYN (for sure): BoCoCa, Park Slope, Brklyn Hts, Prospect Hts
BROOKLYN (? don't know enough about): Clinton Hill, Greene, DUMBO, Greenpoint/Williamsburg (saw other posts - they are so diametrically opposed!) Kensington, Windsor Terrace

I didn't list anything in Manhattan, b/c I'm just not sure that we can afford it or maybe it would be TOO drastic of a change for us.

THANKS A 1,000,000!!!

MrSpice
February 2nd, 2006, 09:22 AM
heyjude: Cannot say much about Queens (have not lived there) except that Astoria is very close to the Midtown Manhtattan by train.

Brooklyn: I never heard that name BoCoCa, but I see that's how they now call Carrol Gardens in Brooklyn. It's a very hip and trendy area with lots of restaurants and bars. I would say it's about 45 min commute to midtown. Park Slope has become very popular in the last few years. Real Estate prices there are rising like crazy. It will also take you about 45 min to get to midtown depending on where in Park Slope you're going to live. Only part of Park Slope is zoned for a good public school. Like with any area in New York, if you want to give your kids to the public school, you need to make sure the local school is a good one. I know that Williamsburg and Dumbo (both are much closer to Manhattan than other Brooklyn areas) are getting very popular these days, but don't know much about it. Clinton Hill is adjacent to Carrol Gardens and is pretty much the same neighborhood.

http://www.nycenet.edu/default.aspx - you can find the school here
http://www.insideschools.org/ -- scholl info and reviews here

ryan
February 2nd, 2006, 12:45 PM
I would only reccomend Williamsburg to the bar-oriented <30. Otherwise I think Bococa is a better fit for similar money. I think Windsor Terrace might be a good fit for a young family - kind of a cheaper park slope vibe from what I've heard...

scrow9
February 2nd, 2006, 10:49 PM
I just read on the Internet something about a New York City personal income tax and that it's about 9%, does that sound accurate? I assume that's just for NYC residents, correct?

We don't have that kind ofr City tax in Los Angeles so if it's true then I need to add that to my salary demand....Oh, what about the sales tax rate, about how much is that?

TLOZ Link5
February 2nd, 2006, 11:04 PM
Sales tax is something like 8.125%.

BPC
February 2nd, 2006, 11:32 PM
I just read on the Internet something about a New York City personal income tax and that it's about 9%, does that sound accurate? I assume that's just for NYC residents, correct?

We don't have that kind ofr City tax in Los Angeles so if it's true then I need to add that to my salary demand....Oh, what about the sales tax rate, about how much is that?

We have a state income tax (imposed on all persons who work in NY State, wherever they may live). The rates run up to around 8% or so. We also have a city income tax (imposed on all persons who both live and work in the City). It currently runs up to about 4.5%, although Mayor Mike likes to raise it every so often to keep us honest. In California, you will have a state income tax (not sure what %s you pay out there) but not an LA city tax, so your net loss will be 4.5% plus the difference in state taxes.

I believe sales tax here is 8.25%. It is not charged on groceries (but is charged on prepared food). There are periodic sales-tax-free periods for clothes up to a certain dollar amount, but I do not believe that has been made permanent.

NYS and NYC also find all sorts of other direct and indirect taxes to hit you with -- on your utilities and cell phone, cigarette taxes, tolls and incessant parking tickets, etc. A lady just got fined $50 for putting her shopping bag on a subway seat. Others have been fined for discarding "household trash" (ie., an envelope with your name on it) in a street can. The list goes on and on. Not sure if any of these will effect you.

Just bear in mind that, if you live in NYC, you have the honor and privilege of being subject to three of the four largest taxing authorities in the nation, the United States (#1), New York State (#2) and New York City (#4 -- right behind California State). Welcome, and congratulations.

MrSpice
February 2nd, 2006, 11:47 PM
http://www.bankrate.com/yho/itax/edit/state/profiles/state_tax_NY.asp

If your total compensation is roughly 100K, you will pay around 10% in city and state taxes. State/city taxes are also deductible on your federal return, unless you're hit with AMT.

I cannot figure out, why don't you come here first and check this place out before you get a new job and move here long term?

scrow9
February 3rd, 2006, 12:18 AM
I cannot figure out, why don't you come here first and check this place out before you get a new job and move here long term?

Oh the reason for that is simple, I am applying for jobs both in the San Francisco area and New York (actually in several other cities and states as well but nothing is currently happening on those applications) If I can find a job here locally I probably will stay in California. At this time I simply cannot afford to take a trip to NYC on my own dime on the mere hope that I will find a job...instead I will wait for a serious offer or interview opportunity, have the company fly me out for the interview and then I may spend a few extra days looking around depending upon how the interview goes.

TonyO
February 3rd, 2006, 09:34 AM
^ It is not a good idea to move here without visiting first. I would say that of anywhere, but especially New York.

scrow9
February 3rd, 2006, 10:26 AM
I will...have the company fly me out for the interview and then I may spend a few extra days looking around depending upon how the interview goes.
Sorry if I wasn't clear about that TonyO

scrow9
February 9th, 2006, 03:05 PM
What would you say would be a good estimate for my monthly commute costs from Brooklyn to Rockefeller center...right now I'm figuring $100 per month for subways and taxis but I could be way off since I'm just really guessing

ryan
February 9th, 2006, 04:08 PM
What would you say would be a good estimate for my monthly commute costs from Brooklyn to Rockefeller center...right now I'm figuring $100 per month for subways and taxis but I could be way off since I'm just really guessing

$76 for a monthly metrocard. You wouldn't use a taxi to commute from Brooklyn.

Purrcilla
February 24th, 2006, 02:54 AM
Hello!

First of all, I am so grateful to have stumbled across this site! :)

BACKGROUND: I will be moving up to NYC this summer for my job in Midtown Manhattan (off of 41st St.) which will pay me approximately $75K. I am a single, 23-year old female.

QUESTIONS:
1. Although I would LOVE to live in Murray Hill, after reading this forum, I think that that UES would be a better area for me instead because (a) I'm young and would like to go out, probably about 2 times a month or so, (b) I would like to live in a SAFE neighborhood, and (c) I will most likely find a more affordable apartment in UES. What would ya'll recommend?

2. I would like a nice, clean, and SAFE apartment (either an alcove studio or 1BR) in Manhattan with a 24-hour doorman, with possibly even an elevator. I don't know if that comes off as pretentious, but having never lived in such a large city, I think having a doorman may give both me and my parents some peace of mine. What range should I expect for something like this? I was budgeting approx $2,000.


3. What areas are pet-friendly? Although I don't plan on bringing my 20-lb terrier with me when I first move up, I would like to eventually move him out with me to NYC.

4. Assuming after taxes I can budget approx $4k a month, can I live comfortably in the city? Here are some of my breakdowns:
- Rent: $2k
- Bills (including high-speed internet and cable TV): $250
- Transportation: $76/month
- I don't plan on eating out extravagantly every month, although once in a while I would like to. I also don't plan on partying like a trustfund baby on the weekends, but I would like to have a drink here and there.

5. If the UES is ultimately the best recommendation for me, how would I get to work? How long is the subway ride (I heard that it's just AWFUL trying to catch the subway during rush hour, so I'm assuming this commute time should also include time spent waiting for available space?!) I'm hoping that by living in the UES vs. Murray Hill I will save on some cabfare since when I go out on the weekends, I'll be closer to home.


I apologize in advance for such a long post and really appreciate anyone who generously reads this entire lengthy post and answers my questions. :rolleyes:

ManhattanKnight
February 24th, 2006, 08:43 AM
Hello!

First of all, I am so grateful to have stumbled across this site! :)

BACKGROUND: I will be moving up to NYC this summer for my job in Midtown Manhattan (off of 41st St.) which will pay me approximately $75K. I am a single, 23-year old female.

QUESTIONS:
1. Although I would LOVE to live in Murray Hill, after reading this forum, I think that that UES would be a better area for me instead because (a) I'm young and would like to go out, probably about 2 times a month or so, (b) I would like to live in a SAFE neighborhood, and (c) I will most likely find a more affordable apartment in UES. What would ya'll recommend?

2. I would like a nice, clean, and SAFE apartment (either an alcove studio or 1BR) in Manhattan with a 24-hour doorman, with possibly even an elevator. I don't know if that comes off as pretentious, but having never lived in such a large city, I think having a doorman may give both me and my parents some peace of mine. What range should I expect for something like this? I was budgeting approx $2,000.


3. What areas are pet-friendly? Although I don't plan on bringing my 20-lb terrier with me when I first move up, I would like to eventually move him out with me to NYC.

4. Assuming after taxes I can budget approx $4k a month, can I live comfortably in the city? Here are some of my breakdowns:
- Rent: $2k
- Bills (including high-speed internet and cable TV): $250
- Transportation: $76/month
- I don't plan on eating out extravagantly every month, although once in a while I would like to. I also don't plan on partying like a trustfund baby on the weekends, but I would like to have a drink here and there.

5. If the UES is ultimately the best recommendation for me, how would I get to work? How long is the subway ride (I heard that it's just AWFUL trying to catch the subway during rush hour, so I'm assuming this commute time should also include time spent waiting for available space?!) I'm hoping that by living in the UES vs. Murray Hill I will save on some cabfare since when I go out on the weekends, I'll be closer to home.


I apologize in advance for such a long post and really appreciate anyone who generously reads this entire lengthy post and answers my questions. :rolleyes:

By learning as much as you can about the City from a distance, you've made a good start. But that's no substitute for spending some time here (at least a week, I'd suggest) to explore as many neighborhoods as you can and getting a feel about your new home town.

Broadly speaking, there are no unsafe neighborhoods in Manhattan (at least among the ones you're considering). Your $2K should get you a nice studio apartment almost anywhere (that's what they go for in my building in one of the City's currently most expensive areas). Your other budget line-items are probably too low, though.

You don't say whether you're going to be working on East or West 41st Street. Most subway lines in Manhattan run North-South, not East-West; so if you want a one-train ride to work, you should live on the same side of the island as your office. The "UES" (at least the northern part of it) has some of the worst subway service (just one line) on the island. Don't discount the possibility of walking to work, which you probably could if you lived in Murray Hill and worked on East 41st. And don't assume that you're going to want to party or eat in the same neighborhood as where you you live; you probably won't.

Good luck!

lofter1
February 24th, 2006, 09:26 AM
Your "bills" estimate does, indeed, seem too low.

