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antinimby
December 14th, 2006, 05:50 AM
So I'm planning on moving to New York from Florida in the middle of the year. I won't have a car or anything like that (I'm selling mine to move there), and pretty much don't plan on taking alot with me other than my clothes, and a few other things. I'm not planning on moving until I first take a trip up there to look for a job, and a place to stay etc etc....All very good ideas.


I'm a photography student right now, but an bartender and ice skater by profession. How are the jobs there? ALSO: How are the ice rinkssss, other than rockerfeller square during xmas hahahaha. I've been reading through the thread, so most of my answers about neighborhoods (affordable ones, safe ones, etc) have been answered. Thanks!With experience, I'm sure you'll find something.

There's also the Wollman rink in Central Park and a newly opened one in Bryant Park.

Naturally, they are only in service during the winter months of course.

Not sure if there are year round indoor ones but I'm sure there are.

macreator
December 14th, 2006, 06:46 AM
Chelsea Piers has their year-round Skyrink.

Punzie
December 14th, 2006, 08:04 AM
I'm a photography student right now, but an bartender and ice skater by profession. How are the jobs there? ALSO: How are the ice rinkssss,
I'm aware that professional ice skaters are very discerning when it comes to ice quality and rink space/time. I was on my college women's ice hockey team for 3 years, and from what I know about skating, I think you should eliminate the idea of using the (above) outdoor rinks for practice. They are great fun to do with friends, but I'll be charitable and say that they are not good for a profession to practice on.

That leaves you with one indoor ("practiceable") Manhattan rink -- Macreator's suggestion:

http://www.chelseapiers.com/sr01.htm

Practice time there is expensive and general rink sessions can be crowded. It's important that you thoroughly research this rink before deciding to move to Manhattan.

If this rink does not "check out," you may have to move to one of the other boroughs of New York City, near one of the indoor rinks. Don't give up your car until you are sure you know where you'll be living, because in parts of the other boroughs, a car is extremely useful.

Front_Porch
December 14th, 2006, 09:53 AM
Whew! I've just finished going through all 51 pages.

Anyway, I'd be grateful for some help specific to my situation.

I'm an Indian, living in India, and have just got a job with a New York based company via campus placements. (I'm a fresh graduate)

I'll be starting off at a salary of 60k, with a signing on bonus of 10k, and an assured year-end bonus of 25%.

My office is two blocks from Grand Central, and I'd want a short commute, of less than 30 min.

I was looking for something in Queens, maybe in Forest Hills.

Here is what I would want in an apartment:
One bedroom or large studio
Rent: 1k to 1.3k
Safe area.
Close to the subway.
Preferably in house gym and laundromat

How realistic is this?
Also, how much extra rent can I expect to for a furnished apartment? How much would I need to spend to furnish it myself?
Also, how comfortable can I expect my life in New York to be?

Welcome! You're going to love it here.

A landlord will ask for an income of 40-50X rent -- my guess is that as a foreign national, you'll be held to the tighter 50x standard -- so your budget is perfect.

Forest Hills basically centers around Forest Hills Gardens -- a 1910s and 1920s middle-class/upper-middle class housing development that's got lots of Tudor homes and is very leafy, and now, very fashionable and expensive -- and radiates outward. The danger is that when you see Internet ads, you'll see things called "Forest Hills" that aren't truly in the neighborhood.

Terrace Realty at www.foresthillsrealestate.com is a pretty big broker in the area; I'm not sure they do rentals, but worth asking.

I also believe there are a number of luxury doorman buildings on the edges of the gardens. (can someone more local jump in here?) I've never lived in Parker Towers, but I've heard good things about it, and it is no fee: www.parkertowers.com

As far as renting furniture, like many brokerages my firm refers people to Cort Furniture Rental -- www.cort.com

Good luck!

ali r.
downtown broker

Lolita88
December 15th, 2006, 10:22 PM
Hi all!
I just finished reading this thread and Im so excited its funny. NYC has been a lifelong dream for me and while I know it will be a hard move for a 19 year old student on my own Im determined to make it work. I've applied and hopefully will be excepted to either Parsons, Pratt or F.I.T. :p for the fashion programs but im wondering do you all think its better for me to get my own place or put in for campus housing? I plan to live in NYC after i finish school as well and although the move wont be untill around august am really doing my research and trying to save every penny.

Also, once I get to the city what are some good places for me to sort of hang out?
Im from Dominican Republic and Miami and diversity is a HUGE plus for me, even with the job i have now im there because of all the diff people I meet daily. So I would like to know some places where I could really get to experience a little bit of everything.

And, I also wanna know if Lord forbid I dont get into the schools, should I move up anyways and maybe go to a community college or something? HELPPPPP (lol)

Anyways thanks in advanced to all.;)

Punzie
December 16th, 2006, 12:47 AM
Put in for campus housing ASAP. You may find off-campus housing that you prefer, but it's good to have a backup in case you don't.

In the beginning, go to the campus hangouts to network with the university folk and find friends who share your interests.

If you're absolutely determined to make it in New York City, move up here even if you don't get into your first choices of schools. Go to a community college, maybe even in one of the outter boroughs where the cost of living is usually lower.

Lolita88
December 16th, 2006, 11:42 AM
Thank you! And yes I am most definetly determined to make it in NYC. I wasnt sure wether to move or not if I dont get in. Since I know if Im not going up there to one of those schools my parents are pretty much not even gonna bother with me, so it'll just be me and housing would be a problem because I'd need a good job and to go to school. Anyways, if there is anymore info or input any one has plz feel free to let me know Im all ears and very intrested in all things NYC. Thanks again in advanced.:p <----btw I LOVE THIS THING (lol)

Lolita88
December 17th, 2006, 02:31 PM
Do you all think a personal assistant job would be a good job for me?

american dream
December 18th, 2006, 12:02 PM
thanx

ryan
December 18th, 2006, 01:34 PM
Lolita88, I'm not sure if I am following, but it sounds like you're asking if you should move here instead of going to school. If you, my answer is no.

It's a very expensive place to live comfortably, so unless you're prepared to pursue a professional job, you'll have a hard time making enough money to do anything but get by. Being broke in nyc is no fun. You need an education (or job experience, or specific, in-demand skills) - even to get a good personal assistant job.

Lolita88
December 18th, 2006, 02:02 PM
Lolita88, I'm not sure if I am following, but it sounds like you're asking if you should move here instead of going to school. If you, my answer is no.

It's a very expensive place to live comfortably, so unless you're prepared to pursue a professional job, you'll have a hard time making enough money to do anything but get by. Being broke in nyc is no fun. You need an education (or job experience, or specific, in-demand skills) - even to get a good personal assistant job.


No definetly not. I didnt mean not going to school, but the opposite, Im going to New York to go to school.:rolleyes:

Lolita88
December 21st, 2006, 01:31 PM
Ok so are there anymore tips any one has? Please feel free to inform me. Oh and also pm me if your willing to answer "stupid questions" and provide just random tips. I love hearing about all things New York.

Thanks in advanced ;)

fishermb
December 23rd, 2006, 11:51 AM
I seem to be getting most of my stuff in check for moving up in a few months, and was looking for one last piece of advice. I am planning to move up to NY on March 1st. I'm going to make a 4-5 day trip up beforehand to look at apartments and eventually sign a lease. If that's the day I'm shooting to sign a lease for, when do you all think is the best time to go up there? I was thinking the week of January 26-February 2...too early? too late? 4-5 days not enough? Also, are there any particular days that are better to look at places than any other? Should I do weekdays or weekends? Thanks all.

Front_Porch
December 24th, 2006, 10:45 AM
What days of the week to look? find apartments in your price range and see when they seem to be showing.

I know that doesn't seem helpful, but when agents work actually depends on the price range: for starter apartments, Saturday is often a big rental day, whereas higher-end agents tend to work every day but Saturday.

If you just randomly have to pick any four days, I'd say Friday to look around a neighborhood, Saturday and Sunday for open houses, and Monday for special appointments to pick up anything you didn't see on the weekend.

Good luck!

ali r.
{downtown broker}

AMBITION
December 25th, 2006, 04:05 AM
wow, it's a nice advanced topic.

lilly62
December 26th, 2006, 11:09 PM
I'm a 22-year-old female, moving to nyc for the first time, alone, and I'm in the process of apartment hunting right now. I found one that sounds good in Bay Ridge in Brooklyn, and another in Upper Ditmars in Queens. I know almost nothing about NY neighborhoods and I just want to know if these two neighborhoods are safe. I want to be able to walk down my street by myself at night without feeling like I should be armed. Do you know anything about these neighborhoods? or any others that are safe, less expensive, and not in manhattan?

goldibabi
December 27th, 2006, 12:10 AM
Hello!

I'm interviewing for a job that would want me to start right away. The salary would be between $35-40k, which, while it seems like a lot to this Illinois gal, isn't so much in NYC. The job is located on Fulton St. I know that on this salary I can't afford to live in Manhattan, and based on the previous posts in the thread I was thinking maybe Queens? Would Brooklyn or the Bronx be better? I'm a 24 year old female with two cats, so I'd prefer to have a studio by myself. I know that I'd need to find a place that ran around 900-1000/month...is that even possible? If it's not too out of the question, it'd be nice to have a shorter (~30 minutes) commute, but if that's wishful thinking, I understand.

Thanks so much for all of your help! Any neighborhood suggestions would be great...I'm open to anything!

Mandi25
December 27th, 2006, 06:14 PM
I've read all of the information on this post about neighborhoods for people considering a move to NYC, but I'm surprised I haven't seen anything about Hoboken. I am a 25 year old professional who will work with clients located all over Manhattan when I relocate up there. I have planned on living in Manhattan when I move, but I've been recommended to look into moving to Hoboken, and I was hoping for some feedback on the area. Can anyone tell me the pros and/or cons to living in Hoboken rather than somewhere in Manhattan? Thanks in advance. :)

Schadenfrau
December 27th, 2006, 08:49 PM
If you search the forums for "Hoboken," you'll find lots of information and advice.

ablarc
December 27th, 2006, 11:08 PM
I haven't seen anything about Hoboken.
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=3786

Formula86
December 28th, 2006, 01:46 AM
Hello, all. I tried reading through this entire thread but only got to about page 20. I figured I would just ask my questions since a bunch could've changed over a few years anyways.

I'm a 24 year old female with a bachelor's degree in English - Technical Writing. I live in Texas and am going to try and get some experience in the magazine field here first (through an internship and possibly job).

When I decide to move to NYC:
*I want to live somewhere where I can have a small house with a fenced-in back yard.
*I want somewhere safe for me and my animals (2 dogs and a cat) because I like to let them go in and out with a doggy door.
*I own a house now and, if I sell it, I think I can get about 90-100 thousand for it. So that could be used for a big down-payment or maybe to pay for a house out-right.
*I'd like to be about 20-30 min from Manhattan by some sort of public transportation (subway, train, etc.).
*I don't mind living somewhere suburban-like. I just want to be close to the city (20-30 min).

Questions:
Where should I live? :)
How possible will it be to find a job working for a magazine (small or large) with a bachelor's degree in English - Technical Writing? Should I try and get my Master's before trying?

I'm not sure what else to put. I'm sure I left out info here and there. So just ask me if you need some more info to answer my questions. :D

Thanks in advance!

Punzie
December 28th, 2006, 04:51 AM
Recall the famous John Lennon quote:

"Life happens while you're making other plans."


Before you get a job in Texas, begin a graduate program in Texas, get a job promotion in Texas, get a beautiful new car, renovate your Texas house, find a partner in Texas who may want a committed relationship, begin wondering about motherhood.........

Get over to New York City!!

Formula86
December 28th, 2006, 05:20 AM
Haha! Very true. I'm just worried about going there with NO job experience in that field and with only a bachelor's degree. I mean, how possible is it I would get a job in the magazine field?

Also - if I go to grad school, I will probably have to go here - I don't think I can afford out-of-state tuition. Blah.

Thanks for the encouragment, though!! :D

Punzie
December 28th, 2006, 06:08 AM
Consider the City University of New York (CUNY) Graduate School. The tuition is reduced once you become a New York State resident. Here's the tuition page:

http://portal.cuny.edu/portal/site/cuny/index.jsp?epi-content=GENERIC&epiproxymethod=get&viewID=epiproxybanner&beanID=965289823&epiproxyrealurl=http%3A%2F%2Fwww1.cuny.edu%2Fporta l_ur%2Fcontent%2Fadmissions%2Fgraduate%2Ftuition.p hp


Here's the main menu for the University:

http://portal.cuny.edu/portal/site/cuny/?epi_menuItemID=b288e5fe531bec864bef4d5178304e08&epi_menuID=a00e05b73704d3407d840d5541a08a0c&epi_baseMenuID=a00e05b73704d3407d840d5541a08a0c


CUNY Graduate School has a fine reputation and top professors. Although the student population is very diverse, most students seem to be in the same boat: smart, hard working, not quite financially established, and determined to make it in New York City.

I got my college and masters degrees out-of-state, so when I impart CUNY info to you, I don't have a "vested" interest.:)

Formula86
December 28th, 2006, 06:35 AM
Cool, thanks. I'll definitely check that out. :)

Any ideas on where I'd live based on my requirements/wants??

Thanks!!

Formula86
December 28th, 2006, 06:43 AM
Ok, I just checked that website out. I don't think the college offers a Master's degree in my field. But I really appreciate the link! Do you know of any other public colleges that are pretty good?

Schadenfrau
December 28th, 2006, 01:06 PM
There's absolutely no reason to get a Master's if you want to work in magazines, but you do need work experience.

Honestly, you're not going to find a house in this area for anything near that price. Also, publishing is a pretty low-paying industry. Before you get serious about moving to NYC, you should reconsider your housing plans.

bmc
December 28th, 2006, 01:37 PM
Take Schadenfrau's advice - moving to the City and buying a house for your said price that is only about 20-30 minutes away from the City is unrealistic - you need to reconsider your housing plans, definitely.

Mandi25
December 28th, 2006, 02:55 PM
Thanks Schadenfrau and ablarc for pointing me in the right direction.:D

Formula86
December 28th, 2006, 06:28 PM
Thanks, guys. That's why I'm here - to find out what's realistic and what's not.

The reason that I am so hung up on finding a house with a yard is because of my animals - especially my cat. He's indoor/outdoor and has to be allowed outdoors (or problems ensue...lol). I would, otherwise, love to live in a small apartment.

So how far away from the city would I have to be to get a house (with a down payment of about 80 thousand)? How much are houses in Long Island, etc?

I'm sure you can tell that even though I've been many times, I've never researched living there until now. So please excuse my naivety.

Would anyone recommend another city altogether? I've also considered Seattle and Boston. ???

Thanks, everyone!

fishermb
December 28th, 2006, 08:04 PM
I'm considering a sublease of 1-br in a 2-br in the 99 John Street building on Gold and John in the financial district. Just curious if anyone has any opinions on the building and specific location. There's a gym and doorman in building, and I've heard there's a good supermarket close by with a good organic food department (all fairly important stuff to me).

It would most likely be a temporary situation of 3-9 months while I get situated in the city and decide exactly where I'd like to live as I'll be moving up from Miami. They're asking $1450/mo fully furnished including utilities.

lofter1
December 28th, 2006, 08:33 PM
Would anyone recommend another city altogether? I've also considered Seattle and Boston. ???

Not sure about the publishing industry, but look into Portland, Oregon for good liveability.

kimokao
December 28th, 2006, 10:33 PM
Hello again!
I'm writing again because i think my last post was lost among others, and because my plans have changed.

