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ablarc
July 19th, 2006, 05:13 PM
Really, though, you should stop focusing so much on how long it will take to get to midtown. It's probably one of the last things you're going to be concerned about once you actually get here.

Unlike people in a lot of other areas, New Yorkers don't spend much time complaining about commuting times. You get on the subway, you read, and soon enough, you're there.
True. Except when you have to stand up amid the sweaty, commuting by rail can be something to look forward to.

I used to love reading on the subway; the train's din forces concentration inward, which also makes it a great place to think. Or people-watch.

These days in "idyllic" Suburbia I sit fuming in traffic with only a radio to keep me company; that's the kind of commute to which you wish a rapid termination. On the subway I more than once regretted arriving at my destination.

milleniumcab
July 20th, 2006, 12:05 AM
Sorry about that. Don't know what went wrong. I fixed it and it now works.

I just tried the link too ablarc. It didn't work for me either..:confused:

ablarc
July 20th, 2006, 06:09 AM
^ Mysterious. Works for a while and then doesn't. I'll try to fix it again later.

will
July 21st, 2006, 12:12 PM
I'm going to be relocating to NYC this fall and am looking at apartments in Manhattan, below 14th street. I'm looking for roommates and wanted to ask everyone what type of apartment I can expect to get into for around $1600/month. Now, since I am looking for roommates this would only be my share, not the total rent. Is this realistic? Thanks!

MrSpice
July 21st, 2006, 03:06 PM
I'm going to be relocating to NYC this fall and am looking at apartments in Manhattan, below 14th street. I'm looking for roommates and wanted to ask everyone what type of apartment I can expect to get into for around $1600/month. Now, since I am looking for roommates this would only be my share, not the total rent. Is this realistic? Thanks!

For that kind of money you can probably rent your own studio

twist
July 21st, 2006, 08:15 PM
We are four jazz artists looking (frantically and frustrated mind you) for a place in a safe (so we're not jacked of all our equipment) neighborhood that we can afford. We are gigging in NY weekly so its insane to keep commuting from Boston (which has no music culture to speak of).

Brooklyn is totally out because after three weeks of driving down to view places what we can afford is LAME at best and so incredibly far from any subway (G train is so sketchy) that we decided on Queens.

Please let me know if Astoria is a cool place to hang and where we won't be marked and come home to any empty apartment!

Clyde
July 21st, 2006, 09:17 PM
Speaking of Astoria, I can't believe the area is still suffering through a blackout after 5 days.

twist
July 21st, 2006, 10:55 PM
Really? I spoke to a broker yesterday and she said that was happening... we have to go back down on Monday to see if we can find anything... hope the lights are on!

Demile
July 22nd, 2006, 12:25 AM
Hmmm... I guess nobody has any real insight on Sunnyside... blah.

Schadenfrau
July 22nd, 2006, 04:56 PM
I lived in Sunnyside. Yes, there are lots of bars.

What specific questions do you have?

speXedy
July 22nd, 2006, 10:03 PM
So my girlfriend just broke up with me. I live in Rochester, NY and I am really thinking about selling my car and just going to NYC. I'd have nothing to bring with me other then a set of bad memories of my past. MY car is woth about $3,000. What is the cheepest place in NYC to live? How much would someone pay to live in a loft or something out of like the musical Rent? I really don't care what it looks like becuase how much time would I really be spending there? So yea, what's the cheepest place I can live, that is somewhat safe. I've grown in Rochester so im not some suburbian person who has to live in Manhatton, though I'd prefer not to live in Harlem. Any ideas? Also what is rent a month in that kind of a place? And what's the best type of job for someone pretty much just out of highschool?

I am going to NYC next month with my father for a weekend. Any suggestions on things I should do? Maybe i should start looking for work then eh?

Schadenfrau
July 22nd, 2006, 10:13 PM
I'd suggest getting a college degree before moving to the city.

Failing that, check out some of the prices here:

http://newyork.craigslist.org/

And I'd get the idea of "Rent" out of your head. That play was wildly unrealistic when it came out, and is much more so now.

speXedy
July 22nd, 2006, 10:19 PM
Thanks for the link ... I know everyone tells me not to go without a college degree, but i feel like I have to try, if i don't make it i can always comes back home and try again later you know? I have my youth and that's what counts.

twist
July 22nd, 2006, 10:37 PM
Oh come on, can't anyone lend a bit of insight to what it might like to live in Astoria? Any info on the areas on Queens that are nice and close to the subway?

ablarc
July 23rd, 2006, 12:40 AM
I know everyone tells me not to go without a college degree, but i feel like I have to try, if i don't make it i can always comes back home and try again later you know? I have my youth and that's what counts.
As it says in the song about New York, if you can make it there, you can make it anywhere...

I have a close relative who moved to New York at age 17, got a job his first day there in a clothing store. He's now 18, manages the store and lives in Red Hook with two roommates. He gets a raise every couple of months and has a great future.

Naturally you need a can-do attitude, but since you seem to have this, don't let the naysayers get you down.

Demile
July 23rd, 2006, 01:44 AM
I lived in Sunnyside. Yes, there are lots of bars.

What specific questions do you have?

How much would you say living expenses would be for one person (studio) per months? I am coming with several thousand saved up to fall back on in case I do not find a job immediately (hopefully I will have one lined up before moving.)

At first I was debating whether or not to keep my car once I move but it's just one more expense I do not need and probably won't be necessary? Is there easy access to the subway or a bus line?

My plan in the long run is to work and enroll in NYSID (eventually) but I wish to just work and... well, live in general before going to school and such.

Am I making sense or am I just being stupid?

ablarc
July 23rd, 2006, 01:46 AM
Just one word, young man: ROOMMATES.

shirley
July 23rd, 2006, 02:03 AM
Hi all, I'm planning on moving to NY January/February next year. I'll be taking my bar exams then trying to find work. From living in London for the past 3 years I'm used to expense, but am still unsure of the costs of living comparatively. What would my chances be of getting some work/a liveable wage?

I'm 24 now, coming 25 so I'm prepared to take a few risks. NY sounds like a dream.i am from china . and i have not been to NY ,and i want to know much about that city ,if some one could tell me some ,i would be appreciated ,thanks this forum .

shirley
July 23rd, 2006, 02:07 AM
[QUOTE=ablarc]Just one word, young man: ROOMMATES.[/QUOTE hi ,everyone ,i just register this forum ,and now i am in Ningbo China ,and today is very hot ,and i nealy can not stand up !

speXedy
July 23rd, 2006, 06:55 AM
As it says in the song about New York, if you can make it there, you can make it anywhere...

I have a close relative who moved to New York at age 17, got a job his first day there in a clothing store. He's now 18, manages the store and lives in Red Hook with two roommates. He gets a raise every couple of months and has a great future.

Naturally you need a can-do attitude, but since you seem to have this, don't let the naysayers get you down.

thanks for the words of inncuragement. But I Had a question. Where am I going to live the first month or two or three while im trying to get asttablsied? I can't live in a hotel ... it's way to much $ ... are there places cheep enough to afford w/o a lease?

ablarc
July 23rd, 2006, 09:23 AM
College dorms in the summertime. Try Columbia.

I lived in a frat house one summer. Not too great but hey, it's a frat house.

During the school year, you might still get a room at a YMCA at a weekly rate; the big one closed, alas.

Roommate agencies. Look on the 'net. You don't like your new roomies? You can switch when you find some you do.

Or round up some friends to join you in your big adventure.

Schadenfrau
July 23rd, 2006, 02:06 PM
I don't think Columbia allows non-students to live in the dorms any longer, Ablarc. I lived at Barnard for a summer, but that was only because they had an exchange program with my college, and maybe about ten other schools. You'd have to look into short-term sublets.

Demile, I'd suggest that you start looking for places with roommates. Sunnyside isn't a big studio neighborhood. You should probably look farther into Queens, in Woodside and Jackson Heights. All of these neighborhoods are on the 7 line.

I have no idea what your lifestyle is like, so I won't go into predicting what your living expenses would be. Start with the cost of your rent, remove the cost of a car (DO NOT bring it), add $24 a week for a MetroCard, then work from there.

ablarc
July 23rd, 2006, 02:11 PM
I don't think Columbia allows non-students to live in the dorms any longer, Ablarc.
Bummer, but the frats are another story. They always need money, and they're not under the university's thumb. Try Sigma Chi, 523 W. 113th St. Don't bother to write or call; just walk in and ask a brother.

speXedy
July 23rd, 2006, 03:18 PM
thanks for all the suggestions, but keep them coming! And when i go in August for a weekend does anyone have any suggestions as to what I should do to start making contacts?

edit:

if anyone has AIM or Yahoo or MSN add me if you are feeling up to chatting, I got 100s of questions.

AIM: speXedy
Yahoo: spexedy
MSN: Michael@iPanzica.com

ablarc
July 23rd, 2006, 03:29 PM
thanks for all the suggestions, but keep them coming! And when i go in August for a weekend does anyone have any suggestions as to what I should do to start making contacts?
Hit the pavement, Jack. No substitute for eye contact with a potential employer.

Forget resumes, forget phone calls, just walk in and ask to see the boss, not his assistant. Tell him or her something true he'll want to hear about what you can do for him. You could be the answer to all his problems (find the problems; they're usually in plain sight). Don't be shy --or if you can't keep from being shy, be cute about it. An employer likes straight talk from a straight shooter.

Think about this: there's no way you can be a brain surgeon or a supreme court justice without a high-priced education, but anyone can sure as hell be President of the United States; the bozo who occupies the job is proof of that.

And there are more jobs out there that resemble President than brain surgeon.

ablarc
July 23rd, 2006, 03:46 PM
*BUMP* to get rid of the spammer at the top. Moderator?

RicanPrincipessa
July 25th, 2006, 11:01 PM
Oh come on, can't anyone lend a bit of insight to what it might like to live in Astoria? Any info on the areas on Queens that are nice and close to the subway?


Same inquiry here!

milleniumcab
July 25th, 2006, 11:59 PM
Here is a little insight about Astoria....

Be careful, you might loose power for about, oooo lets say, 10 days...:D

shirley
July 26th, 2006, 09:39 AM
I don't think Columbia allows non-students to live in the dorms any longer, Ablarc. I lived at Barnard for a summer, but that was only because they had an exchange program with my college, and maybe about ten other schools. You'd have to look into short-term sublets.

Demile, I'd suggest that you start looking for places with roommates. Sunnyside isn't a big studio neighborhood. You should probably look farther into Queens, in Woodside and Jackson Heights. All of these neighborhoods are on the 7 line.

I have no idea what your lifestyle is like, so I won't go into predicting what your living expenses would be. Start with the cost of your rent, remove the cost of a car (DO NOT bring it), add $24 a week for a MetroCard, then work from there. i from china ,i just graduate from college,and rent a house in ningbo city ,the room is very samll ,and pay somewhat high rent .and i want to know your country 's information about the house and something ,as i have not been to Columbia even the usa ,and also i want to make friends with you !

ablarc
July 28th, 2006, 07:22 AM
Hi shirley, tell us about Ningbo City.

RicanPrincipessa
July 30th, 2006, 12:29 AM
Here is a little insight about Astoria....

Be careful, you might loose power for about, oooo lets say, 10 days...:D


I've heard... Makes me wanna re-think my move... ;)

milleniumcab
July 30th, 2006, 01:06 AM
^ It could happen anywhere, I guess.. Don't let that stop you.. Astoria is a cool, diverse neighborhood with an easy commute into Manhattan...

lofter1
July 30th, 2006, 09:07 AM
Chances are, with all the publicity and attention, that Astoria and environs will now get the necessary work performed to remedy this problem.

Some other unfortunate and under-served neighborhood will be the next recipient of Con Ed's seemingly questionable and out-moded long-term business practices ...

It’s All About Efficiency

NY TIMES (http://www.nytimes.com/2006/07/30/opinion/nyregionopinions/30CIlovins.html)
By AMORY B. LOVINS
Op-Ed Contributor
Snowmass, Colo.
July 30, 2006

Old cables and slack maintenance will be blamed for the Queens blackout, just as poor operation and outdated equipment caused the Aug. 14, 2003, Northeast blackout. But both failures were really caused by obsolete business strategies and public policies favoring overcentralized power systems.

Efficient use of electricity is the first line of defense. Efficient buildings and equipment (especially air-conditioners) can slash the loads that overheated Con Edison’s cables. Efficiency can save 75 percent of America’s electricity at lower cost than making it at existing power plants. Helping customers reduce or defer usage when electricity is scarce can also increase distribution equipment’s life and reliability. To encourage these profitable investments, New York should join Oregon and California in rewarding utilities for cutting customers’ bills, not selling more energy.

Almost all power failures originate in the grid, so electricity made near customers is most reliable and cheaper. Clean, local “micropower” plants spread over a city dependably supply a dozen industrial countries with a sixth to more than half their electricity and generate a third of the world’s new electricity. Yet local and national policy still discourages it.

Together, these profitable investments can make major power failures — now inevitable by design — become impossible by design.

Amory B. Lovins is the chief executive of Rocky Mountain Institute

__________________________________________________ ___

A whole slew of opinions from the 7.30.06 Sunday NY Times ...

Op-Ed Contributors

Let’s Keep the Lights On: Some Expert Advice for Con Ed



Expand ‘Demand Response’ (http://www.nytimes.com/2006/07/30/opinion/nyregionopinions/30CIgordon.html)
An approach called “demand response” can help prevent future blackouts. By MIKE GORDON.


Put Profits Into Performance (http://www.nytimes.com/2006/07/30/opinion/nyregionopinions/30CInolan.html)
Three things must be done to restore the integrity of the power system and the faith of New Yorkers in Con Edison. By CATHERINE NOLAN.


Sensors on the Grid (http://www.nytimes.com/2006/07/30/opinion/nyregionopinions/30CIbose.html)
Increasing redundancy by investing in more equipment is vital, but the use of new technologies to upgrade aging equipment is also a must. By ANJAN BOSE.


Physics Trumps Economics (http://www.nytimes.com/2006/07/30/opinion/nyregionopinions/30CIloehr.html)
The reliability of the electric grid is deteriorating, and a blackout like the one in August 2003 will surely be replicated. By GEORGE C. LOEHR.


Make the Utility Pay (http://www.nytimes.com/2006/07/30/opinion/nyregionopinions/30CIgianaris.html)
Con Ed should be prohibited from passing the cost of fines and reimbursements onto consumers in the form of rate increases. By MICHAEL N. GIANARIS.


Monopoly Power (http://www.nytimes.com/2006/07/30/opinion/nyregionopinions/30CIgelinas.html)
The harder part of assuring reliability is ensuring that transmission and distribution lines are adequate to carry electricity to homes and businesses. By NICOLE GELINAS.


Can We Blame the Weather? (http://www.nytimes.com/2006/07/30/opinion/nyregionopinions/30CIfox-penner.html)
An aging distribution system may be implicated in New York’s recent blackouts, but there are longer-term forces at work here. By PETER FOX-PENNER.



Copyright 2006 The New York Times Company

wightgurl
July 31st, 2006, 08:49 AM
If I'm not using a broker and I'm subletting directly from the primary tenant can she charge me a fee in addition to the rent that she's charging me?

I'm not talking about the fact that she can charge me an extra 10% of what her rent is on top of what she pays for rent if she claims that the apartment is "furnished" (ex. - if her rent is $500/month, then she can charge me $50/month extra, making my rent $550/mo.) I'm talking about a fee in addition to that.

More questions about subletting:
(1) if her landlord charges her a 10% subletting fee can she pass that expense on to me? (Meaning if she's already charging me 10% above her rent for it being "furnished" can she charge me 20% above what she's paying for rent if her landlord is getting a 10% sublet fee from her?)

(2) What constitues "furnished" when it comes to charging that extra 10% for subletting? This is a large apartment (it's a one-bedroom with a dining room) and the only furniture that she's leaving for me is: (a) a mattress and bedframe (which I don't want, because I don't want to sleep on a used mattress), (b) a small nightstand, (c) a very small dresser, and (d) 2 love seats. She's also stated that she will remove any of this furniture that I don't want and donate it to "good will"...

(3) She says that her rent is based on her income and that there is a waiting list to get into the apartment building, so I asked her if she is living in subsidized housing and she said that she guesses so. I then asked her if she is allowed to sublet to me and if she's gotten permission to do so (and also asked to see her lease and the proof that she's gotten permission to sublet to me). She's said, "yes" to both questions and says she'll show me the proof. Has anyone heard of subsidized housing allowing subletting?

MikeKruger
August 1st, 2006, 11:52 AM
My wife and I currently live in Jersey. I live 10 minutes from work but she works in Manhattan and her commute is over an hour long. We both enjoy Manhattan and would like to move there next year.
Her commute would be much shorter.
My work is about 1/2 hour by bus when there's little traffic. With traffic , especially leaving work in the afternoon and coming in the city, it's over an hour. Bummer because living in Manhattan and working in Jersey is the opposite of what many people do so you'd expect it to take less time.
There's no path/train/ferry close to work. The light rail passes fairly close but it'd be a long hike to work which would neutralize any advantages of taking that.
By car, taking the bridge rather than the tunnel, I could make it in 20minutes I was told. But then I would have to deal with keeping a car in the city...big costly hassle.
I was wondering if there's anyone here doing a similar commute and how they deal with it, or what the best alternative is.
I know, we could move to Hoboken but that's getting to be as expensive as Manhattan and just as parking-challenging.

florent
August 1st, 2006, 12:07 PM
Hi all,

I'm french and i love NYC. I would like become an engineer and live in NYC. So i want to know ,if it's possible, if it's easy to find a work (engineer) in New York and what kind of salaries would a city firm give you coming out?

Thanks for your answers

P.S.: Sorry but i don't speak english very well (for the moment:D )

Ninjahedge
August 1st, 2006, 01:12 PM
As a Hoboken resident, I could also suggest places like Jersey City.

Hoboken IS very expensive now, and it seems to be more renter-available now (it is rent controlled on older buildings, but the landlord will never tell you that).

Sadly, I think that would be the best place for you given the split you now face, or you can stay where you are and see if a day or two a week could be leveraged to telecommuting.

I doubt it, otherwise you would have already asked/done it, but it is worth a try!

GL!

MrSpice
August 1st, 2006, 03:07 PM
Hi all,

I'm french and i love NYC. I would like become an engineer and live in NYC. So i want to know ,if it's possible, if it's easy to find a work (engineer) in New York and what kind of salaries would a city firm give you coming out?

Thanks for your answers

P.S.: Sorry but i don't speak english very well (for the moment:D )

It depends on the field. New York itself does not have too many engineers working here. Most of the engineering jobs in the city are in Consgtruction/Architecture/Computer Drafting and Networking/Programming (Software Engineers - mostly in financial firms).

And the salary would be based on your experience, field and probably your immigration status (if you're not a citizen/resident, you would need a work visa and those people get paid less, obviously).

florent
August 1st, 2006, 05:41 PM
Ok, thanks you very much MrSpice for your info (it's very interesting to talk with americans )

so the best in order to live in NYC it's to work (or "working" sorry but i don't know) in the finances and to be a citizen (with a green card).

Thanks

milleniumcab
August 2nd, 2006, 12:26 AM
Civil and Environmental Engineers should be in demand here also..

florent
August 2nd, 2006, 06:07 AM
thanks,

i think the best in order to work in New York it's to find a job in the finances.
I'll have to choose my fied in february.

Bye;)

RicanPrincipessa
August 4th, 2006, 12:36 PM
^ It could happen anywhere, I guess.. Don't let that stop you.. Astoria is a cool, diverse neighborhood with an easy commute into Manhattan...

I've heard its a great place... up and coming area.

Does anyone have any more info on Astoria?