Some charges, per my own experience ...

Cable / high speed internet package from Time Warner: ~$140 / m
Cell phone: ~$65 / m
Electric bill (Con Ed): ~ $80 / m
Renters Insurance: ~ $40 / m
Total: ~ $325 / m

Other things to consider ...

+ Laundry
+ Medical / Dental check ups

Movies in Manhatan are $10 + (no bargain matinees here -- drat!!)

Still, on the salary you mention you should be fine ...

Keep us posted ;)

Purrcilla
February 24th, 2006, 04:17 PM
Keep us posted ;)


Thank you both!
My bills budget was a rough estimate, so I really appreciate the more realistic amounts that both of ya'll listed.

I believe my office is on "East" 41st St? It's near the Madison and 41st St.
As for the recommendation for visiting ahead of time, I think that's an excellent suggestion and may try to go and look around sometime in May.

Unfortunately, I still have a few questions left:

1. Does NYC do pre-leases? Although I can wait until June-ish to find an apartment, if it was possible to sign a lease on a place a few months ahead, it would be preferred. If they did allow this, then I would allocate more time in May to go apartment-hunting and sign a lease then.

2. How are the renting policies in NYC? Since this is my first real high-paying job, I don't think they'd be able to look at past pay-checks to determine if I can pay for the rent. Do they allow guarantors such as my father who has EXCELLENT credit history to co-sign the lease with me?

3. Where do most of the young professionals hang out? Closer around the UES area or Midtown area? Of course, I understand that I will be going out and about all over the city, but I was curious to know where "home base" might be.

Once again, I appreciate any and all of ya'lls help! :)

MrSpice
February 24th, 2006, 05:32 PM
I don't know much about the renting policies. I would assume that without a solid work history, it may be more difficult for you to find an apartment in a high-rise apt. building with a doorman. There are lots of places to go out in Manhattan. For example, East Village, West Village, Soho, Upper West Side, Greenvich Village and Upper East Side. I would think that the East Village and Greenvich Village are the most happening areas for young people.

ryan
February 24th, 2006, 05:38 PM
3. Where do most of the young professionals hang out? Closer around the UES area or Midtown area? Of course, I understand that I will be going out and about all over the city, but I was curious to know where "home base" might be.
This is a bit of a contentious conversation - and something we probably couldn't do justice to here, but if you search around the board you'll see a lot of discussions of neighborhoods. Murry Hill & the UES are both reletively white, conservative & preppy/fratty, so if that's your scene, then either would be a good home base.

Personally I'd rather live in Murray Hill for the Indian microhood, but then I choose to live in Brooklyn even though I could afford to live in MH or UES... Do you have a particular scene that you're looking for?

lofter1
February 24th, 2006, 07:02 PM
How are the renting policies in NYC? Since this is my first real high-paying job, I don't think they'd be able to look at past pay-checks to determine if I can pay for the rent. Do they allow guarantors such as my father who has EXCELLENT credit history to co-sign the lease with me?

Guarantors are definitely accepted -- perhaps not in every case.

As for "pre-leases": usually if someone is moving out then the lease mandates notice -- often of 90 days -- so there is a good chance that you could line up something n advance. FYI: if you have any friends in NYC it might be wise to make contact "just in case" (people move out on the last day of the month and new renters move in on the first day -- so that can get a bit jammed up, what with the Landlord trying to make the place ready for the new tenant in the 3 second window between leases).

ausavannah
February 27th, 2006, 10:13 AM
My husband and I may be moving to the NYC due to work.
Is it unrealistic to be able to buy a nice place in the city (3 bedrooms, 2 baths with a laundry room and possibly a balcony, in a good area) for around 1 mil. dollars? Or am I crazy??

mclee
February 27th, 2006, 02:02 PM
My wife and I are planning on moving to NYC in the near future ... she would be at Columbia Medical and I would be working in Westchester. In other words, we would like easy access to the 1 and the Metro North, which leads us naturally to Riverdale.

I've got a general sense of Riverdale ... obviously Fieldston's the fanciest of the fancy (we won't be living there anytime soon), and the main restaurant/shopping drags, such as they are, are Riverdale and Johnson Aves (is that right?), but I don't know any more geography than that.

My questions are about further subdividing Riverdale. A poster over on Craigslist suggested that some apartments are filled with noisy drunken Manhattan College students ... is that true, and where would those areas be? Is there a more suburban section or a more urban-ish area, ie. there a place where you could in fact go out at 11pm and get a quick bite to eat or pick up some groceries? What about crime? I gather it's generally safe area, but it's hard to tell if that's because there's some zero crime area (roving Fieldston security guards) and some bad areas, or if the whole place is reasonably safe. Is it nice to live by Van Cortlandt and other parks (beautiful green urban oasis at your doorstep), scary (nights full of roving packs of drunken fools and homeless people), or something in between.

Thanks for any info you guys have!

MrSpice
February 28th, 2006, 10:43 AM
My husband and I may be moving to the NYC due to work.
Is it unrealistic to be able to buy a nice place in the city (3 bedrooms, 2 baths with a laundry room and possibly a balcony, in a good area) for around 1 mil. dollars? Or am I crazy??

You can buy this kind of apartment in Brooklyn (possibly in Park Slope or Carrol Gardens and cheaper in other areas) or Queens, but not in Manhattan. If you're thinking about a "typical" Manhattan lifestyle - apartment building with a doorman - you will need to spend 1.5-2mil for 3br, and maybe more. Also, to buy a coop, you will need to have a lot of cash laft over in order to be apprived. Coops are cheaper than condos. Don't forget about high taxes and maintenance fees. You may buy a house in Brooklyn and pay 3000/year in taxes. But if you buy a 3br condo in Manhattan, you'd have to pay over 2000/month in maintenance and real estate taxes or even more.

chyllee
March 2nd, 2006, 05:32 PM
Since I'm moving to the city this summer, I just wanted to say thanks to all the advice in this thread from rent to other misc stuff NYC'ers encounter.

Anyhow, onto my dilemma: I'm moving to the UES (probably b/w 70's &100) and was wondering what you guys thought would be the costs/trouble (outside of insurance) of having a car. For example, would I be spending hours looking for parking spot at night (say around 7-8ish)? How expensive (and convenient) is buying a monthly space in a garage/lot? All advice is really appreciated. Thanks.

ryan
March 2nd, 2006, 05:51 PM
Unless you plan to roadtrip more than once a month, I'd look into Zipcars (http://www.zipcar.com/find-cars/). Street parking can be a life-consuming pain.

MidtownGuy
March 2nd, 2006, 07:29 PM
Wow, thanks for that link! I checked it out and it sounds great. Have you any experience with this service?

lofter1
March 2nd, 2006, 09:00 PM
They did a report on 60 minutes (?) last week and it sounded great from those who used it.

Good to see that there are so many Manhattan locations (although the daily rates, when added up for a couple of days, seem pretty close to the mainstream rental companies).

ryan
March 2nd, 2006, 11:43 PM
I have my own car, but if zipcars opened up near me I would seriously consider them over buying a new car (for now i'll enjoy the finite pleasure of no car loan). A major drawback for me is that zipcars is stingy with miles, so my semiweekly roat trips would be very expensive. Seems a lot more convenient than a traditional rental though.

CyndyB
March 3rd, 2006, 01:58 AM
I am so thrilled I found this site while doing some research on New York. My husband and I are moving to NYC from New Orleans in April/May. We are cluless! I have ALWAYS wanted to live in New York short term to experience the city. My husband has been recruited by 4 different companies in New York with a salary range of 120,000 - 132,000 a year. I estimate myself to make between 40,000 - 60,000 a year. This seems like a lot of money to us here in Louisiana but can't quite grasp what that means in New York dollars. Aslo, we both have cars, I have a Chevy Tahoe and my husband has a small sports car. What do people do with their cars in New York City? I am concerned with bringing them because it seems most people rely on public transportation there. Should we sell our cars?? Also, we want to live in the city but want a nice place to live close to everything, any suggestions on where we might could live on our salary range? Also, can someone explain to me with the fees are on these apartments? A few apartments that we liked had fees in excess of 9,000 dollars. We do plan to make a visit prior to moving to find an apartment but want to be educated before doing so. I would certainly appreciate any advice you guys might have! So far our knowledge of the city comes from what we have seen on Seinfeld and Sex In The City. http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/images/smilies/wink.gif

BPC
March 3rd, 2006, 02:09 AM
First decide where you plan to live, sign a lease, and then decide about the cars. You won't need one for any part of Manhattan or for lots of Brooklyn (although it is still a nice luxury if you can afford one). NYC is geographically huge, however, and parts of it look more suburban -- not at all what you see on TV. You definitely won't need both cars. Pick the car that is more attractive to your average teen car thief (SUVS, sport cars, etc.) and sell that one and keep the other one until you settle on a place. Parking runs from $300-500 month for a garage in Manhattan to free on the street or even in a driveway in most of the outer boroughts.

As for income, $160-190K will allow a couple in NYC a comfortable but not luxurious lifestyle. Taxes here are the highest by far in the nation, and rents are out of control. If you have kids, the budget of course will be much tighter.

Brokers' fees are usually 1-2 months rent, last time I was involved in the process. Maybe things have changed, but $9K seems ridiculous.

MrSpice
March 3rd, 2006, 10:27 AM
CyndyB: I would like second what BPC said. I assume when you're taking about "experiencing New York", you're talking about Manhattan. Manhattan is very congested. There are lots of underground parking lots but parking is very expensive (at least 325 per month). You can live in Park Slope in Brooklyn where the rents are a bit lower and parking is a bit cheaper. But since you're likely to commute by train, you would will only use a car on weekends. And with all the traffic and small roads and limited parking (and high cost of gas), I would not drive Chevy Tahoe here.

MrSpice
March 3rd, 2006, 10:33 AM
Since I'm moving to the city this summer, I just wanted to say thanks to all the advice in this thread from rent to other misc stuff NYC'ers encounter.

Anyhow, onto my dilemma: I'm moving to the UES (probably b/w 70's &100) and was wondering what you guys thought would be the costs/trouble (outside of insurance) of having a car. For example, would I be spending hours looking for parking spot at night (say around 7-8ish)? How expensive (and convenient) is buying a monthly space in a garage/lot? All advice is really appreciated. Thanks.