I'm a 19 year old male looking to move to manhattan late spring 2007. I was planning on moving with my best friend, but she just got a great gig at disneyworld so she's gonna be in florida for the next year :-S so now i'm looking at moving by myself. I didn't think that i would be able to afford to live in NYC by myself, but i've been looking everyday at stats and what I'm willing to live with.

I will be moving to NYC with no job, but a substantial savings before i move, enough to maintain me for three months while i get settled and find a job. $8000, which includes plane fare, and hostel living for a week.

I'm looking for a modest studio, or a room in a shared apt for $800 a month.
From listings on craigslist, this seems possible... am i correct?
I am planning on committing to a career in acting, so i would love to be somewhere near the theatre districts.
Also i plan to take classes at Cuny once the fall semester starts.

Can anyone give me any advice about how realistic my goals sound?
Esp. housing location, and my plan.
How realistic is finding and signing housing within a week?
And will a landlord let a 19 year old, jobless kid sign a lease?

Things dont seem to be working out they way i had hoped, but this is more than a dream for me, it's my goal. And i'm determined to make it happen. Any advice, is very much appreciated :)
Thanks for your time,
Kimo

lofter1
December 28th, 2006, 11:00 PM
Signing the lease could be problematic given your situation ... but hardly necessary to get started in NYC.

Move yourself into the hostel for a week or two and then find a roommate situation for a few months. Get to know the city and start to establish a structure that allows you to make some money while you figure out how to pursue your acting career. There are lots of opportunities when you're young and a new arrival with lots of energy & drive.

The most important thing when starting out in NYC (besides a little financial cushion, which you seem to have already figured out) is a strong passion to guide you.

Punzie
December 29th, 2006, 01:00 AM
Do you know of any other public colleges that are pretty good?

New Jersey's State University system, Rutgers:

http://www.rutgers.edu/

The Newark campus is ideal because it's so near NYC. The New Brunswick campus is not nearly as close to NYC, but a communte is "doable". The Camden campus is a short distance from Philadelphia, but far from NYC.


Definitely investigate the CUNY graduate programs some more. Maybe your major is embedded in an unexpected department/school or goes by another name. This has been known to happen with CUNY.

Schadenfrau
December 29th, 2006, 01:44 AM
Formula86, I think you really have to weigh the value you're placing on your desired career and where you're willing to live.

You could certainly purchase a house with an 80K downpayment, but you wouldn't be able to secure a mortgage with a publishing salary, especially at an entry level. At that point, you're looking at well under 40K a year, most likely far less. If you're looking at an internship, you'll probably be paid nothing at all.

People around here don't keep animals outside, whether or not they've houses or apartments. Even the most commutable areas of Long Island/New Jersey aren't friendly to outdoor animals, and with the hours that you'll be keeping, the idea of an indoor/outdoor animal just isn't feasible.

In NYC, people your age generally live in roommate situations, within the five boroughs, or in apartments immediately outside of the city.

If you want to work in magazines, you pretty much have to live in New York. But if you truly can't live in an apartment, there's really no point in even trying.

It's really up to you. I hate to be a downer, but life here, especially if you work in a creative industry, means a lot of sacrifices that many people aren't willing to make.

Schadenfrau
December 29th, 2006, 01:48 AM
Also, I feel that I should reiterate my previous statement that you don't need a master's to work in publishing. In fact, it's probably worse to have one than not to. Work experience is far more valued, and you would basically just be wasting time and money by getting the degree. It would be wiser to spend that effort on working in the field.

Punzie
December 29th, 2006, 02:39 AM
Also, I feel that I should reiterate my previous statement that you don't need a master's to work in publishing. In fact, it's probably worse to have one than not to. Work experience is far more valued, and you would basically just be wasting time and money by getting the degree. It would be wiser to spend that effort on working in the field.

I second this.

I gave you links to CUNY and Rutgers because you asked about public graduate school education, but I too think you should work first. In fact, if you go back to school with quality work experience in the field, you will have a much greater chance of getting a good school graduate fellowship.

This advice applies whether you come here, move to another city, or stay in Texas for the time being.

bookgirl1974
December 29th, 2006, 11:52 AM
I am single, in my early thirties, and planning a move to NY. I'm looking for a studio in the $1100-$1500 range. What is a good hipster/artsy area? The suburbs are obviously not an option. Thanks!

VVNYC
December 29th, 2006, 05:12 PM
I just read through all 54 pages of this thread, so I figured I might as well register an account and make a post.

While the majority of this thread seems focused on housing and neighborhoods (a topic I don't have much insight on), I thought I would share my experience and comments thus far on making the move to NYC.

I've been hooked on NYC for a while now and this past summer I decided to make a run for it. In September I posted my resume online and over the next 4 months, after speaking with nearly 15 recruiters, having 10-15 phone/in-person interviews, and flying up there 4 times, I accepted a great job offer and will be moving to the city in a couple of weeks from Florida.

BTW, I'm 25, 2.5 years experience in the IT field. The one major factor in my situation which most of you will not have on your side is the fact that I have 2 relatives that live in the city and was able to stay with one of them each of the 4 times I visited, so my cost was only that of airline tickets (which cost a total of nearly $1,000)

Random notes:

- It's hard but possible to land a job in NYc without being located there. It's long-shot if you refuse to visit the city at your own cost (only one company I interviewed with - a top investment bank, would have paid to fly me up if I passed the phone interviews), but if you can manage to get up there on your own a few times, it makes almost as easy as living there.

- If you use a online job site, use a NYC address in your account profile so you will show up when recruiters/companies search for the NYC job-seeker pool. (e.g. my Moster account has a relatives NYC address, but my actual Monster resume states my real FL address) This confused a few people at first, but once I explained my situation and that I was traveling to the city periodically on my own, everyone understood.

- Use recruiting agencies, if they exist for your profession. There's tons in IT and I worked with many of them. I got interviews with some fantastic companies through them. Also, I did notice some firms who were willing and placed candidates just out of college w/o experience. I wish I knew that when I graduated.

- Expect a wide variety of experiences, so take everything with a grain of salt. I've had a recruiter basically tell me I couldn't get a job in NYC w/ only 2 years experience without moving there first (he declined to work for me) at the same time I had a recruiter getting me multiple phone interviews at Goldman Sachs, at the same time another recruiting agency routinely got me in-person interviews on <24 hours notice, provided they knew I was going to be in the city in advance.

- Salary survey's on salary.com were a good (and ultimately, accurate for me) guide if you have a fairly common profession and job title. Look at where you fall on the bell curve in your current town, then compare the same title in NYC and expect similar ranges. If you are an engineer making $50k in FL, you might see the same title at $60-65k in NYC. That's a lot more realistic than using the cost-of-living calculators and coming up with "hmm, NYC cost of living is 200% more than my current town, and I make $50k, so I'll need to be looking for salaries of $100k..."

- Live with a roommate(s).

- See above. Read it again. :)

- Visit the city and network and make friends. Through my 2 relatives and trips up there I now know a handful of people that I got help, advice, and potential living arrangement possibilities from.

- I sort of lucked out, but one of my relatives actually had a roommate leave and I got to take over that room. Upper West Side for under $1,000 (my share of rent). I also came across a studio for $1,400 in the same area through a friend. Broker fees would have applied, but it would have been a painless process since the vacating tenant had time to find the replacement before it went on the market.

- I know people living in Queens (Astoria, Long Island City - just as close to midtown as I'll be) for anywhere from $700-900 for a room share. Totally affordable, provided you can live with a roommate(s). Neither of those neighborhoods appealed to me compared to most Manhattan neighborhoods, but they say they love it.

Umm... I think I'll leave it at that for now. I hope some of these comments can be of help to someone. And, lastly, just as a disclaimer, this is only my experience and I know it could vary widely based on your particular situation.

I move to NYC in 2 weeks! Good luck to everyone!

VVNYC
December 29th, 2006, 05:27 PM
I'm considering a sublease of 1-br in a 2-br in the 99 John Street building on Gold and John in the financial district. Just curious if anyone has any opinions on the building and specific location. There's a gym and doorman in building, and I've heard there's a good supermarket close by with a good organic food department (all fairly important stuff to me).

It would most likely be a temporary situation of 3-9 months while I get situated in the city and decide exactly where I'd like to live as I'll be moving up from Miami. They're asking $1450/mo fully furnished including utilities.

I've stayed with a relative a few times at 33 Gold St, just around the block from there. I can't speak for your specific building, but overall I'd say I would have no major issues living there. I'd say on the positive side, there's tons of restaurants, shops and people around during the day time. The price and amenities (gym, doorman) are nice. On the negative side, the area dies down after work-hours and Gold/John kinda feels more like an 'alleyway' than a nice street you'd like to live on. There also seems to be a lot of noise in that area, but maybe that is more a result of being across the street from a garbage area on Gold where trucks came by 24/7.

Overall, particularly for just 3-9 months as you get acclimated to NYC, I'd have no problems living there assuming your roommates are decent and the building isn't any worse than 33 Gold St.

ChasingBliss
December 29th, 2006, 07:34 PM
Hi All,

I just landed my dream job in NYC and am hoping to find an apt. in Brooklyn by Feb. 1. I've read through lots of information regarding about moving, apartment hunting, etc. However, I've seen lots of conflicting information about rent guidelines, I've seen 30% of your income, 40x -70x the annual rent, etc. What's the most realistic rule of thumb? For someone moving to brooklyn making about 75k, what's a reasonable range for a good sized one bedroom in a decent neighborhood?

bmc
December 29th, 2006, 08:32 PM
I am single, in my early thirties, and planning a move to NY. I'm looking for a studio in the $1100-$1500 range. What is a good hipster/artsy area? The suburbs are obviously not an option. Thanks!

You should definitely check out apartments in the East Village - it's definitely artsy and hip there, and you can find apartments there closer to the $1400 range.

akqjt
December 29th, 2006, 09:37 PM
Is there an online resource that has an overview of the various neighbourhoods of NYC? Rather than saying my budget is x and I like this and that about a neighbourhood, I would like to read all about the neighbourhoods and decide from the author's description which I would like the most. I'm not looking for anything too comprehensive, just a snapshot of each neighbourhood. Perhaps something like [ http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/104758/the_best_neighborhoods_of_manhattan.html ] but far more extensive. Anyone seen anything like this?

Lolita88
December 29th, 2006, 10:38 PM
I would like to read all about the neighbourhoods and decide from the author's description which I would like the most.

I wouldnt recommend you do this and I dont even live in NYC. You might wanna make the trip and see first hand. I mean someone could say the neighborhood is lively and really mean its extremely loud and that may or may not be a problem for you.I dont know though, to each its own.

akqjt
December 29th, 2006, 11:33 PM
Well, it's not like I wouldn't research the person's comments and just take them for granted. I figured if I could get a brief overview of the various neighbourhoods that I could narrow down the search to a select few and research those ones more in-depth.

Formula86
December 30th, 2006, 01:13 AM
Formula86, I think you really have to weigh the value you're placing on your desired career and where you're willing to live.

You could certainly purchase a house with an 80K downpayment, but you wouldn't be able to secure a mortgage with a publishing salary, especially at an entry level. At that point, you're looking at well under 40K a year, most likely far less. If you're looking at an internship, you'll probably be paid nothing at all.

People around here don't keep animals outside, whether or not they've houses or apartments. Even the most commutable areas of Long Island/New Jersey aren't friendly to outdoor animals, and with the hours that you'll be keeping, the idea of an indoor/outdoor animal just isn't feasible.

In NYC, people your age generally live in roommate situations, within the five boroughs, or in apartments immediately outside of the city.

If you want to work in magazines, you pretty much have to live in New York. But if you truly can't live in an apartment, there's really no point in even trying.

It's really up to you. I hate to be a downer, but life here, especially if you work in a creative industry, means a lot of sacrifices that many people aren't willing to make.

Well, I know that having animals is a big problem. Here I can just have the doggy door open 24/7 and let them go in and out as they please. And I'm not even that comfortable with it being open at night here, so I guess it'd be worse there.

I guess I just thought I'd see if there was any way. Oh well. Maybe when I am animal-less.

Thanks to everyone for the help!

Formula86
December 30th, 2006, 02:37 AM
Really quickly - what did you mean by New Jersey and Long Island not being friendly to outdoor animals? And why would my hours of work matter? Because people don't leave doggy doors open there (I'm assuming they don't)?

Thanks! Just wanted to clear that up.

Punzie
December 30th, 2006, 09:19 AM
Really quickly - what did you mean by New Jersey and Long Island not being friendly to outdoor animals? And why would my hours of work matter? Because people don't leave doggy doors open there (I'm assuming they don't)?


I can't speak for the other boroughs, but a lot of Queens is dog-friendly.

Queens has a good number of house rentals. Almost all allow cats, and many allow dogs. The houses have yards that are not like the ones where you live, but the dogs seem happy.

My recommendation is to rent a house with a housemate. If the house is very large, rent it with two housemates.

I would try to find a housemate(s) with a dog(s). The ideal would be for you and your dog-owning housemate(s) to pool the dog walking and chores. You and your housemate can let the dogs out in the yard when the other is not home, giving the dogs more outdoor time.

NYC has laws about dogs that are left alone in yards for long periods of time, but a lot depends on your neighbors. If they have dogs that stay outside all day without a problem, then you can probably keeps yours outside all day, (provided that there are no barking matches). Otherwise, you will probably have to keep your dogs inside when you're not home.

Everything I said applies even moreso to Nassau County (Long Island), but it's a longer commute to Manhattan.

My recommendation to share a house rental is only until you're established and ready to buy your own house.

Lolita88
December 30th, 2006, 10:58 AM
Would my small dog be a problem? She's a poodle and chihuahua mix and is chihuahua sized. She doesnt require much outdoors time, she just does her bussiness and thats that. How hard is it going to be to get a apartment or studio for me, my boyfriend, and my doggy or maybe just me and my doggy (we'll see how that goes).

Formula86
December 30th, 2006, 11:58 PM
I can't speak for the other boroughs, but a lot of Queens is dog-friendly.

Queens has a good number of house rentals. Almost all allow cats, and many allow dogs. The houses have yards that are not like the ones where you live, but the dogs seem happy.

My recommendation is to rent a house with a housemate. If the house is very large, rent it with two housemates.

I would try to find a housemate(s) with a dog(s). The ideal would be for you and your dog-owning housemate(s) to pool the dog walking and chores. You and your housemate can let the dogs out in the yard when the other is not home, giving the dogs more outdoor time.

NYC has laws about dogs that are left alone in yards for long periods of time, but a lot depends on your neighbors. If they have dogs that stay outside all day without a problem, then you can probably keeps yours outside all day, (provided that there are no barking matches). Otherwise, you will probably have to keep your dogs inside when you're not home.

Everything I said applies even moreso to Nassau County (Long Island), but it's a longer commute to Manhattan.

My recommendation to share a house rental is only until you're established and ready to buy your own house.

Really? Ok, well that's something to think about. Are cats allowed outside like they are here? Will they get picked up by animal control or hurt by neighbors? Will people deliberately hurt him (my cat)?

I can keep the dogs inside when I'm not home and let them out when I get back home. I'm not really worried about them. Just the cat mostly.

Is it unsafe to leave a doggy door open into a yard? Are the yards community yards? Mine just basically go in and out all day. I don't think anyone would think they were left outside for long periods of time (cause they'd see the doggy door). But if I'd have to share the yard, then that's different.

Thanks so much. :)

Formula86
January 1st, 2007, 05:37 AM
Bump! :)

Lolita88
January 1st, 2007, 06:19 PM
About how much do you pay in rent and utilities monthly? You dont have to be too specific, but I am trying to get a good idea of how much I would need a month.
THanks in Advance:o

haloperi
January 3rd, 2007, 09:37 AM
^ wouldn't that greatly depend on which part of the city you're going to live in?