Schadenfrau
August 4th, 2006, 12:39 PM
I wouldn't really call Astoria "up and coming." The neighborhood has been quite established for years.

It's a good area, but what do you want to know, specifically?

el8edfx
August 6th, 2006, 02:46 AM
I want to move to New York City (hopefully live in Manhattan) in May 2007. I'm trying to learn as much as I can and do as much as I can to make this happen. I love NYC everytime I go. I just can't get enough of the energy there... Here's the thing. I'm 25, will have my Bachelors Degree in Finance with a minor in communicaiton and international business from a top 20 (yes 20 not 10) university with a high GPA in May. I want to work in the Production/finance part of the film industry there.. How likely is this to happen?.! I have very little experience. Is a degree enough? Is it all in my head that I need to come from a top 5 college to actually start my career in NYC?

What do I need to make to live in Manhattan as a single female alone.. (which means it needs to be a safe place) is that possible? I don't need much other than a relativly safe area. I don't require huge luxuries other than being able to go to trendy clubs every now and then.

I am just starting to look into specifics as far as moving so ANY advice is appreciated!

:rolleyes:

ASaint763
August 6th, 2006, 10:30 PM
I'm moving to NY in just a couple of months, and have been told various different neighborhoods to check out. I'll be back there in September officially looking for a room (since I KNOW I will need roommates.) What areas should I look at? I am an actor with a day job (a job in corporate america that will be transferring me back east.) I've been told to look at Washington Heights, Morningside Heights, and various pocket areas in NYC, then Astoria and sections of Queens (what sections, though?) The office is in midtown (Park Ave.) and of course, all my dance classes, auditions, etc, will be in midtown/Chelsea...so I need something that would be efficient to commuting to midtown...

Any suggestions? Advice? Comments? :) I'd appreciate anything...

Elena1983
August 7th, 2006, 07:27 AM
English Schools in New York?
Do some of you know Aspect School?

ASaint763
August 9th, 2006, 11:21 PM
Does anyone know any other site, besides CraigsList, that would have actors looking for roommates? I'm networking all I can with friends and friends of friends, and friends of friends of friends, for a place to move into (shared) in October.

...I'm leary of CraigsList with everything I have read regarding rent scams, people looking for sex instead of rent, etc...

lofter1
August 10th, 2006, 12:32 AM
Try "Backstage" -- or if you're a member of the union there is a bulletin board at the AEA lounge on W. 46th St.

RicanPrincipessa
August 10th, 2006, 03:18 AM
I wouldn't really call Astoria "up and coming." The neighborhood has been quite established for years.

It's a good area, but what do you want to know, specifically?


These are my top three questions!
Living Costs
Night Life
Diversity

Thanx in advance! :)

Peteynyc1
August 11th, 2006, 09:40 AM
These are my top three questions!
Living Costs
Night Life
Diversity

Thanx in advance! :)

I have quite a few friends who live in Astoria. It is extremely diverse, one of its best qualities. There is a particularly large Greek and Brazilian population there, but also just about every other nationality and ethnicity. Also really great that it is somewhat reasonably priced for being so close to the city. The area is very convenient from the city, only like 5 stops from midtown on the N (or R?) line. Overall its a relatively safe area. As far as night life, I know there are some small clubs and lounges out there but its not going to be so happening compared to what you will find a short ride away in Manhattan. If I was looking to move to an affordable outer borough location I would probably pick Astoria. Hope this helps..

RicanPrincipessa
August 12th, 2006, 01:32 AM
I have quite a few friends who live in Astoria. It is extremely diverse, one of its best qualities. There is a particularly large Greek and Brazilian population there, but also just about every other nationality and ethnicity. Also really great that it is somewhat reasonably priced for being so close to the city. The area is very convenient from the city, only like 5 stops from midtown on the N (or R?) line. Overall its a relatively safe area. As far as night life, I know there are some small clubs and lounges out there but its not going to be so happening compared to what you will find a short ride away in Manhattan. If I was looking to move to an affordable outer borough location I would probably pick Astoria. Hope this helps..


The more I read up on Astoria the more excited I become! Thanx so much for the info!!!!

ryan
August 12th, 2006, 04:26 PM
Astoria is a really nice neighborhood - you couldn't do much better for the money. And, the beer garden (http://www.bohemianhall.com/), of course.

RicanPrincipessa
August 13th, 2006, 01:19 AM
And great places you might recommend to visit when I make my move?

EJ80
August 13th, 2006, 12:04 PM
Hi everyone!

First, this thread has been a great source of info already and it would be great if it was turned into its own forum.

That being said, I have some questions. I plan to move to NYC by the end of the year. I'm a single 26 year old woman. I live in Atlanta right now so I know there are going to be major changes to my style of living. Currently I have a ~1000 sq ft 2 bdr apt in a good area that I pay about ~$900/mo for. Never going to happen in NY right? ;)

When I move to NY, I'll be working in Chelsea (around 8th and 9th Ave). I'd like a fairly spacious (by NY standards) apartment in a safe area. I never do well w/ roommates so thats pretty much out of the question. I'd like to live in Brooklyn but I'm open to other areas, except the Bronx (nothing against the Bronx, its for purely personal reasons). I plan on keeping my car since I roadtrip quite a bit.

So basically heres what I'm looking for in a nutshell:

<$1500 per month
Spacious 1 bedroom/loft (I figure spacious 2 bedroom is dreaming)
Good neighborhood (Diverse, not lots of crime)
No roaches (I _hate_ bugs)
Good access to public transportation
A place to park my car
Not in the Bronx

Thanks in advance for all replies.

Schadenfrau
August 13th, 2006, 12:30 PM
The Bronx is probably the only place that would allow you those somewhat unrealistic expectations. Then again, it's probably a good thing that you wouldn't consider moving there.

EJ80
August 13th, 2006, 12:43 PM
The Bronx is probably the only place that would allow you those somewhat unrealistic expectations. Then again, it's probably a good thing that you wouldn't consider moving there.okay which of my wishes make my expectations unrealistic? i can be flexible. :)

milleniumcab
August 13th, 2006, 03:34 PM
Hi everyone!

So basically heres what I'm looking for in a nutshell:

<$1500 per month
Spacious 1 bedroom/loft (I figure spacious 2 bedroom is dreaming)
Good neighborhood (Diverse, not lots of crime)
No roaches (I _hate_ bugs)
Good access to public transportation
A place to park my car
Not in the Bronx

Thanks in advance for all replies.

You are about 15 years late..

EJ80
August 13th, 2006, 07:15 PM
*sigh* Okay, can I have some constructive feedback please? Tell me what in my list is a dealbreaker?

By spacious, I don't mean by Atlanta standards, I mean by NY standards.

What are more "realisitic" expectations. The only thing I'm really super firm on are the bugs and not in the Bronx. The rest is flexible.

Schadenfrau
August 13th, 2006, 11:09 PM
Why not the Bronx? You'd find the space, and street parking for your car.

Outside of those two things, you're not likely to find much.

ablarc
August 13th, 2006, 11:19 PM
what I'm looking for in a nutshell:
Astoria.

Schadenfrau
August 14th, 2006, 12:07 AM
Astoria is great, but there's certainly no parking, and "spacious" is a foreign word.

EJ80
August 14th, 2006, 05:00 PM
Parking can be managed. If need be, I have a place in Brooklyn to park my car until I need it. Spacious is by NY standards. By no means am I expecting to have the space I have now...

Schadenfrau
August 14th, 2006, 05:16 PM
If you're into Brooklyn, try Kensington, Lefferts Gardens, and Crown/Prospect Heights.

ryan
August 14th, 2006, 06:39 PM
*sigh* Okay, can I have some constructive feedback please? Tell me what in my list is a dealbreaker?

I think it's possible that you'd find a place with many of your goals, but not all. Think about a nicer studio in a better neighborhood ("good" is too subjective - what is important to you?), or a bigger, dumpier apt further from the subway. You might find something in my neighborhood (Greenpoint) if you're ok with a broker fee (more $$$ upfront, but will lower your monthly rent). You should definitely look at queens - search for Long Island City/Sunnyside/Jackson Heights/Astoria on craigslist. You might find a bargain.

I don't think anyone who mentions crime would be too happy with Prospect/Crown Heights.

Schadenfrau
August 14th, 2006, 08:16 PM
That's probably true, but it's one of the few Brooklyn neighborhoods with multiple Craigslist listings within those specifications and price range.

ryan
August 14th, 2006, 08:55 PM
I see lots of listings for Greenpoint. Sure we have crummy train service (unless you commute to midtown east like I do), and the neighborhood is smelly, dirty, ugly, and our best asset is proximity to Williamsburg. (ok, we have two nice parks, a good video store, good bars and it's quiet). That said, rent is rising fast, and I can't ever move because my landlord promised never to raise our rent.

Schadenfrau
August 14th, 2006, 09:15 PM
You're stuck, Ryan! Fortunately, that's a great place.

By the way, where have you been? I've missed you.

ryan
August 15th, 2006, 08:24 PM
Thanks Schadenfrau- lots of real life I guess. (and of course less time spent paid to sit in front of a computer with not enough to do...)

ASaint763
August 19th, 2006, 01:03 AM
So I head back next month to look for a room (I will definitely need a roommate/roommates) and find the process completely daunting. It's different than living in a california suburb (like I do now) where you look at a complex, decide which model you like, and boom! You have an apartment. Are there any pointers I should follow when back there looking for rooms/roomates?? I keep hearing about scams, etc. I have a WEEK (ack!) to find a place, since most of my money is going towards the actual move.

I need advice!

Oh, I am looking at Astoria, Queens, and maybe Washington Heights? Any other suggestions? I'm a 27 year old (white) female, actor with a day job in corporate america (im transferring with it) ... any ideas???

Help! Please!

rjjr2531
August 21st, 2006, 03:23 AM
my best friend and i are planning on moving to NYC after x-mas. we are coming from dallas, TX in need of a change. here is are situation and some questions i have. thanks for your help!

-both will have about 6-10 thousand in bank a piece, one will have a waiter job and one going unemployeed, we need to be somewhat close to community college, we also love the night life (clubs). we are looking to spend about 6-700 a month a piece on rent.

do we need a car? how long does it take to get around NYC incase job and house and school are separated? where would be a good area to live given our situation?

thats it for now. again, thanks for any of the replies and advice. hopefully ill think of some more questions and list them as well...

Neil from Dallas, TX :D

ASaint763
August 22nd, 2006, 12:50 AM
So I may have found a place...78th and York. Is that a good area...it's the Upper East Side...

ryan
August 22nd, 2006, 10:59 AM
Some people on the forum say that is the best neighborhood. It's a largely white, fratty, heterosexual neighborhood. A safe bet.

ryan
August 22nd, 2006, 11:10 AM
-both will have about 6-10 thousand in bank a piece, one will have a waiter job and one going unemployeed, we need to be somewhat close to community college, we also love the night life (clubs). we are looking to spend about 6-700 a month a piece on rent.

That's a lot of money in the bank - more than anyone I know who moved here when they were young. You can manage that rent in my neighborhood (I don't mean to harp - it's just what I know best) and you can walk to Williamsburg, which has lots of clubs and bars. I'm not sure where community colleges are, but everything is just a subway ride away.


do we need a car?

No. A car in NYC is strictly a luxury.


how long does it take to get around NYC incase job and house and school are separated? where would be a good area to live given our situation?

Most places are 20-40 minutes from me by subway. Compared to a city like Dallas everything in NYC is very close together, so you could most anywhere given your criteria. (though you probably don't want to live far out in Brooklyn or Queens, which can make for long commutes).

kliq6
August 22nd, 2006, 11:24 AM
So I may have found a place...78th and York. Is that a good area...it's the Upper East Side...

I lived in that area for years, very good place to live

ryan
August 25th, 2006, 03:51 PM
http://graphics10.nytimes.com/images/misc/logoprinter.gif (http://www.nytimes.com/)
http://view.atdmt.com/ORG/view/nwyrkfxs0040000007org/direct;at.orgfxs00000913/01/
August 24, 2006
The Housing Virgins of Manhattan (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/)

By PENELOPE GREEN (http://query.nytimes.com/search/query?ppds=bylL&v1=PENELOPE%20GREEN&fdq=19960101&td=sysdate&sort=newest&ac=PENELOPE%20GREEN&inline=nyt-per)
BEN SNYDACKER is just 21, and a freshly minted New Yorker. Tall and brash, he’s enjoying his third month in his new job, as a sales assistant for Virgin Records, and his new apartment, a minute space creatively described as a two-bedroom in a rank 19th-century tenement building on Avenue B that he shares with a college roommate (monthly rent: $2,600). It has been a summer of firsts for Mr. Snydacker, a Skidmore graduate: after scuffling in the city’s rental market, a sometimes-lawless agora peopled with good guys, bad guys and all the shape-shifters in between, Mr. Snydacker has emerged a little tougher and, emotionally, a little older. He is no longer a housing virgin.

“It was probably the second most stressful experience of my life,” he said the other day. “That is, if I retained any memory of having had meningitis when I was 6 months old.”

It’s late August, and an annual Manhattan (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/classifieds/realestate/locations/newyork/newyorkcity/manhattan/?inline=nyt-geo) roundelay is winding down. The new college graduates have been pouring into town from all over the country since June, short of money and time but long on hope, specifically the hope of finding a safe haven on this island, which is to say a legal rental for under $1,500 a bedroom. (Williamsburg and beyond is a bridge too far for much of this crowd.) With vacancy rates at 0.78 percent, and rental prices up 15 percent over last summer, “these apartments are in high demand and usually disappear within 24 hours,” said Gordon Golub, senior managing director at Citi Habitats, the largest rental agency in the city.

“Year by year for the past three years,” he continued, “there has been more and more hiring by large firms at the entry level. And so within a tight rental market, this particular market is extremely tight.”

And the fees are higher. Three years ago, agents were, in many cases, negotiating their fees down to 8 percent; some landlords were even paying agent’s fees directly. Today, agents typically charge 15 percent of a year’s rent (which, depending on seniority and performance, they share with their companies at rates of between 20 and 60 percent).

Additionally, landlords require three months’ rent up front (first, last and a security deposit), though in some cases, if the credit history of a tenant is weak (or non-existent) and the salary not large enough, they might extract a larger deposit or ask for a guarantor. The formula for salary requirements is between 40 and 45 times one month’s rent, or about $120,000 for a $3,000-a-month apartment. That sum is well beyond the reach of tenants like Mr. Snydacker, whose starting salary at Virgin is $35,000; in such cases, a parent will often serve as a guarantor. With their laptops filled with postings from the online marketplace Craigslist and Backpage, the Village Voice’s online listing service, the new New Yorkers have encountered every dodge and near-scam that Manhattan’s so-called “rogue” brokers have to offer — the bait-and-switch, the unreturned fees, the fake bidding wars. By this week, for the most part, they will have found housing, which they’ll accessorize with a flat-screen television and maybe a few pieces of Ikea furniture, upon which their friends will sprawl and hear the war stories of the summer of 2006.

Here’s Mr. Snydacker’s: With a job that began on June 5, he was camping at his dad’s apartment in Connecticut and commuting an hour and a half each way, each day, into the city. He started off by replying to individual postings on Craigslist, but he grew leery of meeting agents on street corners and seeing one-bedroom apartments that had been advertised as two.

“I felt like it was time to go to a big agency so there’d be accountability,” he said. “I didn’t want to be making deals on street corners with these agents who were saying, ‘Please don’t go in my office.’ They were trying to undercut their own companies.”

But size did not guarantee fair play, he said. An agent at one of the larger firms showed him a two-bedroom in the far East Village, on the heels of another showing by another agent for the same apartment.

“Then it was a race to see who could get their application in first,” said Mr. Snydacker, who drew $500 from an A.T.M. as a kind of place holder, for which the agent wrote out a receipt. Apartments are not taken off the market until an application has been approved and the certified checks duly cashed, but a $500 deposit shows a landlord a would-be renter’s good faith during the application process. It’s typically returned, or applied to the broker’s fee or the rent itself.

“Except when I arrived with all our checks to sign the lease,” said Mr. Snydacker, “the guy refused to give me the money back. He said we needed two receipts. He was pretty aggressive, and there was a moment when I thought, ‘I’m already spending $5,000, what’s another $500?’ But my dad called a lawyer, and then called the broker, who then got really aggressive with me. I called customer service at the agency, and they were pretty decent. They said, ‘Don’t worry. Come in and get your money.’ ”

Mr. Snydacker took his roommate to the agency’s office, where he said the agent scowled beetle-browed and silently counted out a stack of $20 bills onto his desk. Just as silently, Mr. Snydacker said, he counted them, and left.

“I don’t know why this guy felt like he had a right to be angry with me,” said Mr. Snydacker. “But he was furious. He’s a big guy, and it was pretty scary.”

CRAIG NEWMARK, the founder of Craigslist (and a San Francisco resident), said last week that monitoring the site’s New York City housing section is “my biggest single project, actually. When you are in a situation where you feel everyone else is cheating,” he said, “a lot of people feel a moral sanction that they can cheat, too.”

“Over the years we’ve been telling brokers that’s not O.K., and over the years the less ethical behavior is slowing down,” he said. “On the other hand, there are some persistent bad guys, and the worst of them I’ve reported to New York State’s Department of State. Real estate in New York is a blood sport. It’s not like anywhere else.”

Mr. Newmark has taken to dropping in on real estate agencies unannounced when he is in Manhattan. “I’m letting them know I am really committed and that I really exist. I’ve had a few cases, specifically three, where people have reported problems getting a fee back, and in each case I’ve talked to the agent and gotten it back.”

Last summer, Ann Marie Yoo, a 23-year-old Columbia graduate now working as a health care consultant, and two of her college roommates applied for an apartment in Morningside Heights. They lined up their financial ducks in three days, she said, but when Ms. Yoo arrived in the agent’s office with her sheaf of certified checks, her agent announced that the landlord had given the apartment to someone else.

“I never felt like the broker was looking out for us,” she said, “and he was really impatient through the whole process. He tried to get us to stay, to keep our deposit for another apartment, but I’d had it.”

This is when she made her move from a large agency to “a completely random agent on Craigslist,” said Ms. Yoo.

“He was the sketchiest man,” she said, “and the apartment was — eh. But the location was just so prime and he said ‘We don’t do credit checks and we only charge 12 percent.’ ” And so Ms. Yoo and her friends once again assembled the sheaf of certified checks. On the morning of the lease signing, the agent called Ms. Yoo three or four times to say he was stuck on a train, he was on his way, he would meet her on a corner near her Midtown office.

“I’m waiting, and 10 minutes goes by, and then 20, and he pulls up in huge, grimy white minivan, and says, ‘Why don’t you step inside?’ ” Ms. Yoo remembered. “And I’m wondering what all the stuff about the subway was, as I say, ‘No way am I going to step inside your van!’ He starts giving me grief, saying stuff like, ‘I don’t feel like working with people who don’t trust me.’ And I’m freaking out because I think we’re going to lose the apartment, even though there’s no way I’m getting in the van. So I’m begging him to take the checks, to guarantee me the apartment.”

But the agent drove away, leaving Ms. Yoo gape-mouthed on Madison Avenue, after making another appointment to meet that evening at a Starbucks near the apartment.

“I take my roommates with me,” Ms. Yoo went on to say, “because there’s no way I’m going to meet him alone, and as we’re walking to the apartment with the keys he calls me on the whole thing again. He literally said something to the effect of, ‘You’re not comfortable with me because you’re Asian,’ and I’m like, ‘No, I’m a young woman alone in the city.’ ”
“Brokers always provide you with an experience you never forget,” she concluded wryly.

Some young graduates forgo the rental scene altogether, hopping from one couch or futon to the next, hoping their friendships and their welcomes don’t wear out too quickly.