Monthly costs are lower in the upper streets of UES (above 90th street) and are about 325-350/month for a small/medium car (like Toyota Camry). In the 70s/80s, it will cost at least 350-400/month (including tax which is 18.5% in New York - you can get 8% back by filling out a special application with NYC dept. of Finance if you park your car on a monthly basis).

ablarc
March 3rd, 2006, 10:47 AM
If you live in Manhattan, you'll go out of town for the weekend maybe every third weekend. For those occasions, you can rent a car --clean and new and free of dings. No hassles, no expenses except the car rental itself. Rental agencies are within walking distance of mos spots in Manhattan. When actually in the city you don't need a car; plenty of people get by without owning a car --including rich folks.

MrSpice
March 3rd, 2006, 10:55 AM
If you live in Manhattan, you'll go out of town for the weekend maybe every third weekend. For those occasions, you can rent a car --clean and new and free of dings. No hassles, no expenses except the car rental itself. Rental agencies are within walking distance of mos spots in Manhattan. When actually in the city you don't need a car; plenty of people get by without owning a car --including rich folks.

I am very happy that most people have this attitude and don't have a car because the streets and highways are already congested enough here. However, the reality of it is that I, for example, love to have my own car where I can drive around Manhattan on a weekend or drive to Brooklyn where my parents live, or drive out of town if I want to at any time. Car rental is very expensive in Manhattan. I guess it maybe cheaper at the end than owning a car. Some people are just scared to drive in Manhattan because of the crazy taxi drivers. So, if you're not used to the rude, offensive driving, you should not drive in Manhattan.

NewYorkYankee
March 3rd, 2006, 12:45 PM
Taxi drivers arnt the only rude drivers in Manhattan. Ive often found 'regular' drivers are very rude as well.

ryan
March 3rd, 2006, 01:08 PM
CindyB-

I'd suggest you at least visit Park Slope and Boreum Hill/Cobble Hill/Carroll Gardens. You might find that you like the vibe better than the UWS or UES and all their homogenized chain stores - and you'll definitely find better apartments (for the money). You could find yourself living in a Cosby show brownstone instead of a bland brick box.

In my opinion, "Experiencing New York" is best accomplished outside of Manhattan.

MrSpice
March 3rd, 2006, 01:13 PM
CindyB-

I'd suggest you at least visit Park Slope and Boreum Hill/Cobble Hill/Carroll Gardens. You might find that you like the vibe better than the UWS or UES and all their homogenized chain stores - and you'll definitely find better apartments (for the money). You could find yourself living in a Cosby show brownstone instead of a bland brick box.

In my opinion, "Experiencing New York" is best accomplished outside of Manhattan.

I agree that both Park Slope and Carroll Gardens are very nice. It depends on how much commute the person is willing to tolerate. I think Carroll Gardens is about 30 min away by F train from Midtown Manhattan.

bnittoli
March 7th, 2006, 02:03 PM
Hi, Iíve wanted to move to NYC for sometime now and Iíve been busy researching neighborhoods and listings on craigslist. Although Iím looking for work in the city, I can continue to telecommute for my current Connecticut based IT job which is paying me 86K. Iíve been eyeing the high rises in downtown. I like them because I prefer a modern apt dťcor and the fact they have fitness centers, laundry facilities in building and w-fi lounges, and patio accesses that I could make use of to get a break from what I know will be a tiny apartment (especially since Iíll be telecommuting).

My question is does anyone have experience living in one of these places? Any tips or suggestions? There are a lot of no-fee listings on craigslist, though there seems to be a lot of repetitiveness. Plus the pics tend to show furnished model units that donít seem to match up with the tag line. Iíd like to know if there is some catch or gotcha that involves the units or buildings themselves. I realize the downtown area isnít the hippest place at night (that doesnít bother me). The centralized subway lines will get me all over to explore.

Also as a reality check, I also need to figure out if my salary really is enough for this type of place and still be able to enjoy myself. I imagine Iíll want at least a 1bd convert which according to listings is going to run me ~2000-2200 or so. I do have a sizable savings backup and still am planning on finding another job in city eventually. Iím not an expensive restaurant/club guy or live extravagantly otherwise. Iím usually out doing photography, biking, people-watching, or browsing bookstores, and love the energy of the city.

Thx in advance for your help.



Bob

gerry
March 23rd, 2006, 12:13 PM
hi im a 20 year old irish man and im planning on moving to new york and the end of may with 2 friends, 1 of whom will be returning to the republic and the end of the summer to finish his final year in college! the reason i am writing in is because i need advice on jobs, what would be the ideal jobs would you you reccomend for 3 irish lads with basic quailifications but have great concept of how to do work eg.plumbing,bricklaying,carpentry etc. as two people who since we've left school have worked on building sites we would love to do that in the usa but we are not quailified! we would be interested in other work like bar work,factory or wharehouse work but is there a great deal of these jobs availible in nyc?

Also as we have never been to new york before we would be greatful if you could give us advice on the best places to live in new york preferably in an irish area that persuming we get jobs would be an affordable area to live in.As a large sector of new yorks population is irish do you think that, that would help us better of getting work? as we have no idea on the goings on in the big apple any advice or suggestions are greatly appreciated
thank you!

bluegreyeyes
April 2nd, 2006, 08:11 PM
i'm interested in moving to NYC in a few months. i have 2 potential roommates to live with. we're all recent college graduates that won't be making anymore than $40k. we're looking for a 2 bedroom, 1 bath... dogs allowed. we're hoping not to spend anymore than $900/mo. each. any suggestions?

ericnyc
April 3rd, 2006, 03:30 PM
Would my partner and I regret renting an apartment in the Financial District? The converted office buildings are very nice and have lots of ammenities and they allow pets. They are offering free rent and no fee specials to get people back downtown. I know everything pretty much closes after 8pm, but the subway is pretty accessable and we can take it uptown pretty easily. Taking all of this into consideration...is it a bad idea to move that far downtown? We're moving in a couple of weeks (please get me out of Kentucky!) and are seriously considering these buildings. Any advice would be helpful!

Eric

MrSpice
April 3rd, 2006, 04:14 PM
Would my partner and I regret renting an apartment in the Financial District? The converted office buildings are very nice and have lots of ammenities and they allow pets. They are offering free rent and no fee specials to get people back downtown. I know everything pretty much closes after 8pm, but the subway is pretty accessable and we can take it uptown pretty easily. Taking all of this into consideration...is it a bad idea to move that far downtown? We're moving in a couple of weeks (please get me out of Kentucky!) and are seriously considering these buildings. Any advice would be helpful!

Eric

I work in the Wall St area and see more and more people living here. I see people walking their dogs. You will feel the same you feel somewhere in speepy area of Brooklyn where shops close in the evening, that's all. After all, most people in this country live in suburbia where there's less excitement that in the Financial district. It really depends what's most important to you. This is a beautiful and historic area. Virtually any subway line is available here - you can get to Greenvich Village in 10 min by subway.

ericnyc
April 3rd, 2006, 04:34 PM
The last time we were in the city we stayed at the Manhattan Seaport Suites. The area seemed nice...despite the "mall" feel of the Seaport. Our issue was the lack of the bohemian gritty feel that New York is know for. I guess that part is just a hop away though. The free workout facility alone is a plus in these buildings. The rent is average to high (1800 or so), but the apts. are larger with full kitchens and nice bathrooms. If we hate it we'll move :) If anyone else is interested, Cooper and Cooper deal with alot of these buildings and...as far as brokers go...are pretty attentive to your needs.

southernsweetie
April 4th, 2006, 10:10 PM
hello all. I am planning to move to NYC here in about 8 months and was just wondering if anyone had some pointers to give me. I have been look online for typical rent prices and stuff but i really don't know what areas are ok. Any advice or help you have would be appriciated! thanks

aural iNK
April 13th, 2006, 02:58 PM
Thank you everyone who contributed to the wealth of information in this thread. Many of my questions have already been answered by reading through the pages.

I do have a few more questions though. My girlfriend and myself are moving to NYC the first week of June. What is an ideal time for us to search for apartments? Would we be better off chosing something in early May when many apartments start to hit the market or should we wait until early June when we move? It would be easiest for us to get a hotel for a few days in June to complete our search, but I worry that many places will have been rented by that time. Is there a sweet spot to begin a search for rentals available the following month?

Also out of curiosity, how much should we expect to pay in the UWS below 96th for a decent 1 bedroom place? And switching gears, should it be easier to find work when living in the city rather than applying from afar? Thanks for all of your help!

MrSpice
April 13th, 2006, 03:05 PM
hello all. I am planning to move to NYC here in about 8 months and was just wondering if anyone had some pointers to give me. I have been look online for typical rent prices and stuff but i really don't know what areas are ok. Any advice or help you have would be appriciated! thanks

Where do you plan to work? What do you like to do? Logically, most people want to live relatively close to work. There are plenty of neighborhoods and choices.

MrSpice
April 13th, 2006, 03:11 PM
Thank you everyone who contributed to the wealth of information in this thread. Many of my questions have already been answered by reading through the pages.

I do have a few more questions though. My girlfriend and myself are moving to NYC the first week of June. What is an ideal time for us to search for apartments? Would we be better off chosing something in early May when many apartments start to hit the market or should we wait until early June when we move? It would be easiest for us to get a hotel for a few days in June to complete our search, but I worry that many places will have been rented by that time. Is there a sweet spot to begin a search for rentals available the following month?

Also out of curiosity, how much should we expect to pay in the UWS below 96th for a decent 1 bedroom place? And switching gears, should it be easier to find work when living in the city rather than applying from afar? Thanks for all of your help!

1. I don't know what is the best time to look for an apartment, but I doubt there's much difference between May and June in terms of supply. It's a huge city with so many people moving in and out all the time. Having said that, finding a good apartment at a good prices is always a challenge here, especially now when the economy is booming and rental prices are going up. So, the earlier you start looking, the better. The whole process may take a while, especially if you're renting in a coop or a condo building where the board approval is required. The board usually meets only once a month.

2. Regarding the job search - I would start now from afar. You can start looking on Monster and Hotjobs. You can start sending your resume. You can say in your cover letter that you're moving to New York in June. Again, I think the earlier you start the better. Maybe flying here for an interview will give you a chance to also look for apartments.