Anyway, I'm planning on moving to NYC in about a year :D

I'm gonna rent a room (hopefully) somewhere in the central~lower part of Manhattan

Lolita88
January 3rd, 2007, 01:06 PM
^ wouldn't that greatly depend on which part of the city you're going to live in?




Yeah I guess your right Um....Either Chelsea, The Village, Soho, Tribeca, or Somewhere like Washington Heights or Morningside Heights. Just a general description is fine.

lofter1
January 3rd, 2007, 05:49 PM
I know someone in SoHo who is paying ~ $5K / month for a one bedroom loft @ 1500 sq ft.

That is the current market rate level.

You might luck out if you know womeone and get a Rent Stabilized sublet for much less than that ... but chances are slim.

ManhattanKnight
January 3rd, 2007, 06:03 PM
In my West Village building, a rent-stabilized 1-BR sublet would go for $1,300-1,400/month. An identical non-stabilized apartment in the building now rents for $4,000/month. The smallest studio goes for $2,800 and the largest apartment (3-BR with a miniscule garden) $10,500. So, while rent-stabilized sublets are rare, they are worth the time and effort needed to find one.

Punzie
January 3rd, 2007, 10:47 PM
You might luck out if you know womeone and get a Rent Stabilized sublet for much less than that ... but chances are slim.

Chances are slim if you are not a "networker"...

If you network, network, network, chances are good. Network, network, network. I would bet that at least one active member on WNY knows about a rent stabilized apartment in Manhattan. Network, network, network. Be proactive about PMs. Network, network, network. Join every website dedicated in some way to New York City. Network, network, network...

ThisIsntMyRealName
January 3rd, 2007, 11:09 PM
In my West Village building, a rent-stabilized 1-BR sublet would go for $1,300-1,400/month. An identical non-stabilized apartment in the building now rents for $4,000/month. The smallest studio goes for $2,800 and the largest apartment (3-BR with a miniscule garden) $10,500. So, while rent-stabilized sublets are rare, they are worth the time and effort needed to find one.

Hey, just wondering, how does a building have rent stabilized and non-rent stabilized in the same place? How do you qualify for rent-stabilized?

ManhattanKnight
January 4th, 2007, 12:02 AM
^It's apartments, not tenants, who "qualify for" rent stabilization. Lots of buildings in NYC have both stabilized and non-stabilized apartments. Some of those existed during World War II, when "rent control" went into effect. When those apartments become vacant, they become "rent stabilized." There are numerous ways in which a building, including those built today, can have a mixture of stabilized and non-stabilized apartments. Often those involve a landlord's being granted a tax or other financial benefit by the City in exchange for having some apartments being subject to rent stabilization.

LawJen07
January 4th, 2007, 01:56 AM
Hi,

I've been reading all the posts and they've been extremely helpful, but I figured I'd ask a few questions specifically tailored to my situation.

I'm a 25y/o female currently finishing up my last semester of law school in Cleveland and have a job lined up with a Big NY law firm. Starting salary will be $145k. I'll be moving probably after I take the bar exam in July, around August 1st. I'm thinking that I'll go apartment hunting in early July.

I'm trying to figure out a good fit for a neighborhood and am having trouble as many sound good to me. My firm is located in the World Finanacial Center downtown. An easy commute would be nice but I don't mind a longer commute if I can get more bang for my buck so to speak in other areas. I've thought about looking in Battery Park City and areas near my office, but have heard that it gets rather deserted at night. I lived in the Village this past summer for a few months while doing a summer job with my firm and loved it, but felt it was a little too much of a college area for me (I was living in NYU summer housing). I've tossed around the idea of looking outside of Manhattan as well (i.e. Queens, Brooklyn, Jersey, etc.).

Basically, what I'd ideally like is the following:

Rent for under $2500/month is possible, but the lower the better (have to pay back a bunch of student loans)

Preferably a 1 br

A neighborhood that's got lots of young professionals like myself, has easy access to the subway, grocery stores, movie theatres, etc.

A doorman building with an elevator would be a plus, but that's negotiable.

Basically, I'm trying to figure out where I could best get my money's worth (biggest, nicest, apartment that won't cost me an arm and a leg) in a neighborhood with a lot to do. Any recommendations? Hopefully this is coherent. If not, I apologize and I'll clarify later. Thanks so much!

Punzie
January 4th, 2007, 05:15 AM
Really? Ok, well that's something to think about. Are cats allowed outside like they are here? Will they get picked up by animal control or hurt by neighbors? Will people deliberately hurt him (my cat)?


Speaking for Queens and Long Island: If you live in a single-family house, letting your cat outside is allowed and is usually not a problem with neighbors. He will be more welcomed if he's neutered and wearing a collar with an ID tag.

The collar is so that people know that he is a cared-for pet with an owner, not a stray. The collar should be visible from a distance, rather than blend in with the cat's fur.

The ID tag wouldn't be one of those chunks of metal dogs wear; it would be small and have the minimal amount of information needed to contact you. This way, if your cat gets lost and is found, he will likely be returned to you.

When your cat first goes outside, there's a possibility that he may search for his old home. Missing cats that were moved from a nearby area are sometimes found at their old house. Since this isn't possible in your case, it's especially important that your cat wear a collar and ID tag when you first move in. (I actually recommend this for all people who move a cat anywhere!)

Animal control is underbudgeted and understaffed, and the last thing they want to do is pick up somebody's pet cat. They are in "reactive" mode for immediate or very serious problems.

Your cat has about the same (low) chance of being abused by humans in NYC as anywhere else in the U.S. It's one of those risks of letting a cat outside.

Your cat's biggest enemies in NYC are moving vehicles. If your cat crosses streets in your area, I'll write more about it.

Formula86
January 4th, 2007, 05:19 AM
Speaking for Queens and Long Island: If you live in a single-family house, letting your cat outside is allowed and is usually not a problem with neighbors. He will be more welcomed if he's neutered and wearing a collar with an ID tag.

The collar is so that people know that he is a cared-for pet with an owner, not a stray. The collar should be visible from a distance, rather than blend in with the cat's fur.

The ID tag wouldn't be one of those chunks of metal dogs wear; it would be small and have the minimal amount of information needed to contact you. This way, if your cat gets lost and is found, he will likely be returned to you.

When your cat first goes outside, there's a possibility that he may search for his old home. Missing cats that were moved from a nearby area are sometimes are found at their old house. Since this isn't possible in your case, it's especially important that your cat wear a collar and ID tag when you first move in. (I actually recommend this for all people who move a cat anywhere!)

Animal control is underbudgeted and understaffed, and the last thing they want to do is pick up somebody's pet cat. They are in "reactive" mode for immediate or very serious problems.

Your cat has about the same (low) chance of being abused by humans in NYC as anywhere else in the U.S. It's one of those risks of letting a cat outside.

Your cat's biggest enemies in NYC are moving vehicles. If your cat crosses streets in your area, I'll write more about it.

Thanks for the reply. I was beginning to think you'd forgotten about me. Haha!

As for my cat...he is neutered and he's always ID'ed. He is also microchipped. He always has a collar, etc. I even have back-ups at home just in case he loses his outside.

He does cross the street here, but I don't live on a dead street either. So he's used to cars, etc.

What about the yard(s) and the doggy door thing?

Thanks!!

NYatKNIGHT
January 4th, 2007, 09:02 AM
Chances are slim if you are not a "networker"...

If you network, network, network, chances are good. Network, network, network. I would bet that at least one active member on WNY knows about a rent stabilized apartment in Manhattan. Network, network, network. Be proactive about PMs. Network, network, network. Join every website dedicated in some way to New York City. Network, network, network...This is essentially my advice too. My most valuable information has come from bartenders. They talk to a LOT of people. Of course, you'll have to put in some time....

Lolita88
January 4th, 2007, 09:57 AM
Chances are slim if you are not a "networker"...

If you network, network, network, chances are good. Network, network, network. I would bet that at least one active member on WNY knows about a rent stabilized apartment in Manhattan. Network, network, network. Be proactive about PMs. Network, network, network. Join every website dedicated in some way to New York City. Network, network, network...

Well Hello! Im Paola or Lola to most a future fashion designer and a nice girl about to move to Manhattan in a few months. How are you doing? LOL

No but seriously I see what you mean. And I am a very friendly person who loves to meet new people (oh Lord I sound like this is a personals ad LOL) but I think Im good at networking. Hopefully I get that slim chance!:p

Lolita88
January 4th, 2007, 10:03 AM
This is essentially my advice too. My most valuable information has come from bartenders. They talk to a LOT of people. Of course, you'll have to put in some time....


And time is something I will definetly be willing to put in. I dont know if this lets you get a better idea of me, but I work at an airport and although the pay isnt the best, part of me staying is how many people I meet daily and the conversations I get to have are amazing. Also I'll be in the fashion field and I know if you dont network, you wont go anywhere.

ASaint763
January 4th, 2007, 09:47 PM
So I've come across an apartment share that I would share with two other actors. One is a friend of a friend, and our personalities would really be a good fit. The only problem?? The room doesn't have a window. Is this commonplace in NY? Is it safe? legal???

lofter1
January 4th, 2007, 10:00 PM
Legally -- per the NYC Building Code for light & air -- a bedroom must either have a window that opens or an operable skylight (or partitions that allow light / air into the sleeping area).

However you will find places all over NYC where building owners have allowed the insertion of -- or constructed themselves -- partitions within dwelling units to increase the number of "bedrooms". Interior "offices" with no windows (the unscrupulous developers' way of squeezing in another "bedroom" while skirting the Building Code) are often used as bedrooms.

Just be extra familiar with fire exits it the building ... :cool:

Schadenfrau
January 4th, 2007, 10:04 PM
It's pretty common to divide a space like that for roommate situations.

Like Lofter said, it's not technically legal, but it is very common.

ASaint763
January 4th, 2007, 10:06 PM
Thanks. Now, this place, is at W.40th and Ninth...I know the area has some nice restaurants and even a dance studio nearby. I was totally sold on the idea until I found out that there was no window in the bedroom...just finally got a lead on fellow actors that I could get along with that would allow a cat.

Should I still continue to look??

Schadenfrau
January 5th, 2007, 12:56 PM
If it's a good price, I'd take it. You can always move, and it's not very likely that you'd find a situation with a 3-bedroom apartment in Manhattan and in your price range.

Punzie
January 6th, 2007, 09:32 AM
Should "Moving to New York" should be a sub-forum?:)



Is it unsafe to leave a doggy door open into a yard? Are the yards community yards? Mine just basically go in and out all day. I don't think anyone would think they were left outside for long periods of time (cause they'd see the doggy door). But if I'd have to share the yard, then that's different.


If you own or rent a private house, you will have a private yard. (As least in Queens and Nassau County, L.I.) I'm sure there are exceptions to this, but I can't think of any at the moment.

The property may already have a fence or short gate enclosing it. If it doesn't, and you own the house, you would be legally allowed to put one up and would probably be eager to do so; it would be the only way your dog would have free roam of the yard. If you own the house, of course you could install one or more doggy doors.

In terms of renting, your dog is so accustomed to the freedom of a yard that you should only look at houses with enclosed yards. For you, whether or not the house has one (that's intact) is a "deal-breaker". Luckily, great many houses in many different areas have enclosed yards.

The question of a doggy door on a house rental is tough because there's little chance that there will be one. Most dog owners improvise once they move in.

I underlined "private house" in the first paragraph because with a multi-family house rental, you need to ask prospective landlords if the yard is yours or if you're sharing it with the other family(s).

Formula86
January 6th, 2007, 05:03 PM
Ok, cool. :) Even if I'm renting, I could always just replace the back door temporarily so I don't put a hole in their door. :)

Is it SAFE to have a doggy door, though? I mean, I have small dogs and so no one should be able to fit through the door, but is it still safe to have an unlocked doggy door open even when I'm not home? I would have multipul locks and a steel bar lock at the very top.

Thanks so much!

lofter1
January 7th, 2007, 10:17 AM
Is it SAFE to have a doggy door, though?

One thing springs to mind: Rats???

(Or maybe that's just in the horror-movie version)

Punzie
January 7th, 2007, 12:50 PM
One thing springs to mind: Rats???

(Or maybe that's just in the horror-movie version)

Her cat will take care of those.:D

But of the people I know who have doggy doors and don't have cats, I haven't heard of a rat problem.

I think that the discussion of doggy doors is very specific and should be taken to the "Dogs in NYC topic." I'll find it and post it here.

Punzie
January 7th, 2007, 01:02 PM
One thing springs to mind: Rats???

(Or maybe that's just in the horror-movie version)

Her cat will take care of those.:D

But of the people I know who have doggy doors on houses and don't have cats, I haven't heard of rat problem with the doors. (Doesn't mean the problem definitely doesn't sometimes exist, just means I haven't gotten word.)

The discussion of doggy doors is sufficiently specific that it should probably be taken to the topic of moving/living with pets:

http://wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=10745

Formula86
January 7th, 2007, 03:28 PM
Ok, I just posted that question in the thread you gave me. Thanks. :)

I am completely freaked out now. I cannot deal with rats. And my cat goes outside, so he might not be here to catch them.

Isn't there some sort of pest control that can help? Ok, I may be reaching...

ChasingBliss
January 8th, 2007, 10:00 AM
Hi All,

I will be in NY this weekend looking for apartments in Brooklyn, and I want to make I'm fully prepared to put in a full application for a place if I find the right one. So far, I have the following items prepared: Last 4 months' bank statements, letter of reference from my landlord, credit report, and offer letter from my new job stating salary. Is there anything else I need?

Front_Porch
January 8th, 2007, 01:27 PM
I have said this before on this thread, so forgive me if I'm repeating myself, but:

wear a shirt and tie (or a blouse and slacks if you're female).

Obviously you want to wear comfy shoes, and sneakers are fine, but if you're up against other applicants, I cannot stress enough what a statement being slightly dressed-up makes.

ali r.
{downtown broker and suburban landlady}

LawJen07
January 8th, 2007, 02:12 PM
Hi (I posted this message before, but have a feeling it got buried in all the doggie dog posts),

I've been reading all the posts and they've been extremely helpful, but I figured I'd ask a few questions specifically tailored to my situation.

I'm a 25y/o female currently finishing up my last semester of law school in Cleveland and have a job lined up with a Big NY law firm. Starting salary will be $145k. I'll be moving probably after I take the bar exam in July, around August 1st. I'm thinking that I'll go apartment hunting in early July.

I'm trying to figure out a good fit for a neighborhood and am having trouble as many sound good to me. My firm is located in the World Finanacial Center downtown. An easy commute would be nice but I don't mind a longer commute if I can get more bang for my buck so to speak in other areas. I've thought about looking in Battery Park City and areas near my office, but have heard that it gets rather deserted at night. I lived in the Village this past summer for a few months while doing a summer job with my firm and loved it, but felt it was a little too much of a college area for me (I was living in NYU summer housing). I've tossed around the idea of looking outside of Manhattan as well (i.e. Queens, Brooklyn, Jersey, etc.).

Basically, what I'd ideally like is the following:

Rent for under $2500/month is possible, but the lower the better (have to pay back a bunch of student loans)

Preferably a 1 br

A neighborhood that's got lots of young professionals like myself, has easy access to the subway, grocery stores, movie theatres, etc.

A doorman building with an elevator would be a plus, but that's negotiable.