Lani Fortier, 24, spent eight months of her first year out of the University of Connecticut (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/u/university_of_connecticut/index.html?inline=nyt-org) in the Mercy Ships program, which uses former ocean liners-turned-floating hospitals to provide medical treatment to developing nations.

When Ms. Fortier joined, her ship was moored off Liberia, where in addition to assisting the ship’s doctors, Ms. Fortier played on the Liberian women’s soccer team and rebuilt an orphanage that had lost all its funding.
Ms. Fortier and a business partner are now in Manhattan starting their own charity, Charityis.com (http://charityis.com/), to pay for projects like Mercy Ships. Ms. Fortier, who said she hopes to make $500 a week once the charity is operating, is sleeping on a futon in the postage-stamp-size West Village living room of her best friend from New Hampshire, and another roommate, Jessica Flint, an editorial assistant at Vanity Fair.

Ms. Flint, who has lived in four apartments in four years since graduating from Miami University in Ohio (including a room in the apartment of an unemployed woman who’d racked up $1,000 in cable charges she tried to foist on Ms. Flint) has a particular soft spot for Ms. Fortier.

Ms. Flint also offers advice to newbie Manhattanites: she and her friend Cate Edwards, daughter of John Edwards (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/e/john_edwards/index.html?inline=nyt-per), the 2004 Democratic vice-presidential candidate, have a blog, www.urbanistaonline.com (http://www.urbanistaonline.com/), a kind of Zagat (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/z/zagat_survey/index.html?inline=nyt-org)-like lifestyle guide.

“My experience was so bad,” Ms. Flint said, “I feel fine about Lani staying here.”

One morning last week the two new roommates were perched on “Lani’s room,” a black futon Ms. Flint bought last year. Ms. Fortier’s possessions were tucked inside her sister’s red suitcase, which was parked demurely in the long front hall of the apartment. She left many of her things in Africa, she said, including her own suitcase. “In hindsight, giving away most of my clothes was maybe not a good thing,” she mused.

Ms. Fortier will stay as long as she’s welcome, which, judging from Ms. Flint’s demeanor, could be many months. She’s been living out of a bag for so long, she said, it’s no hardship. “And this is a very nice futon,” she said, patting it approvingly. “Nice and thick!”

Ms. Flint’s own tiny room is rather stunning, with canvases painted in lavender and pale green and laid out like a puzzle on one wall, a chandelier that pours like a baby fountain from the ceiling and sheer lavender curtains she’s stenciled with a few lines from “The Great Gatsby.”
It’s the part about how Manhattan looks from the Queensboro Bridge, though Ms. Flint has substituted the word “penthouse” for the bridge because “last year I lived in a penthouse,” she explained, and then quoted her version.

“The city seen from the penthouse is always the city seen for the first time,” it reads, “in its first wild promise of all the mystery and the beauty in the world.”

Ms. Flint is very happy to be home.

Finding an Apartment Without Being Taken

THE best sources for apartment listings in Manhattan (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/classifieds/realestate/locations/newyork/newyorkcity/manhattan/?inline=nyt-geo) are online, at craigslist.org (http://craigslist.org/) and backpage.com (http://backpage.com/), the Village Voice’s listings. As a result of efforts by volunteers who police Craigslist for listing abuses, and the attention of the site’s founder, Craig Newmark, bad behavior on Craigslist is diminishing. Backpage may still be a bit unruly, said Jonas Sigle, chief technical director at the rental agency Manhattan Apartments Inc. and one of many self-appointed “policemen” trawling Craigslist.

Since June, another factor that has cut down on listing mayhem is the $10 charge that Mr. Newmark has required of all fee apartments posted on his listing service. The charge has winnowed down a big annoyance: multiple postings of the same apartment by the same agent. Since new postings appear higher on the Craigslist Web page, repeated postings of the same apartment were a Darwinian strategy followed by most agents, resulting in a blizzard of listings. (Almost as quickly as the $10 charge policy was initiated, many agents began posting on owner-only sites, where no charges are levied.)

Not all agents are rogues, of course. In evaluating an agent, Mr. Sigle recommends looking out for someone “who knows the product, knows what kind of accounts — or landlords — are going to accept what kind of application.” In other words, he said, “will they take students or someone who needs a guarantor? Someone who is clear and honest and upfront.”
Beware of agents who will not disclose their agencies; you want the protection of a customer service department or an office manager should something go awry.

Leroy Frazier, a special prosecutor in the Manhattan District Attorney’s office, said that the amount of outright fraud in the rental market has remained constant from year to year, and mostly has to do with people offering apartments that don’t exist or don’t belong to them.

“I would certainly advise not renting an apartment entirely online,” he said. “I would inspect the apartment, and while inspecting it, I would try and talk to a neighbor or, better, the super — someone who can document that you’ve been there.” Always create a paper trail with certified checks or a credit card, never cash.

It’s a big red flag, he said, if someone tries to talk you out of doing any of the above.

arh30
August 30th, 2006, 12:06 AM
Hi, my best friend and I have been wanting to move to new york for awhile now. We've decided to save up and try to move there by next summer. We both will be attending school and working (she's 21 and i'm 20).

Here's my questions:

1.)We would like to live in a somewhat safe area and not pay an outrageous monthly rent. (perhaps somewhere in the $800-1200 range) Will it be possible to find anything in this range in a somewhat decent area?? I've found some places online in Harlem, Washington Heights, Brooklyn, etc..but i've heard not so nice things about these places in the past. Do you have any suggestions of areas?

2.) Is it reasonable to think that after moving there we could both finds jobs, jobs that would give us enough money to live in new york? How's the job market?

We're just two young florida girls who want to move to the city and live up our dreams. Any help/suggestions/ideas would be great!! I feel so lost right now, and the internet doesn't seem to be providing as much information as I'd hoped.

(p.s. this fourm has helped me a lot though!):D

ryan
August 30th, 2006, 11:02 AM
$800-$1200 is a bit low. Brooklyn's a big place - can you be more specific?

There are lots of jobs - people move here all the time and make it, so I'm sure you can too. It might be kind of hard, but if you really want to be here, you'll make it happen.

arh30
August 30th, 2006, 04:25 PM
$800-$1200 is a bit low. Brooklyn's a big place - can you be more specific?

There are lots of jobs - people move here all the time and make it, so I'm sure you can too. It might be kind of hard, but if you really want to be here, you'll make it happen.

One place I found was at "park place at nostrand ave & bedford aves"..And I keep seeing a bunch in Harlem also. I hate to sound so clueless about these neighborhoods, but in general what are your thoughts on them? Is it reasonable to think I could live there safely? I've lived in some pretty bad areas before but I don't want to get myself into any bad situations either.

It's possible that we might look for a more pricier place. We are both willing to do what it takes to make it and I know that we can. I just don't know where to start up there.

We will be visiting the city in december..any reccomendations of places to look or visit would be great too.

lofter1
August 30th, 2006, 05:36 PM
Look for places somewhat close to subway stops -- they'll no doubt be a bit pricier but come winter those few extra blocks can get ya.

nydreamer83
September 3rd, 2006, 08:46 PM
Hello fellow future New Yorkers--

I intend on moving to NYC as soon as a job situation works on..quite soon..

ive browsed through alot of the topics..but didnt see this unusual question...forgive if i skipped it....coming from PA, where the cost of living is around 20% LESS....and tax situation is different...would anyone be able to estimate a typical weekly salary after taxes? for $35k a year, or $45k, or even $55k a year? maybe even $65k? give or take..my industry's salaries are all over the place...i have no dependants or anything else that affects how taxes are taken out...thanks for any info...you guys are quite helpful

ryan
September 4th, 2006, 10:41 AM
Salary.com might give you some useful information (but it's self-reported, so don't take it too seriously). I wouldn't know how to guess at an average salary, and my mom taught me not to talk about money, so...

I know people who are happy with $20k and people who make 6 figures and complain about being broke.

nydreamer83
September 4th, 2006, 11:19 AM
hi Ryan,

thanks for your response..

its not about being happy, its about paying my bills in FULL on TIME!! haha...thats all...hopefully i get a salary that makes that possible..i dont live an extravagant lifestyle...so we shall see...thanks!

ryan
September 5th, 2006, 11:35 AM
I'm a bit confused about all these salary/cost of living questions. We're all just random people who live in NYC - we're not statisticians or relocation professionals. I could tell you salary ranges for my field, but I don't think you should listen to my (or any other random forumer's) uninformed guess at the median income in NYC. I suggest you look at job postings in your field, or find a forum or professional organization's site in your field to find useful information.

In general, you'll get better answers to specific questions like "what are rent ranges for Astoria?" For general information, please start at page one of this thread and read through - there's been dozens of posts on lots of threads about decent neighborhoods.

justin
September 17th, 2006, 07:13 PM
Hi ,

I'm starting a new job at Fordham in January and am just starting to look for a convenient 1BR apartment. I'm looking for a safe neighborhood with good local food shopping, within easy walking distance or subway/Metro North ride from Fordham's Bronx campus. I'd appreciate getting some idea of what neighborhoods to look at, what price range to expect, and how to go about finding an apt. online.

Thanks,
justin

ablarc
September 18th, 2006, 09:27 AM
I'm starting a new job at Fordham in January...
How are professors' salaries these days?

justin
September 18th, 2006, 04:31 PM
Fancy bumping into you here, ablarc! The salaries are pretty good, given that you work ~10 hrs a week and have a 3-month vacation. Relative to NYC rents, though...

justin

ablarc
September 18th, 2006, 11:52 PM
^ You need a wife to support you.

Glad you're finally making it to New York. I detected a certain yearning...

surferjackie
September 19th, 2006, 06:50 AM
Hi all,

I'm so glad to have found this forum as so many of my questions have been answered.

I'm planning to move to NYC from Honolulu, Hawaii, in February next year. I'll be receiving my MBA in marketing and I'm hoping to find a job that's related to my degree. Several questions:

- Is it worth it to line up interviews in the week before Christmas or is it better to just save the money and move out there in February without a job and start looking when I get there? (Ticket and accomodation for that week will cost me more than $1000)

- Is it gonna be difficult getting a job in the marketing/PR industry for a fresh graduate with not much work experience?

- I have excellent references from landlords here in Hawaii. Is that good enough to find an apartment without employment verification/paystubs/guarantors etc?

Thanks in advance for all your help!

Jackie

Rob73
September 23rd, 2006, 12:18 AM
Here is the link to a web site with excellent resources on finding an apartment in New York City; Manhattan, The Bronx, Queens etc. It also offers advice on preparing to search for your apartment.

http://www.apartmentrentalnewyorkny.info (http://www.apartmentrentalnewyorkny.info/)

tha_monsta
September 27th, 2006, 12:07 PM
Hi all

I've read through the past 40 pages of this thread and found it very helpful -- thanks to all who have shared their knowledge.

I am considering taking a job in NYC in the next 1-3 months. The job would be on Madison Ave. and pay right around $100,000.

I would love to live in Manhattan, but I have a wife and a new baby to support. From what I've read, $100,000 might not go too far.

I'm willing to live anywhere that would allow me to be within an hour commute of work via public transport. I enjoy culture and theatre, but my family has to come first. I also like diversity and urban lifestyle.

I think I'll probably rent for a while to get a feel for things, and then maybe consider buying if it's at all possible.

I'd appreciate any suggestions on cities/neighborhoods within an hour of the city with decent prices. A good elementary school would be nice too.

Thanks very much.

Schadenfrau
September 27th, 2006, 12:53 PM
You are a prime candidate for Park Slope, my friend.

mjsmjs
September 28th, 2006, 03:37 PM
Hi. Im 26 and just got a job in western nassau county on long island. Rather than live in that area I am considering moving somewhere in Queens or Brooklyn and commuting east. Anyone ever done this? Have any reccomendations about neighborhoods that would be nice for someone my age? Thanks

antinimby
September 28th, 2006, 09:36 PM
What sort of commuting are you doing, auto or trains?

If you are driving, I suggest you go with Queens instead of Brooklyn because the drive will be tough.

If you plan on taking the LIRR, then Brooklyn is a possiblity.

As for BK and QNS neighborhoods, they can't be categorized according to age groups as you have asked about. Ethnic and racial groups are the predominant differences bet. the neighborhoods. There are a few exceptions of course but generally that is the case.

OmegaNYC
September 28th, 2006, 10:27 PM
Another Rule. Stay off the BQE. You don't wanna get caught there during rush hour.....

MrSpice
September 28th, 2006, 11:53 PM
Hi. Im 26 and just got a job in western nassau county on long island. Rather than live in that area I am considering moving somewhere in Queens or Brooklyn and commuting east. Anyone ever done this? Have any reccomendations about neighborhoods that would be nice for someone my age? Thanks

Forest Hills, Rego Park or Kew Gardens areas of Queens - close to Long Island and relatively nice

penetrode
September 29th, 2006, 09:24 AM
Hello all!

I know this has probably been touched on many times, but here it goes...

I'll be moving to NY next November ('07). I will be staying with a friend in the city until I find work. I am an accountant and I don't think it'll be too difficult to find work. As soon as I get settled in with a job, my girlfriend will be re-locating to NY as well. As soon as we find a place to live, she'll be looking for a job (commericial real estate)

Few Q's
I'll be looking for places to live in and around les, hells kitchen,chelsea

550-600 Sq ft with small dogs allowed. I'm expecting depending on the location an average of $2100????

Any pointers or suggestions would be much appreciated!

Thanks guys!

ryan
September 29th, 2006, 10:54 AM
Hi. Im 26 and just got a job in western nassau county on long island. Rather than live in that area I am considering moving somewhere in Queens or Brooklyn and commuting east. Anyone ever done this? Have any reccomendations about neighborhoods that would be nice for someone my age? Thanks

"Cool" neighborhoods for your demographic in Queens include Long Island City, Jackson Heights & Astoria.

Front_Porch
September 29th, 2006, 01:37 PM
one of the few actual cities on Long Island, racially and economically mixed, lots of young people (especially in the West End), beautiful beach, bit of a surfer/party vibe.

milleniumcab
September 30th, 2006, 12:29 AM
Forest Hills, Rego Park or Kew Gardens areas of Queens - close to Long Island and relatively nice

I agree and add Middle Village to them... Good commute east, if driving ...Driving back home could, once in a while, be tough though...

BRT
September 30th, 2006, 11:26 AM
Any pointers or suggestions would be much appreciated!

Thanks guys!

I'd suggest that you start by just getting an idea of the kind of stuff that's out there. Search broker sites like corcoran and citihabitats, search craigslist, etc.. How familiar are you with the city? It might also help you to look at new york mag, village voice, etc.. to get info on neighborhoods. And depending on your familiarity level, taking a trip up for 2-3 days at some point for no purpose other than just exploring neighborhoods would be great.

You're still a loooong way from needing to make decisions on housing. Rental stock moves quickly. Plan on having a place no more than a couple of months prior to your ultimate move date, a month or inside is usually even better. But you also need to be prepared to usually make a decision on the day you see an apartment, they are rarely on the market long.

If you have a couple of weeks and a place to stay, you can find a place without a broker. It just takes a little bit more legwork and savvy. Another broker-less option is to go for one of the really big apartment buildings that have their own leasing office; drawbacks here are that this limits your choice, the buildings are generally less interesting, and not bargain-priced compared to similar spaces so arguably some of the broker expense is folded into the rent. But if you have more money than time, a broker helps. I used one for this reason, and I'm glad I did, I got a great place with limited hassle.

You should have your job lined up prior to beginning this search, for a couple of reasons. First, landlords generally want to see that you gross at least 40x or so the monthly rent. Second, it makes a big difference on the commute. If you're working around columbus circle, the east village might as well be in another state; parts of hell's kitchen can equal hellish commute for parts of MTE.

For the neighborhoods you listed and apartment description you can realistically find something for $2100. $2500 would increase your options. Another neighborhood to consider with ample stock in this price range is Yorkville. It's not the most transportation convenient neighborhood in the world but there are a lot of amenities, and the apartments are in the same price range as HK/LES. But going back to the earlier point, if you're working on the west side of the city, Yorkville could make for a really unpleasant commute.

Best of luck!

daver
October 2nd, 2006, 04:38 PM
In response to some general questions about taxes and whatnot, I can offer the following: I live in NYC (SI) and work in NJ currently. I make low six figures. I claim four deductions. For withholding I have 13.1% fed tax, 6.2% socsec tax, and 1.45% medicare. I assume these would be the same anywhere. I also have withheld 5.8% NY state tax, 3.35% NY city tax, and 0.9% NJ SUI/SDI tax. These are decently in excess of what I paid for similar taxes in Phoenix AZ.

Other things to consider besides housing costs:

* Sales tax is 8.25%. This is not much more than PHX, but is lot more than it is in other parts of the country. Sales tax is more freakly and inequally applied out here than in other places I have been, however. For instance, in what I understand to be an effort to stop people from fleeing to NJ to buy clothes, you can currently buy reasonably priced clothes in NYC and pay NO sales tax.

* Many everyday items you use will cost more out here. Like I mean everything. Make sure you figure that into your equations.

* If you are planning on going sans auto, make sure you plan for transit costs. Buses and subways in NYC are $2, and you can transfer about. This is a good deal. Express buses from say Staten Island to Manhattan are $5, no transfer. Buses in NJ can be pricey. I can commute from the Staten Island railway over the ferry and to anywhere in Manhattan for $2. I catch a bus from Times Square to NJ for $3.10. This costs me a total of $10.20 per day round trip. The same trip via auto costs me between $11.40 and $16.40 per day in tolls, plus fuel and upkeep, insurance and whatnot.

* Auto insurance in NYC is pricey. You can get deals if you search A LOT. Even deals are pricey. Many insurers don't even want to write policies in NYC. There is a reason for this. Make sure to go on Geico.com or progressive.com or whatever you like if you are planning on insuring your car out here to at least get an idea of what you are in for.

* If you want to play, ya gotta pay. There are many very cool free things to do in NYC. There are also a lot of very expensive things. If you have a family, costs can add up quick. Make sure you are leaving some cash in your budget.

* Schools out here are good and advanced. If you are transferring kids from other parts of the country, be prepared for them to possibly be behind and need some catch-up.

Well, gotta catch the bus, at least a few things off the top of my head. :D

Lance
October 5th, 2006, 05:02 PM
I'll be moving to NY at the end of the year and working in the Grand Central Station area of Midtown. I'm looking for areas of the City to explore as places to live the next time I take a trip up there.

I have a non-working wife and baby and a job that is pretty back end loaded for compensation. I would like to be relatively close to work (commute wise) because I'll be working long hours and want to spend as much time with my family as possible.

I've explored areas of Manhattan and pretty much decided that I'd like to live in the UWS if I can find something. However, I've decided that I need to start looking at other areas outside of Manhattan too in the event I can't find what I want in the UWS.

I've looked a bit at Park Slope and would appreciate some help on finding other family friendly areas with a relatively decent commute to Midtown. Any suggestions? Looking for strollers and family friendly activities versus an active social scene. Thanks.

Schadenfrau
October 5th, 2006, 05:16 PM
Try the Yorkville area of the UES. You will be working on the east side, right? The commute across town is a pain.

Front_Porch
October 5th, 2006, 05:32 PM
(Disclosure: downtown r.e. agent, mostly Chelsea and the Village)

You might want to try Battery Park City, too: lots of playground and similar family (dad works on bonus job, wife is SAHM) situations.

ali r.

Lance
October 5th, 2006, 05:33 PM
I've read a little about the Yorkville area but not much. I'll check it out. Yeah, I'll be working on the east side...close to Grand Central Terminal.

Didn't realize the commute would be tough from UWS to that part of town. Is it a pain b/c you have to switch trains?