3. A decent 1br (600sq feet and higher) will cost at least 2600/month on UWS, probably more than that. Look on Craigslist and local real estate web sites (Corocran, Elliman and rental sites)

TonyO
April 13th, 2006, 03:31 PM
I do have a few more questions though. My girlfriend and myself are moving to NYC the first week of June. What is an ideal time for us to search for apartments? Would we be better off chosing something in early May when many apartments start to hit the market or should we wait until early June when we move? It would be easiest for us to get a hotel for a few days in June to complete our search, but I worry that many places will have been rented by that time. Is there a sweet spot to begin a search for rentals available the following month?


The best time to find a rental is around 2-3 weeks before you need it. Most listings are available and leases are signed in that time frame.

lofter1
April 13th, 2006, 03:38 PM
NYU graduation day is May 11, 2006. Lots of students will be moving out by June 1, so if you're looking downtown then June 1 might be a good time to start a lease.

Gab
April 13th, 2006, 05:37 PM
Can you tell me the name for government agency concerning the rent and the lease?

lofter1
April 13th, 2006, 05:53 PM
Most rentals are privately owned, but many of those contain "rent stabilized" apartments that are governed by NY State law and are overseen by a state agency: "DHCR", the NYS Division for Housing & Community Renewal http://www.dhcr.state.ny.us/index.htm .

That site has all sorts of info, including info on Affordable Housing (http://www.dhcr.state.ny.us/ahd/default.asp) .

THe New York City agency that oversees Housing issues is the "HPD", the Department of Housing Preservation & Development: http://www.nyc.gov/html/hpd/html/home/home.shtml

NewYorkYankee
April 13th, 2006, 09:47 PM
Im looking for my first apartment now, what a pain. Ive decided to take advantage of the deals and stay downtown, close to school and easy to leave (subways). So, if any of you out there know any good places lemme know.

NewYorkYankee
April 14th, 2006, 11:30 AM
I dont know where to post this, so Im putting it here. Does anyone know anyone who lives in 63 Wall Street? Im probably getting an apartment in this building and I just wanted some feedback.

aural iNK
April 14th, 2006, 11:42 AM
Maybe flying here for an interview will give you a chance to also look for apartments.

Lets say I do just that and have one day for my apartment search. What route do you think would give me the best bang for the buck in that time frame? Call a broker?

NewYorkYankee
April 14th, 2006, 01:12 PM
Yes, call a broker maybe 2 days ahead, theyll have apartments lined up for you.

MrSpice
April 14th, 2006, 01:43 PM
Lets say I do just that and have one day for my apartment search. What route do you think would give me the best bang for the buck in that time frame? Call a broker?

Call brokers and agree to see other apartments you can find on craigslist and other rental sites like sublet.com. You can also check out the NY Times real estate web site and look for no-fee rentals and rentals by owner. One day is certainly not enough for an interview and apartment search. I am sure you can come here for a few days and plan ahead.

Gab
April 15th, 2006, 05:09 PM
Most rentals are privately owned, but many of those contain "rent stabilized" apartments that are governed by NY State law and are overseen by a state agency: "DHCR", the NYS Division for Housing & Community Renewal http://www.dhcr.state.ny.us/index.htm .

That site has all sorts of info, including info on Affordable Housing (http://www.dhcr.state.ny.us/ahd/default.asp) .

THe New York City agency that oversees Housing issues is the "HPD", the Department of Housing Preservation & Development: http://www.nyc.gov/html/hpd/html/home/home.shtml Thank you for the information, but I would like to know if the landlord or landlady forget to renew the lease, does it mean , I would get my renewal automatically?

lofter1
April 15th, 2006, 05:56 PM
That depends if you are in a rent-stabilized or rent-controlled apartment. Tenants in those type apartments have a legal right to lease-renewal and the Landlord must offer the tenant the proper paperwork that renews the lease term. Even absent that paperwork the tenant's legal tenancy continues.

In an un-regulated apartment there is no legal right to renewal without a new lease being offered.

There are specific situations where it gets more complicated than that -- but that's the gist of it.

Anarchy77
April 16th, 2006, 04:00 PM
Yes, call a broker maybe 2 days ahead, theyll have apartments lined up for you.

But what about discrimination issues regarding housing? If you're black and the broker sees that you're black, will the available apartments become unavailable?:mad:

lofter1
April 16th, 2006, 08:37 PM
Haven't heard that one ^ in NYC lately -- is that how it is in Seattle?

Anarchy77
April 17th, 2006, 03:15 PM
In seattle, we usually go straight to the landlords rather than a broker. But by and large, we don't get that overt discrimination that you get in nyc when you show up to check out a decent apartment. Then again, I moved out in the late 80's so things may have changed? Or maybe not?

Gab
April 17th, 2006, 03:54 PM
With the Rťgie du Logement in Quťbec, if the landlord or landlady forget to renew the lease, it's not the tenant's concern. The first apartment I got on Poupart street, I had a lease when I moved there and I didn't need to renew my lease. I stayed there for 3 years.

ManhattanKnight
April 17th, 2006, 04:12 PM
that overt discrimination that you get in nyc when you show up to check out a decent apartment. Then again, I moved out in the late 80's so things may have changed? Or maybe not?

NYC has changed. These days, overt discrimination is reserved for those with low six figures incomes.

k_i_l_o_g7
April 17th, 2006, 09:52 PM
I've already been duped into a couple no-fee websites that turned out to be foney money suckers. Anyhow I found an apartment for me and my Fiance finally in Chelsea, I'm way down in Houston TX so i cant do much if this real estate company takes my money.

Has anyone Heard of Croman Real Esate INC>? aka www.9300realty.com (http://www.9300realty.com)?
I did a search on the forum for Croman and one add popped up.

He wants the deposit now before he takes it off the market. Is this safe/ smart?

thanks
Kilo

Anarchy77
April 17th, 2006, 11:56 PM
NYC has changed. These days, overt discrimination is reserved for those with low six figures incomes.

I tell people when they ask me if I wanna move back that if I ever get rich, I would be very open to the possibility, or a kick ass career opportunity that would make enduring the environment hardships worth it.

nycbound
April 18th, 2006, 01:57 AM
Can anyone tell me, if I took a transfer to Meriden, CT- how close is it to NYC. What would be the best source of travel and what would be the estimated travel time?

aural iNK
April 21st, 2006, 03:01 PM
Which banks are generally considered the best in NYC as far as good service and easy access? Any particular ones you'd recommend steering clear from?

lofter1
April 21st, 2006, 07:35 PM
Commerce Bank has expanded hours and seemingly are friendly to those with low-balance accounts (unlike some big NYC banks that charge you like crazy if your balance goes below a certain point -- even if you've been with that bank for half your life).

common man
April 22nd, 2006, 04:09 PM
Hello everyone, I am moving to NYC in the Fall for a 4 month period while I take part in an internship. I will be living with a friend who is moving up there. I have recently been trying to research the neighborhood that I will be living in so I can know a little of what to expect. I found out that my apt is on 144th in Harlem. Does anyone know anything about this area? Is it high crime, low crime or average? This may be a stupid question but I am a white guy, will I stick out like a sore thumb? Also does anyone know how long a subway ride from there to midtown would take. I appreciate any input

czsz
April 22nd, 2006, 04:14 PM
What is the cross-avenue on 144th? From what I remember of the street, it's fine during the day but can be somewhat unnerving at night. Broadway in the 140s is one of the few places Starbucks has closed because of a lack of customers, and there's one corner that's a persistent drug-dealing hotspot. Closer to the west side it's mostly Dominican, becoming increasingly African American as one moves further east. I know quite a number of people in your position, obtaining apartments in this area because it's rather cheap, but you probably would have been better off choosing something in Queens or Brooklyn. The ride to Midtown is comparable to one from those two boroughs- it will probably be half an hour or so during non rush hours, increasing depending on the volume of those using the line at any one time. The ride will be quicker if you have access to an express line.

common man
April 22nd, 2006, 04:38 PM
Wow I did not think a post would come so fast. You are absolutely right about the cheap part. My friendís aunt owns the apt and is renting to him dirt cheap. My internship is at ABC it a great thing, but it is unpaid, so cheap is my only option. I will try to get more specific on the location of the apt from my friend and let you know. I really appreciate your response CZSZ

lofter1
April 22nd, 2006, 04:38 PM
On the west side you can get to midtown in about 15 minutes via express.

144th changes block by block so more details would be helpful.

common man
April 23rd, 2006, 12:19 AM
Ok so its 142 street and riverside drive, does anyone have any details on that area?

James_Oz
April 23rd, 2006, 09:50 AM
Hi everyone,

I'm a 21 year old final year law student (undergraduate) who lives in Perth, Australia. I'm looking to move to NYC within a few years and begin a legal career.

Basically all I have to do is sit the NY State Bar Exam, and I'll be doing a comprehensive review course for that exam while here in Perth.

What I'm interested in finding out is - how competitive is the legal market in NYC, and would having an international degree set me that much further back from the Ivy Leagers in the USA? Could I feasibly get *a* job in NYC in the legal field with an international degree? Or, would working at McDonalds be a more realistic option?

Basically my primary goal is to leave Perth and live life in the big city - career is less important to me. However I would prefer to make this move with as much security as possible. As I've almost finished a law degree I feel I should at least attempt to pursue this career, even if it may be extremely difficult to find work in NYC.

How much money would I be looking at spending to live decently in NYC? Would a legal career in an average firm cover this? I'm not talking the $140,000 graduates here but the mid-level type jobs, as I feel my international degree may leave me with no choice but mid-level positions, at least entry level anyway.

I'm not concerned with issues of safety or a long commute. I just want to experience the big city life while still young. Cheers for any help!

ManhattanKnight
April 23rd, 2006, 10:17 AM
Hi everyone,

I'm a 21 year old final year law student (undergraduate) who lives in Perth, Australia. I'm looking to move to NYC within a few years and begin a legal career.

Basically all I have to do is sit the NY State Bar Exam, and I'll be doing a comprehensive review course for that exam while here in Perth.

What I'm interested in finding out is - how competitive is the legal market in NYC, and would having an international degree set me that much further back from the Ivy Leagers in the USA? Could I feasibly get *a* job in NYC in the legal field with an international degree? Or, would working at McDonalds be a more realistic option?

Basically my primary goal is to leave Perth and live life in the big city - career is less important to me. However I would prefer to make this move with as much security as possible. As I've almost finished a law degree I feel I should at least attempt to pursue this career, even if it may be extremely difficult to find work in NYC.

How much money would I be looking at spending to live decently in NYC? Would a legal career in an average firm cover this? I'm not talking the $140,000 graduates here but the mid-level type jobs, as I feel my international degree may leave me with no choice but mid-level positions, at least entry level anyway.