Basically, I'm trying to figure out where I could best get my money's worth (biggest, nicest, apartment that won't cost me an arm and a leg) in a neighborhood with a lot to do. Any recommendations? Hopefully this is coherent. If not, I apologize and I'll clarify later. Thanks so much!

http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/images/misc/progress.gif

Front_Porch
January 8th, 2007, 02:46 PM
Your budget is a little low for your salary (general rule of thumb is 25%; I understand about the student loans, but unfortunately, your peers are helping set the market prices.)

You will end up compromising on something. If I were you I would either:
1) compromise on space and get a really nice studio like www.elliman.com #827687. That puts you in a dollhouse, but in a nice part of the Village with a part-time doorman, and laundry in the building, and to the extent it feels "student-y" you'll be able to go south to go out.

or
2) live in a fun but inconvenient neighborhood. I would pick Kip's Bay for you because there's lots of different restaurants and lots of singles (it's near the hospitals, so you get a bunch of doctors and residents). This raises the hairy possibility of a three-train commute, but it's still probably only half an hour to the WFC, and a building like 230 East 30th will rent you an alcove studio with a nice marble bath and a view for that price. (This is a direct rental building, so I don't have a listing to show you.) No doorman but video security, laundry, etc.

ali r.
{downtown broker}

fishermb
January 8th, 2007, 05:16 PM
Getting close to making a trip up to the city to try and sign a lease on a place, will be looking for a small studio somewhere as I have indicated in earlier posts. Because of my salary, I know I will need a guarantor, and my mom is going to make the trip with me to sign (and subsequently, will help out with the rent as well).

What I'm wondering is, considering that she is an out-of the tri-state area guarantor, is there anything specific that I should know about this situation, and what exactly do she and I need to bring with us? I won't be starting my job until 2 weeks after I move in, and I just graduated college so I don't have any pay stubs or anything of that sort, but obviously my parents are able to provide all of that stuff I guess (though my dad runs his own business.)

Thanks all-

ManhattanKnight
January 8th, 2007, 05:17 PM
LawJen07, on your budget, your chances of finding a 1-BR in a desirable Manhattan neighborhood are very slim, but as Front Porch says, you should be able to find a decent studio apt. If that's where you wind up, I'd suggest that you then take some time to get to know the City better and grab a better opportunity when you spot one.

Anyhow, as a 1st-year associate at a big NYC lawfirm, it's not like you're going to be spending much time at home or seeing movies or dining at nice restaurants.

ASaint763
January 8th, 2007, 07:38 PM
I have a potential roommate situation that might fall through, and considering other options. I'm from out of state, but make a decent salary (roughly $40K) and wondering if I would qualify for a simple studio or 1 bedroom?? If they go by 40 x rent =annual salary, looks like I could afford something between $800-1000. Is this realistic? Or would I still not be able to rent? Hard to fathom since anywhere in CA (even SF!) I would qualify with my excellent credit and steady income (I'm transferring with my job.)

Advice??

If so, what neighborhoods, in addition to Astoria, do you reccomend??

Thanks!!

Schadenfrau
January 8th, 2007, 08:26 PM
Sorry, but I wouldn't count on being approved for an apartment with that income.

Not that it's unlivable, but rather it's not wise to jump into a lease in neighborhoods with studios available in that price range if you're not familiar with the city. Many apartments in that range won't require the 40x income standard, and you'd do well to see how much city grit you can live with before committing to a lease.

If you're just starting out, it's really better to have roommates, anyway. Move here on a sublet, then narrow your options.

ASaint763
January 9th, 2007, 01:43 AM
...why is NY housing so difficult??

I mean, really.

So I have this potential sublet. They want a deposit, but I'm uncomfortable paying the deposit straight out without signing at least some written contract to protect my interests. I mean, after all, a sublet shouldn't require you to pay a contract. Even realtor friends of mine state that I shouldn't go into a deposit situation without being on the lease or signing some sort of contract. But the situation is ideal, the people seem great (I know them through friends) and the area is ideal for an actor with a corporate america day job like me...

But for future reference...areas in Queens or Brooklyn? Is it completely out of reality for someone with an income of $40-60K to not have their own place?? I won't earn more than that until I get a few acting gigs (and in tv/film nonetheless...) How do people do it on their own???

antinimby
January 9th, 2007, 02:05 AM
^ Simple: not enough supply to meet the demand.

Schadenfrau
January 9th, 2007, 02:16 AM
I hate to say it, but you're not likely to find a place of your own in Queens or Brooklyn with the income you're talking about, especially if you're factoring in freelance work as part of the income.

If you're looking to move in with roommates, a deposit is standard. If you want to come up with a contract, that's something that you need to work out with the individuals involved, and the landlord shouldn't be needed there.

I don't mean to be mysterious, but things will become much more clear once you've lived here for a bit. You'll hear of neighborhoods you might be interested in, and you'll find ways around income requirements.

However, none of the landlords who would rent an $800 a month studio are going to be available to people looking online- you've really got to do footwork with those types. Honestly, just move here and sort things out from there. Asking about neighborhoods where you could rent your own apartment in in Queens/Brooklyn is putting the cart before the horse.

Really, people "do it on their own" through experience. You'll pay your dues with roommates, and you'll learn from there.

Front_Porch
January 9th, 2007, 09:40 AM
Asaint763,

If you like the people you're subletting from, and you somehow know them, you should be able to exchange a deposit for a written sublease -- you can print a standard lease from the Internet (google Blumberg and lease as search terms).

Just make sure they have an actual lease on the property, and you're not being scammed.

Otherwise, on your budget, you might want to look into The Bronx. The commute to the east side isn't all that bad.

ali r.
{downtown broker}

Schadenfrau
January 9th, 2007, 10:56 AM
Parts of the Bronx even have quick commutes to the west side- primarily the area around Yankee Stadium.

ryan
January 9th, 2007, 02:38 PM
A little blunt honesty from Consumerist (http://www.consumerist.com/consumer/howto/how-to-move-to-new-york-city-sane-and-not-broke-226540.php). I think the first and the last are particularly good points.

HOW TO: Move To New York City Sane And Not Broke (http://consumerist.com/consumer/howto/how-to-move-to-new-york-city-sane-and-not-broke-226540.php)

First, ask yourself...
DO I REALLY NEED TO MOVE TO NEW YORK? Answering no to this is the easiest way to avoid the inevitable hassle and heartache of. New York City is a glittering emerald slut, full of potential and promise, but it can also be a total bitch. Nightlife is down ever since they enacted that cabaret law. The city's conduits of power are increasingly rusty and incestuous. Parts of the city are becoming, or already are, Disney versions of themselves, like the Lower East Side and Times Square, respectively. There's lots of other great cities in the world. The Bay Area has nicer weather. Philadelphia has dirt cheap rents. Even so, New York is awesome and is still the capital of the world for many a human endeavor. Let's move!

TAP PERSONAL CONTACTS. The easiest way to move to NYC is to have a friend, or a friend of a friend, who will let you crash in their apartment until you get your shit together. Be cool and offer to help out with rent as much as you can. If you're broke, maybe offer to clean up the apartment really nice all the time.

SCOPE OUT THE RENTAL MARKET. Determine where you would like to live and how much you can pay. Personal finance gurus recommend spending no more than 25% of your expected salary on rent. Realistically, you may have to spend up to 50%. But if you lock yourself into a high rent so you can live in "the cool spot" you may end up spending all your time inside your stupid little apartment cause you can never afford to go out. Think smaller and cheaper.
On this note, Brooklyn is a nice, cheaper-than-Manhattan place. Fort Greene and Carrol Gardens are good spots to look at in Brooklyn. Rents are relatively affordable, amenities are there, it's not too far from Manhattan, and they're fairly safe. Living near but not next to housing projects is a sure way to get more apartment for your money.
If you must live in Manhattan, Upper Upper West Side (past the 100's) has become affordable. There's places to be found on the more easternly points of the Lower East Side.
Cruise Craiglist for the going rates in your desired area(s) for 2+ roomies. Hone in what rent you think you're going to be paying each month. This number will rule your life.

SAVE Five times your expected monthly rent. To move into a lease, you will probably have to put up two month's rent + security deposit (usually another month's rent). There may even be a broker's fee, which is at least another month's rent. You will need the rest of the money to feed yourself and not feel like a loser. Stuff it in a high-yield online savings account, like HSBC (http://www.hsbc.com/) or INGDirect (http://www.ingdirect.com/).

DUMP YOUR JUNK. You probably don't need about 90% off what you own. Hold a yard sale. Donate. Digitize everything you don't need a real-world copy of. Put stuff in local storage. Throw it away. Whatever you do, just get rid of it. A good goal is reducing your belongings to an essential wardrobe, books, and your "tools of the trade." For most people this means a computer. For you it may be a welding torch. Shipping costs. Space in NYC is at a premium. Less stuff means less stuff you don't have room for.

LINE UP JOB PROSPECTS. Send out feelers and resumes before you arrive. Tap those personal connections. Let people know you're coming. If you went to college, call up the alumni office and see if they can hook you up with former students in New York. Monster.com has never done anything for us. Craigslist (http://newyork.craigslist.org/jjj/) has. Don't get discouraged if people don't initially seem that interested in you. Tons of people say they're going to move to New York but never do, so NYC veterans learn to take a policy of, "I'll see it when I see it." That's okay, just start cranking the wheel on getting a cash flow going as early as possible.

MOVE. Go Greyhound. Fly coach. Drive yourself. U-Hauls and the like can be expensive over long distances, so its cheaper to ship your stuff freight with a trucking company like ROADWAY (http://www.roadway.com/) and then get to NYC by other means. If you've already reduced everything to two pieces of luggage, bonus.
Once you're here...

DO MASLOW. Take care of your pyramid of needs, working from the bottom up. If you have a choice between doing something at the top of this pyramid, versus something at the bottom, do the thing at the bottom. Not taking care of your needs at the bottom will thwart your attempts to do the ones at the top.
http://www.consumerist.com/assets/resources/2007/01/maslows.jpg
At the same time, maybe you will have to eat only one box of pasta a day so you can afford to go out for social drinks. That's fine, just don't make it a habit, or you may end up begging for quarters in Union Square.

GET A JOB. Even if it sucks. You need to make money just to tread water. Our first job was as a bike messenger. In winter. Saner folk go the temping route. Atrium (http://www.atriumstaff.com/) is a fantastic temping agency. Tell them Ben Popken sent you. If you refer people to them who stay on for a few months, you get a small finder's fee.

LEARN TO ENJOY SOLITUDE. It's easy to feel lonely in a city of a gazillion people. That's because you are alone and no one wants to talk to you. Be prepared to have no new friends for at least a year. Be prepared for people who say, "Oh, we'll totally hang out once you're here," and then stand you up even after you set a date. Everyone's got crazy schedules here so "hang out with the new guy" may rank pretty low. Be glad people do this, so you can scratch 'em off your list before they have time to really disappoint you.

BECOME AWESOME. Whatever your deal is, be it your job or your hobby, get really good at it. You will have lots of free time to work on this because you have no friends. Socializing is often centered around people who have "your thing" in common, so it helps to be dedicated and skilled in it. This is for both personal satisfaction, and that other people will take you seriously if you're taking your thing seriously.

TUNNEL. Use the resources of your current crappy job to get you your next, better job. With the money from bike messengering, we bought clothes that made us look presentable for the temp agency. Between directing phone calls at the temp job, we blasted out hundreds of resumes that eventually landed us a job at an online marketing firm. While at the online marketing firm, we started an advertising blog on the company's behalf that ended up getting us a job with Gawker. Now we're tunneling towards building a six-month emergency cushion and doing more personal creative projects.

DON'T MOVE BACK. A lot of people quit New York less than a year after moving. That's a personal choice, but if you're trying to be in New York, obviously leaving it is not a viable solution. If things get so hard you want to move back, ask for help from family and friends. Evaluate the choices you're making, the things you're buying, and see where you can cut back. Realize you're not going to get that super-star job right off the bat (see: BECOME AWESOME). Stiffen that upper lip. Or cry. Whatever you need to do, just don't move back. Life is hard. Welcome to it.

— BEN POPKEN

haloperi
January 9th, 2007, 05:27 PM
I really don't care how small the place I live in is..
As long as I can sleep and wash..

Anyways, that said, you know those $500/month ads on Craigslist (for renting a room/ apt. share).. are they legit?

Do $500/month rooms actually exist in NYC? (no matter how small) :P lol

lofter1
January 9th, 2007, 09:10 PM
GREAT advice :




First, ask yourself...

DO I REALLY NEED TO MOVE TO NEW YORK?

Answering no to this is the easiest way to avoid the inevitable hassle and heartache ... New York City is a glittering emerald slut, full of potential and promise, but it can also be a total bitch.


And yes, $500/month rent for a roommate situation can be found (gotta add on to that for utilities, etc.) ...

Just remember: You're looking for a place to live -- and it will be temporary. Although it would be great to live with some folks that turn out to be friends the important thing is to get yourself a foothold in the City -- if it isn't perfect or what you want you can always move on. But it is always a really good idea to have some clear groundrules in any roommate situation.

melissamango
January 10th, 2007, 01:47 PM
Hello...

I'm planning to move to New York City within the year and would like to meet other people from the San Francisco Bay Area who are aspiring to relocate as well. I'm the only one of my friends that's doing so, thus far, and it would be ideal if I can plan a move with someone else.

A little bit about me: 28 y/o Financial Analyst ready to start a new and see if I can make things happen in the East Coast.

Any information or help would be greatly appreciated. And if you know anyone from over my way who's moving.. that'd be ideal.

Thanks!

Lolita88
January 11th, 2007, 10:19 AM
OK so whats the average amount of money I can plan on spending a month on rent If Im moving with room mate. We dont mind sharing a room. Also we would like to live in Manhattan. (I think any part as long as there is plenty of life and is safe is ok) I wanted to know how much per person? Thanks in advance:p

conezone
January 11th, 2007, 10:22 AM
OK so whats the average amount of money I can plan on spending a month on rent If Im moving with room mate. We dont mind sharing a room. Also we would like to live in Manhattan. (I think any part as long as there is plenty of life and is safe is ok) I wanted to know how much per person? Thanks in advance:p

$847.63

fishermb
January 11th, 2007, 12:25 PM
repost as my original seems to have been lost...

Getting close to making a trip up to the city to try and sign a lease on a place, will be looking for a small studio somewhere as I have indicated in earlier posts. Because of my salary, I know I will need a guarantor, and my mom is going to make the trip with me to sign (and subsequently, will help out with the rent as well).

What I'm wondering is, considering that she is an out-of the tri-state area guarantor, is there anything specific that I should know about this situation, and what exactly do she and I need to bring with us? I won't be starting my job until 2 weeks after I move in, and I just graduated college so I don't have any pay stubs or anything of that sort, but obviously my parents are able to provide all of that stuff I guess (though my dad runs his own business.)

Thanks all-

Front_Porch
January 11th, 2007, 01:11 PM
Fishermb: I didn't reply to your original because I thought I would be a downer, but since you reposted: I think you're going to have a hard time.

Would love to hear the experience of others on this board, but from my point of view (a real estate agent, therefore closely allied with landlords) you don't have money. You don't have an income, you don't have a history of having an income, and you effectively don't have a guarantor.

The easiest route -- since you do have a job -- is to lean on your company here, and get placement assistance from them. The second route is to have your mom pay several months rent up front. The third route -- the one you may be stuck with -- is to find a roomie who has already guaranteed their lease, and do a sublet/share.

Think about it from the landlord's point of view: even if you showed up February 1 with a suitcase full of cash that would cover February, March, and April, you're still a rental risk. What's the landlord's recourse if you're in the apartment and you don't pay May? Nothing.