Schadenfrau
October 5th, 2006, 05:40 PM
It's a pain because no trains run from east-west/west-east anywhere above 42nd Street.

You could always switch to the 7 at 42nd, but the lack of cross-town trains uptown is a drag.

AJ25
October 9th, 2006, 01:12 PM
Hi,

I'm a Dental ceramist and am looking to move to the city or a nearby suburb(subway it into work).

Does anyone know anbody who owns/works in a Dental lab or any good agencies that focus on this area?

Also if i were to work in the city but live in a suburb, can anyone recommend anywhere that would be a good family place and easy train into the city?

Thanks:D

Schadenfrau
October 9th, 2006, 01:29 PM
The subway doesn't run outside of the city limits, so if you were living in a suburb, you would be taking a commuter train.

Would you be looking to buy or rent in the suburbs? Would you have a car? How many children do you have? What would you be willing to pay?

Sorry to bombard you, but we need more specifics.

AJ25
October 9th, 2006, 03:15 PM
No children at the moment, rent at first, anything up to $2,500 pm, may have a car

Schadenfrau
October 9th, 2006, 03:57 PM
I wouldn't worry about living in a family-oriented neighborhood if you don't have children right now. For that amount of rent, you'll definitely be able to find something within city limits, and near, if not in, Manhattan.

AJ25
October 10th, 2006, 12:36 PM
Excellent.

Does anyone know anyone who works in or owns a dental lab?:D

NYC244
October 11th, 2006, 10:49 PM
i do not have questions as i already moved 4 yrs ago(almost),but would like to share my little story.
well,i 've been living in calif since the end of the 80's and i have never really expected to live anywhere else.untill 2001.in fact,untill the sept,11th of 2001-to be exact.i have no clue to this day,what made me wanna move to nyc after i saw this terrible thing happened.it's like someone told me that one day i will be part of this beautiful city...
so with time passing by i became very interested in ny,always finding myself looking at the ny pics.one day(8 mos after my thought crossed my mind)my ccousin invited me to come and visit.and i did.i remember ,after we lended on jfk,and when pilot said-if this is youe home-welcome home and if you're here to visit,have a pleasant stay-i wished to be one of those in the first group,welcomed home..and i just knew that next time i will lend,i will be at home.i knew,one day ,this will be my home.i stayed one week and went back to cali.i had a job there,friends,long term partner-father of my kids and everything...but i just wanted to leave all that and come to ny,which means-start everything from zero.
it took me crazy few mos to plan everything,i went through a lot of stress,trying to get cust. over my kids because my bf wouldn't let me leave and it took me a lots of sleepless nights ,lotsa nerves but i made it.i moved to ny just few mos later.and i did lend the second time to jfk and was welcomed home as i wished for.
today, i am here,i have a nice job,my family is here,my kids...people i like and cherrish are here...i love ny.i love the city...and i am so happy i decided to break away...something i have lost,but i have gained much more...so my advice to all of you who truly wanna come here and stay for good-do it.you won't regret.this city is extremely lovable...and when you get to know him,you'll never trust those people who talk negative and complain about well known ny attitude.
by the way i am new to this forum so hello to everyone.straight from the bx!

NYC244
October 11th, 2006, 10:53 PM
Not all of the BX is crime ridden. The north Bronx is nice and diverse. Good Luck! :)

yes!i live by jacobi med ctr and it's just beautiful here!

NYC244
October 11th, 2006, 10:54 PM
Public schools in the East Bronx are fine. The troubled schools are mostly in the south and central portions of the Bronx. There are excellent public schools in Morris Park, Throgs Neck, Pelham Bay and Country Club, which are all nice, safe East Bronx neighborhoods.

ps 108 is very good and in nice area.my daughter goes there.

jwolf2277
October 12th, 2006, 11:44 AM
Moving to new york in a year or so. I have a few questions. Im currently 23. Living in Ohio. Im wanting to move to new york in the next year to year and a half. I will have about 7000-10000 saved by then. No debt. Here are my questions.

Where is the best place to even start looking for a job? I do have a associates degree in business management (might also get a minor in networking by then) from miami university. I should also a certificat in personal training by this time. What should I expect when it comes to jobs with my degree? I work with a computer dispatch program so im pretty good with a computer (the basics no programming stuff). Is it easy to just come out there and find a job or does it take some time?

I still have time to research living there and the expenses so no questions about that yet. My biggest concern is finding a job that will pay the bills. Dont need all the expensive stuff (no car, or eating out all the time).

Thanks for any help.

antinimby
October 12th, 2006, 03:58 PM
jwolf, it's all about job experience.
Without it, it'll be tougher.
Work on that.
Don't wait till you get here to look, try applying months before you get here.

$10,000 won't last very long in this city. You might want to look into sharing an apt. with roommates.


Welcome to the forum, NYC244.
Those are very encouraging words. :)

summergurl18
October 15th, 2006, 03:14 AM
Hi,
can any of you guys help me with this.
i'm living in south africa, and turning 18 soon,
I wanna move to nyc, how do you sujest i get a green card?
more so, if i wanted to come to new york city to work like
internships, waitressing etc, do you know how i can do that?


thanks

NYC244
October 15th, 2006, 02:37 PM
GREEN CARD IS a big of a problem...once you get that,everything else is easy..i guess.

couplefromtexas
October 16th, 2006, 07:59 PM
Me and my wife are thinking of relocating to NYC to attend school. Can anyone give us advice on if we will be able to find something for 1500 or less in Mnahattan. All the links I can find to rental buildings are way out of our price range. Im sure there are good deals out there, any help on how to find them would be appreciated.

Also what parts of town would you advise to avoid looking at?

lofter1
October 16th, 2006, 08:27 PM
If you're really lucky you might be able to find a sublet for that amount -- but most likely that would be through friends or associates as anything at that price level will get grabbed up quickly.

Front_Porch
October 17th, 2006, 10:02 AM
You'll be able to find one-bedrooms in that price range in "Upper Manhattan" -- North of 110th Street. Neighborhoods to look at include Harlem, East Harlem, Washington Heights and Inwood. Transportation and safety can be issues — just check out some of the debate on this board over Harlem — so be sure you visit before you lease.

ali r.
{downtown broker}

kliq6
October 17th, 2006, 11:34 AM
1500 or less will put you in Washington Height and parts of harlem, good luck

ryan
October 17th, 2006, 12:17 PM
This should really be in the moving to NY thread (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=5632&page=42).

sarah t
October 17th, 2006, 07:04 PM
hi, looking for a little insight here....

I will be graduating with my masters in elementary education in December. I am looking to move to NYC to teach sometime during the spring months. how hard (or easy??) is it to get a job in an elementary school? I know there's a lot of shortage areas (mostly in high school areas) that are looking for teachers, but what about at the elementary level? I have been working in daycare for about 4 years but no actual experience teaching in a "real" school yet.

also--if you get hired, do you have any say in which school you will teach in or do they just place you wherever? what are some good elementary schools? i'm thinking somewhere in the greenwich village area or even brooklyn... greenpoint area.

thanks!!!

NunoLinhares
October 20th, 2006, 09:33 PM
Hi,

I just signed a contract with the US-branch of my company. This is a dutch company (www.tridion.com) which opened an office in NY last march. We're doing great, making plenty of money, etc.

This means I'll be moving to NY in January, but I have no clue how stuff works in the US, so I'm looking for advice in:
- Finding a decent bank, which allows me to do international money transfers through the Internet
- Finding a decent place to live in (I'll be making small 6 digits a year, so I hope I can rent a decent place for 30 - 40% of my salary)
- General stuff for Europeans moving to US: other europeans' experience and things I must be aware of

TIA

Nuno

milleniumcab
October 21st, 2006, 12:55 AM
[quote=NunoLinhares;126654]Hi,

I just signed a contract with the US-branch of my company. This is a dutch company (www.tridion.com (http://www.tridion.com)) which opened an office in NY last march. We're doing great, making plenty of money, etc.

This means I'll be moving to NY in January, but I have no clue how stuff works in the US, so I'm looking for advice in:
- Finding a decent bank, which allows me to do international money transfers through the Internet[quote/]


My bank is Commerce Bank and I love it. Friendly service that's available 7 days a week.. They have free online banking and I don't see why international money transfer should be a problem.. You better ask them just to make sure

- Finding a decent place to live in (I'll be making small 6 digits a year, so I hope I can rent a decent place for 30 - 40% of my salary)[quote/]


Let's assume you will be making $120,000.00 per year...30% of that is $36,000.00... If you are willing to pay $3,000.00 a month to rent a place in NYC, you will have a nice place to live in..

- General stuff for Europeans moving to US: other europeans' experience and things I must be aware of[qoute/]


In USA, it is customary to tip people who provide you a service...Proper tip is anywhere from 15% to 20% and even higher for exceptional service...:D

milleniumcab
October 21st, 2006, 01:02 AM
^^^Darn it, why was I not able to disect my comments?. Can anybody help me one more time..Ablarc, Ninja hedge or anybodyelse, what did I do wrong?...

NunoLinhares
October 21st, 2006, 04:30 AM
Thanks milleniumcab, 3000/month is pretty much my target for rents.

I'll start looking around for places on the net and will be flying in and out of NY until the end of this year, so I'll have the time to check out a few places before I move in.

The tips are something that - at least - are clearer in the US than here. In Europe you don't _have_ to tip anyone, but nevertheless it is expected in some countries while in others not, so it's really a mess.

Thanks again!

Nuno

lofter1
October 21st, 2006, 08:47 AM
^^^Darn it, why was I not able to disect my comments?. Can anybody help me one more time..Ablarc, Ninja hedge or anybodyelse, what did I do wrong?...

one way to do it is to cut & paste the quote / unquote stuff ...



^^^Darn it

and ...


disect my comments?

(If you click "reply" on this it will reveal how it looks )

Front_Porch
October 21st, 2006, 11:35 AM
Hi,

I'll be moving to NY in January, but I have no clue how stuff works in the US, so I'm looking for advice in:
- Finding a decent bank, which allows me to do international money transfers through the Internet

- Finding a decent place to live in (I'll be making small 6 digits a year, so I hope I can rent a decent place for 30 - 40% of my salary)
- General stuff for Europeans moving to US: other europeans' experience and things I must be aware of


I second the Commerce Bank recommendation, they're pretty wonderful.

Your expectations for rent are way too high. Landlords will probably want you to earn 45-50 times your monthly rent; while 40% of your income as rent might be feasible, it's unlikely anyone would take you as a tenant.

Also, an NYC landlord is going to need to run your credit. Go to www.irs.gov and look up the instructions for applying for an ITN, which you'll use to file American taxes and which landlords will also use for a credit check in place of a Social Security Number.

good luck!

ali r.

Lance
October 21st, 2006, 06:23 PM
Does that 45 -50X only include salary or would they also consider signing bonues, guaranteed year end bonuses, etc?

Front_Porch
October 21st, 2006, 08:10 PM
Does that 45 -50X only include salary or would they also consider signing bonues, guaranteed year end bonuses, etc?

It's not one firm line in the sand, but a shifting standard. It depends, first, on who the landlord is. Are you dealing with a straight apartment rental or a sublet of an existing co-op or condo?

Secondly, this sounds spamish, but on a small deal the broker might matter. I can get a landlord who works with our firm a lot to soften his or her standards a little, if we otherwise present a good package.

Thirdly, it's ok to discriminate against foreign nationals. I just worked with a Canadian client and found that she got a lot of cold shoulders despite good credit, solid employment contract, lovely interviewee. And visa status matters: some foreign nationals are considered better risks than others. So I just wanted to advise the original poster, a foreigner, that he or she will have to meet stricter standards than an American would.

For an American, I'd say quick rule of thumb is that signing bonuses don't count, but guaranteed year-end bonuses do.

But, fourthly (is that even a word?) I think that standard would shift depending upon employment. Although it is a violation of city law to discriminate on basis of occupation, if a lawyer and a banker go after the same apartment, the landlord might tilt the playing field however she or he had to so that the banker would win.

ali r.
{downtown broker}

g-baby
October 24th, 2006, 10:42 PM
hey,whats the story,i am new here so give us a chance:) i am 24 and from Dublin,Ireland.i was thinking of moving to NYC soon and looking for advice on jobs.i am an electrician but don"t want to do that in NYC,just wanted to know how hard it is to get a job in a bar if u do not have a lot of experiance or what other jobs are handy to come across.Thanks:cool:

milleniumcab
October 25th, 2006, 07:32 AM
hey,whats the story,i am new here so give us a chance:) i am 24 and from Dublin,Ireland.i was thinking of moving to NYC soon and looking for advice on jobs.i am an electrician but don"t want to do that in NYC,just wanted to know how hard it is to get a job in a bar if u do not have a lot of experiance or what other jobs are handy to come across.Thanks:cool:

There are quite a few lined up for pubs. What is wrong with electrician?...

lofter1
October 25th, 2006, 09:43 AM
A good conscientious electrician is always in demand.

But then so is a good conscientious bartender ...

g-baby
October 25th, 2006, 10:54 AM
been an electrician for 5 years now just wanted to try something different,i am not just looking to work in a bar,i would work at any job that was handy to come across.Also i am trying to get a visa but they are very hard to obtain,some people have told me to just go without one,just wanted to know what u think of this?,thanks a lot for your replies to my other question:cool:

countdrak
November 1st, 2006, 10:00 AM
I am moving from a small midwest town to NY for work. I will be working in Harrison NY in westchester county, and my wife might be getting a job in manhattan.

We don't know or cant decide where to live. My top priority is safety and rent in the range of $1000-1500. Everyone I talk to has a different opnion. I would also want to keep my car.

Some people suggested living in manhattan , so atleast one of us is close to their jobs. Some suggested NJ, others Queens. That pretty much covers everything!! Couple of places I was looking at were in Forest Hills , Astoria Queens. Or White Plains in westchester county. I was told I could drive from Queens to Harrison because i will be going against the traffic and will be fairly close to the city. I have some family in forest hills, hence I picked it in Queens.

I am totally confused any help would be great. What would be the best place for us, safety, rent and commute in that order.

easyide
November 3rd, 2006, 01:40 AM
Hey all, I've noticed this has become a very popular thread here on Wired New York. I'm also very interested in moving to NYC. When? Well that has yet to be discussed.
Since I've seen so many people with the same questions and plans I just started a group on Yahoo! just for people like us. This group I feel can be a great starting point for all of us who are SERIOUS about making the move to the great NYC. I'll be the first to admit, the group looks a little raw right now, but I encourage people to join and if anybody wants to help me out with ideas and what not, let me know.

I figured it'd be kind of fun if a few good people could come up with a solid plan to move out. A set date, place, roomates. Hey, maybe you'll be able to find your future roomate in the group, maybe you can meet up and share the costs of moving out there.

I know it may sound like I'm moving fast here, but I really think this could be a good thing. If you know anybody thats in this similar situation encourage them to join. If you know of other message boards online similar to this post the groups address on there.

So lets get this going, join up, let me know what you think!

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/nyc_relocation/

Stugots315
November 3rd, 2006, 11:23 AM
Wow what a task it can be with moving to the NYC area! I have searched this thread and found some great info but I would like to ask some more specific questions that perhaps somebody could give me some guidance on. First I will be working a block away from the empire state building. Now I have been told that I should look to live in Jersey City, White Plains, or New Rochelle. Perferably I would like to live in a Italian neighborhood where the rent is not astronomically high. I am just looking for a safe place to get started in and then move from there. Any recommendations would be greatly appreciated!

Thank you in advance!!!

ryan
November 3rd, 2006, 11:59 AM
Somebody more knowledgable can tell you about Arthur ave in the Bronx, which is apparantly the more vital Italian-American neighborhood in the city. You could also look around Graham Avenue in Williamsburg. It's overpriced, but you might find a deal.

NYC244
November 3rd, 2006, 01:36 PM
YOU'RE wrong about arthur ave in the bx. long time ago-yes...vital italian neighborhood,but today-you can count italians by fingers on your hands...:mad:

Somebody more knowledgable can tell you about Arthur ave in the Bronx, which is apparantly the more vital Italian-American neighborhood in the city. You could also look around Graham Avenue in Williamsburg. It's overpriced, but you might find a deal.

Schadenfrau
November 3rd, 2006, 01:38 PM
Why does that make you angry enough to post an emoticon, NYC244?

It's not an Italian-majority neighborhood, but there are certainly more than ten Italian-Americans living there.

PiNk
November 3rd, 2006, 04:01 PM
Wow, this forum has answered quite a few questions and brought up new ones in my mind. I'm currently living in Birmingham, Alabama and want to eventually move to New York. My boyfriend is not as enthusiastic about the idea but I know he'll come around. Anyways, I'm not really concerned with safety of the area because my city is listed as number six on the 25 worst crime cities. And everywhere is subject to atleast a little crime. I do want a descent neighborhood and I'm completely aware I won't be finding any cozy little three bedroom two bath homes like I live in now. However as far as appeal of the apartments I've been looking at on craigslist, everything seems so much nicer than what you would get down here, so that kinda makes up for the steeper prices.
Anyways my questions are this-I have two cars and realized it wouldn't be logical to bring both but I would still like to bring one-is it worth it? Or is transit just the best way to go? How is parking? And I keep hearing there's wifi access everywhere there-is that true? Can you literally just open up your notebook and have internet? I'm not real clear on the whole wifi thing even though my laptop has it-the only place around here with wireless internet is starbucks and the drivethrus there are just so much more appealing...
Also, how bad is my southern hospitality going to be taken there? I have a force of habit to saying yes ma'am and sir. My boss whose from upstate new york finds this hilarious.
I have many more questions but I won't bug you all with them right now.

lofter1
November 3rd, 2006, 09:31 PM
... I have two cars and realized it wouldn't be logical to bring both but I would still like to bring one-is it worth it? Or is transit just the best way to go? How is parking?

Leave the cars down south. You can always bring ONE up here later. It will be an unneeded expense and huge headache. Lots of posts in various threads about the nightmare of cars in NYC.




... how bad is my southern hospitality going to be taken there? I have a force of habit to saying yes ma'am and sir. My boss whose from upstate new york finds this hilarious.

We might find it hilarious, too -- but in a good way. Good manners certainly won't get in your way. (And will probably get knocked out of you after a couple of months in NYC, anyway).

ablarc
November 3rd, 2006, 09:40 PM
Good manners certainly won't get in your way. (And will probably get knocked out of you after a couple of months in NYC, anyway).
New Yorkers like to make this claim, and it was once true. Times change.

I live in the South, and I find New Yorkers are now as courteous as Southerners. (And deep down they're friendlier, you might eventually find.)

Myths die hard when they're carefully tended.

milleniumcab
November 5th, 2006, 04:31 AM
Anyways my questions are this-I have two cars and realized it wouldn't be logical to bring both but I would still like to bring one-is it worth it? Or is the transit just the better way to go? How is parking?

Let me welcome you to NYC, whenever you decide to move.. Cars are nothing but trouble here, so leave them there for now and see how it goes..

And also, I drive a cab and get to chat with many tourists from all over. Most think New Yorkers are friendlier than they've heard. So don't worry, you'll fit right in....

mikewazowski
November 13th, 2006, 11:04 AM
Hey everyone

I'll spare you the details but I've recently split with my long-term partner and am really looking to get away.
I went to New York city for a week in September and immediately fell in love with the place. I so desperately want to go back I was thinking about going again for a week with a mate over the Christmas period, but unfortunatley I am unable to get the time off work.

I know it's only been a couple of months since I came back from New York so naturally I would still be suffering from the sentimental side of missing the holiday, but something is different here. Everytime I think about the city I get depressed and just want to be back there. Even when I was with my girlfriend I used to harp on about it, much to her dismay. I always felt there was something missing in my life and now that we have seperated I feel the time has come to make that step in my life and to finally fulfil a secret life-long dream.