I'm not concerned with issues of safety or a long commute. I just want to experience the big city life while still young. Cheers for any help!

There are obvious issues about how far an undergraduate law degree will get you in the US (both in terms of qualifying to take the bar exam and arousing employer interest) and qualifying for non-citizen employment, but, in general, a foreign legal education can be an asset here. Some foreign-educated lawyers enroll in a US law school to obtain a US LLM degree to enhance their credentials before seeking employment. In lieu of or addition to that, a summer associate job with a major firm here or a branch Australia office would be a plus.

If you'd like to discuss this more fully, please PM me (before moving on to greener pastures, I spent many years with one of the largest US-based international law firms).

movingtonyc
April 24th, 2006, 12:00 AM
I have been trying to escape arizona for many years to NYC, I am doing it in a couple months. Although I do have some questions......

First I am familiar with the city, I visit a lot and love it. Only planning on staying for 6 months to a year though until I go to Barcelona and do the same thing.

Anyway, I know a lot of people who are "in the know" who pay 900-1300 a month for decent places in the east village and a few other spots. I dont really excpect this so I am willing to pay around 1500 a month but really would rather not.

My job will be transferring me, I make 50k a year at my job and another 20k or so with my internet marketing business on the side. That amount can vary higher or lower so I am trying not to factor that portion of my salary into the move. I plan to leave AZ with 6000 dollars in the bank.

This is all pretty realistic and on the low side of things considering i am 25 single etc etc.

In az you typically pay first and lasts months rent and shitty landlords will make you pay a security deposit but that is not the norm. Is it the same there?

I want to live in the east village or immediate surrounding area, my job is in midtown.

Barring a friend or work finding a space to live there is a huge problem. Which is why im posting here because I cant really get a good answer.

Is there any sort of option of getting a place before your actually in new york?? Has anyone heard of anyone doing this before?

My main expense other than rent will be alcohol.

James_Oz
April 27th, 2006, 10:59 PM
Hey ManhattanKnight, I PMed you but no response yet.

Did you get my PM?

nycbound
April 29th, 2006, 01:50 AM
MovingtoNYC-

I don't live in NYC... yet. But have been doing a lot of research.
A sublet seems like it might be a good option for you, especially since you only plan on staying 6months.

Here are a few sites that I have come across, they might help:
http://www.sublet.com/
http://newyork.craigslist.org/
http://realestate.nytimes.com/rentals/List_Listings_ListingType.asp
http://citi-habitats.com/rentals.php

Good luck!

MikeW
May 4th, 2006, 12:04 PM
The people 'in the know' got here a long time ago, and only have those rents because of NY's rent regulations. Newcomers don't get those deals. Under two grand is going to be tough anywhere in Manhattan, if you want your own place. If you get, or become, a roommate, you can pull it off.


I
Anyway, I know a lot of people who are "in the know" who pay 900-1300 a month for decent places in the east village and a few other spots. I dont really excpect this so I am willing to pay around 1500 a month but really would rather not.

MrSpice
May 12th, 2006, 11:26 AM
The people 'in the know' got here a long time ago, and only have those rents because of NY's rent regulations. Newcomers don't get those deals. Under two grand is going to be tough anywhere in Manhattan, if you want your own place. If you get, or become, a roommate, you can pull it off.

Not true. My friend just rented a nice studio around 91st Street and York for $1500 in a coop building. But to get this kind iof deal, one has to sign a long term lease (many coops and condos won't allow anything less than 1 year). One can find a decent studio in a walk up building on Upper East Side (1st/York avenue, 90s streets) for $1300-1400/month, but should be prepared to climb the stairs to 3rd, 4th, 5th floor without an elevator.

aural iNK
May 30th, 2006, 03:11 PM
We had our first day of apartment hunting in NYC last Friday. We looked at three 1-bdr apartments around 8th Ave in the 40's and another in Murray Hill. All four were very livable and within our budget (rents between 1500-2000 a month with a 15% broker fee). We didn't find exactly what we were looking for, but I figure someone may find value in this information.

Also, here's a link I've found to be very helpful as first time renter in NYC:

http://www.manhattanapts.com/rentalfacts.html

moogyboy
May 30th, 2006, 05:15 PM
We had our first day of apartment hunting in NYC last Friday. We looked at three 1-bdr apartments around 8th Ave in the 40's and another in Murray Hill. All four were very livable and within our budget (rents between 1500-2000 a month with a 15% broker fee). We didn't find exactly what we were looking for, but I figure someone may find value in this information.

Also, here's a link I've found to be very helpful as first time renter in NYC:

http://www.manhattanapts.com/rentalfacts.html

The requirements look pretty steep...pretty forbidding, in fact. Are they any more lenient if you look outside Manhattan?

cheers

Billy S.

ryan
May 30th, 2006, 06:18 PM
Yes. I had an unusually easy process. I found my apt in Brooklyn on craigslist. We called the landlord to take a look at the place. He showed us around and then drove us around the neighborhood on a tour. We said we would take it and asked if he wanted a deposit - he said no, that it was too far in advance (it was two months before our move-in) and that he didn't want to sit on our money longer than he needed to. A month later we signed a lease and put down one month's security deposit. There was never any application or credit check (he knew we didn't have local jobs and didn't mind).

I haven't heard of anyone else having such an easy time, but you will find nice people out there...

ryan
June 1st, 2006, 05:27 PM
Can anyone tell me, if I took a transfer to Meriden, CT- how close is it to NYC. What would be the best source of travel and what would be the estimated travel time?

Sorry for the slow reply - Meriden is thereabouts a 20-minute drive north of New Haven, CT, which is an easy but long Metro North (http://as0.mta.info/mnr/schedules/sched_form.cfm) ride to NYC. About 100 minutes each way. If you're traveling with more than one person I suggest you drive all the way to the city. It's more cost effective and factoring in parking takes about the same amount of time.

Take route 15 (Merritt Parkway) to the cross Bronx Parkway to the Sawmill Parkway into Manhattan. This will put you on the west side highway, which is great if that's where you want to be, but not if you're looking to go east. (in which case I can't be very helpful b/c I don't do that drive much).

milleniumcab
June 2nd, 2006, 07:47 PM
I have been trying to escape arizona for many years to NYC, I am doing it in a couple months. Although I do have some questions......

First I am familiar with the city, I visit a lot and love it. Only planning on staying for 6 months to a year though until I go to Barcelona and do the same thing.

Anyway, I know a lot of people who are "in the know" who pay 900-1300 a month for decent places in the east village and a few other spots. I dont really excpect this so I am willing to pay around 1500 a month but really would rather not.

My job will be transferring me, I make 50k a year at my job and another 20k or so with my internet marketing business on the side. That amount can vary higher or lower so I am trying not to factor that portion of my salary into the move. I plan to leave AZ with 6000 dollars in the bank.

This is all pretty realistic and on the low side of things considering i am 25 single etc etc.

In az you typically pay first and lasts months rent and shitty landlords will make you pay a security deposit but that is not the norm. Is it the same there?

I want to live in the east village or immediate surrounding area, my job is in midtown.

Barring a friend or work finding a space to live there is a huge problem. Which is why im posting here because I cant really get a good answer.

Is there any sort of option of getting a place before your actually in new york?? Has anyone heard of anyone doing this before?

My main expense other than rent will be alcohol.

$1500 seems like a good number to be able to find a small apartment in a non-luxury building to me...would you care if the building had an elevator, doormen, etc...If you don't you should be able to find a place.. East Alphabeth City.. like Avenue C or D...

When it comes to "alcohol".. Now that can be quite expensive::D)))

milleniumcab
June 2nd, 2006, 07:54 PM
I think any apartment in NYC, rent controlled or stabilized, looses the protection of that law, once they hit $2000... Please correct me if I am wrong...

ManhattanKnight
June 3rd, 2006, 08:43 AM
I think any apartment in NYC, rent controlled or stabilized, looses the protection of that law, once they hit $2000... Please correct me if I am wrong...

Rent deregulation is more complicated than that:


Two Different Ways a Rent Stabilized Apartment May Be Deregulated:



1) OCCUPIED APARTMENTS ONLY: High-Rent/High-Income ("Luxury") Decontrol (http://www.housingnyc.com/html/guidelines/decontrol.html#luxury)
(http://www.housingnyc.com/html/guidelines/decontrol.html#luxury)

the apartment has a legal regulated rent of two thousand dollars ($2,000) or more per month AND
the apartment is occupied by persons whose total annual household income exceeds one hundred seventy-five thousand dollars ($175,000) in each of the two preceding calendar years
OR
2) VACATED APARTMENTS ONLY: High-Rent Vacancy Decontrol (http://www.housingnyc.com/html/guidelines/decontrol.html#vacancy)

A rent stabilized apartment which becomes vacant and could be offered at a legal regulated rent of $2,000 or more per month is no longer subject to rent regulation.http://www.housingnyc.com/html/guidelines/decontrol.html

I don't believe that there are any comparable rules for rent-controlled apartments.

CarmenSuicide
June 4th, 2006, 07:51 PM
Here's another NYC n00b question(s)!

My dream has always been to move to the city- up until recently, my excuse has been that I'm in school. Well, as of three weeks ago, I'm graduated and ready to take the plunge


But I am so clueless.
I've heard that its hard to get a job without living in the city, but the thought of moving somewhere so far from home (I'm in NC now) with no job or source of income terrifies me. I'll be in the city next week interviewing with 3 placement firms, but who the heck knows how that's going to go. Does anyone have any advice about getting a job before moving? Is it possible without a specialized skill? I'm 22, recent grad with a generic BA in criminal justice and about 2 year of corporate sales/admin experience. This seems to land me anywhere between $8 an hour or $40k a year.
I dont want to get screwed and take the first job I'm offered, but I also dont want to be without a job for weeks (especially since I'm so new to the city and job hunting is going to be challenging since I dont know my way around well.) Its gonna cost me an arm and a leg to just get my stuff into whatever crappy apartment I can afford, so I'd like to have at least a bit of an idea as to what I'm getting myself into.

I'm gonna be pissed at myself if I move to a city thats over double the price of where I'm living now to make 50cents more an hour :confused:

ryan
June 5th, 2006, 09:49 AM
Carmen,

Living in NYC is very expensive, so even best case scenario you might end up with less spending power here than elsewhere. You should move here if you feel really infatuated with the city - otherwise you'll have trouble getting through the transition, which can be hard.