I feel like it may take a personal connection to get you an apartment -- maybe your school has an alumni network you can send an email blast out on?

ali r.
{downtown broker}

Lolita88
January 11th, 2007, 01:29 PM
$847.63

Really I thought it would be more? Is that anywhere in Manhattan?

Kitty-london
January 11th, 2007, 02:29 PM
Hey guys. Hope this is in the right place, its just a general wonderment. How much would you expect to pay per month, for a one bedroom appt in the following areas: Tribeca, greenwich village Soho, gramercy and chelsea?? xx

lofter1
January 11th, 2007, 05:52 PM
There are two non-regulated 1 bedrooms in my building in SoHo ...

Recent prices for leases signed:

1 BR / ~ 1500 sf: ~ $5K / Month
1 BR / ~ 1,000 sf: ~ $3.5K / Month

Mandi25
January 11th, 2007, 09:35 PM
Very funny, conezone...that one made me laugh out loud. :D

webskare
January 12th, 2007, 03:34 AM
Hey all, this thread has a lot of great info!

About me: I'm a 21 year old guy, graduating from an out-of-state college in May. I have a job offer doing IT at a bank in the Financial district, paying $60,000 a year.

I've found it very hard to figure out what neighborhoods are good to live in. So if anyone could point me to some good neighborhoods, I would be really greatful! Here's what I'm looking for:

- Per-person rent of $1500 or less (I've given up on not having a roommate!)
- Within 30 minutes of Fulton St./Broadway-Nassau station, preferably without transferring if possible (lines: 2, 3, 4, 5, A, C, J, M, Z)
- Relatively 'tame' neighborhood; low crime; quietish (for NY anyway)
- Conveniences: good subway service, nearby stores, etc.
- Lots of young professionals; good single scene for 20-somethings

If I can't get all of this on my budget, the list is ordered with the more important stuff at the top. So what neighborhoods should I be focusing on?

One final question, if I want to move in in mid-to-late June, when should I start calling brokers and looking at places?

Oh also, I've never lived in a city before (grew up way out in Suffolk County on Long Island, went to school in rural Pennsylvania), so will this be total culture shock for me? (I tend to be introverted and shy, it's been worrying me a little bit...)

Thanks for reading!

NameGirl
January 13th, 2007, 02:41 AM
...why is NY housing so difficult??

I mean, really.

So I have this potential sublet. They want a deposit, but I'm uncomfortable paying the deposit straight out without signing at least some written contract to protect my interests. I mean, after all, a sublet shouldn't require you to pay a contract. Even realtor friends of mine state that I shouldn't go into a deposit situation without being on the lease or signing some sort of contract. But the situation is ideal, the people seem great (I know them through friends) and the area is ideal for an actor with a corporate america day job like me...

But for future reference...areas in Queens or Brooklyn? Is it completely out of reality for someone with an income of $40-60K to not have their own place?? I won't earn more than that until I get a few acting gigs (and in tv/film nonetheless...) How do people do it on their own???

With your salary, you can easily get a studio or 1 bedroom in the Brooklyn neighborhood of BayRidge. It's a nice area. You'll be fine there.

Darren
January 13th, 2007, 11:18 AM
I was wondering if their is any Agenceys that could help me on my move to NYC

wiredgirl445
January 13th, 2007, 05:12 PM
A friend and myself are planning on moving to New York in August. We don't particularly want to live in Manhattan, we are open to the boroughs or Jersey city, etc. We are planing a trip in March to go look around some different areas. What are some suggestions of places that are near/close that are safe and affordable (less then 2300 a month)? How would you suggest we get started with this move?

ManhattanKnight
January 13th, 2007, 05:36 PM
How would you suggest we get started with this move?

http://img401.imageshack.us/img401/787/searchmc9.jpg

Formula86
January 14th, 2007, 03:43 AM
Okay, I did a search in this thread, but I didn't find anything.

Just a quick question -
What does "railroad style" mean? I come across it a lot while searching for places to live.

Thanks in advance!

ManhattanKnight
January 14th, 2007, 06:46 AM
^
http://img269.imageshack.us/img269/4216/googlepc4.jpg

Formula86
January 14th, 2007, 06:52 AM
You know, everything can be answered elsewhere. Is there even a purpose for this thread?

The only real information I've gotten from this forum is from ONE single member through PM's.

I asked here because I wanted to know whether or not a "railroad style" apartment is a good or bad thing. Every real estate ad can spin it one way or the other. And if I read the definition for myself, I may not know whether or not whatever it is, is a good idea in real life. Maybe they are usually cheaper, etc.

So stop being such an ass. I asked here for a reason.

Punzie
January 14th, 2007, 12:53 PM
I asked here because I wanted to know whether or not a "railroad style" apartment is a good or bad thing. Every real estate ad can spin it one way or the other. And if I read the definition for myself, I may not know whether or not whatever it is, is a good idea in real life. Maybe they are usually cheaper, etc.

In a "railroad style" apartment, rooms are attached together like railroad cars, one after another. The advantage is that the rent/price is usually less expensive than a non-railroad place of comparable square footage in a comparable location.

For a single person, this is just fine. Two people sharing one bedroom together occasionally get in the way of one another, but it usually works out.

If housemates have separate bedrooms: one housemate can only get to her bedroom by walking through the bedroom of her housemate. (Think railroad.) This situation can probably be worked out by reasonable people.

The big problem with railroad apartments: three or more people living in one. No privacy, people bumping into one another... what a nightmare.

My friend owns a 2-family house in Queens, and he resides on the first floor, which is a (quite large) modified railroad. The two full bathrooms are off to the sides of the "front car" and "back car"; one does not have to walk through bathrooms. The "cars" themselves are much wider.

He paid a considerably lower price for the house because of the first floor's design. He knew when he bought the house, however, that he would definitely not be raising children in it. With regard to pets, he owns rabbits and they enjoy running up and down the "railroad stretch".

wiredgirl445
January 14th, 2007, 12:55 PM
I appreciate your help with sending me through the thread to find some information. And while I did find some good places to start a search on the internet, most of the information was related to apartments in NYC. I am more trying to get some advice from those who know about or live in places such as Jersey City, Hoboken, Yorkville, or Brooklyn, Bronx. Just wanting to see what people have to say about these areas i.e, safe, affordable, close commute to the city. Thank you.

Schadenfrau
January 14th, 2007, 12:56 PM
Formula86, you've been given plenty of advice by many forum members- just not the advice you're looking to hear.

If you had performed the basic Google searches ManhattanKnight is suggesting, you wouldn't need to ask so many redundant questions. Though, the more questions you ask, the more apparent it becomes that it wouldn't be wise for you to move to NYC.

I have never heard of a single person in NYC, or even on Long Island, with a "doggy door." The aforementioned Google search should have made you well aware that most people here live in apartments, and they certainly don't have yards. If you can't familiarize yourself with the most basic information like that, you're wasting everyones' time, including your own.

milleniumcab
January 14th, 2007, 05:35 PM
I live in a railroad apartment, all 450 sqft of it.. When you enter, you are in the kitchen. Walk through the kitchen to the living room, then to the first bedroom and then to the second bedroom. But I have separated the entrances to each bedroom from the living room ( it took a lot of imagination and a small fortune ). ..So I can now say my apartment is a semi-railroad apartment...:D

wiredgirl445
January 14th, 2007, 08:35 PM
I also have a question on when a good time would be to try and sign a lease. If we are looking to actually move in to a place like Brooklyn at the beginning of August, when would be the best time to plan a trip there to sign a lease? What's the earliest or latest date we should do this on? Thanks

kalki
January 14th, 2007, 09:13 PM
Ok, so it's late and I can't sleep because I'm trying to work this all out in my head and it's not working. What better way to figure out this stuff then to ask the people who know? :) (I'll try to give as much information as I can, so bear with me if this seems wordy)

We are in the process of selling our home in Maryland and moving back to NYC after being away for 8 years. I'm trying to figure out the logistics of it all and it's literally keeping me awake at night.

Step 1 is obviously to sell the house. (ie, get a contract signed and start the closing process, which takes about 30 days)

Ok, so say this happens and we're ready to proceed with getting a place in NYC. My husband's job allows him to work from home, so he won't be changing jobs. I, on the other hand, will be going from part-time (kinda interning) work here in Maryland to working full-time in NYC. And making much more than I make now. (I'm in school now here and will be concentrating more on working when I move, hence the large jump in pay.)

I read a link (http://www.homesteadnyc.com/index.cfm?page=Renter) that kinda outlines what you need to rent in NYC. Now my husband makes great money alone, but for the kinds of places we're looking, he doesn't make 40 to 50 times the monthly rent. (Is that the common number used? I guess I should make sure of that to begin with)

The last piece of backstory is that when we sell our house, any debt we have will be completely paid off. (Aside from student loans) But this will only happen on the day that we officially close on our house (ie, the day we move out) and get the check. Will this effect our chances of getting an apartment with having debt before we sell the house? (The link mentions that they do credit checks. And while the credit is fine, there is debt there)

So here are some of my questions. I need to get a job for us to then get an apartment. We have a couple friends in the city that we can stay with for a few days here and there to find these things, but I'm confused on the order and any sort of obstacles we might come across. (I'm a planner and like to at least have some idea of what we're getting into!)

What order do these things need to happen in? I'll be looking for full-time administrative assistant positions (with hopefully something more to them than just outlook and filing!), but am completely flexible on where in the city and the only hang up would be a decent salary. I have been looking on Craigslist and have found tons of jobs that I would qualify for and would fit the salary requirements for me. So it doesn't seem like it would be hard for me to get and find a job.

But the link above said that they want a letter from your employer stating how long you've been working there, the salary you make, pay stubs, etc. How does that work if you aren't living in the city yet? I could provide that from the job I'm at now, but it will be significantly lower than what I'll be making in NYC. (Getting this letter from my husband's employer is no problem)

So my original plan was this. Say we sign a contract on our house Feb 1. Feb 2-4 I go into the city and go on interviews I have set up in advance. Get job, come home, go back a week later and find an apartment. But now I doubt this will work for a few reasons. One, will I be able to get an Admin Assist job that didn't start for a month? And if so, will they write a letter stating that I'll be working for them starting March 1 and will a future landlord accept this as proof of salary? Two, is it feasible to find an apartment 2 weeks before you want to move into it? Or is it like other places where you need to look 30 days out? Or even worse, would we get the keys that day for the place and start paying rent right then? (That's probably the case, which actually isn't that big of a deal if it's only two weeks)

I guess I thought that I had done a lot of research and kinda had a plan, but as time gets closer, I'm starting to panic some. Can anyone point me to some good resources (maybe even a breakdown of the steps one can take) for moving to NYC? It's been a long time since we've lived there and the last time either of us had to look for a place was 93! So I apologize for being so long-winded, just wanted to make sure I got it all out there the first time :)

Front_Porch
January 14th, 2007, 09:58 PM
Congratulations of moving back, the city is very different from when you left, but most people think it's nicer.

Don't worry so much about the sale of your house and your mortgage debt -- the way that will show up on your credit report, it shouldn't bother a potential landlord.

But you probably do need to make 45 times your monthly rent to sign a long-term lease. What you might want to do is to look into a short-term one or two month sublease, so you have some place to crash for a couple of months while you look for a job, and then you can get a longer-term lease based on both incomes.

ali r.
{downtown broker}

kalki
January 14th, 2007, 10:13 PM
Thanks Front Porch! Oh yeah, completely different from when we lived there. We've been back to visit at least 4 times a year for the last 3 years, so we have a good sense of it some.


We have some friends there we can stay with, so we're going to try to go up and have me get a job before we rent an apartment. Is it unrealistic to think we could find a place looking for a week about 2-3 weeks before we would want to move in?

Also, I see you are a downtown broker. Are there good places to be had for $2500 and under there? We're interested in moving to the Fin Dist, Battery park, etc.

Thanks again for the info!

fishermb
January 15th, 2007, 11:28 AM
Also, I see you are a downtown broker. Are there good places to be had for $2500 and under there? We're interested in moving to the Fin Dist, Battery park, etc.


From what I've seen, a 1-br in a new luxury hi-rise in the financial district is going for closer to $3000, which will have a fulltime doorman, gym, lounge, decks, often concierge servivces, and other nice amenities.

Front_Porch
January 15th, 2007, 03:03 PM
Kalki, I think you could get a one-bedroom for $2,600 if you don't need new new.

Your best bet is to come up and trot around Battery Park City -- many of those buildings will deal directly with you and allow you to skip the brokers' fee.

Bring a copy of your last year's tax returns and some recent pay stubs.

ali r.
{downtown broker}

melissamango
January 15th, 2007, 03:16 PM
Hello....

So I'm planning to move to NYC within the year and have decided that I want to sublet first and try things out before I find a permanent place. Does anyone know of someone who sublets their studio/apartment/room in the summer in or around Manhattan?

Any information would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks!

fishermb
January 15th, 2007, 06:46 PM
Hello....

So I'm planning to move to NYC within the year and have decided that I want to sublet first and try things out before I find a permanent place. Does anyone know of someone who sublets their studio/apartment/room in the summer in or around Manhattan?

Any information would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks!

There are always tons of sublets on craigslist. My advice is to put up a post in the "sublet/temp wanted" section giving a general idea of your situation, when you want to move, and areas you are looking in. While there are a lot of people who post ads for their available sublet, I happened to find mine by having someone contact me because I put up a "wanted" post. The majority of people listing sublets right now are for places available ASAP, or for the 1st of the upcoming month, but occasionally there's people posting availabilities for months in advance, so check it out.

melissamango
January 16th, 2007, 01:28 AM
Thanks for the advice FisherMB! I'll check out Craigslist ASAP.

DOUGLASTONQUEENS
January 16th, 2007, 09:35 PM
What are the best areas to live in Westchester? (Public Transportation, Affordable Apartments, Safe Neighborhood [Nightlife not required])

ryan
January 16th, 2007, 10:20 PM
Tuckahoe sounds really funny...but seriously a good friend of mine shopped all of Westchester and decided it was the best cheap/access to transportation/safe compromise for her. She had a nice apartment with a garden. I've been told Tarrytown is the most city-ish.

Schadenfrau
January 16th, 2007, 10:39 PM
Tarrytown/Tuckahoe are nice, but I'd definitely go for something in the Bronxville PO before that. It's a shorter train ride, and you can find apartments on the Yonkers/Mt. Vernon side for a really fair price.

If you're not looking to be in the Bronxville school district, the apartments are affordable. Also, the Fleetwood section of Mt. Vernon is great. Both of these stops are 20-25 minutes from Grand Central, and you get a lot of apartment for the money.

These places are commuter havens, and any apartments you find will be within easy walking distance to the MetroNorth, unlike much of Westchester. I'm stupidly versed in southern Westchester knowledge, so please, ask away.

DOUGLASTONQUEENS
January 17th, 2007, 01:29 AM
Wondering about the Westchester area because I might attend school there (Purchase).

ryan
January 17th, 2007, 10:00 AM
Great school. It's best to live on campus, but if not, most people live in Port Chester. I would avoid White Plains.

lerobsing
January 18th, 2007, 08:14 AM
Good morning y'all -

Think i may have put this question in the wrong place yesterday - sorry.
Are there any New York City public school teachers out there who were hired in another state before moving to NY?
I have a guaranteed job but i don't know at what school yet -
Would like to hear from anyone who's experienced this -

So - we're moving up in early July and would like to find short-term housing (1,2,3 months) somewhere kinda central as to accommodate a relatively reasonable commute if i were to teach in Brooklyn, Queens, or Manhattan. We would like a 1 bedroom at around 2000 a month -
The question here is how soon is it reasonable to look for a short-term place?
We're coming up in march to visit and i'm thinkin' that's probably too early?
So....April, May?
Also, what would be the best "central" location? Maybe East Village? We don't care about nightlife, no nightlife, young, old, whatever!