Ideally I'd like to convince a mate to come out with me but I am prepared to go it alone if need be.
I have a pretty well paid job here in the UK but do not have much money saved at all at the moment. I have been forced to move back in with my parents so hopefully that will give me the opportunity to save some cash. I'd be looking to stay out there for about 6 months to a year. Obviously get a job but as it wouldn't be long long-term I would not be too worried about career prospects. Just something that pays the bills and gives me enough money to do my own thing in the big apple. Obviously I have not set my sights on living in Manhatten, I'd prefer to relocate to the surrounding boroughs. The cheaper the better in my book but with a sensible distance to NYC.

I'm basically looking for any advice anybody is willing to give me, apart from that I will need to get a green card first. Please reply here or feel free to email or MSN me - all my details should be listed on this forum. It would be great to hear from native New Yorkers or anyone who has spent a lot of time and has a great knowledge of living in the city. It would also be good to speak to a fellow English person who has already done, or is thinking of doing the same thing and already has a few things up their sleeve.

Thanks for your time and I look forward to hearing from you

TarAldarion
November 13th, 2006, 11:24 AM
Hello evryone

My name is Aldarion im 22 yrs old and live in Oslo, Norway.
Im planning on moving to NY and live a couple of years(Maybe forever) and have some (many) questions.:confused:

1.What is the average rent prize on a appartment in NY.(about 40-50Squaremeters). is Queens close to manhattan. sounds like a nice place there.i pay about 1200$ in oslo

2.How much to buy an appartment in same size.(Costs about US700.000-800.000$ in Oslo)

3. And if i want to buy can i get a loan in US or do i have to take up a loan in Norway.

4. How is the job market in NY? is it easy to get jobs there as a chef or cook (is educated cook).

5.Whats the average salary per. month.(i earn about 3500$a month wich is 20$an our)

6. Were do i apply for an work permit. (US embassy?)

7. How much does it cost too live in NY (food, taxi, subway, electrisity, etc.) in average a month.

8.and lots of other questions.......

plz just give me whatever info you have, that you think i should know about because i know pretty much nothing.

Thank you......

Aldarion:)

And also, im sorry for my bad writing. talk much better then i write.
And how about taxes?

lofter1
November 13th, 2006, 12:22 PM
welcome to wny, tar ...

your writing in english is far better than 99% of what any of us could do in norwegian ;)

I suggest you try "search" for apartments / salaries / etc., as there a a lot of threads on those topics and you'll probably find that the information is already here, waiting for you to discover it.

ManhattanKnight
November 13th, 2006, 12:30 PM
You can find information about US immigration and work permit requirements at the US Oslo Embassy web site: http://www.usa.no/

TarAldarion
November 13th, 2006, 12:50 PM
[quote=lofter1;130538]welcome to wny, tar ...

your writing in english is far better than 99% of what any of us could do in norwegian ;)

quote]

HEHE guess so but then again you guys don´t learn Norwegian in school:)

TucsonMedic
November 13th, 2006, 07:33 PM
Hi everyone!

I am planning on moving to NYC in the early spring and have been looking for information on jobs/salaries/apartments. I am currently a medic in tucson and I have a BS in Criminal Justice. Thinking about applying with NYPD or maybe just continuing to work as a medic......not sure trying to figure out which would pay more. Not sure if any one knows a little more about these types of jobs in NYC any information would help! Thanks!

antinimby
November 13th, 2006, 11:37 PM
I believe the starting salary for new recruits in the NYPD is very low. Something like below 30K for the first year.

Not sure what medics make, but would think you should be able to make more than that since it looks like you've got experience.

Schadenfrau
November 14th, 2006, 08:48 AM
Are you talking about EMS? You'd make more as a cop after the first six months.

TarAldarion
November 14th, 2006, 12:34 PM
need some answers on previous post!!!!

TucsonMedic
November 14th, 2006, 01:15 PM
Are you talking about EMS? You'd make more as a cop after the first six months.

Yeah EMS........ I checked out the NYPD website and they start at 25 and then after 6 months move up to 32! that is way low especially since the cost of living is so much higher there........ I dont expect the EMS salary to be anything great either :( I am just worried I am not gonna be able to live on that kind of salary there.....unless all i do is work tons of overtime!

anyone know about other law enforcement agencies in the area maybe like the port authority police so i can look up more information?

antinimby
November 14th, 2006, 05:05 PM
I would think that the PA would pay better but there's less of them and may be tougher to get into.

antinimby
November 14th, 2006, 05:25 PM
need some answers on previous post!!!!There were answers to your work permit question, read again.

OK, I'll try my best with your other questions.


1.What is the average rent prize on a appartment in NY.(about 40-50Squaremeters). is Queens close to manhattan. sounds like a nice place there.i pay about 1200$ in osloI'm not sure about rent but 40-50 sq. metres is the equivalent of 430-530 sf.

Others here can give you a better answer.

Yes, Queens is part of the city of New York and is very close by. It is just across the East River from Manhattan. You can take the subway or drive across bridges/tunnel. You can also look at Brooklyn as well.


2.How much to buy an appartment in same size.(Costs about US700.000-800.000$ in Oslo)You can find studios and 1 bedrooms, even new ones, for that price in NY.


3. And if i want to buy can i get a loan in US or do i have to take up a loan in Norway.Better to get one in Norway.


4. How is the job market in NY? is it easy to get jobs there as a chef or cook (is educated cook).Try to look for a job before you get here. Use online sites to look for openings and apply.


[5.Whats the average salary per. month.(i earn about 3500$a month wich is 20$an our)That sounds pretty similar to what one might get here.


6. Were do i apply for an work permit. (US embassy?) This was answered a few posts back.


Thank you......

Aldarion:)

And also, im sorry for my bad writing. talk much better then i write.
And how about taxes?Taxes are high but I'm sure you are used to it being from Europe. Your English is very good, I understood everything you were trying to say. Good luck and come back here to ask more questions if you need to. :)

ManhattanKnight
November 14th, 2006, 05:39 PM
need some answers on previous post!!!!

Please read the 2 that have already been posted. As a general matter, US law does not permit Norwegian nationals (or persons from most other countries) to come here to find employment, with or without a "work permit." Generally speaking again, that is possible only when the foreign person marries a US citizen, has some other family connection with this country, is sponsored by a US employer that can prove that it cannot find any US citizens who are qualified for a job position, or wins one of the very few openings in the annual "DV Lottery." This country used to welcome immigrants; sadly, it no longer does.

antinimby
November 14th, 2006, 05:41 PM
This country used to welcome immigrants; sadly, it no longer does.Legal ones. Illegal ones just walk across. :D

ManhattanKnight
November 14th, 2006, 05:44 PM
Legal ones. Illegal ones just walk across. :D

If he can do that from Norway, he probably has a skill set sufficiently unique to permit him to enter legally.

antinimby
November 14th, 2006, 05:47 PM
Well for Tar, he would just come over on a visitor's permit and not return. Find a girl/guy, get married and then he/she can get a green card. Many have gone this route.

antinimby
November 14th, 2006, 06:54 PM
This might answer a few of the questions about the avg. cost of an apartment in Manhattan.


******************************

November 14 (http://www.therealdeal.net/breaking_news/2006/11/14/1163549303.php), 7:08 pm

Report: high rents, ultra-low vacancy rates in Manhattan


New numbers for October from real estate firm Citi Habitats show high residential rents and low vacancy rates across Manhattan. Borough-wide, the average apartment rented for $2,863 a month.

Soho/ TriBeCa had the highest neighborhood rents by far, with spots in those neighborhoods renting for an average of $4,316 a month, making them far more expensive than even Chelsea and the West Village, where rents averaged just over $3,200 per month. Bargain hunters should head north--- way north-- to Harlem, where the average apartment rents for just $1,754 a month.

That said, good luck trying to move anywhere at all. Vacancy rates are incredibly low in Manhattan at just 0.80 percent. Finding one of those pricey apartments in SoHo/TriBeCa or the West Village, the data show, is almost mathematically impossible. By Tim Moran


Vacancy Summary October, 2006
Vacancy
Neighborhood Rate
BPC / Financial Dist. 0.61%
Chelsea 0.66%
East Village 0.69%
Gramercy 0.56%
Mid-Town East 1.21%
Mid-Town West 0.80%
Murray Hill 1.25%
Soho/Tribeca 0.37%
Upper East Side 0.89%
Upper West Side 0.86%
West Village 0.35%
Overall Vacancy 0.80%

Copyright &#169; 2003-2005 The Real Deal.

mikewazowski
November 14th, 2006, 07:33 PM
Hey

Didn't get a response from any of this but that's grand, it's kind of busy on here.
Is there anyone that can help me or could you point me in a better direction to post this?


Thanks


Hey everyone

I'll spare you the details but I've recently split with my long-term partner and am really looking to get away.
I went to New York city for a week in September and immediately fell in love with the place. I so desperately want to go back I was thinking about going again for a week with a mate over the Christmas period, but unfortunatley I am unable to get the time off work.

I know it's only been a couple of months since I came back from New York so naturally I would still be suffering from the sentimental side of missing the holiday, but something is different here. Everytime I think about the city I get depressed and just want to be back there. Even when I was with my girlfriend I used to harp on about it, much to her dismay. I always felt there was something missing in my life and now that we have seperated I feel the time has come to make that step in my life and to finally fulfil a secret life-long dream.

Ideally I'd like to convince a mate to come out with me but I am prepared to go it alone if need be.
I have a pretty well paid job here in the UK but do not have much money saved at all at the moment. I have been forced to move back in with my parents so hopefully that will give me the opportunity to save some cash. I'd be looking to stay out there for about 6 months to a year. Obviously get a job but as it wouldn't be long long-term I would not be too worried about career prospects. Just something that pays the bills and gives me enough money to do my own thing in the big apple. Obviously I have not set my sights on living in Manhatten, I'd prefer to relocate to the surrounding boroughs. The cheaper the better in my book but with a sensible distance to NYC.

I'm basically looking for any advice anybody is willing to give me, apart from that I will need to get a green card first. Please reply here or feel free to email or MSN me - all my details should be listed on this forum. It would be great to hear from native New Yorkers or anyone who has spent a lot of time and has a great knowledge of living in the city. It would also be good to speak to a fellow English person who has already done, or is thinking of doing the same thing and already has a few things up their sleeve.

Thanks for your time and I look forward to hearing from you

DEBLOMBARDO
November 15th, 2006, 10:01 AM
Hi- If u need any help regarding an apartment- do get in contact
with Stephanie Wallace- a wonderful Brit herself who is working
wonders in Manhattan- she'll get u the best apartment at the best
price and I'm sure she can offer u the proper advice and point u in the
right direction for all your questions:)

She's the manager of a wonderful property management company
over on East 78th- they offer loads and loads of quality apartments
without any broker's fees at all-

I should know as I am a colleague of hers who can also offer you
great apartments should u decide on a wonderful Queens apartment
once u get set:)

Best of luck in your endeavors!

Deb 917-567-7458
Stephanie 212-517-3000

DEBLOMBARDO
November 15th, 2006, 10:13 AM
Just to let u know- here are the basic prices as well:)

In Queens; gorgeous totally new studios run from $995.
1 BR $1100 and up
2 BR $1550 and up

In Manhattan; wonderful studios run from $1595 and up
1BR $1695 and up
2BR $2195 and up

Hope that helps:)
So now that u see the prices- call one of us to get any more info to help
u along:)

Deb 917-567-7458
Stephanie 212-517-3000

TarAldarion
November 15th, 2006, 10:30 AM
Just to let u know- here are the basic prices as well:)

In Queens; gorgeous totally new studios run from $995.
1 BR $1100 and up
2 BR $1550 and up

In Manhattan; wonderful studios run from $1595 and up
1BR $1695 and up
2BR $2195 and up

Hope that helps:)
So now that u see the prices- call one of us to get any more info to help
u along:)

Deb 917-567-7458
Stephanie 212-517-3000

do you think you could send me some info on various appartments in queens.
prized under 1200$ maybe som pictures and info about the neighborhood?

if you can send me a mail on:comaksel@hotmail.com.

for you others that answered my post, thanks a lot!!!!!!!!!

i pay 36% in taxes in norway is it about the same in the US?

daver
November 15th, 2006, 11:00 AM
i pay 36% in taxes in norway is it about the same in the US?
On your stated income of $42k/yr I would say that income tax here will be lower than 36%. We do also have a sales tax here on many items, I don't know if you have that in Norway.

lofter1
November 15th, 2006, 11:42 AM
Also consider that Health Insurance coverage is VERY expensive in the USA and may not be included in your work package ...

daver
November 15th, 2006, 12:06 PM
Also consider that Health Insurance coverage is VERY expensive in the USA and may not be included in your work package ...
True. My current health insurance plan for my family costs more than my rent for the first time in my life. Health care costs are really out of control.

Disco Man
November 15th, 2006, 01:15 PM
I previously mentioned in one of the threads of considering to come and work in NYC for one of the major hotels. After reading what you folks opinion on the salary and advice from Daver, it appears that $42k per year won't get me much play in NYC. I would probably end up struggling to budget the salary for all my expenses. (I would be laughing if I'm getting that now in Australia, as I could be living large. This means able to afford your own apartment and enjoy a good lifestyle.)

So my question is this, what's the salary range that a person needs to be able to live in NYC comfortably? :confused:

(I mean able to rent your own apartment, go out for movies once in a while and able to buy nice clothes, go clubbing etc.)

daver
November 15th, 2006, 01:39 PM
You can live in NYC on $42k. I believe I said that it would be difficult to live comfortably in MANHATTAN on $42k. What kind of tastes do you have? Are you comfortabe living in a 300 sq. ft. studio, or will you be looking for a 1 bedroom? Are you comfortable taking mass transit, or will you be wanting a set of your own wheels (highly NOT recommended in NYC)? Are you looking to live alone, or will you share the rent with others?

Samson
November 15th, 2006, 03:51 PM
My wife and I are moving to NYC. We have a 2 1/2 year old son and a dog. Any suggestions on neighborhoods for a family would be greatly appreciated. We were thinking of a neighborhood in Brooklyn. We can spend 3500.00.

ryan
November 16th, 2006, 12:01 PM
For $3500 you could live anywhere you like. I'd guess close to a park. Park Slope is an obvious suggestion (and apparently has good public schools so you could stay a while). You could afford a very swanky brownstone apt in Ft. Greene, where I see more kids than any other park. If you like the vibe, you could afford a very nice place in Williamsburg close to McCarren park (which has two dog runs).

Disco Man
November 17th, 2006, 07:24 AM
You can live in NYC on $42k. I believe I said that it would be difficult to live comfortably in MANHATTAN on $42k. What kind of tastes do you have? Are you comfortabe living in a 300 sq. ft. studio, or will you be looking for a 1 bedroom? Are you comfortable taking mass transit, or will you be wanting a set of your own wheels (highly NOT recommended in NYC)? Are you looking to live alone, or will you share the rent with others?

I would definitely want to live by myself. I don't mind whether its studio or 1 brm, as long there's enough room to move around. I wouldn't mind taking transit but not living too far away from Manhattan, I wouldn't want my own car either.

Yeah, I am a pretty classy person. So I would like to be able to go watch movies, go to gym, go clubbing and taking girls out on a date.

So to be able to do all these, how much salary would I need to be able to live happily in New York?

Front_Porch
November 17th, 2006, 10:04 AM
how much salary would I need to be able to live happily in New York?

For "happily," I'd try to keep rent at 25% of salary. So if you are planning to spend $2500 on a studio in Manhattan, "happily" = $120K; $1500 on a one-bedroom in Jackson Heights, "happily" = $72K, etc.

So you would be perfectly "happy" on your $42K if you could keep your housing costs to $850 a month, which puts you in a big studio or a small one-bedroom in a decent neighborhood in The Bronx.

ali r.
{downtown broker}

daver
November 17th, 2006, 10:31 AM
Ali- I notice that you calculated your percentages on gross income as opposed to net income. Is that standard in the real estate industry? Do you generally take into account the large differences in net income due to say the high taxes in someplace like NYC, or the home care costs that are much higher for a family than a single person? Obviously I, as a consumer, have to take these costs into account, I'm just curious as to whether the real estate (and loan) industry generally pays any attention to anything other than gross income.

operant.behavior
November 18th, 2006, 04:30 PM
Okay, so.

I'm your run-of-the-mill nineteen-year-old writer willing to suffer for her art. (Really, I just want to move back east to be closer to my family - Utah's a wasteland, and I'm lonely, besides.)

I don't have a college degree yet, and I'm wondering if it's even feasible to live in New York.

I'm not picky about neighborhoods. I would prefer to live in a cheaper area, personally, because I'm not used to the high life; I have friends in Queens and Brooklyn, and I like the atmosphere just fine. I don't mind roommates, sharing my space or even sharing a room with two or three others. I don't mind public transportation at all. I don't have a spendy lifestyle. I never go out, I'm not very social, and I'm very much a minimalist.

But even so, I'm wondering if I could possibly support myself in New York. Any input?

Schadenfrau
November 18th, 2006, 05:00 PM
I'm sure you could, but you'd be wise to get your degree first.

Front_Porch
November 18th, 2006, 08:22 PM
Ali- I notice that you calculated your percentages on gross income as opposed to net income. Is that standard in the real estate industry?

No, but using percentages of gross income is easiest for people who haven't yet lived in NYC, and thus don't yet know their tax structure, to comprehend.

If you're buying, banks will lend you more than that -- the "old standard" was a bank would let you spend 28% of your gross on housing costs, and in these days of the Wild West I've found that you can push them to 35%.

And while I've lived at spending 35% (even 50%) of my gross income on housing, in my experience when most people go over 25% they start to feel house-poor.

ali r.
{downtown broker}

krulltime
November 18th, 2006, 09:15 PM
Okay, so.

I'm your run-of-the-mill nineteen-year-old writer willing to suffer for her art. (Really, I just want to move back east to be closer to my family - Utah's a wasteland, and I'm lonely, besides.)

I don't have a college degree yet, and I'm wondering if it's even feasible to live in New York.

I'm not picky about neighborhoods. I would prefer to live in a cheaper area, personally, because I'm not used to the high life; I have friends in Queens and Brooklyn, and I like the atmosphere just fine. I don't mind roommates, sharing my space or even sharing a room with two or three others. I don't mind public transportation at all. I don't have a spendy lifestyle. I never go out, I'm not very social, and I'm very much a minimalist.

But even so, I'm wondering if I could possibly support myself in New York. Any input?


Well there used to be a place in Brooklyn where you could be around with people similar to your situation (*cough!*Williamburg*) but it has become too expensive. Ofcourse there are other places in the city though. You will find something I am sure.

antinimby
November 18th, 2006, 10:47 PM
operant.behavior, I get the feeling that you will find New York more affordable than others because you seem to be very flexible with your living situation.

Rooming with other people will cut down on the high cost of living here in the city. It really is just the rent that's expensive.

Other than that, food, clothes, stuff, transportation, etc. are comparable with other places.

You can also go to college here in the city. The colleges and universities I would say are more well known and prestigious than what you may find in Utah.

Go to school, work part-time/full-time - many have made it in New York doing this.

antinimby
November 18th, 2006, 10:52 PM
Hey
Didn't get a response from any of this but that's grand, it's kind of busy on here.
Is there anyone that can help me or could you point me in a better direction to post this?
ThanksNoticed no one replied to your post.

Anyway, after reading your other post, it appears that you would like to bring someone over with you to live in New York.

As you know, the U.S. has a very strict immigration policy. While I'm no immigration lawyer, I believe you would have to marry a U.S. citizen or at the very least, a resident who has a green card.