If you want to do it, I suggest you put all your belongings in storage and find an apartment share on craigslist. This way you can move up and have a place to stay while you find a job. After you have a job and get to know the city you'll be able to find an apartment and move your belongings out of storage.

It might sound like a compromise, but everyone I know moves within a year of coming to the city, so it's really best to travel light until you're settled. Good luck.

milleniumcab
June 5th, 2006, 09:43 PM
Carmen,

Living in NYC is very expensive, so even best case senario you might end up with less spending power here than elsewhere. You should move here if you feel really infatuated with the city - otherwise you'll have trouble getting through the transition, which can be hard.

If you want to do it, I suggest you put all your belongings in storage and find an apartment share on craigslist. This way you can move up and have a place to stay while you find a job. After you have a job and get to know the city you'll be able to find an apartment and move your belongings out of storage.

It might sound like a compromise, but everyone I know moves within a year of coming to the city, so it's really best to travel light until you're settled. Good luck.

Good advice Ryan..

prilna77
June 7th, 2006, 05:08 PM
Hi all,

I am a newbie here. I was trying to find any info on moving to NYC from Canada concerning work permit, but no luck as of yet. So here is my question: I am a canadian citizen, but would like to move to NYC for employment opportunities. I did some research. Getting a work permit with out an employment offer seems impossible. Does anyone know if employers actually care to do (or at least assist with) the paperwork for that? Maybe this will also help - I am looking for a job in administration: office manager, admin. assistant, anything similar.

I would really appreciate any shared experience or knowledge on this matter.

Thanks.

Natasha

prilna77
June 7th, 2006, 05:38 PM
Here's another NYC n00b question(s)!

My dream has always been to move to the city- up until recently, my excuse has been that I'm in school. Well, as of three weeks ago, I'm graduated and ready to take the plunge


But I am so clueless.
I've heard that its hard to get a job without living in the city, but the thought of moving somewhere so far from home (I'm in NC now) with no job or source of income terrifies me. I'll be in the city next week interviewing with 3 placement firms, but who the heck knows how that's going to go. Does anyone have any advice about getting a job before moving? Is it possible without a specialized skill? I'm 22, recent grad with a generic BA in criminal justice and about 2 year of corporate sales/admin experience. This seems to land me anywhere between $8 an hour or $40k a year.
I dont want to get screwed and take the first job I'm offered, but I also dont want to be without a job for weeks (especially since I'm so new to the city and job hunting is going to be challenging since I dont know my way around well.) Its gonna cost me an arm and a leg to just get my stuff into whatever crappy apartment I can afford, so I'd like to have at least a bit of an idea as to what I'm getting myself into.

I'm gonna be pissed at myself if I move to a city thats over double the price of where I'm living now to make 50cents more an hour :confused:

Hi Carmen,

I am in the same situation (aside from the issue with the work permit), so let's stick together. May I ask which employment agencies you are using?

Thanks.

Natasha

MrSpice
June 7th, 2006, 07:02 PM
Hi all,

I am a newbie here. I was trying to find any info on moving to NYC from Canada concerning work permit, but no luck as of yet. So here is my question: I am a canadian citizen, but would like to move to NYC for employment opportunities. I did some research. Getting a work permit with out an employment offer seems impossible. Does anyone know if employers actually care to do (or at least assist with) the paperwork for that? Maybe this will also help - I am looking for a job in administration: office manager, admin. assistant, anything similar.

I would really appreciate any shared experience or knowledge on this matter.

Thanks.

Natasha

I believe that because you're a Canadian citizen, the special NAFTA rules apply to you. You can actually obtain this kind of visa quickly at the border - it should be easy:

http://www.grasmick.com/nafta.htm

http://www.allhod.com/nafta.shtml

http://www.usimmigrationlaw.net/canadians-TN-visas.htm

This is so-called TN visa. Remember that only Canadian citizens have this privelege. You need to get an offer of employment first (i.e., go through all the interviews and get an offer letter). If your job is in demand and you have good skills, an employer may be willing to consider you since all they would need to do is send you the regular offer letter that they would send to anybody here in the US. The only difference is that if your application is denied, they would have wasted their time with you. But I would think it's most likely that your visa will be approved.

I am not an expert on this, so contact an attorney if you want to be sure.

milleniumcab
June 8th, 2006, 12:21 AM
Does anyone know if employers actually care to do (or at least assist with) the paperwork for that? Maybe this will also help - I am looking for a job in administration: office manager, admin. assistant, anything similar.

You would have to be trying to fill a position which is not easily fillable by an American Citizen living in the States...Do you think " a job in administration: office mannager, admin. assistant or anything similar " fall into that category?

antinimby
June 8th, 2006, 03:31 AM
Way to go, milleniumcab. You've just managed to disparage millions of people.:rolleyes:
I'd like to see you do some of the things these people can do.

Prilna, nevermind that smart alec comment. I suggest you go ahead and give it a try.
Good luck and don't forget to let us know how everything went.:)

ablarc
June 8th, 2006, 07:00 AM
My dream has always been to move to the city...
Dreams are for pursuing before they fade out.

Go for the brass ring.


But I am so clueless...
That can actually be an asset. Think how much you won't know that ain't so. Also, think how useful that can be to an employer actually looking for someone who seems clueless.


Is it possible without a specialized skill?... I'm 22, recent grad with a generic BA in criminal justice
No specialized skill? You're good at being clueless, and you have a degree in criminal justice? Hmm...If I were the police running an undercover operation to infiltrate a terrorist organization with someone who seemed clueless, I'd want you to get a grunt job in their shop, and I'd subsidize you handsomely.


I'll be in the city next week interviewing with 3 placement firms, but who the heck knows how that's going to go.
Those firms are in it for themselves and take conventional paths of least resistance. They'll get you a job at less than your full potential.

Don't let folks influence you to aim too low.

Go for the brass ring.

aural iNK
June 8th, 2006, 02:43 PM
I'm looking for a couple of guys to help us unload our U-Haul on short notice. Does anyone have any advice on what moving companies may be able to help us out? How much do these services run? Thanks!

milleniumcab
June 8th, 2006, 02:56 PM
Hey Antinimby...Maybe I was a bit rough but I gave a straight answer. And I thought Prilna77 were looking for answers not

encouragement..

milleniumcab
June 9th, 2006, 10:46 PM
I heard of a lot of people who spent thousands of dollars for false hopes..If they only had someone like me who told them the way it really was..;)

ablarc
June 9th, 2006, 11:29 PM
Some people get lucky, some people make their own luck.

antinimby
June 10th, 2006, 12:17 AM
Hey Antinimby...Maybe I was a bit rough but I gave a straight answer. And I thought Prilna77 were looking for answers not
encouragement..And you did neither.

milleniumcab
June 10th, 2006, 01:35 AM
And you did neither.

You say...

stanteau
June 21st, 2006, 02:33 PM
I live in Toledo Ohio, a city that is dying in every way shape and form, and I just lost my job. I got about a cool grand and I want out, I wanna see the lights. Me and my girlfriend are going Friday and if we find jobs, we're staying, but I need advice, how can I do this? Where can I live? Are room mates that easy to find? Just gimme the run down.

CarMc2005
June 21st, 2006, 03:41 PM
I live in Minnesota and I want to move to New York. However I know nothing of New York geographically. So the things I'm trying to figure out that (surprise!) other midwesterners can't help with are:

1. I'm a comedian and I need an area conducive to going to comedy clubs.
2. I'm a single, 20 something, female who knows no one in the area.
3. Budget is an issue; size and cleanliness of an apartment don't matter as long as it's livable.
Where's the best area? Manhattan? I like it but I don't know where. Chelsea? But do they have apts. avail? Or are there any places that I'm over looking (ie places in BK or Queens)?

Also, I want to move 8/1... I figure MN is hot too so why not? Or should I wait until 9/1 (factoring in the rental market as well)? Moreover, should I get a broker? If so when do I talk to them?... I still can't believe apartments have brokers there... that seems so odd.

ryan
June 21st, 2006, 04:01 PM
You should start by reading this thread (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=5632), which was intended to collect all the somewhat repetitive answers to questions like yours. But here are my brief attempts at advice:

1. I've heard of clubs in several different areas: all are easily accessed by the subway, so I don't think you need to focus too much on where you live - you're better off focusing on finding a neighborhood with the right mix of affordability, culture and amenities that works for you.

2. You won't be the only single 20-something woman - nyc is all about single life. You'll have fun.

3. I would definitely suggest shopping Brooklyn and Queens if budget is a concern. Search around the forums for more information about specific neighborhoods and take a look at craigslist for listings. You can always post a question about a specific neighborhood here. I always tell people to find a roommate situation or a sublet for their first few months in NYC. You'll want to explore the city and figure out where you want to live - and you'll have a home base for apt shopping. I know people who literally look at dozens of places, so you can't give yourself too much time. Good luck.

MrSpice
June 21st, 2006, 04:08 PM
Comedy clubs are scaterred throughout Manhattan - from West Side (Carolines, Gotham) to East Side (Dangerfields and several smaller ones) to Greenwich Village (Boston, Comedy Cellar, etc.)

ryan is absolutely right - your first priority would be to find a place to live and to make sure your act is really good so you can get to perform at any of those clubs. Your only shot would be open mic nights, I assume, when you will have a few minutes to convince the audience that you're funny...

CastleHillzfinest718
June 25th, 2006, 01:01 PM
Hiyas,

I am going to be moving to nyc sometime in the near future. I will be working for a law firm while going to fordham law school at night. The firm i am going to be working for is up in Tarrytown. I was thinking of living in the Bronx but am concerned about crime, drugs etc as I have a family. I would like to live in an ethnically diverse neighborhood just for sake of an interesting place to live.
Any advice on moving there?

Feel free to email me.

Thanks,

KC

-As long as you act right, not draw attention to yourself and not look like a target, you should have no problem, however, I wouldn't advise moving somewhere like Hunts Point. Baychester, Pelham Bay, Pelham Parkway and Williamsbridge are still nice areas however.

idesignm2
June 26th, 2006, 08:56 PM
OK, so I am a 24 year old graphic designer from Syracuse, NY. I graduated from college about a year ago with my BFA in design. I have yet to find something in my field here. In fact, I have worked in a computer warehouse for the better part of the last year. I decided about 6 months ago that it was time for me to move elsewhere. And I have always had that desire to move to New York City, so I figured I am still young and I can afford to make mistakes. When I move which is going to be August 1st, I am going to have around $3,000 saved. I am looking into finding roommates and have been looking mostly in the Astoria area because I have heard nothing but great things about the area.