Please advise -
Thanks y'all -
lerobsing

DOUGLASTONQUEENS
January 18th, 2007, 11:36 AM
Great school. It's best to live on campus, but if not, most people live in Port Chester. I would avoid White Plains.

Why would you avoid White Plains?
How about Rye?

dvs_devil
January 22nd, 2007, 01:37 PM
Hi there, kind of new here, im actuallyt posting from the UK. I'm hoping to move to the US in a couple of years and was wondering what life is like in the New York, and is there a lot of jobs, since im magering in IT Computers. Also is the people there prejudice and racial tension since i'm a non-religious Pakistani muslim.

ryan
January 23rd, 2007, 06:38 PM
Why would you avoid White Plains?
How about Rye?

Personal preference. I've pretty much said all I know.

milleniumcab
January 23rd, 2007, 10:53 PM
Why would you avoid White Plains?
How about Rye?
My sister in law lives in Rye...Rye is an excellent city.. But it probably is not the best choice if money is a concern...

TarAldarion
January 24th, 2007, 01:19 PM
Hello evryone
ok posted this before but need some more answers
My name is Aldarion im 22 yrs old and live in Oslo, Norway.
Im planning on moving to NY and live a couple of years(Maybe forever) and have some (many) questions.:confused:

1.What is the average rent prize on a appartment in NY.(about 40-50Squaremeters). is Queens close to manhattan. sounds like a nice place there.i pay about 1200$ in oslo

2.How much to buy an appartment in same size.(Costs about US700.000-800.000$ in Oslo)

3. And if i want to buy can i get a loan in US or do i have to take up a loan in Norway.

4. How is the job market in NY? is it easy to get jobs there as a chef or cook (is educated cook).

5.Whats the average salary per. month.(i earn about 3500$a month wich is 20$an our)

6. Were do i apply for an work permit. (US embassy?)

7. How much does it cost too live in NY (food, taxi, subway, electrisity, etc.) in average a month.

8.and lots of other questions.......

plz just give me whatever info you have, that you think i should know about because i know pretty much nothing.

Thank you......

Aldarion:)

And also, im sorry for my bad writing. talk much better then i write.
And how about taxes?

ManhattanKnight
January 24th, 2007, 01:27 PM
^I and at least one other person responded to your first posting, and you would have found answers to most of your questions if you'd followed the advice that you received.

kliq6
January 24th, 2007, 03:44 PM
I can answer one question for sure, TAXES are HIGH!!!!!!!!!!!!

milleniumcab
January 24th, 2007, 10:55 PM
This thread is a good one for people who needs some serious information about New York City but it has become a broken record as far as questions that are being asked...It seems nobody has the patience to search for answers before asking the same questions over and over again...:p

lofter1
January 24th, 2007, 11:07 PM
Agreed ^^^

But it must be said that the search function here isn't the friendliest one around :cool:

milleniumcab
January 24th, 2007, 11:11 PM
^^^ Hiiiiiimm, maybe then that might need some fixing before we fix the people...:D :D :D

Schadenfrau
January 24th, 2007, 11:25 PM
I really do think the search function works just fine.

So many times in this thread, you're just dealing with people who want you to post magical answers to their impossible questions. A $500 a month loft in Tribeca? Sure, right this way!

I understand that people have specific questions, but in the time it takes someone to type, "I don't want to read all of these pages," they could probably have breezed through at least two pages. If someone can't take the time to do that, NYC is better off without them.

lofter1
January 24th, 2007, 11:46 PM
I'll drink to that ^^^ :D

ryan
January 25th, 2007, 12:44 AM
When someone asks if Queens is close to Manhattan, they should be directed to the search capabilities of google.com.

Lolita88
January 25th, 2007, 10:02 AM
One of my co-workers (which lived in NYC for a while) told me the best time to visit Chinatown is ater 5? Is this true?

lofter1
January 25th, 2007, 12:10 PM
Depends what you're going down there for ---

If you're shopping for foodstuffs to cook for dinner better to go earlier.

If you want to see Chinatown in it's full craziness go mid-day ...

Lolita88
January 25th, 2007, 07:56 PM
Thanks... :P

milleniumcab
January 25th, 2007, 11:31 PM
Buy me one too Loft, my choice of drink is Cape Cod...:D

ManhattanKnight
January 27th, 2007, 02:06 PM
On the importance of networking (and, of course, being gayer than gay), in finding affordable apartments in NYC:


January 28, 2007
Habitats | Lower Broadway

In the Right Place at the Right Time

By FRED A. BERNSTEIN

IT was shortly after he appeared on the television show “Queer Eye for the Straight Guy” that Jeff Berman decided he couldn’t continue sharing an apartment near Battery Park with four roommates.

He still liked his roommates, but suddenly, he didn’t trust them with his furniture. The apartment’s fraternity house atmosphere, he said, hadn’t worried him “when we had a couch that cost $140, which we had split five ways.”

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/01/28/realestate/23habi.1.600.jpg


But now that “Queer Eye” had furnished the place with stylish pieces from Desiron in SoHo, Mr. Berman started feeling protective. “It is really nice stuff,” he said, pointing to a zebra-wood desk and a dining room set that could be on the cover of House & Garden. “I felt like the nagging mother,” he said.

So he was happy when a friend, Lauren Reece, asked him to share her 1,400-square-foot loft on Lower Broadway.

Ms. Reece, an owner of Billy’s Bakery, a 1950’s-style Chelsea institution, had also been on “Queer Eye,” not as a contestant, but as a dessert maven. At the time, she was Billy Reece and had not yet begun the transition from man to woman.

For Mr. Berman, a young lawyer who had met Ms. Reece — then Billy — at a bar in Chelsea two years before, moving in with a transsexual required a leap of faith. He was worried that a host of changes, physical as well as psychological, would make the perky Ms. Reece “a bit unstable.”

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/01/26/realestate/28habi.2.190.jpg

As it turns out, domestic tranquillity reigns. The two roommates could pass for a suburban couple: Mr. Berman, 26, in workout pants and a T-shirt, Ms. Reece, 28, in a pink cardigan and pearl necklace.

Home from work, Mr. Berman drinks a beer while Ms. Reece, who is perfecting her feminine figure, eyes a protein bar (not one of the cupcakes for which Billy’s Bakery is famous).

Mr. Berman’s bedroom is enclosed, at one end of the loft; Ms. Reece’s is reached by a stairway and sits atop the bathroom and laundry room, at the other end. The space separating them, with 14-foot ceilings and large, south-facing windows, is filled with the “Queer Eye” furniture.

“It was a boondoggle,” said Mr. Berman of his appearance on “Queer Eye.”(He is gay; his episode was about making a gay man “gayer.”)
Ms. Reece, too, has received free furniture from a television show. In 2005, “Law & Order: Criminal Intent” rented the loft for two days of shooting and in the process built a large storage unit, which the producers were glad to leave behind. These days, the shelves hold part of Ms. Reece’s collection of jadeite dishes, mostly from the 1940’s.

Against another wall is a large collection of American cookbooks, including a rare second edition of “Joy of Cooking.” Cookbooks “trace social history,” Ms. Reece said, reflecting every change in society, from the Depression, to shortages in wartime, to new technologies.

She also has every issue of Everyday Food magazine, published by Martha Stewart, one of her idols. In fact, she appeared on Martha’s TV show last May; at the time, she was introduced as Billy, though with long hair and a somewhat feminine appearance as a result of hormone treatments.

“Martha was cool, but some of the stagehands were a little surprised,” said Ms. Reece, who added that more recently, she had been rejected by TV shows after explaining that Billy no longer exists.

All of which intrigues the mild-mannered Mr. Berman, who came to New York in 2002 from Philadelphia to attend Columbia Law School. Before that, as an undergraduate at the University of Pennsylvania, he said, he was completely closeted, but by 2002 he was ready to explore life as a gay man in Manhattan.

During law school, he first lived in student housing near Grant’s Tomb, then moved with several of his classmates to the apartment downtown. In the process of coming out, he began blogging about his experiences. A producer at “Queer Eye” read his blog, which mentioned the four straight roommates, and recognized a hook for an unusual episode.

It begins with the “Queer Eye” cast — the Fab Five — meeting Mr. Berman and his roommates and trying to figure out which one is gay. (They didn’t pick Mr. Berman.)

At the time, the apartment had no discernible style, and Mr. Berman was flabbergasted when, in just four days, Thom Filicia and his team transformed it into a trendy bachelors’ pad. (He also received thousands of dollars’ worth of clothes, including a white dinner jacket, and cooking lessons at the French Culinary Institute.)

In the meantime, Billy Reece had some good luck of his own. After working at the Magnolia Bakery, an impossibly popular spot in the West Village, he left to start Billy’s with two partners. The business was a success almost from the day it opened in December 2003. Also in 2003, a friend, Tad Beck, invited him to share the loft.

In the late 1990’s, the owner of the building, which houses several theater companies as well as residential tenants, went bankrupt; the banks that took over the building tried to evict the tenants, Mr. Beck said. The tenants hired lawyers and ultimately won a settlement allowing them to stay in the building for life at rents far below market. Mr. Beck, the actual leaseholder, pays about $2,200 a month and is subject to only tiny annual increases.

He and Ms. Reece were roommates until Mr. Beck decided to attend art school in California. That’s when Ms. Reece asked Mr. Berman to move in, which involved bringing his “Queer Eye” furniture, now intermingled with Ms. Reece’s midcentury kitchen appliances and her giant armoire by Martha Stewart for Bernhardt.

But the armoire will be going; Ms. Reece plans to leave New York later this year. Her partners in Billy’s Bakery are buying her out, and she plans to move to the Midwest, not far from where her mother lives. Her family, she said, has been “amazingly supportive” of her sex change.

That will leave Mr. Berman as Mr. Beck’s only subtenant, which he says will be a welcome respite after years of roommates. Not that the place is quiet. The jeans store right downstairs plays “thumpa thumpa music” too loud, he said, and you can hear it through the floorboards until the store closes at 7 p.m.

But Mr. Berman rarely leaves his office at Debevoise & Plimpton in Midtown before 7, and otherwise the place is spacious, light and, by New York standards, a steal.

And it only took litigation, a reality series, a roommate’s sex change and two people’s out-of-state moves for him to get it.

Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company

ryan
January 27th, 2007, 02:13 PM
I've got to get out and buy some cupcakes.

Front_Porch
January 27th, 2007, 04:12 PM
How is a lawyer at Debevoise in a $2,200 apartment not subject to luxury decontrol? Is there a loophole if the tenant-of-record (in this case, Beck) doesn't make $175K even though his subtenant does?

ali r.
{downtown broker}

ManhattanKnight
January 27th, 2007, 04:40 PM
^Three possibilities: (1) he's only a year or two out of law school and almost certainly not yet earning $175K, much less for 2 years in a row (2) what counts is the tenant's, not the subtenant's, income and (3) we don't even know that the apartment is rent-stabilized (all that the article says is that the tenant reached a "settlement" with the landlord). The online version of the story omits a photo of the building's exterior that appears in the printed edition. It's a not-bad-looking 5-story castiron, and some of the rules that apply to Soho loft buildings may be at work here. Lofter1?

lofter1
January 28th, 2007, 11:55 AM
Correction to your post ^^^

The $175K Income benchmark that triggers possibility of de-regulation of an RS unit is based on Total Household Income -- roommates included.

Big Apple, eh?
February 1st, 2007, 05:43 PM
Hello all,

First time poster on this forum, so be gentle...

I have moved from Canada and am now enjoying my residence in midtown Manhattan, courtesy of my company. I work in lower Manahattan (downtown?) by NYSE.

First things first, of course, so had a look around central park, went to Rockefeller centre...

But for the past week I've been going out and seeing apartments for myself. Now hold on, before you go :rolleyes: and all, I looked through the first 30 odd pages of this article :)...I'm telling you, its not very easy going through the whole thing. I have gone out and seen some apartments (~25) primarily through craigslist.

I focused on Jersey (mainly because, its affordable, close-ish, and has some Indian stuff happening). I have been told to be weary of certain areas such as Bushwick, Washington heights, some far up in the Bronx. Now, I usually dont like asking for help unless I have to. So here I am.

I am looking to spend about ~1100 (yea I know...not looking for someplace in Tribeca or SoHo, thats for sure). People at work have been less than forthcoming about what and where etc.

I am running out of time, and need to get this setup as quickly as I can.
1) 1 bedroom apartment (not a studio)
2) ~1100/month (no share)
3) ~30-40 minutes to WTC path or City Hall MTA

I am a reasonable fixer upper...but I dont want to unless I have to. I am drawing absolute blanks on Queens and Brooklyn. I understand Flushing might be an area that would be reasonable, but I think its about an hour or so by train?

Personal situation: I am in my late twenties, male, single, zero US Credit history, Canadian Credit History very much ok, and making close to 6 figures...before taxes...man I thought Canada was bad with taxes...Federal, State AND city) Actually this is another reason I was looking in Jersey...they have a slightly higher state tax...but no city tax (yet).

Wow, this turned out longer than I thought. I'll do my best to answer if you have any questions.

Thank you immensely for your help.

Schadenfrau
February 1st, 2007, 05:57 PM
Inwood.

OmegaNYC
February 1st, 2007, 06:09 PM
^ Iwood would be a good choice. You'll be downtown on a A train in about 20 minuets. It always run express.

Lance75
February 1st, 2007, 07:15 PM
Inwood's a good suggestion.

Bay Ridge in Brooklyn is also a nice neighborhood, although it's probably close to the upper limit of your desired commute time.

Newark, perhaps? The Ironbound district is interesting, and it's short walk to Penn Station.


Any reason you absolutely must have a bedroom? If you're willing to settle for a studio, it could open up a few more possibilities. Given your age and marital status, it might be worth giving up some space to be in a "hipper" location close to other young singles.

Front_Porch
February 1st, 2007, 10:46 PM
For that price, I second Newark. There are rental units downtown (which is a little intimidating, so check it out at night) as well as in the Ironbound.

Foreign nationals can find housing difficult -- get a letter from your Canadian bank, stating your great credit history, and another one from your U.S. employer stating you are employed as a 'JOB TITLE' at a salary of $$XX.

Have those in hand, so you can make your case on the spot when you find something.

You are paying an extremely low percentage of your earnings in rent -- 25% is pretty "standard" and people have been known to crash through it -- but when you make your case to a landlord, turn it into a positive -- a sign that you're fiscally conservative.


ali r.
{downtown broker}

penetrode
February 2nd, 2007, 10:16 AM
Hi guys,

I am moving to NY the last week of October. I'm relatively familiar with the city and visit multiple times a year. I have a good friend up there and plan to stay with him until I get everything settled. Here is my plan/question;

I am an accountant and will be getting promoted to a business analyst. Surfing various employment websites, it looks as though in my field, I will have no problem finding a job up there in a reasonable amount of time (max 4 weeks)? I’ve re-done my entire resume and will be using my friend’s Manhattan address. I have about 2.5 years of experience and I estimate my salary to be in the $60k range. My girlfriend is a commercial real estate agent and will be re-locating to NY as soon as I get on my feet; Our combined income will be in the 6-figure range. My lifestyle is low maintenance, I don't go out to the trendy clubs, gamble or just blow money randomly. My partying is defined as a few guinnesses on the weekend. To put it bluntly, I don't go out much, most of my time is relagated to my girlfriend or recording music.