Since you are looking for a mate, why don't you come over on a visitor's visa and look for a mate here?

There are plenty of available singles here in New York and if you do meet that someone special, then you two can get married and you'd get your green card. :)

Disco Man
November 19th, 2006, 09:12 AM
For "happily," I'd try to keep rent at 25% of salary. So if you are planning to spend $2500 on a studio in Manhattan, "happily" = $120K; $1500 on a one-bedroom in Jackson Heights, "happily" = $72K, etc.

So you would be perfectly "happy" on your $42K if you could keep your housing costs to $850 a month, which puts you in a big studio or a small one-bedroom in a decent neighborhood in The Bronx.

ali r.
{downtown broker}

Thank you for replying to my post, it gives me a good idea on what salary range I need for the lifestyle I want in New York.

$850/month doesn't sound too bad for one bedroom apartment in Bronx. The only concern I would have for living in Bronx is that it doesn't sound like a safe place to live as lots of forum users here feel that its a dangerous area to live in.

I agree with what you said about spending 25% of the total income on housing because if I end up spending about 50% of my income on housing, I would definitely start feeling poor. But if it means I can live by myself in a nice high rise, I would be pretty ok with it. Because I would spend lots of time in my castle rather than going out.

Thank you for replying my post, your advice is greatly appreciated. :)

Schadenfrau
November 19th, 2006, 02:21 PM
There are lots of fine neighborhoods in the Bronx; I live there, myself. Don't let people who have no idea what they're talking about scare you away from anything.

ThisIsntMyRealName
November 19th, 2006, 03:10 PM
SchadenFrau, you live in the Bronx? Is it Riverdale? I never knew that about you. What's your background?



There are lots of fine neighborhoods in the Bronx; I live there, myself. Don't let people who have no idea what they're talking about scare you away from anything.

sebanc
November 20th, 2006, 03:56 AM
We are thinking of moving the NY sometime in the the next 6 months.

I'm trying to figure out what places I should be looking at, or more appropriately, should NOT be looking at.

Basic info:
Me, my wife, and a baby.
Household income between 60k-75k.

We're looking for safe, first and foremost (I know, I know, NY is safe, etc. but some areas are less safe than others. We want to avoid those places).
Affordable.
A do-able commute (hour or less).

We would really prefer to own (condo, house, etc). I've been looking online and it looks like there are places in the 200k-300k range. Are those going to be in sketchy neighborhoods?

We don't really care how interesting the neighborhood is, as long as it's safe and relatively quiet.

From reading on this forum, I gather places like Bay Ridge, Forrest Hills, etc. are nice. What other places are good for families, or what neighborhoods are wise to avoid?

One more thing: No one ever brings up Staten Island; what are some neighborhoods to consider there (and which ones to avoid)?

Thanks.

daver
November 20th, 2006, 08:55 AM
One more thing: No one ever brings up Staten Island; what are some neighborhoods to consider there (and which ones to avoid)?
There are of course always exceptions, but in Staten Island I would try to stay south of SIE, avoid pretty much anything North Shore, especially Stapleton and the stuff around there. In general, the farther south the better, like Great Kills or below is where you will find a lot of nice family neighborhoods. I just had to move again and I considered Tottenville, Pleasant Plains, Prince's Bay, Huguenot, Annadale, Eltingville, and Great Kills. That isn't to say there isn't decent stuff farther up, There are some very nice family oriented neighborhoods in New Dorp, for instance. Also consider how you are planning to get to work, it was important to me to easily be able to get on the train, so I only considered neighborhoods along SIR. The South Shore schools are generally very good, I have four boys in school, two in primary and two in intermediate.

Schadenfrau
November 20th, 2006, 09:32 AM
SchadenFrau, you live in the Bronx? Is it Riverdale? I never knew that about you. What's your background?

I live in Port Morris, the southernmost section.

What exactly do you mean about my background? Race? Education?

ThisIsntMyRealName
November 20th, 2006, 03:11 PM
I live in Port Morris, the southernmost section.

What exactly do you mean about my background? Race? Education?

Yes, how about your age, sex, race, and education?

Schadenfrau
November 20th, 2006, 03:32 PM
I'm 30, female, and white. I have a BA from a liberal arts college, and I work as a magazine editor. There are plenty of people with similar demographics living in the borough, and not just in Riverdale.

operant.behavior
November 20th, 2006, 04:32 PM
operant.behavior, I get the feeling that you will find New York more affordable than others because you seem to be very flexible with your living situation.

Rooming with other people will cut down on the high cost of living here in the city. It really is just the rent that's expensive.

Other than that, food, clothes, stuff, transportation, etc. are comparable with other places.

You can also go to college here in the city. The colleges and universities I would say are more well known and prestigious than what you may find in Utah.

Go to school, work part-time/full-time - many have made it in New York doing this.

That's the plan. Frankly, schools out here are miserably underfunded and poorly respected. It's just not the quality of education I'm looking for. Going out of state right now isn't an option, considering the tuition, so my thought is to move, work long enough to be considered in-state and complete my degree.

Jobs, on average - what's normal for pay? Out here, it's not uncommon to work for a minimum wage of 5.15, and I know that wouldn't support me back east. Unless I've made some horrible miscalculations, I should be able to get by on nine dollars an hour, and I believe I'll have a job waiting for me. But on the off-chance I don't, would you happen to know what's commonly acceptable for jobs not requiring a degree?

Thank you so much for the insight. I appreciate it. Moving halfway across the country is nerve-wracking at best.

sebanc
November 20th, 2006, 04:50 PM
There are of course always exceptions, but in Staten Island I would try to stay south of SIE, avoid pretty much anything North Shore, especially Stapleton and the stuff around there. In general, the farther south the better, like Great Kills or below is where you will find a lot of nice family neighborhoods. I just had to move again and I considered Tottenville, Pleasant Plains, Prince's Bay, Huguenot, Annadale, Eltingville, and Great Kills. That isn't to say there isn't decent stuff farther up, There are some very nice family oriented neighborhoods in New Dorp, for instance. Also consider how you are planning to get to work, it was important to me to easily be able to get on the train, so I only considered neighborhoods along SIR. The South Shore schools are generally very good, I have four boys in school, two in primary and two in intermediate.

Great. Thanks for the quick response.

antinimby
November 20th, 2006, 06:01 PM
operant.behavior, there are many odd jobs that you can do.

Since you said you were a writer by heart, I would suggest that you should look into working in any field that would later help you with your career.

Without credentials, you might want to work for little pay and just try to get experience that way.

Offer to work for free and then you can get a foothold into the industry.

New York is a leader in printed media, news media, publishing, marketing, etc.

You couldn't have found a better place to live if you're an aspiring writer.

The other thing I wanted to suggest is if you plan on going to college here, you should think about going to a public college for the first couple of years and then transfer to a university to get your degree.

As you know, this will be much cheaper and since the employer will only care about your degree, the fact that you went to a public college the first few years will be irrelevant.

Schadenfrau
November 21st, 2006, 12:00 AM
I'm sorry to say it, but I have to disagree, Antinimby. Publishing employers tend to place great weight upon where you went to school, and CUNYs probably will not cut it.

If you want to be a writer, go to the best school that you possibly can. I've never heard of anyone who cares about the difference between colleges and universities, other than Canadians. Unless you're going to an Ivy League school, the best education for writers tends to come from liberal arts colleges, not state universities. I certainly don't personally support that opinion, but that's what I've seen. Reputable publishing companies generally won't be allowed to hire an intern who's not enrolled in college, and they don't tend to hire CUNY students, either. It's unfair, but true.

Frankly, I wouldn't advise anyone interested in publishing to move here without a degree. It is a very old-school industry, and has little tolerance for dreamers, or aspiring anythings. That's certainly not a romantic notion, but, contrary to popular belief, the field is anything but romantic.

ThisIsntMyRealName
November 21st, 2006, 12:04 AM
I'm 30, female, and white. I have a BA from a liberal arts college, and I work as a magazine editor. There are plenty of people with similar demographics living in the borough, and not just in Riverdale.

You surprise me more and more everyday, SchadenFrau!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

coolwata34
November 21st, 2006, 09:56 PM
ok soo heres the situation.. im currently deployed to afhganistan with teh national guard. butmy fiance and my self plan on moving to new york ( astoria... queens etc) upon my return ... she has a degree as a paralegal and im a certified personal trainer.. bank roll is pretty high seeing i havent had to pay for anything in the past yr ... looking at around 15-20 g's no joke. u guys think the probability of a nice apt and good jobs is very likly. we are both 21 yrs old and really love the city been dreaming of moving there for a while... we are not brining a car with us or any other bills but cell phones .. thanks

ryan
November 22nd, 2006, 10:17 AM
coolwata, you're in a great position to move here. Aside from your impressive savings, you both have skills that are marketable here, and a decent apartment will be no problem. You'll have an easier move than most. Good Luck.

coolwata34
November 22nd, 2006, 11:43 AM
coolwata, you're in a great position to move here. Aside from your impressive savings, you both have skills that are marketable here, and a decent apartment will be no problem. You'll have an easier move than most. Good Luck.


thank you for the response Ryan, my main concern is that i will be going there with out a job and finding a job is obvioiusly a first priority, what burough(spellcheck) lol, do u think would be most suitable, mind u credit aint perfect but im sitting at ruffly a 650, and to my knowledge of searching for apts in new york that they want decent credit. do u think there is any way around that? thanks

daver
November 22nd, 2006, 11:53 AM
thank you for the response Ryan, my main concern is that i will be going there with out a job and finding a job is obvioiusly a first priority, what burough(spellcheck) lol, do u think would be most suitable, mind u credit aint perfect but im sitting at ruffly a 650, and to my knowledge of searching for apts in new york that they want decent credit. do u think there is any way around that? thanks
I have been told that not all landlords check credit, I have run into ones that will take a larger security deposit against lower credit score.

As to what borough, what are you looking for out of a neighborhood, what size place do you want, and what are you willing to spend a month would be questions to get started.

coolwata34
November 22nd, 2006, 12:04 PM
As to what borough, what are you looking for out of a neighborhood, what size place do you want, and what are you willing to spend a month would be questions to get started.[/quote]


well for a apt im looking for a decent size bedroom that i can fit a queen bed in .. moderatly sized living room that can hopefully also have a little table and chairs in for dinner like a dinning room / living room combo lol.. i like everything with in walking bikeing and running distance..love takeing the subway. i wont have a car soo my fiance and my sef plan on getting the monthly subway passes. as far as spending wise.. i m thinking around 2000 a month max.. cause figure hopefully we both land decent jobs(she alread y ahs a pretty god oppurtunity witha firm ) and we wanna be able to enjoy the luxuires and expenses as well as the time at home
thanks

pittnurse
November 24th, 2006, 12:19 PM
Hi all!

First i want to thank all of you for your expert advice. I always have loved nyc from the first time i visited it. i understand the extreme expense and am just looking to open a new chapter in my life that will be as enjoyable and challenging as college. I will be a graduating nurse in May and am looking to make the big move. My questions are endless but i'll just ask a few. Are there any nurses that have any opinions and suggestions as to the best hospital to work at in the city? I am looking to work in the ER, day or evening shift, have tuition reimbursement, and have a close proximity to a subway. Right now, i am moving with my best friend who is a retail and marketing major. I was looking into living in Queens, specifically Astoria or Long Island City. Anyone live there currently and have opinions? How social are those areas? I konw manhattan will be the hub of acitivity, but if we just wanted low key do astoria or LI city offer any social outlets :) How is the metro situaiton at night? How long of a commute would it be from Queens to the upper east side? I appreciate any and all help. We are two single fun girls who are just looking to make some good memories and friends. HAPPY post TURKEY DAY!

~JULIE

kimokao
November 24th, 2006, 04:28 PM
Hello! And thank you so much for this awesome resource... i've gained so much more insight on this huge subject.
I was hoping for a little but of help and advice.
Here's my situation, i'm 19 and looking to move to new york sometime in the spring. I'll be moving with my best friend and we'll both try to become actors. Between the two of us we'll have 15k saved.
Before today i had relatively little grasp on the boroughs and their relationships,
1. where would 2 young struggling actors be best situated in the city? I was thinking something on the east side, but now there seem to be tons more places to choose from. We'd like a place relatively close to the theatre districts (i'm still not sure what these places are)
2. How should we go about finding housing? I've been checking out craigslist every other day for help... but i'm not sure on how to actually go about getting a place. We might stay at a YMCA for a week. And we do have a few friends there who could help us scout. Advice?
3. Any other advice!?

I've been to the city twice and i'm in love with it. Trying to become theatre actors, NYC is the best place to be so i've heard.

Thank you so much for reading this, any help or advice would be greatly appreciated! :)

milleniumcab
November 24th, 2006, 07:41 PM
Hi all!

First i want to thank all of you for your expert advice. I always have loved nyc from the first time i visited it. i understand the extreme expense and am just looking to open a new chapter in my life that will be as enjoyable and challenging as college. I will be a graduating nurse in May and am looking to make the big move. My questions are endless but i'll just ask a few. Are there any nurses that have any opinions and suggestions as to the best hospital to work at in the city? I am looking to work in the ER, day or evening shift, have tuition reimbursement, and have a close proximity to a subway. Right now, i am moving with my best friend who is a retail and marketing major. I was looking into living in Queens, specifically Astoria or Long Island City. Anyone live there currently and have opinions? How social are those areas? I konw manhattan will be the hub of acitivity, but if we just wanted low key do astoria or LI city offer any social outlets :) How is the metro situaiton at night? How long of a commute would it be from Queens to the upper east side? I appreciate any and all help. We are two single fun girls who are just looking to make some good memories and friends. HAPPY post TURKEY DAY!

~JULIE

Hi Julie,

Stick with Astoria as you have better options of transportation and it is a little better neighborhood than LIC and it offers much more social activities...
I am not a nurse but you will have no trouble getting a job since nurses are in high demand in NYC.. If you have enough experience you will get your pick of hospital too..

Good luck with everything..

lofter1
November 25th, 2006, 11:18 PM
I have been told that not all landlords check credit, I have run into ones that will take a larger security deposit against lower credit score.

This article makes me very glad I'm not apartment hunting (I'd never pass muster under these rules) ...

Only the Strongest Survive


http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2006/11/24/realestate/26cov.600.jpg
Illustration by Stephen Schildbach


nytimes.com (http://www.nytimes.com/2006/11/26/realestate/26cov.html?ref=realestate)
By TERI KARUSH ROGERS
November 26, 2006


ALTHOUGH qualifying to rent an apartment in New York City is not yet as tough as winning admission to Harvard or Yale, it increasingly feels that way to a large contingent of aspiring tenants — even if they actually attended Harvard or Yale and easily passed muster with their previous landlord.


Among the 50,000 background checks run this year on Manhattan tenants by On-Site.com, a national background-checking and leasing service used by some landlords and managing agents, fully 41 percent of applicants garnered a rating of either “reject” or “maybe” (21 and 20 percent respectively).


That means a fifth of would-be renters are being shown a different door than they had hoped, while another fifth struggle to upgrade their conditional status.


With paychecks lagging behind the 10 to 15 percent rent increases for market-rate apartments over the last year, many more would-be tenants fail to scale the standard annual income threshold of 40 to 45 times the monthly rent.


That means that if you want to rent a studio for $2,000 a month, you need to earn $80,000 to $90,000 a year (much higher figures, by the way, than the 36 times the monthly rent required in the rest of the country).


Renters who flunk the income test must prove themselves in other ways. Landlords are demanding extra cash up front, solid credit records and local guarantors who earn around twice the income threshold and are willing to bare their finances to both strangers and kin. Even then, a history of litigation against a prior landlord usually triggers automatic disqualification.


Landlords can afford to be picky, because vacancy rates have lurked beneath 1 percent for a year, according to figures provided by Citi Habitats. And they defend their standards quite simply: higher rents mean that more money is at stake if a tenant stops paying.


“It’s very pro-tenant here in terms of the courts,” said Gary L. Malin, the chief operating officer of Citi Habitats. To evict someone who isn’t paying, “it can take six months to go through the right legal process,” he said. “That’s six months of no rent.”


Unhappily for apartment seekers shackled with a housing court history, landlords usually slam the door. “It is the policy of 99 percent of our customers in New York to flat out reject anybody with a landlord-tenant record, no matter what the reason is and no matter what the outcome is, because if their dispute has escalated to going to court, an owner will view them as a pain,” said Jake Harrington, a founder of On-Site.com, based in Los Altos, Calif.


Around 15 percent of New York City applicants processed by On-Site.com have been involved in landlord-tenant court cases, a “drastically higher” figure than found elsewhere, Mr. Harrington said. Renters are presumed litigious if they stopped paying rent to a slumlord or even if they acquired a court record by mistake.


Jill Jordan, a Halstead Property agent, said she had a client who paid two months’ rent in advance before leaving on a lengthy trip. The landlord failed to account for it and filed a collection action against the woman that surfaced in a background check when she wanted to rent her next apartment. That triggered a demand for a bigger security deposit and requests for more financial information from her guarantor. He declined, and Ms. Jordan’s client had to walk away.


Countering a court record is difficult but not necessarily impossible. By law, it cannot be reported after seven years. For people who want a place to live now, not five years from now, an upfront confession with supporting documents can turn things around.


“More information is always helpful, as far as we’re concerned,” said Laurie Zucker, the vice chairman of the Manhattan Skyline Management Corporation, which manages 35 rental buildings in Manhattan. “There may have been a problem with the apartment like a leak. You never know.”


If you have any blemish on your record, smaller landlords may be more lenient, especially for renters able to pay more upfront. “You’ll have a much easier time dealing with them,” said Barak Dunayer, the president of Barak Realty.


He recommended seeking individual owners who are leasing condo units. “I can usually kind of talk them into it,” he said. “Whereas with those big landlords, I’ll be lucky if they return my calls.”


JoAnn Schwimmer, an associate broker at DJK Residential, agreed that smaller landlords tend to be less selective. “I want to say it’s because they haven’t been burned as many times,” she said.


Whether a landlord owns one or many dwellings, tight supply means he or she can aspire to renters with sterling credit histories. “Before, if you had bad credit, landlords would take either a guarantor or six months’ or a year’s security or rent upfront,” said Amy Herman, an agent at Halstead Property. “I see a lot less of that. They’re looking only for a person with good credit.”


Anita Ray, a 31-year-old merchandise planning consultant, thought her credit was good enough.


“I work so hard, I have a college degree, I make so much money, I have an incredible career, and I can’t rent a place,” lamented Ms. Ray, whose college run-in with credit cards cropped up like a cold sore during a fleeting apartment search this summer.


Ms. Ray said she had been a model fiscal citizen since graduation. But the managing agents of two no-fee luxury buildings downtown disagreed that her credit had been rehabilitated enough by a decade of good behavior. They demanded security deposits ranging from $5,000 to $10,000, despite Ms. Ray’s offer to produce an out-of-state guarantor and a very qualified local co-signer.


Ms. Ray balked. She chose to remain in her $1,700-a-month Upper East Side walk-up (whose landlord had required only a guarantor), an apartment she had found with the help of Ms. Schwimmer.


“It kind of makes you feel like you’ve done something wrong,” Ms. Ray said. “You feel like a kicked puppy or something. Now I’m looking to buy a condo. Not a co-op. I don’t want to go through this again.”


Even as credit history is increasingly viewed as an oracle of rentworthiness, too much reliance on it may handicap renters unjustly while painting an unrealistically positive picture for landlords.