Also, I had a few interviews in Manhattan. One said they wanted more experience, the other said they would have probably hired me if I was living in the area already. Yes I am going to the city without a job. I plan to freelance when I get there. I have some work set up with the Delia's clothing corporation and possibly some others. I have been networking like crazy.

I live at home with my parents and if things don't work out in the city, then I can just move back home. Does anyone have any advice? I am trying to avoid the brokers fees. I just think finding a roommate will be best.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

milleniumcab
June 26th, 2006, 10:38 PM
idesignm2,
This thread offers a lot of info, go back and read some.

I will only tell you this... If you see moving back home as an option , you will never try hard enough..;)

idesignm2
June 27th, 2006, 01:45 PM
Actually, I was browsing through the topic, but I figured I would ask something more specific with me. I was hoping maybe to find any graphic designers who post on here who may offer me advice as it pertains to looking for work in my field and all that too.

But yeah, sorry to ask a question I am sure has been asked repeatedly. This post is really helpful. And I know that living at home is an option, but if I end up coming back then I will be coming home to fight for a bunch of months to find another crappy job not relating to my field which would serve as my constant reminder as to why I should be doing better. And believe me, knowing that is all the motivation I need to find something in the city.

starlite8907
June 28th, 2006, 01:07 PM
Im a high school senior planning on either moving to NYC to attend NYU for college or law school or after I graduate law school (Northwestern is my second choice). Is this too big of a move for someone my age,since I'll be only 17 when I enter college? Should I wait until I attend law school and save money up to move to NYC? Or should I just move after I finish law school?

Schadenfrau
June 28th, 2006, 01:49 PM
I don't understand what you're asking? You're asking if you should go to college in New York?

MrSpice
June 28th, 2006, 01:59 PM
Im a high school senior planning on either moving to NYC to attend NYU for college or law school or after I graduate law school (Northwestern is my second choice). Is this too big of a move for someone my age,since I'll be only 17 when I enter college? Should I wait until I attend law school and save money up to move to NYC? Or should I just move after I finish law school?

It's a personal choice. Look at the expenses, look at the lifestyle (city as opposed to suburban lifestyle that most colleges in the country offer). Your age in itself won't make a difference either way. You plans regarding the law school may actually change after you spend a few years in college. NYC Law School is extremely competitive. How are you so sure you'll be able to get in? I think the best way for you to plan your college life is think about your college education first. See where they will accept you first. Travel to those places and see which one you like better.

rknarr
June 30th, 2006, 02:30 PM
How hard is it to find a job around the city in queens/manhattan for a college student. Just a basic job that pays $8-10/hr to help offset some of the costs of living in NYC?

mark_miao
June 30th, 2006, 11:18 PM
hi everyone , i come to country ,and now come to the city for working ,exactly saying ,for living

antinimby
July 1st, 2006, 01:32 AM
rknarr: not any harder than any place else.

mark_miao: welcome to our country and New York.

rknarr
July 1st, 2006, 08:31 PM
antinimby,

thanks for the response, wasnt sure if it would be harder or not

PrettyRicky215
July 6th, 2006, 11:45 PM
I am moving to NYC next summer and Im married and have 2 small kids. I will be working in downtown Manhattan. I'm looking for a good residential neighborhood, somewhere that I can pretty much walk everywhere; church, grocery store ect. Although saftey is an issue because of the kids, from what I have read NYC is all-around generally safe. I dont mind a moderate commute to work (45-60 min max) and I don't care which borough. I'm looking to spend around $1500 a month for a 2 bedroom. Any suggestions??? I will be visiting NYC frequently throughout the next year and I would like to know where to look. Thanks in advance.

Demile
July 7th, 2006, 11:50 AM
Hi, I'm new to the board and I must start off by saying, wow, what a great forum!

I am a 20 year old female, currently living in Northern California. I am working one job full-time and am searching for a second full or part-time job. I am saving up every freaking cent I make because I plan on moving to NYC in the next year or so.

I have a few questions.

I am looking into moving to Queens, specifically Sunnyside or Woodside, as I hear that is where the some of the cheapest housing is located. It also is appealing to me as I hear it is very ethnically diverse (though, isn't most of NYC?) and Queens apparently has a ton of bars/pubs. Confirm? Deny?

What are some of the cheapest prices anyone has seen? I have searched listings online and have seen some places in the $600-$800/month range, which in my opinion sounds really low, even if it is a studio or one bedroom... then of course there are places that are much, much higher.

My only requirements are:
-Studio or 1-bedroom
-Cat allowed
-High-Speed internet (strongly preferred but I can live without... maybe.)

Would I be better off with landlord controlled/paid heating? or a place where I pay it myself? I have heard some real horror stories about landlord controlled/paid heating. I never use heat as it is, even in the frozen and semi-frozen winters here.

Moreover, what is the job market like? I am going to have a fair amount of money set aside before I make the move (several thousand) but how easy or difficult is it to get a job? I have plenty of food service/hospitality experience and some retail experience, and I am going to have more in both by the time I move. How much should I have to make per month to afford SURVIVING in Sunnyside or Woodside? I'm not asking to live luxuriously, I just want to survive... I can live the life of luxury after I make my millions and move into a Manhattan high rise. (haha... yeah, right.)

What about cars? I don't have a car at the moment but I plan on getting one in the future to make transportation at my current location easier... and the move. Should I even bother keeping it? All signs so far are pointing to no, as parking would be a pain in the butt and it would just be ANOTHER expense breaking into my cashflow.

Any advice is welcome.

The first reaction I get from anyone around here when I tell them I want to move to NYC is "WHY THE HELL WOULD YOU EVER WANT TO DO THAT?" because to them the entire world consists of Redwood trees and marijuana. I NEED more than that.

But why do I want to? Well, aside from being a dream of mine, I also want to eventually go to New York School of Interior Design... but for now I just have the need to get out and live. I hate California with a passion and have always wanted to move to New York... and after the times I have been there I have just fallen in love with it even more.

Thanks a bunch!

-Demile

AsianNYLover
July 8th, 2006, 02:44 AM
"I hate California with a passion and have always wanted to move to New York... and after the times I have been there I have just fallen in love with it even more." Quote

Hey I'm moving to NYC as well in about a year or so. I currently live in the Los Angeles Area. Lived in LA almost 3 years now. It kinda Sucks out here. New York is so much better and nicer. I can't wait to move. People I have talked to think I'm crazy to make the move. I'm currently working as a Server/Runner at a restuarant and currently looking for a second job to save some money. I moved to LA to go to school at a film school to work in the entertainment industry. LA isn't the only city I can find work in the entertaiment industry. There is alot of job opportunities in NYC as well.

RicanPrincipessa
July 10th, 2006, 12:43 AM
Hey everyone!

I'm 19, coming from Florida and plan on moving to NY in December.

I want to attend school in SOHO and live near or in SOHO. Would anyone know of any good areas to check out?

I'm also wondering about the cost of living. I won't have that much saved up for the trip since it's last minute.

I really would like to find a nice lil place in a safe area where I can afford to live but also be able to go out once in a while.


How much would I have to make to not have to live paycheck to paycheck?


Thanx in advance!

BRT
July 10th, 2006, 01:43 PM
Living in Soho is going to be pretty difficult on any sort of a budget. It's one of the most expensive areas in town. Does the school you will be going to have any housing? If so, that's probably a good option. If not, consider either New Jersey near a PATH train, in Inwood/Wash heights along the A line, or Brooklyn along the N or R.

The cost of living is high in NYC, but there are deals; housing is really the big unavoidable hit.

How much do you plan to have saved? Depending on how you find housing, you may need to have more saved than you think. I assume on a limited budget you will not be using a broker, but that will probably mean that you need to pay for temporary housing for a few weeks while you look at apartments. And once you find your apartment, you are probably going to need enough to cover two month's rent -- month one plus the security deposit.

RicanPrincipessa
July 10th, 2006, 03:50 PM
Living in Soho is going to be pretty difficult on any sort of a budget. It's one of the most expensive areas in town. Does the school you will be going to have any housing? If so, that's probably a good option. If not, consider either New Jersey near a PATH train, in Inwood/Wash heights along the A line, or Brooklyn along the N or R.

The cost of living is high in NYC, but there are deals; housing is really the big unavoidable hit.

How much do you plan to have saved? Depending on how you find housing, you may need to have more saved than you think. I assume on a limited budget you will not be using a broker, but that will probably mean that you need to pay for temporary housing for a few weeks while you look at apartments. And once you find your apartment, you are probably going to need enough to cover two month's rent -- month one plus the security deposit.



I will have about 3000 saved. Between me and my roomate about 6 or 7000 saved. The school I plan to attend has housing but we both will have to come out of pocket to pay for school which would be impossible to do our first few months of getting settled in the city. So thats why we need to find somewhere else to stay. Thanx so much for your advice. I'm def. going to check into other areas!

amaluu729
July 14th, 2006, 10:59 AM
Hi everyone - and for the resident NY-ers, thank you so much for sharing your expertise with all of us.

Hubby and I might be moving to NYC from Chicago ... he has an offer in and would be working right in the heart of Times Square. His would-be boss recommended Hell's Kitchen area, but I've heard mixed reviews. I know everyone has their own opinions of the areas around Midtown, but I'd love to hear about them and what your personal experiences have been. Also, any surrounding areas that are 1-2 subway stops from Times Square would be great. I've seen alot of property available on Roosevelt Island, but haven't heard any "insider" opinions on this area. Brooklyn is another option, but I know nothing about Brooklyn and what areas would be good and lively enough (without being wild & crazy) for a young professional couple. I'm not talking necessarily about hot clubs, more so enough dining (including late-night), shops, bookstores, movie theaters, etc.

I don't want to make you guys repeat yourselves though so I'll spend some time reading through this thread fully to see if the areas of Brooklyn have already been described earlier ...

But I am interested about what areas are 1-2 stops from Times Square, and what your thoughts are on Hell's Kitchen/Clinton. Love to hear personal anecdotes from anyone who recently moved out to NYC too ... please keep sharing your stories!!!

Thank you so much!