Housing
I’ve been researching this on and off and have narrowed it down to a few choices. I want to get a 450-500 sqft studio $1700 per month preferably in Murray Hill, east village, or les. I am considering Williamsburg as well. Looking on craigslist, this price looks definitely attainable. I figure renting a studio might be the best route because it’ll allow me to save a little bit of money and also give us about a year to settle in to the city and move into a bigger apt the next year. It seems that the studio apts $1500-1700 range all have broker fees? I’m willing to pay a broker fee if I can find that so called “perfect” place.

You guys live up there and should have a better idea if what I am planning is reasonable. Am I thinking entirely too positive or are my plans, particularly housing plans unrealistic? I’d love to hear what you guys think!

Thanks in advance!
chris

Big Apple, eh?
February 2nd, 2007, 10:40 AM
Hey All, thanks for the responses so far. Lance asked about the requirement/preference of a 1 bed vs. studio. Although I would love to live somewhere in Manhattan, or someplace a little more "hip" as you say, I am somewhat of a cooking hobbyist, and Indian food, has a very strong aroma, which is very well and good, but its not that great when it settles into your business suits, and your other clothes, and walking and mingling with clients becomes somewhat of an event :) Superficial, yes I know, but that's the way it is. So I just segregate the beautiful cooking area...air it out...and enjoy a good meal or few. Plus a one bedroom simply offers that much more convenience in terms of not sleeping in an alcove etc. I am definitely open to suggestions as I have not really lived in studios before.

Ali also asked a question about the low percentage of earning in rent. It does appear so, but from the preliminary calculation I have done, the taxes are going to lop off a significant portion of the earnings, with my budget coming out to just about 20&#37; of my net earnings :( That, and I figure I might as well start saving up (for anything and everything...look into 401k, roth etc..)

Input? suggestions? Critique? All always welcome.

Thanks again.

Schadenfrau
February 2nd, 2007, 01:28 PM
A one-bedroom isn't going to offer you much more protection than a studio in the way of cooking smells. A good closet door and ventilation would take care of that, so don't write a studio out of your search.

haloperi
February 4th, 2007, 05:59 AM
Question:

Should I read all 62 pages (Has there been good suggestions/questions-answers in these pages)?
or
Can someone summarize all the important tips? (All and/or any tips) [[you'd be my favorite person for the entire year, lol -- although, I don't know how much that means to you, haha]]

(If you need to know my situation, I'm looking to share a room/apt and my price range would be around 500 dollars - preferably in central~lower Manhattan)

clubBR
February 4th, 2007, 11:33 AM
Hi guys,

I am moving to NY the last week of October. I'm relatively familiar with the city and visit multiple times a year. I have a good friend up there and plan to stay with him until I get everything settled. Here is my plan/question;

I am an accountant and will be getting promoted to a business analyst. Surfing various employment websites, it looks as though in my field, I will have no problem finding a job up there in a reasonable amount of time (max 4 weeks)? I’ve re-done my entire resume and will be using my friend’s Manhattan address. I have about 2.5 years of experience and I estimate my salary to be in the $60k range. My girlfriend is a commercial real estate agent and will be re-locating to NY as soon as I get on my feet; Our combined income will be in the 6-figure range. My lifestyle is low maintenance, I don't go out to the trendy clubs, gamble or just blow money randomly. My partying is defined as a few guinnesses on the weekend. To put it bluntly, I don't go out much, most of my time is relagated to my girlfriend or recording music.

Housing
I’ve been researching this on and off and have narrowed it down to a few choices. I want to get a 450-500 sqft studio $1700 per month preferably in Murray Hill, east village, or les. I am considering Williamsburg as well. Looking on craigslist, this price looks definitely attainable. I figure renting a studio might be the best route because it’ll allow me to save a little bit of money and also give us about a year to settle in to the city and move into a bigger apt the next year. It seems that the studio apts $1500-1700 range all have broker fees? I’m willing to pay a broker fee if I can find that so called “perfect” place.

You guys live up there and should have a better idea if what I am planning is reasonable. Am I thinking entirely too positive or are my plans, particularly housing plans unrealistic? I’d love to hear what you guys think!

Thanks in advance!
chris

Personally, with your financial benfits, I'd buy a one or two bedroom apt. in Long Island City (Hunters Point)

momomoriah
February 4th, 2007, 09:55 PM
http://thehudsoncondo.rtrk.com/coupon/?scid=286932&cid=52582&tc=07012616153761912&kw=985983:13285&dynamic_proxy=1&primary_serv=thehudsoncondo-px.rtrk.com

i mean is that even possible??
im dying to live in nyc im going to massage therapy school at the moment and hopefully ill find somewhere to work up there. but is that really a good profession to live there? or should i apply at f.i.t. for fashion merchandising?

Freedom
February 5th, 2007, 12:30 AM
I am currently planning to move to New York in early 2008, and will be attending Milano The New School in Fall of 2008. Could anyone recommend the best way to find a good school for my daughter (age 7). Also, how would you recommend I begin my apartment search? Would you recommend finding an area near where Ryan will go to school, where I will go to school or do my best to just find safe and affordable - and do whatever I must do to get where I have to be? :confused: I have far more questions than I have answers at this point; so I am so thankful for this site.

ta3formforged
February 5th, 2007, 01:21 AM
I understand it's not recommended to rent something "sight unseen" but is it possible to do so? I spoke w/ a broker today, and she said that landlords won't let you sign a lease if it's "sight unseen"--any truth to this?

If I want to have a lease start around August 15th, when should I start contacting brokers or go out to NY?

My wife wants to live in somewhere charming, cute, safe, within a few blocks of the subway, and somewhere between $2,300 - $3,000--any ideas? We were thinking Upper East Side or Brooklyn Heights but would LOVE some other ideas.

Schadenfrau
February 5th, 2007, 11:15 AM
Question:

Should I read all 62 pages (Has there been good suggestions/questions-answers in these pages)?
or
Can someone summarize all the important tips? (All and/or any tips) [[you'd be my favorite person for the entire year, lol -- although, I don't know how much that means to you, haha]]

(If you need to know my situation, I'm looking to share a room/apt and my price range would be around 500 dollars - preferably in central~lower Manhattan)

If you had read this thread like everyone suggested, you wouldn't have such unrealistic ideas.

haloperi
February 5th, 2007, 10:47 PM
If you had read this thread like everyone suggested, you wouldn't have such unrealistic ideas.
Who is this "everyone"? :p
and what do you mean unrealistic? :( :confused:

I just didn't want to read everything if there were going to be a lot of stuff about getting $3,000 studios (or stuff that didn't pertain to me) -- you see, I read the first few pages and all I'm reading about is $70K salaries and people from London...

Schadenfrau
February 5th, 2007, 11:19 PM
If you're looking to pay $500 a month for a share, you're going to be looking far into the outer boroughs.

Lance75
February 5th, 2007, 11:19 PM
Haloperi, if you had done any research (even a cursory google search), you would know that a $500 room--much less an apartment--in Manhattan is unrealistic.

clubBR
February 6th, 2007, 02:40 AM
If you had read this thread like everyone suggested, you wouldn't have such unrealistic ideas.

haloperi, unless you have someone you know like a relative or friends, its hard to find a shared apt.. Look through craigslist.com and i think i've seen shared apts in the $500 range but they could be higher.

clubBR
February 6th, 2007, 02:48 AM
I am currently planning to move to New York in early 2008, and will be attending Milano The New School in Fall of 2008. Could anyone recommend the best way to find a good school for my daughter (age 7). Also, how would you recommend I begin my apartment search? Would you recommend finding an area near where Ryan will go to school, where I will go to school or do my best to just find safe and affordable - and do whatever I must do to get where I have to be? :confused: I have far more questions than I have answers at this point; so I am so thankful for this site.
Look in the Long Island City (Queens), Morningside Heights (West Side), Yorkville (East Side), and St. George (Staten Island) neighborhoods. Good schools and affordable prices.
Perhaps you have an ethnic preference?
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=12477

ryan
February 6th, 2007, 10:52 AM
Perhaps you have an ethnic preference?
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=12477

"Ethnic preference" made me throw up a little in my mouth. I'll hope that you meant it in a good way.

By the way your ethnic neighborhoods of manhattan are unhelpfully out of date for much beyond touristing. Alphabet city is a German neighborhood? Your wikipedia link says "The neighborhood of Little Germany disappeared within one year in 1904" Not very useful advice, though I can say that there's some good vegan food over there.

Schadenfrau
February 6th, 2007, 10:56 AM
haloperi, unless you have someone you know like a relative or friends, its hard to find a shared apt.

That's absolutely not true. NYC has more random roommate situations than you can shake a stick at.

milleniumcab
February 7th, 2007, 12:04 AM
Could anyone recommend the best way to find a good school for my daughter (age 7). Also, how would you recommend I begin my apartment search? Would you recommend finding an area near where Ryan will go to school, where I will go to school or do my best to just find safe and affordable - and do whatever I must do to get where I have to be? :confused:

I moved to the Upper East Side 17 years ago after my search for best NYC public elementary schools yielded 2 on UES, PS 6 and PS 158..My kids went to PS 158...They are both still good and also I have been told there are some other good ones in West Village and Chelsea areas.. Best way to make sure that your daughter goes to a good public school is to move into that school's zone...Maybe others in this forum can give you names of few more good elementary schools..Good Luck..

haloperi
February 7th, 2007, 01:42 AM
Ethnic preference? Lol... umm...
I think you missed the point of my post :/

Anyway...
Well, I've seen SOME room/apartment shares in Manhattan on CL for around $500, but I'm really scared that they might be a fake/scam



Maybe I'll ask some specific questions? Hopefully, they won't irritate any of you.. (you can answer all, one, or none, lol) Please bear with me.. it'll be my first time being totally independent... So, yes, I'll admit.. I might be somewhat naive

1) Are there a lot of "scammers" in Manhattan? (maybe this is an obvious answer, but I don't read about NYC news everyday :p)
1a) Are there any clues to look for in a scam?

2) Are motels/hotels the only place to stay immediately after I arrive in NYC? (if I have no relatives in NYC)
2a) If so, which hotel is the cheapest in NYC? (Yeah, I know Google, but it really doesn't have everything)

3) Should I ask for any files/proof of anything?
3a) Should I ask for proof of lease (of the apt.)? Is there such a thing? Lol.

Thank you.

lofter1
February 7th, 2007, 11:06 AM
Absolutely ask for a copy of the lease. If someone is unwilling to show you a lease then it's a possible sign that something is not right.

Be aware that per NY law once you have resided someplace for more than 30 days then you have full protections under the law as an occupant -- meaning that in a bad scenario the leaseholder can't just toss you out on a day's notice (law requires 30 days and specific procedures).

A roommate agreement outlining ALL costs / obligations / time frames is a very good idea. If someone who is subletting or looking to share balks at a written agreement then this is another potential bad sign.

Here is a good link to "legal" info on Roommate Situations (http://www.tenant.net/alerts/articles/roommates.html)

ManhattanKnight
February 7th, 2007, 11:22 AM
One other little piece of advice: all payments between roommates should be made by check, not cash, and all bank statements showing those payments should be retained for several years and, if possible, stored somewhere other than the shared apartment or house. If cash payments are unavoidable, insist upon getting signed receipts, and also store those someplace safe. You never know when you'll show up at your apartment only to find that your roommate has put your stuff out on the curb, changed the locks and is claiming that you failed to pay him/her what you owe for rent or utilities.

lofter1
February 7th, 2007, 12:49 PM
Very good point ^^^. Also it is wise to get something in your name with the address of the premises (bank statements, credit card bills, etc.)

In NY if you have lived in a place for more than 30 days (even without a written housing agreement) and a housemate either moves your property out of the unit or changes the locks on you then an actionable illegal act has taken place -- it is an Illegal Eviction and NY occupants are protected by law against such acts. Immediately one should go to the local Police precinct with proof of habitation and get the police involved.

There are many cases where people who hold a lease and then rent to others act worse towards that tenant than would the Landlord who holds full title to the property.

Not meaning to scare you. Make sure you know your rights -- and protect yourself.

haloperi
February 7th, 2007, 04:19 PM
Wow, thank you so much for those tips!
Never knew any of those things mentioned :eek:

Lofter1 and Manhattanknight, I owe you guys(?) a big one :D

mandylulu1
February 11th, 2007, 09:39 PM
I am moving to NYC from Tennessee in August of this year (2007). The problem I'm having is deciding when to start looking for apartments and a job. Any suggestions?

Lolita88
February 12th, 2007, 06:27 PM
Hey, Where is Jackson Heights? Would you live there? THanks guys

bmc
February 13th, 2007, 09:16 PM
I am moving to NYC from Tennessee in August of this year (2007). The problem I'm having is deciding when to start looking for apartments and a job. Any suggestions?
You definitely want to look for no-fee apts. by owner, and one of the best places online to do that is on Craigslist: http://newyork.craigslist.org/abo/. You want to start looking for apts. a few months before you move. You can also search for jobs on craigslist at http://newyork.craigslist.org/ and choosing what category you're interested in under the "jobs" section.

Good luck!

bmc
February 13th, 2007, 09:16 PM
Hey, Where is Jackson Heights? Would you live there? THanks guys
You can read more about Jackson Heights here if you're unfamiliar with the neighborhood: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jackson_Heights%2C_Queens

milleniumcab
February 13th, 2007, 09:26 PM
Hey, Where is Jackson Heights? Would you live there? THanks guys

JH is in Queens. No, I would not live there...YW..

Lolita88
February 13th, 2007, 10:03 PM
Thanks guys, no wonder the apts are so cheap there

ryan
February 13th, 2007, 10:15 PM
I would absolutely live in Jackson Heights. Good food. Not for xenophobes.

fishermb
February 13th, 2007, 10:35 PM
My 2 great aunts lived in Jackson Heights for a long, long time (they recently passed on at 99 and 95) and never had any problem with the neighborhood.

Lolita88
February 14th, 2007, 06:01 PM
Well I dont think i would have a problem there either. What's the commute like to midtown from there?

Ambitious n Vicious
February 15th, 2007, 03:20 PM
Ok so, ima be moving to Nyc from Cali in no more than 2 months to go to FIT on 7th at 27th st. I did a lil research and took some advice and decided I wanted to live in the Lower Eastside or SoHo. Getting a job isnt a problem to me. But of korse I wanna live in a safe area. Being a student and having no one to stay with leaves me confused about the 1st step in moving to nyc. I just want my move to run as smoothly as possible so im looking for advice and perspectives.

ryan
February 15th, 2007, 03:47 PM
You could get an apt by visiting for a few days (however long it takes you) and staying at a hotel, which should be no problem for you if you have the means to live in SOHO or the LES. There's lots of very useful advice about shopping for an apt in this thread - just start on page one.

Also, if you happen to be gay (and I don't mean to be presumptuous, but are going to FIT) then you would probably be happier living in Chelsea, which is conveniently just south of FIT.

Ambitious n Vicious
February 15th, 2007, 04:16 PM
How close is LES and SOHO from FIT?

ryan
February 15th, 2007, 04:19 PM
they're close by subway...have you not looked at a map?

lofter1
February 15th, 2007, 04:21 PM
SoHo rents are ridiculously high -- way out of reach for most working folks, let alone most students who are looking to move into the area.

I'd think what you'll need is a place that offers you some space to be able to do some of your design work at home. You might start off by looking for a roommate situatiion with your own (not too small) bedroom -- perhaps a six-month situation. And then adjust once you get here and know the city better.