One reason is that reports furnished by the three major reporting agencies may hold inaccuracies. Equally troubling for both landlords and tenants is credit bureaus’ scoring. Consumers are graded on a scale of 300 to 850, producing a so-called FICO score. But the score is geared toward creditors, not landlords — and creditors, unlike landlords, seek customers who carry interest-accruing balances on their loans and credit cards.


“So the most financially sound person is going to pay off their credit-card balance in full, but the best credit-card customer is not that person,” said Mr. Harrington of On-Site.com, which weighs FICO scores against factors like references from prior landlords, housing court history, length of employment and cash flow. Applicants with FICO scores below 650 receive closer scrutiny, but high scorers are not given a pass.


“We have people all the time with a 700 to 800 FICO score, but their landlord-tenant record is horrible,” said Mr. Harrington, citing a recent incident in which his company called the former landlord of a woman who had moved to New York from Georgia. Although her income and credit were excellent, her ex-landlord reported that she had not paid the rent for three months and abandoned her dog when she left.


“She had plenty of money,” Mr. Harrington said, “but she was a really irresponsible resident.”


Even with a dicey credit report, a would-be renter who has lived through extenuating circumstances — a divorce, for example — can be greenlighted.


“For some reason, when people go into a divorce, if it’s nasty, people stop paying their bills more often than not,” said Stephen V. Maschi, the director of leasing for Glenwood Management, which handles more than a dozen luxury buildings in Manhattan. “If it’s a housewife who wasn’t working, it depends on where she is in the divorce. If there’s been a settlement already and she’s getting support from her husband, we just look at that as income. If not, we ask for a guarantor.”


Smaller landlords who rely on brokers to screen applicants can get an incomplete snapshot, which opens a loophole for second-string tenants to squeeze through.


“A broker’s interest is most typically getting the deal done,” Mr. Harrington said. Brokers make up about 10 percent of his New York clients, he said, and they tend to request the least thorough (and least expensive) background check that On-Site offers.


Sometimes, too, a large security deposit or a chunk of prepaid rent, usually credited to the last months of a lease rather than the first, can offset deficiencies in credit, income or employment history.


Most landlords expect tenants to have worked at the same place for at least a year. Being between jobs is “kind of the worst thing ever,” said Jeff Vogel, a senior agent at Citi Habitats.


If a tenant’s record is less than blue chip, many landlords ask for a guarantor within easy litigation distance (defined as New York State, New Jersey and Connecticut) who earns anywhere from 60 to 100 times the monthly rent. But guarantors also tend to come in the form of parents — an infantilizing proposition for some renters.


“Unfortunately, when you try to rent in New York, you’re very dependent on your parents,” said Sarah Lux, a 24-year-old senior analyst for Stern Investor Relations, who recently rented her second Manhattan apartment. While her first landlord required only one guarantor for two roommates, the new one wanted guarantors for two of three roommates.


“It was really hard to get all of our parents together,” said Ms. Lux, “and it’s hard, too, because you’ve been living here a year and trying to make it on your own.”


Ms. Lux may be comforted by knowing that landlords apply similarly high standards to much wealthier tenants. Last year, Gretchen and David Weir sold their 10-room apartment on the Upper West Side for $6 million — their total investment was $1.3 million in the 1980’s. The Weirs — she is a freelance book editor, and he a substance-abuse counselor — sought a temporary rental while they looked for a smaller place.


Luis E. Vazquez, an associate broker at Coldwell Banker Hunt Kennedy, helped them and their two teenage children find a three-bedroom apartment for $10,000 a month. Yet because the Weirs didn’t earn $400,000 a year, their landlord requested and received a security deposit equal to six months’ rent.


Beyond requests for extra money and guarantors, many owners are tightening requirements on pets and roommates.


Some are also screening out tenants for various, often idiosyncratic reasons. Landlord repellents are said to include people with particular occupations, like lawyers (too litigious) and musicians (too loud).


But paroled murderers and sex offenders may sail right through. Counter to the national trend, most of the city’s landlords match applicants’ names only to terrorist lists, said Mr. Harrington of On-Site.com. Gaining access to New York State’s Balkanized criminal records costs an extra $60 and delays the application process by about a day, he said. And many landlords, he said, believe that most crimes don’t predict the risk of default.


For their part, brokers present a compelling case that their services pay off for anyone with a blip in his or her past, provided that the client finds the broker through a personal recommendation, rather than by responding to an online ad.


“Agents know their landlords’ preferences and are able to play matchmaker,” said Chad Thomas, an agent at Mark David & Company.


Brokerages sometimes curate lists of landlords who are more forgiving than others. Halstead’s includes Archstone-Smith, a real estate investment trust that owns 11 luxury buildings in Manhattan and applies the same comparatively relaxed tenant standards to its buildings nationwide, a tranquilizer in the high-strung New York market. “You shouldn’t have the same feeling in your stomach as when your dentist tells you that you need a root canal,” said Jack R. Callison, an executive vice president of Archstone-Smith.


For second-tier renters who can’t afford Archstone-Smith’s price of admission, the cold months are a strategic time to start an apartment hunt.


“It’s always good to look in November through January” — traditionally a slow period for rentals, Mr. Dunayer said. “Landlords have their properties sitting on the market longer and may be more accommodating to anybody who’s less than perfect.”


Copyright 2006 The New York Times Company

Front_Porch
November 26th, 2006, 12:01 PM
A nice piece, but a little bit disingenuous in some ways.

My first reaction is that negative credit info only tends to hang around on your report for seven years, so the woman who is ten years out of college probably didn't have a "run in with credit cards," she more likely had a bankruptcy.

My second reaction is to remind readers that housing discrimination based on employment IS AGAINST THE LAW in the five boroughs of New York City. Asking you for your income, or a guarantee of your income, or additional safeguards if you once ran out on your rent is fine; rejecting your application simply because you're a lawyer or a musician is not.

If you feel you've suffered this kind of discrimination, call 311 and report it.

ali r.
{downtown broker}

lofter1
November 26th, 2006, 06:34 PM
And God Forbid that you should try to enforce your rights in a situation with an intransigient landlord who fails to provide you with heat, services, repairs, etc.

Is it really the potential litigation that is feared?

Possibly the real fear is that you are a citizen who asks only that the contract between landlord and tenant be honored -- and probably have an understanding of the law to know that, in some cases, the only way to enforce your rights under the law (and thereby get the end of the bargain that a lease entails you to) is by taking action against a non-complying landlord / building owner.

Ali: Do you and your clients make any distinction based on specifics of landlord / tenant cases? Or are tenants with such history(s) all tossed into the same barrel?

Schadenfrau
November 26th, 2006, 07:24 PM
I've nothing to add, but just wanted to compliment Ali on being such a fantastic resource for these boards.

Front_Porch
November 26th, 2006, 10:54 PM
Schadenfrau, thanks for the compliment, I'm blushing (but I love it)!

Lofter, I don't think landlords fear litigation -- I think they fear not getting paid.

In NYC, where the system is notoriously pro-tenant, it can take months to evict someone for non-payment. During that time, the landlord's mortgage bills and heating bills don't stop coming. So landlords try to minimize non-payment risk at the one point where they have the most control -- which is at the point of filling the vacancy.

If you were a renter with a blemish on your record, I think the solution would be to focus on smaller buildings and to try and meet the landlord -- and to present your story. I have a tenant in the 'burbs who has pretty bad credit, and he 1) wore a tie when he was househunting, which showed me he took the whole thing seriously; and 2) informed me in advance that his credit would look poor, because he was a student and had huge loans.

He's been a great tenant, but if he'd been dealing with a big management company, his application never would have made it out of the pile.

ali r.
{downtown broker}

lofter1
November 27th, 2006, 08:42 AM
Understood ^^^

But to the question of a potential renter who has the "blemish" of a housing court record (which a renter will have even if the renter continued to pay rent in full but was forced to bring an action against a non-compliant landlord in order to get the landlord to comply with the terms of the lease):

Why should such a potential tenant be ruled as non-viable (which appears to be the general rule, as evidenced by numerous comments in the above article)?

Lance
November 27th, 2006, 10:32 AM
Good question, Lofter. I wondered the same thing. Why is the potential tenant automatically punished w/out any understanding of the facts of the dispute? Surely the lessee isn't always presumed to be the guilty party???

daver
November 27th, 2006, 10:38 AM
Good question, Lofter. I wondered the same thing. Why is the potential tenant automatically punished w/out any understanding of the facts of the dispute? Surely the lessee isn't always presumed to be the guilty party???
They flat out don't care. With a 1% vacancy rate they can generally afford the "mistake" of ruling out potentially good tenants, there are plenty more to take their place. That is why if you have such an action on your record, your best bet is to 1) be up front and preemptive about it with a description to any agent or potential landlord, and 2) probably steer towards smaller more personal places where they are capable of using their heads rather than the bigger "managed" types where they will likely follow their formula and kick you regardless of the circumstance. It just isn't worth the risk to them.

Legal and/or right doesn't always equal reality.

lofter1
November 27th, 2006, 12:28 PM
FYI regarding the BLACKLIST of potential renters with a record of Housing Court actions ...

Numerous tenants have been erroneously blacklisted by companies who collect and sell information to landlords -- thereby shutting out those tenants from housing options.

More on this HERE (http://www.tenant.net/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=1941&sid=0921a013b8701958e33f8e2d054c3d93) -- and below ...

A class action LAWSUIT (http://www.tenantreportsettlement.com/faq.php3) against one of those companies, First Advantage SafeRent, Inc., is in process ...


Frequently Asked Questions

Q. Why is there a lawsuit? What is the case about?

A. Plaintiffs have asserted claims against the defendant, FAS, for violations of FCRA, NYFCRA and GBL §349 arising of out the purported inaccurate reporting by First Advantage SafeRent, Inc. to its consumers of statuses of cases filed in the New York City Housing Court. FAS denies the allegations. You can find complete details about the lawsuit in the Settlement Agreement (http://www.tenantreportsettlement.com/settlement.pdf).

Q. How do I know if I am a Class Member?

A. You are a Class Member if you have been a respondent or defendant in a lawsuit commenced in a New York City Housing Court and were listed between February 26, 2001 and March 16, 2006 in FAS's court records database concerning such lawsuit.

Q. How do I know if I am a Qualifying Class Member?

A. All persons who were, to the best of FAS's knowledge and belief, the subject of a RegistryCheck™ Report between February 26, 2001 and March 16, 2006 that described the status of a New York City Housing Court action as "case filed," but for whom FAS had a disposition reported by the New York Unified Court System when it issued the report, and who do not opt out of the settlement will be Qualifying Class Members.

Q. What kind of programmatic relief does the Settlement provide?

A. A full description and details of the programmatic relief can be found at pages 9-13 of the Settlement Agreement (http://www.tenantreportsettlement.com/settlement.pdf). Briefly, the Settlement provides for certain changes in the format of FAS's RegistryCheck™ Reports, such as the addition of a disclaimer as to the use of Court Records, the change or deletion of potentially misleading information, and the addition of status descriptions for cases where no further action is taken by any parties.

... Additionally, FAS is instituting a new procedure whereby tenants can potentially get their court record completely deleted where the case didn't have merit, was brought in error, or any similar reasons. Again, please read the Settlement Agreement (http://www.tenantreportsettlement.com/settlement.pdf) to get a complete description of all the programmatic relief ...

conezone
November 30th, 2006, 12:14 PM
Hi there. I've read through every page of this thread and its been very informative. I just wanted to get a little advice specific to my situation.

I am 23 and will be moving from Boston to NYC with my girlfriend over the summer. By that time we will both have bachelor's degrees; hers in communications and mine in business. She is interviewing now and will most likely have a job lined up before we move. I will have to find one once we get there.

We both want to live in Manhattan but I'm not sure how realistic that is. I'm not sure what kind of salary each of us will make but I'm figuring we'll make around $45,000 to $50,000 each. Is it possible to find a nice 1 bedroom in Manhattan for around $2000-$2500? We could probably even live in a larger studio (at least 500sq feet) if we have to. I have good credit and although my girlfriend doesn't have any credit I know her parents would be able to guarantor if necessary. As far as neighborhoods I think we are pretty flexible. She will most likely be working in Midtown so the easier to get there the better.

Thanks in advance for any advice.

daver
November 30th, 2006, 01:10 PM
We both want to live in Manhattan but I'm not sure how realistic that is. I'm not sure what kind of salary each of us will make but I'm figuring we'll make around $45,000 to $50,000 each. Is it possible to find a nice 1 bedroom in Manhattan for around $2000-$2500? We could probably even live in a larger studio (at least 500sq feet) if we have to. I have good credit and although my girlfriend doesn't have any credit I know her parents would be able to guarantor if necessary. As far as neighborhoods I think we are pretty flexible. She will most likely be working in Midtown so the easier to get there the better.
It is _possible_, but not simple. Especially without employment. The guarantor will help, but not as much as if they were NY/NJ/CT. And what exactly do you mean by "nice"? Because if you are looking for a 24hr doorman, gym, and that sort of stuff, it definitely isn't going to happen at that price level.

A possible idea for you is to look at Queens, there are some nice areas there that you could get into. Some parts of it are a quicker trip to mid-town than parts of Manhattan are. Just something to think about.

conezone
November 30th, 2006, 01:29 PM
It is _possible_, but not simple. Especially without employment. The guarantor will help, but not as much as if they were NY/NJ/CT. And what exactly do you mean by "nice"? Because if you are looking for a 24hr doorman, gym, and that sort of stuff, it definitely isn't going to happen at that price level.

A possible idea for you is to look at Queens, there are some nice areas there that you could get into. Some parts of it are a quicker trip to mid-town than parts of Manhattan are. Just something to think about.

By nice I don't mean luxurious. I mean clean and comfortable; a place that has been renovated/updated within the last 15 years. I don't think it would matter if it was a studio or a 1 bed as long as we have close to 500 sq feet.

I also forgot to mention that I have about ten grand saved up (I'd like to hold on to as much of it as possible) that I can use while I'm looking for a job. I'm fairly certain I'll have a job within a month or two because I have some relatives that work in NY that are going to help me out.

Are you saying it makes a difference if the guarantor is not close to NY? Why is that?

daver
November 30th, 2006, 01:40 PM
Are you saying it makes a difference if the guarantor is not close to NY? Why is that?
They want someone within easy "litigation distance" that makes 60 to 100 times the rent. Read the article posted here: http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showpost.php?p=132495&postcount=714 Having said that, you _probably_ won't run into a problem with that. $10k is nice to have and will certainly help. Something to keep in mind though is that at the income level you are looking to live, it is less than two months expenses.

conezone
November 30th, 2006, 03:03 PM
They want someone within easy "litigation distance" that makes 60 to 100 times the rent. Read the article posted here: http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showpost.php?p=132495&postcount=714 Having said that, you _probably_ won't run into a problem with that. $10k is nice to have and will certainly help. Something to keep in mind though is that at the income level you are looking to live, it is less than two months expenses.

Thanks for the link. So if my girlfriend and I both have permanent jobs with a combined income of $80,000 to $100,000 and have an out of state guarantor do you think we will run into problems? Are there even 1 bedrooms in say the upper west side for $2,000-$2,500?

daver
November 30th, 2006, 03:26 PM
Thanks for the link. So if my girlfriend and I both have permanent jobs with a combined income of $80,000 to $100,000 and have an out of state guarantor do you think we will run into problems?
No, and you probably wouldn't need the guarantor in that situation.


Are there even 1 bedrooms in say the upper west side for $2,000-$2,500?
Er, not really. But you might could find something acceptable if you were willing to put some effort into looking for awhile.

The other thing I forgot to mention is to be prepared to spend up to 15% of the annual rent on a fee for an apartment. You can find no fee, or lower fee (like 1 month rent), but it seems like 15% is becoming more the standard, especially in Manhattan. That would be $3,600-4,500 at the rents you are considering. That being said, I didn't pay a fee at the last two places I've rented, although I did have to front load several months rent at the most recent one.

fishermb
November 30th, 2006, 06:42 PM
I'm a bit confused about places that are listed as "2br flex"...does that mean that these are really 1br apartments that can be converted to 2br? Does that usually mean a home office that can be used as a bedroom? Or does it mean turning your living room into a bedroom?

Front_Porch
November 30th, 2006, 08:48 PM
In New York City, a bedroom has to have a window. Period.

If a room has a windowed alcove, it is usually referred to as a "junior" version of the apartment class the size above it .. . a studio with a windowed alcove isn't a one-bedroom, but you could fake it by throwing up a wall, so that apartment would be marketed as a "Junior-1."

Kitchens are included in the New York City room count, so a bedroom, living room, kitchen and dining alcove, where the dining alcove is windowed, is a "Junior-4" because, again, you fake make it a four-room apartment by throwing up a wall. The family eats in the living room, at the coffee table or off a small additional table, and that walled former dining space becomes a home office or the baby's room.

I don't use the term "flex," but if I did, it would be to indicate a windowless space -- a home office, or, heaven forfend, a walk-in-closet -- that you could put a bed in.

So my guess is a "Flex 2" is somebody's brilliant attempt to sell you a big one-bedroom that doesn't quite qualify as a Junior 4.

Ask the lister how many rooms the apartment has currently, and see if they say 3, which would be living room, bedroom, kitchen.

You could put two separate people in such a space by cutting a rectangular living room in half, making the windowed end into a bedroom, and creating an interior windowless living room with just a sofa and a TV, but it wouldn't be pretty.

ali r.
{downtown broker}

fishermb
November 30th, 2006, 09:15 PM
Thanks Ali, I've been seeing a lot of great looking places but I was afraid that they were probably just big 1BR's that, like you said, could be made into a 2BR of sorts. I'm basically going to be looking for an apartment for 2 people in Manhattan for ~$2600. I've seen all these buildings on craigslist in the Financial District, Chelsea, and Murray Hill with doormen, elevators, gyms, for $2500-3000 that list "2BR," but I guess they're just possible conversions.

My roomate is checking some places out next week, so I guess they'll get a better idea of what it will be like, I won't be able to check them out personally until sometime in early January. We need a place for February 1st as my job will start around the 10th. My work is in mid-town (office building on the corner of Bryant Park), I know that's an area accessable by subway lines almost everywhere in Manhattan. If anyone has any suggestions, please let me know. It may sound stubborn, but I will only live in Manhattan. I'm moving from Florida and only planning to be in the city for a few years to get myself situated into my industry, so I want to make the most of my time, I really don't want to deal with any commuting. Same goes for Harlem and above, that commute won't be much quicker than LIC/Astoria. I know $2600/mo isn't much for 2 people, but I'm willing to be in a smaller place if the location is where I want to be.

Front_Porch
November 30th, 2006, 09:49 PM
Well, at the risk of being the bad guy, you just can't be in Prime Manhattan in a two-bedroom on your budget.

That budget will get you a true two-bedroom in the East Village, but I bet you won't like it -- it will be pretty far East, a schlep from the subway, in a walkup building, and the bedrooms will be eight feet wide, and one bedroom will probably walk through the other one, making it a bad share.

Your best bet is to cut up a one and deal with the lack of space -- I actually think Battery Park City is going to be your best bet: for $2,800-$3,000 you can see some units that would be tolerable, and they have doormen and gyms. These Murray Hill craigslist posters, what they're sending you are not big 1-BRs, they're small 1-BRs. Make them send you floorplans, with dimensions marked, and check with the building to make sure you can put up a wall. Honestly.

ali r.
{downtown broker}

mymelody
December 1st, 2006, 12:43 AM
Hi, this is my first post and I would love some local advice. I'm in California and I've lived almost everywhere in California, most recently in Pasadena and now back to San Francisco where I'm from. I don't really consider L.A. a proper city in the true sense of the word, plus seeing fake bake people in the middle of winter turns my stomach. Actually the thought of living in L.A. and O.C. makes me want to hurl. San Francisco, even though it's got more of a metropolitan feel, is still too small and provincial for my taste. I should also add that I lived briefly (1 year or so) in Brooklyn when I was in art school there 16 years ago. I want to come back and have made my decision to do so.