Schadenfrau
July 14th, 2006, 11:05 AM
Are you focusing on the area near Times Square because you want to walk to work? If not, you'd probably be happier with a slightly longer commute.

amaluu729
July 14th, 2006, 11:28 AM
He'd prefer to be close enought to walk if at all possible, and I've been looking at the rents nearby and I see that they are around $2400 and up, which we're starting to prepare ourselves mentally for.

A few stops away on the Subway might not be bad. I think a max commute time would be 10-15 mins (knowing this boy's tendency to sleep in, being any farther could be dangerous!) ...

I have no idea where I would be working, once he makes his decision I will start job hunting in my industry (tourism/marketing).

Thanks for the reply!

ryan
July 14th, 2006, 11:45 AM
If a walking commute is your highest priority, then Hell's Kitchen is probably a good option for you. It's changing a lot, so each time I go through I see areas I would love to live in and areas I would not. You'll have to look at specific apts to know for sure.

I know Times Square is exciting when you visit, but most people I know avoid it at all costs - especially if you're working in that area, you'll probably want to might want to rethink commuting - I think it's fair to say that most people's favorite areas are more than a 15 minute walk from this area.

I don't use the subway to go one or two stops (it's faster to just walk) but 15 minutes by subway probably opens you up to a much larger area than you're thinking. Chelsea and the UWS would both be quick commutes (as would Long Island City, Queens, but I'm guessing that's off your list) and are more pleasant (in my opinion) than areas around Times Square.

Keep in mind that you might work in a different part of the city than you husband, so to be fair, you might just pick a neighborhood you both like, instead of one that's super convenient for him.

ryan
July 14th, 2006, 11:50 AM
I know nothing about Brooklyn and what areas would be good and lively enough (without being wild & crazy) for a young professional couple. I'm not talking necessarily about hot clubs, more so enough dining (including late-night), shops, bookstores, movie theaters, etc.

You would probably really like South Brooklyn (Cobble/Boerum Hill, Park Slope, etc). Next time you're in town go to dinner on Smith St and see if you like it.

amaluu729
July 14th, 2006, 11:55 AM
You guys are probably right, even here in Chicago I completely avoid touristy areas, so we'd probably be much happier far away from an area as crazy as Times Square.

What is Long Island City like? And anyone know anything about Roosevelt Island?

Any other recco's of areas for young professional couples (currently childless, could change in a few years!)? Someone said Hoboken to us because we're Indian and they said there's alot of young Indian couples out there. I'm not so sure. I'm not married to the idea of Manhattan, but I do think if we're taking the plunge we should experience living in the heart of things for a little while, right? Thoughts?

ryan
July 14th, 2006, 12:18 PM
There are several Indian neighborhoods if that's what you're looking for. The area around Lexington & 28th st has a large professional community (and good restaurants), then there's also Jackson Heights in Queens (and along the 7 train which goes to Times Square) which is a much bigger (more recent-immigrant-oriented?) neighborhood. Fun for brunch buffets. There's some awful Indians restaurants along East 6th street in the East Village (and I don't think much residential community). I've heard that both Hoboken and Jersey City have Indian neighborhoods, but I don't have any details.

One of the best things about NYC is that is diverse enough that you don't need to live in a neighborhood tailored just for you. It's an option, but you could be happy (and see people like you) in lots of areas.

I've never heard anything good or bad about Roosevelt island, but your commute would be limited to the F train. Take a look at a subway map (http://www.mta.nyc.ny.us/nyct/maps/submap.htm)and you can track out from Times Square to see what areas would be an easy ride.

amaluu729
July 14th, 2006, 12:36 PM
Thanks Ryan, for the info on where I can probably get some good food. I've been to Jackson Heights and the Curry Hill area, and while its great for the food, I'm not necessarily interested in being only around "my people" per say, which is why i actually thought it was weird that someone suggested Hoboken to me for that reason. Also Jackson Heights I know has more of the folks that are directly from India, while we were raised here but of Indian origin. Actually all of that has nothing to do with anything, so I'll just drop it. :)

Interested on hearing more about where you resident NY-ers live and what you like/dislike about your neighborhood.

THANKS!

ryan
July 14th, 2006, 12:59 PM
I'm not necessarily interested in being only around "my people" per say, which is why i actually thought it was weird that someone suggested Hoboken to me for that reason.

I didn't want to say it so bluntly, but I suspected as much. People are quick to categorize - even if the implications are...unintended. You'd be happy living almost anywhere.

I have a good apt situation so I don't want to move, but if I were to I like Ft. Greene lately. It's beautiful brownstone Brooklyn with a developing (or gentrifying, depending on your point of view) restaurant/bar scene. It's a really mixed neighborhood, and relatively affordable (That $2400 will go so, so much further in Brooklyn). Another cheapo neighborhood that can be fun is Astoria, which has the beer garden (more fun than it sounds).

Demile
July 14th, 2006, 09:37 PM
After I start my second job (here in Northern California) my monthly income will be about $1,400/month... I am going to be saving for several months and plan on moving to ny after saving a decent amount.

I will have anywhere from $6000 to $10,000 saved up by the time I move (probably $8,000).

I am looking into Queens (Sunnyside or Woodside) or somewhere Brooklyn, since I heard they are the most affordable for housing (a studio or 1 bedroom that will allow a cat)

What do some of the cheapest apartments go for (that aren't in shambles)? I have searched all over the internet and some websites tell me there are places in Queens as "low" as $600/month while other sites say that the lowest cost places are around $900/month.

What would be the ideal salary to even manage to SURVIVE? I don't do much along the lines of going clubbing or to the movies and such... though a few drinks every once in a while at a pub is probably the most I would do.

I have read this question asked many times through the thread but haven't seen it answered yet (it's taking me a while to get through it) but do jobs tend to pay higher wages in NY than in other states? (Resturaunt jobs and retail around where I live tend to pay an average of $7/hr.)

Any help on this would be great... I'm still reading through this damn thread but it's taking me a while since I don't have all the time in the world right now :p

head2
July 15th, 2006, 04:12 PM
Hi all...I have read through every page on this post..whew! Thanks for the great insight..I do have a few questions..

I am moving to NYC, October 7, 2006 for a job in lower manhattan, to which I will commute by vehicle but want to be accessible to midtown as well for my spouse to find work. I am looking for a 1BR in either Brooklyn or Queens in the $1200 range. I have visited and am familiar with Manhattan...not so much with Brooklyn or Queens but have done extensive research on some key areas to focus in on. My main question regards locating an apartment in a short period of time.

I would, of course, like to secure a place before I start work and have chosen the Labor Day weekend to visit. This gives me a Saturday-Monday shot at finding a place. My plan was to gather info on listings of my liking through avenues such as craigslist, contact and set up appointments up to 2-3 weeks before I visit. Then, spend those first few days of the visit going through appointments, looking for the right spot. I understand about having all my references/money orders/paystubs etc. ready, but my worry is being able to find a place in those 3 days.

Should I have some realtor's information in case I am running into a problem and its crunch-time, so I can use them as a quick backup? Or should I contact a realtor ahead of time? Will this require me to pay them or only pay their fees when I rent one of their apartments? I am hoping that the no-fee brokers and sell by owners listings will come through for me, but I don't want to get caught with nothing once my final day comes around.

Is it reasonable to expect to find a place in the Brooklyn/Queens area with only 3 days to look (i understand its a holiday weekend) and when I am looking a month in advance to my move?

Thanks in advance...I can't wait to get up there! Your opinion is greatly appreciated!

BrooklynRider
July 16th, 2006, 10:32 PM
You can find a place, but the application process can be long and competition on rentals is stiff. Be prepared for credit checks and processing fees. If you see something you "like," go for it. The rental rental inventory in the city is very tight right now.

amaluu729
July 18th, 2006, 12:46 PM
Can anyone give me any insight on the various Brooklyn neighborhoods, which areas are "hotter" and have a fair amount of shopping, nightlife, restaurants, etc. and also the commute times to Midtown/Times Square???

Any help would be greatly appreciated!!!

My hubby and I are getting very excited, we think this is really happening!!! The offer should be official today, and we'll know by the end of the week! Now if I can just get my head wrapped around all of these neighborhoods and learn the subway system quickly, we'll be all set!

ablarc
July 18th, 2006, 07:59 PM
Can anyone give me any insight on the various Brooklyn neighborhoods, which areas are "hotter" and have a fair amount of shopping, nightlife, restaurants, etc. ...Now if I can just get my head wrapped around all of these neighborhoods...
A little reading:

http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/search.php?searchid=236061

amaluu729
July 19th, 2006, 10:20 AM
Thanks Ablarc, but unfortunately that link didn't work. Was it directing me back towards the beginning of this thread? I read through this thread and found some info on Brooklyn neighborhoods (which was very helpful, thank you everyone!) ... I guess what I am looking for is a good estimate of the travel time to Midtown/Times Square. Is there a website to calculate travel times from various Brooklyn and Queens neighborhoods to Midtown?

Also would love to hear NYC residents personal thoughts on their own neighborhoods or areas that they lived in previously. THANKS!

Schadenfrau
July 19th, 2006, 11:34 AM
It would be helpful if you named some neighborhoods you're interested in.

Really, though, you should stop focusing so much on how long it will take to get to midtown. It's probably one of the last things you're going to be concerned about once you actually get here.

Unlike people in a lot of other areas, New Yorkers don't spend much time complaining about commuting times. You get on the subway, you read, and soon enough, you're there.

ablarc
July 19th, 2006, 04:19 PM
Thanks Ablarc, but unfortunately that link didn't work.
Sorry about that. Don't know what went wrong. I fixed it and it now works.

ManhattanKnight
July 19th, 2006, 04:36 PM
Really, though, you should stop focusing so much on how long it will take to get to midtown. It's probably one of the last things you're going to be concerned about once you actually get here.

Unlike people in a lot of other areas, New Yorkers don't spend much time complaining about commuting times. You get on the subway, you read, and soon enough, you're there.

Absolutely true. But if you want to pursue this non-issue, the MTA (the agency that operates NYC's subways) web site has system maps and schedules that you can use to do your own calculations:

http://www.mta.nyc.ny.us/

Ninjahedge
July 19th, 2006, 05:02 PM
Actually, the reason a lot of suburbanites move in, or close to the city IS commuting time.

Most people stop worrying about it later on for various reasons, one being the extreme cost of living within walking distance of work, and try to not let it bother them.

At least, that is the way it hasbeen with most of the people I have worked with in the city for the past 10 years. YMMV.