I will be doing a travel nursing assignment in NYC for 3 months, with my apartment being provided and paid for by my travel nurse company. Since I have 3 years experience as a pediatric critical care RN, I think I'll have no trouble finding work with premier hospitals like NY Presbyterian after I finish my travel assignment. But I wish to get a head start in apartment hunting because I've heard how difficult it is to find a safe and affordable place.

What I would like to know is if I get a job at NYP, which nearby neighborhoods are safe for a single girl, and is the average rent feasible on a RN's salary? I don't know what the average salary is for NY RNs, but I read somewhere that it's about 65K, which kinda sucks for me because in SF I make 80K. But I just want to live in NYC so badly, I will make the monetary sacrifice. I don't mind commuting to work provided it's not longer than 30 minutes each way, the last thing I need after a stressful 12 hour night shift is a tediously long commute home in the morning especially if I have to work again that night. Oh and one last question, would I be needing my car, or should I just sell it before moving to NY?

Any suggestions? I don't know anybody in NYC except for a cousin that I've not seen for over 20 years, so any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Front_Porch
December 1st, 2006, 02:08 PM
As I understand it, there's pricing parity between prime Manhattan and prime SF. Try really, really hard not to take a pay cut, or ask for housing assistance as part of your pay package.

On a $65K salary, if you spend a quarter of your income on rent (which is a reasonable rule of thumb), you'll get a one-bedroom in a gentrifying area of Harlem. All the Manhattan neighborhoods below 96th Street will be out of the question (a studio down near Wall Street, where things are kinda cheap, runs around $2K a month).

The Brooklyn that you remember, where neighborhoods nearish to Manhattan were affordable, is long, long gone.

There are some nice neighborhoods in Queens for your budget, but your commute would probably be 45 minutes at night.

ali r.
{downtown broker}

ManhattanKnight
December 1st, 2006, 02:32 PM
I think I'll have no trouble finding work with premier hospitals like NY Presbyterian after I finish my travel assignment. But I wish to get a head start in apartment hunting because I've heard how difficult it is to find a safe and affordable place.

NYP has a (subsidized?) housing program for its professional employees, including nurses. Take a look HERE (http://www.nyp.org/pro/housing.html?name1=Housing&type1=2Active).

mymelody
December 1st, 2006, 06:57 PM
Thanks for the replies. I just checked out NYP's housing website and am quite surprised that they do offer housing to employees. The Harlem thing is intriguing to me....which parts are considered gentrified or is it something one just has to feel out for himself or herself? Here is SF, the equation goes somewhat like this, newlyl built Whole Foods + new condo lofts ($600K for 1BR) in a sketchy neighborhood= gentrification in progress.

fishermb
December 1st, 2006, 07:32 PM
I've been giving some thought lately to studios, mainly because my potential future roomate might not be able to afford the same rent as me - approx. 1500/month, and it seems like it's hard enough to find a 2BR for 3000, let alone only 2600. For anyone who has lived in a studio, what have been their general experiences? I'm graduating college in 2 weeks and like I stated in an earlier post, will be moving up to Manhattan sometime around Feb. 1 (possibly March 1). I don't mind living by myself, and I've been in dorms and small apartments for the last 3 1/2 years, so I'm used to small spaces, small kitchens, small bathrooms.

I'm more so wondering if people feel too clasutrophobic, if they'd recommend any areas for a 1300-1500 price range, and if there's any chance I'm going to find a doorman or laundry facilities in the building? (hopeful, I know). I know many areas of Harlem are being gentrified, but as my friends are all living downtown, and my work is in midtown, I'd rather be somewhere between Tribeca and the CP South. Thanks again-

Front_Porch
December 1st, 2006, 10:49 PM
Have lived in studios for nearly ten of my nearly 20 years here. Think about light, closets, and condition of kitchen. The whole key is do you want your bed hidden -- alcove, screen, convertible futon or sofa, Murphy bed -- or can you deal with it out?


But again, I hate to keep throwing cold water on you, but under $1,500 is going to be hard, if not impossible, in "prime" neighborhoods. I live in a big studio in a doorman building near Columbus Circle and rental rates are $2,200 to $3,000. The last time I had a client with a budget of $1,800, she fled to Brooklyn because she couldn't stand what I had to show her.

For $1500 you're really looking at Harlem or the Upper East Side.

The further north or the further away from subways you can go, the cheaper it will get.

ali r.
{downtown broker}

tazeek5808
December 2nd, 2006, 01:45 PM
hey everyone,

I recently stumbled upon this forum and it has been very insightful and informative. I however have not found much about west villlage or greenwich.

I'd like to move to manhattan in the near future and I was wondering what rent would be like in an area like greenwich? I may room with a friend, so i think that we may be able to afford around $2000 or more a month for rent, maybe a 1 bedroom. Does this sound reasonable and what is the neighborhood like? I ocassionally enjoy a night out at clubs or bars, and I really enjoy being able to sit back and relax at a coffee shop on the weekends.

I work for an ad agency right now (have a bachelors degree in ad.) and I'm hoping for a jump to a mid level position with a raise... Any thoughts would be appreciated. Thanks :)

Canadian420
December 2nd, 2006, 03:49 PM
Hello Everyone,

I'm new to this forum and contemplating a move to NYC. I came for a visit two summers ago and absolutely loved it. This May I will be graduating with a masters degree in engineering (structural). Anyone have a rough idea how much I should expect to make at a Manhattan firm? I do not hold a proffesional license and would be registering as an EIT. Also, what is the salary of an intermediate to senior level engineer in Manhattan? Thanks in advance

zoeyandkrista
December 2nd, 2006, 09:40 PM
Hi there...I'm new here and I'm going to be moving to New York City in the next year or so. I will be moving with my husband and our two daughters, ages 6 and 2. I have many questions about the city, and many having to deal with children, that no website has been able to tell me. :confused:

1. Could anyone give a quick discription of each borough? Which one is the best, close to Central Park, shopping, good schools, and a good family neighborhood?:)

2. Second..we own our house now, and will be renting an apartment. How much do people spend of their income on rent? For example..if you made 175 grand a year...you would spend 5 grand max a month on an apartment? Does that sound right? :confused: What kind of apartment could you get for that?

3. Whats the deal with kids and taxis? We are thinking of maybe having a 3rd child when we move to NY and how do you deal with infants there? Do you have to carry around carseats with you? :confused: Is it legal for kids to just sit with a seatbelt? What do most parents in new york city do with their infant, toddler, and school aged kids?

4. Saftey for kids in New York...with walking through crowds, taxis, subways, busses....can anyone give me some good links or rules?:)

5. How can you handle more than 1 kid in New York with safety?

6. Dogwalkers...what is a good price for them? Do they come into your apartment? IS that safe?

7. How many hours does a typical nanny work? Can they take the children to activities like soccer, ballet etc? What is average pay?:)

8. Cars..do apartment buildings regularly have garages? Is that an extra fee? How much is gas there? And where are gas stations? :confused: How is driving in NYC..hard? Any seperate rules? Better to save the car for trips and use public transportation around town??

I think thats all for now..so sorry to ask all these questions..Thank you in advance:D

Front_Porch
December 3rd, 2006, 09:46 AM
Hi there...I'm new here and I'm going to be moving to New York City in the next year or so. I will be moving with my husband and our two daughters, ages 6 and 2. I have many questions about the city, and many having to deal with children, that no website has been able to tell me. :confused:




www.urbanbaby.com will answer a lot of your questions about living in New York City and dealing with a nanny and two darling children.

fishermb
December 3rd, 2006, 04:29 PM
Can anyone comment on the area around the mid-60's and West End? There seem to be a number of studio units with doormen, gyms and elevators that are within my price range. I know it's going to be a small room, that's not my concern. I don't really know much about the area, except that by looking at the subway and bus maps, transportation seems a bit limited.

lofter1
December 3rd, 2006, 07:22 PM
That ^^^ could be in the complex called Lincoln Towers (http://www.lincolntowers.com/), which is well located for transportation, with a local subway stop a couple of blocks away at 66th / Broadway and a major subway hub at Columbus Circle. Lots of bus service along Broadway / Columbus. Ample shopping, dining, etc. in the area. Close to both Riverside Park and Central Park.

All in all not a bad place to start out and get situated in NYC before you find a place more to your liking.

fishermb
December 3rd, 2006, 08:01 PM
That ^^^ could be in the complex called Lincoln Towers (http://www.lincolntowers.com/), which is well located for transportation, with a local subway stop a couple of blocks away at 66th / Broadway and a major subway hub at Columbus Circle. Lots of bus service along Broadway / Columbus. Ample shopping, dining, etc. in the area. Close to both Riverside Park and Central Park.

All in all not a bad place to start out and get situated in NYC before you find a place more to your liking.

I guess I should've added a few more questions to my original post, but is it relatively safe area? Decent young population? (I'm 22, graduating college in a week). And for anyone who might live there or right in that area, are there any good organic grocery stores nearby? Whole Foods, etc.?

lofter1
December 3rd, 2006, 08:42 PM
Very safe area ...

Huge Whole Foods just blocks away at the Time Warner Center at Columbus Circle.

daver
December 5th, 2006, 08:24 AM
1. Could anyone give a quick discription of each borough? Which one is the best, close to Central Park, shopping, good schools, and a good family neighborhood?:)
Well, the boroughs are Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, the Bronx, and Staten Island. From the rest of your post it kinda sounds like you want to be in Manhattan, so... Manhattan is The City. Brooklyn and Queens have some decent places to live where it is reasonable to have a car. The Bronx has a bad name, but seems to be becoming a much nicer place in recent years. Staten Island is very suburban compared to any of the other four boroughs, and has a longer commute time into The City, generally.

As far as neighborhoods in Manhattan, if that is truly where you want to be, I think you should be looking on the upper west side.


2. Second..we own our house now, and will be renting an apartment. How much do people spend of their income on rent? For example..if you made 175 grand a year...you would spend 5 grand max a month on an apartment? Does that sound right? :confused: What kind of apartment could you get for that?
Landlords are typically looking for 40-45x the rent in annual income, with some going up to 52x. At $175k/yr, you would be looking in the $3400-4400/mo range. Also, apartments rentals generally have a fee (but not always.) The fee ranges from one months rent to the increasingly common 15% of the annual rent.


3. Whats the deal with kids and taxis? We are thinking of maybe having a 3rd child when we move to NY and how do you deal with infants there? Do you have to carry around carseats with you? :confused: Is it legal for kids to just sit with a seatbelt? What do most parents in new york city do with their infant, toddler, and school aged kids?
I would not put a three year old in a car without a carseat regardless of the law. I expect that the law still applies, even in taxis. Car seats are required in NY through age seven. I don't generally take taxis with my kids, we take the subway.


4. Saftey for kids in New York...with walking through crowds, taxis, subways, busses....can anyone give me some good links or rules?:)

5. How can you handle more than 1 kid in New York with safety?
My little ones (5&6) get a hand. Period. I don't care if they are big boys or not. All the children know my cell phone number, and they know that police officers are there to help them. My bigger kids (10&12) are responsible for making sure they stay near me, I do keep an eye on them.

There are a lot of people in Manhattan, but it isn't like there is a crush of people everywhere you go. There are concentrations of people in certain places (like the subway at rush hour for instance,) but walking down everyday streets isn't bad at all.


6. Dogwalkers...what is a good price for them? Do they come into your apartment? IS that safe?
Dunno, we walk our dogs. I imagine you would need to screen your dogwalker just like anyone else you were looking to employ. I know lots of people do it, so I doubt there is rampant crime associated with them.


7. How many hours does a typical nanny work? Can they take the children to activities like soccer, ballet etc? What is average pay?:)
My wife is a stay at home mother, but I would suspect that you can get whatever you are willing to pay for, can't help you on prices.


8. Cars..do apartment buildings regularly have garages? Is that an extra fee? How much is gas there? And where are gas stations? :confused: How is driving in NYC..hard? Any seperate rules? Better to save the car for trips and use public transportation around town??
Not a lot of gas stations in Manhattan. There are more in the other boroughs. Gas is expensive in NYC, it is much cheaper across in NJ. Right now it is running around $2 or so in NJ, more like $2.60 in NYC.

Some buildings have attached garages, a space is typically an additional charge. Residents usually get a discount in an attached garage. Prime parking in desireable neighborhoods will run you $300-550/mo. You can fijnd cheaper if you look out further.

Driving in Manhattan sucks. Depending on the time of day and where you are, it is literally often faster to be walking. Driving in Brooklyn, the Bronx, and Queens is not so bad, but still is kinda sucky including parking in some areas. Driving in Staten Island, while sucking, is somewhat necesssary and parking is usually not bad.

In Manhattan, I would generally keep your car garaged and take the subway/buses/taxis. Many people sell ther cars and just rent one at the few times they need one.

conezone
December 6th, 2006, 03:02 PM
Has anyone here had any success with http://www.rent-direct.com/?

Also between UWS, UES and West Village, where would be the best place to look for 500sqf studios?

Front_Porch
December 6th, 2006, 10:34 PM
The Upper East Side way east (over by First or York, which means far from the subway) and the Upper West Side way north (i.e. nearing or even just across 96th street) will be cheapest. The Village gets more competition because it has the combo of a good elementary school, good transportation, and NYU students who all need housing.

I wouldn't ask for "500 square feet" because I think the square footage wars have gotten out of hand lately and you'll hear that everything is 500 square feet . . . ask instead, for an alcove studio, or a jr-1, or a "jumbo" studio, and then get dimensions.

Good Luck!

ali r.
{downtown broker}

conezone
December 7th, 2006, 12:20 AM
The Upper East Side way east (over by First or York, which means far from the subway) and the Upper West Side way north (i.e. nearing or even just across 96th street) will be cheapest. The Village gets more competition because it has the combo of a good elementary school, good transportation, and NYU students who all need housing.

I wouldn't ask for &quot;500 square feet&quot; because I think the square footage wars have gotten out of hand lately and you'll hear that everything is 500 square feet . . . ask instead, for an alcove studio, or a jr-1, or a &quot;jumbo&quot; studio, and then get dimensions.

Good Luck!

ali r.
{downtown broker}

Thanks. What are the prices of those kinds of apartments like on the UWS from 59th to 86th and on the UES anywhere near a subway? I'm planning on coming down and staying in New Jersey for about 3 weeks. Is my best bet to just search craigslist for no fee apartments and look at as many as I can? Thanks again.

Front_Porch
December 7th, 2006, 10:02 AM
I don't work those neighborhoods so it's hard for me to quote prices . . . I see a brand-new listing at 66th between 2nd and 3rd, which looks like a no-fee, for $2,395 and it looks like a small one-bedroom.

I would definitely come in the city and walk around, since you have time. Make some appointments for apartments you see listed in the Times or the Post, to give you an idea of baseline pricing, pull some things off craigslist and see if they're real, but ultimately the best way to find a no-fee rental is probably to see a "For Rent" sign in the neighborhood and go to see it. Stop in at big buildings and ask the doorman or super if there's anything available.

ali r.
{downtown broker}

ryanwhere
December 7th, 2006, 12:59 PM
Hey guys... i started reading this read and saw lots of people discouraging the under $2000 apartment in Manhattan idea (no roomates). i just wanted to chime in and let you all know that i just moved into a nice sized studio in the east village (elevator building, balcony, newly remodeled building) for LESS than $1,500.

The approval process was a huge pain but my broker took care of all the grunt work in that regard. i went through a firm called The Real Estate Group New York (http://www.tregny.com/) and i'd recommend them to anyone.

so, it certainly is possible to pay $1,500 in the city and i have to say, the area i live is is just awesome (alphabet city/east village) :)

ryan

conezone
December 7th, 2006, 01:49 PM
Hey guys... i started reading this read and saw lots of people discouraging the under $2000 apartment in Manhattan idea (no roomates). i just wanted to chime in and let you all know that i just moved into a nice sized studio in the east village (elevator building, balcony, newly remodeled building) for LESS than $1,500.

The approval process was a huge pain but my broker took care of all the grunt work in that regard. i went through a firm called The Real Estate Group New York (http://www.tregny.com/) and i'd recommend them to anyone.

so, it certainly is possible to pay $1,500 in the city and i have to say, the area i live is is just awesome (alphabet city/east village) :)

ryan

How much was the broker fee?

conezone
December 10th, 2006, 08:32 PM
Hey guys... i started reading this read and saw lots of people discouraging the under $2000 apartment in Manhattan idea (no roomates). i just wanted to chime in and let you all know that i just moved into a nice sized studio in the east village (elevator building, balcony, newly remodeled building) for LESS than $1,500.

The approval process was a huge pain but my broker took care of all the grunt work in that regard. i went through a firm called The Real Estate Group New York (http://www.tregny.com/) and i'd recommend them to anyone.

so, it certainly is possible to pay $1,500 in the city and i have to say, the area i live is is just awesome (alphabet city/east village) :)

ryan

So i guess its a safe bet to say you work for The Real Estate Group New York.

invictus77
December 13th, 2006, 04:05 AM
Wasn't sure if this was the right thread, but didn't want to start a new thread.

Anyways, I'm looking to move to the NYC surrounding areas. I want to be close enough to NYC but in a little quieter area. Is the best bet Jersey City or are there other places that are like this?

I don't mind a car commute, but I know that Jersey City is somewhat closer and can access NYC by train.

heyeahthat0neguy
December 13th, 2006, 09:30 AM
So I'm planning on moving to New York from Florida in the middle of the year. I won't have a car or anything like that (I'm selling mine to move there), and pretty much don't plan on taking alot with me other than my clothes, and a few other things. I'm not planning on moving until I first take a trip up there to look for a job, and a place to stay etc etc....

I'm a photography student right now, but an bartender and ice skater by profession. How are the jobs there? ALSO: How are the ice rinkssss, other than rockerfeller square during xmas hahahaha. I've been reading through the thread, so most of my answers about neighborhoods (affordable ones, safe ones, etc) have been answered. Thanks!

Mayhem
December 14th, 2006, 03:33 AM
Whew! I've just finished going through all 51 pages.

Anyway, I'd be grateful for some help specific to my situation.

I'm an Indian, living in India, and have just got a job with a New York based company via campus placements. (I'm a fresh graduate)

I'll be starting off at a salary of 60k, with a signing on bonus of 10k, and an assured year-end bonus of 25%.

My office is two blocks from Grand Central, and I'd want a short commute, of less than 30 min.

I was looking for something in Queens, maybe in Forest Hills.

Here is what I would want in an apartment:
One bedroom or large studio
Rent: 1k to 1.3k
Safe area.
Close to the subway.
Preferably in house gym and laundromat

How realistic is this?
Also, how much extra rent can I expect to for a furnished apartment? How much would I need to spend to furnish it myself?
Also, how comfortable can I expect my life in New York to be?

Mayhem
December 14th, 2006, 04:13 AM
Sorry for the double post, but I can't figure out how to edit a post.

Anyway, some things I forgot to mention:

1) I'll be moving to New York over the summer of 2007 (exact dates to be finalized), and have a relative there I can stay with for a short time, while I hunt for an apartment.

2) I'd prefer a building with an elevator.

antinimby
December 14th, 2006, 05:44 AM
Anyways, I'm looking to move to the NYC surrounding areas. I want to be close enough to NYC but in a little quieter area. Is the best bet Jersey City or are there other places that are like this?
I don't mind a car commute, but I know that Jersey City is somewhat closer and can access NYC by train.Oh there are plenty that fit that description besides JC.

You've got neighborhoods in Queens, Brooklyn and the Bronx that are also accessible by trains.