Ambitious n Vicious
February 15th, 2007, 04:51 PM
thas what i was thinking. im juss totally foreign to ny as a whole and i have to move there. lol i just want a pool of non ghetto areas so my search will be alot easier. ima get a hotel for a week and i think id find a spot by then. ima craigslist roomates and hopefully i hit the jackpot. i guess the goal is to find a spot thats closest to a subway rite

Schadenfrau
February 15th, 2007, 04:58 PM
Every neighborhood near the subway is a ghetto. Stay far, far away- like in Los Angeles.

Ambitious n Vicious
February 15th, 2007, 05:10 PM
thas effed up, i aint bringing my car. i was reading up on these pages and read that Astoria is a good safe placed to be. How far is that from FIT?

conezone
February 15th, 2007, 05:28 PM
I'm sure this must have been posted here at one time or another but I've found it to be very helpful.

http://www.gypsymaps.com/

Lolita88
February 15th, 2007, 05:31 PM
Every neighborhood near the subway is a ghetto. Stay far, far away- like in Los Angeles.


LOL!! :p

vosh
February 15th, 2007, 07:14 PM
Hello. What I would like to know is how one goes about becoming a New York Jew. Is there an office? Many thanks.

milleniumcab
February 15th, 2007, 08:50 PM
Upps, I did not mean to but I guess I hit a couple of nerves...JH isn't what it used to be but I guess you can say it's still ok...There are better neigborhoods in Queens though...

milleniumcab
February 15th, 2007, 08:56 PM
Hello. What I would like to know is how one goes about becoming a New York Jew. Is there an office? Many thanks.

I did not know you had to apply to an office to become a New York Jew.:confused: .. It should be enough to be a Jew and live in NYC, in my opinion..:rolleyes:

Schadenfrau
February 15th, 2007, 09:02 PM
What would you consider a better neighborhood for a similar cost and commute, Milleniumcab? Jackson Heights seems fair on both counts.

vosh
February 15th, 2007, 09:38 PM
I did not know you had to apply to an office to become a New York Jew.:confused: .. It should be enough to be a Jew and live in NYC, in my opinion..:rolleyes:

I am not a Jew, but I am Jew-ish.

Ambitious n Vicious
February 16th, 2007, 04:05 PM
BEDFORD WILLIAMSBURG.... perspectives, opinions, thoughts...

Schadenfrau
February 16th, 2007, 04:41 PM
How much are you looking to spend?

Ambitious n Vicious
February 16th, 2007, 04:48 PM
1000. Looking for roomate so I can decide where I really wanna be before signing something. I want to live in the most "art-c" area as possible. (i hate that word)

Punzie
February 16th, 2007, 05:09 PM
Hey, Where is Jackson Heights? Would you live there? THanks guys
If I were young and starting out, sure, I would live in Jackson Heights. The area is slowly improving and is fairly safe now.

I also have a feeling that the inexpensive real estate there would a good medium- to long-term investment.

Schadenfrau
February 16th, 2007, 05:13 PM
"Art-C" is far worse than artsy, but if you're bent on living in a stereotypically "bohemian" environment, by all means, head to Williamsburg.

ETA that $1,000 will be your contribution to the total rent with the roommate? If so, you're in business. If not, try again.

Ambitious n Vicious
February 16th, 2007, 05:28 PM
it is. lol but iont really care where, i just wanna be kewl. im not picky.

i have a g to put up a month. my ex chick lives in the bx n she said look into harlem between 59th and 113th st. it would be cool to spend less than a 1000 a month.

Schadenfrau
February 16th, 2007, 05:41 PM
Harlem is nowhere near 59th Street, though, and I don't think you could find anything below 113th for under $1,000, if you plan on living alone.

Harlem is technically anywhere above 96th Street.

Ambitious n Vicious
February 16th, 2007, 06:56 PM
Oh, I probly read her msg wrong. But hows that area?

Schadenfrau
February 16th, 2007, 10:08 PM
You need to be more specific. "Above 96th Street" leaves a huge swath of Manhattan. Like it has been suggested to most people who post on this thread, please do a bit more research and come back with your questions.

ryan
February 17th, 2007, 12:31 AM
"Art-C" is far worse than artsy, but if you're bent on living in a stereotypically "bohemian" environment, by all means, head to Williamsburg.

I heard all the "Art-C"s were heading the the Bronx. It's definitely the most bohemian neighborhood. Williamsburg - all of Brooklyn really - is totally over.

Ambitious n Vicious
February 17th, 2007, 11:17 PM
how many diff parts are in bk. ima stay in bk. where do i wanna go and where dont i wanna go? much appreciation.

milleniumcab
February 18th, 2007, 01:18 AM
What would you consider a better neighborhood for a similar cost and commute, Milleniumcab? Jackson Heights seems fair on both counts.

I guess so but further away you get from the subway, better JH gets.. That makes the commute a little more challenging, don't it?...

frogoutofwater
February 18th, 2007, 01:17 PM
It looks like Mr. frogoutofwater and I will be re-locating to New York from Paris this summer. Timing is tight (my contract runs until the end of June, he's writing a CFA exam in early June, my employer wants me to start in mid-late July). Through a combination of sources (including an installation allowance, reimbursement of moving expenses - and cash on hand), I think we can handle the start-up costs of relocation as renters, but it would be helpful to be reminded of what we need to have on hand.

We own a house in Canada and rent in France. We went through hell on the renovation of the house we owned and the redecoration/repair of the flat we rent in Paris (guess how much fun it is to repaint 12-foot high, crumbling, elaborately panelled, plaster walls in a 1600 sq foot apartment?) I can't stomach a major renovation, at least for another few years. Heck, we'll probably only stay in NYC for 3-6 years, max, before returning to Canada.

I've been reading threads on this board (including all of the posts in this thread) and doing some other research to get a sense of housing costs for rentals and purchases of 2-bedroom housing with an out-of-pocket cost for rent/mortgage in the $4000-5500 range, but I still have some questions. Any assistance would be greatly appreciated.

1) Pros and cons of renting versus buying in the price range noted above, where we expect to stay in NYC for only 3-6 years? If we buy, we'll have to sell our house in Canada (which is appreciating in value, but the gains are subject to capital gains tax because it's not our principal residence these days). We've got tenants who cover 95% of the out-of-pocket cost. I know that there are tax savings associated with ownership in New York (tax deductibility of mortgage interest), but are there any meaningful deductions for rent in our income bracket (see 3 below)?

Even if we decide to buy, I'm thinking that we should rent for a year so that we can settle into the city, figure out where we want to live, figure out what kind of budget really makes sense, strengthen our credit history etc. (Although this means we'll have to move twice.)

2) If we rent, what are the pros and cons of using a broker (and paying a broker's fee) and looking for a no-fee rental building? What is the quality like for no-fee rental buildings in our price range?

3) We can probably manage an apartment-hunting trip in mid-June, and hope to move in mid-July. Is that timing right, or should we do the trip in mid-May for a July 1 move-in date? How many days do we need to budget for this trip to ensure that we get something signed up in time for the move? Would we be better off just putting off the apartment search until we arrive - and staying temporarily in a furnished sublet for a month?

4) Mr frogoutofwater has a good US credit history (he lived in the US for 4 years), whereas mine is almost non-existent. (I was a slave (oops, I mean lawyer) at a Manhattan law firm for a year in the mid-90s and never had time to spend or borrow any money.) Mine is the larger salary these days, though (currently and in NYC), and he's been unemployed for the last two years (hint - don't move to France without a job). Our combined income will probably be in the range of $300,000. At this income level, are landlords going to want a guarantor because our paperwork will be unusual? (Another complication is that my income is tax-exempt in France so I don't have a French tax return.)

5) What kind of extra charges (max) can we expect in a rental for heat, gas, hot water, electrical?

6) Is there such a thing as a stylish 2BR flat (i) without parquet floors and (ii) with a kitchen that is large enough for two people to use at the same time?

Thanks

Lolita88
February 18th, 2007, 01:49 PM
Which would you recommened for when I move? Going Up and living in a sublet or hotel untill I get an apartment or getting an apartment in advanced and setting up a move in date? Can I set up a move in date for lets say a few weeks after the paper work is signed? And if you think I should go up there first would you pick a sublet or a hotel stay? Thanks in advanced:p

Front_Porch
February 18th, 2007, 01:50 PM
Relocating on the basis of one trip in is tough. I've had clients that have done it, but you need to give yourself a good three or four days -- you need to refamilarize yourself with New York neighborhoods and how they've changed since you were here doing biglaw, and then you need to go on appointments. Figure it will take you or your broker 48 hours to line up an appointment, just to be safe.

It will help if you start looking at ads on nytimes.com now, just to see what you like. Do yourself a favor and disregard any ad without an address, or that seems like an unusually great apartment -- those are fakes.

Depending on where you want to live, $4,000 a month is probably a somewhat low budget for what you want. I just placed someone in a two-bedroom with a little outdoor space in Chinatown, but the kitchen wasn't huge. You probably want something more like www.elliman.com #843525, which will be a little more spacious and give you some kitchen room. That's $5,000 a month. Similarly, if you want to go direct, a 2-Bedroom in the Caroline (a luxury Chelsea rental building at 60 West 23rd) will run you $5K a month. You will save a broker's fee by going direct, but any broker, including me, will argue that you get charged a little more for the apartment. In this case maybe I've loaded the dice by giving you a Caroline comp that has only one bath for your $5,000; the Elliman listing has two.

You should certainly also look at direct sites like www.Glenwoodnyc.com and www.relatedrentals.com. However, (while I'm admitting my bias) the only area downtown where I would advise renters to go direct would be in Battery Park City, which is very renter-oriented.

In general, "uptown" -- by which I mean north of 59th Street -- will be somewhat cheaper than the prices I'm quoting you.

However, despite the scary prices and the possibilty of a broker's fee of 15% of a year's rent, I would absolutely rent for a year before you buy. Think of it as insurance that you don't end up buying the wrong place for you.

You may well end up with a co-op sublet, which might be the most apartment for your money. In that case, you'll have to do an application package which includes:
1) personal letters of recommendation
2) employment letters ("Frog out of Water is employed by Acme Co. as a Widget-Maker at a salary of $10 per year")
3) a U.S. credit check. It sounds like at least one of you has a U.S. Social Security Number -- pay experian.com or transunion.com $10 now to run your report and see what it looks like. It is not as important that your score is good as that it exists -- if you are foreign nationals, we're in a different game.

I think I hit everything, if not, PM me, or ask again here.

Welcome back!

ali r.
{downtown broker}

fishermb
February 18th, 2007, 02:27 PM
Which would you recommened for when I move? Going Up and living in a sublet or hotel untill I get an apartment or getting an apartment in advanced and setting up a move in date? Can I set up a move in date for lets say a few weeks after the paper work is signed? And if you think I should go up there first would you pick a sublet or a hotel stay? Thanks in advanced:p

I am going with the sublet for 2 months option, I am moving up this Friday from Miami, and think that will give me the best options. I can get around town, see what area I like that is within my range, and then have time to scour craigslist and find something. You wouldn't want to go up for say a few days and hope that you find the right apartment, because you might wind up forcing yourself to sign something that isn't ideal merely because of time constraints, that's what one of my friends did and she really regrets it.

Lolita88
February 18th, 2007, 04:02 PM
I am going with the sublet for 2 months option, I am moving up this Friday from Miami, and think that will give me the best options. I can get around town, see what area I like that is within my range, and then have time to scour craigslist and find something. You wouldn't want to go up for say a few days and hope that you find the right apartment, because you might wind up forcing yourself to sign something that isn't ideal merely because of time constraints, that's what one of my friends did and she really regrets it.


Thanks and that is my fear, to be forced into anything

theBIGmove
February 18th, 2007, 07:37 PM
Hi,
Me and my friend are planning to move to New York from California sometime next year and needed some advice on places to move to. We are both recent college graduates, so of course we are on a tight budget. We are looking for something safe because we are 2 women in a new city, a 2 bedroom, some place that is some what close to a local transportation, and are hoping to spend less then $1500, but that may be impossible. If someone can help, that would be great... Thanks!

Gothamite
February 19th, 2007, 09:53 AM
Hello everyone. I am trying to move to New York after I graduate High School this May (I want to move around October). I am currently trying to get into the Art Institute of New York and FIT to major in fashion design. Basically I need advice on a few things. If you can answer ANY of my questions I would be forever grateful!!!

- What is a moderate priced area for apartments that aren't a bad area? Some price examples?
- Is there any opportunities for acting and modeling careers in New York (movie auditions, modeling agencies etc.)
- Have you heard any good or bad things about FIT or Art Institute of New York?
- Overall what is the best strategy to move to New York? (amount of money, time of year, job searching, etc.)
- What are some of the areas of New York I need to avoid when looking for apartments?

Thank for SO much for any help whatsoever. If there is anyone here who has Myspace who is willing to help me out please add me so we can chat! www.myspace.com/goingplatinum or email at imgoingplatinum@hotmail.com

Marshal
February 19th, 2007, 10:40 AM
Hiyas,

I am going to be moving to nyc sometime in the near future. I will be working for a law firm while going to fordham law school at night. The firm i am going to be working for is up in Tarrytown. I was thinking of living in the Bronx but am concerned about crime, drugs etc as I have a family. I would like to live in an ethnically diverse neighborhood just for sake of an interesting place to live.
Any advice on moving there?

Feel free to email me.

Thanks,

KC

If you look in the North West section of the Bronx, near Van Courtland park you'd be quite pleased. I believe it's the best value for your money. Get one of the local papers for ads or speak to a super.

ryan
February 19th, 2007, 11:29 AM
What is a moderate priced area for apartments that aren't a bad area? Some price examples?

There are lots- go back and read this thread from the first page.


Is there any opportunities for acting and modeling careers in New York (movie auditions, modeling agencies etc.)

Of course...is this a trick question? Seems like actors move to LA after a few years, but there is lots of work here.


Have you heard any good or bad things about FIT or Art Institute of New York?

FIT is a good school for anything fashion-oriented (it's in the name, right?). I've never heard of the Art Institute of New York - I'm no expert on acting or modeling, but no reputation is probably a bad thing. Look online (http://www.usnews.com/usnews/rankguide/rghome.htm)for general ratings for schools in your intended major. Your other questions can be answered by reading through this thread.

Ambitious n Vicious
February 19th, 2007, 12:06 PM
why do new yorkers always say they cant see themselves living anywhere else? im purchasing my plane ticket friday and moving to brooklyn.....

Lolita88
February 19th, 2007, 12:52 PM
- Have you heard any good or bad things about FIT or Art Institute of New York?


I am also in the process of applying with FIT I think it is an awesome school. After doing my research on Art Institute I found out and even from one of the advisors which I knew, the school is all about sucking money out of you. And for the same price if not less you could get way better schooling. For example what I was gonna end up paying to go to the one here in Miami it would be a bargain for me to move and get out of state fee's in another art school in NYC. :cool:

Ambitious n Vicious
February 19th, 2007, 01:11 PM
I am also in the process of applying with FIT I think it is an awesome school. After doing my research on Art Institute I found out and even from one of the advisors which I knew, the school is all about sucking money out of you. And for the same price if not less you could get way better schooling. For example what I was gonna end up paying to go to the one here in Miami it would be a bargain for me to move and get out of state fee's in another art school in NYC. :cool:

Thats good to know... since Fit is the reason for me moving to Ny. I heard about Parsons also... So is Fit the best and affordable school to go to?

Gothamite
February 19th, 2007, 01:39 PM
I am also in the process of applying with FIT I think it is an awesome school. After doing my research on Art Institute I found out and even from one of the advisors which I knew, the school is all about sucking money out of you. And for the same price if not less you could get way better schooling. For example what I was gonna end up paying to go to the one here in Miami it would be a bargain for me to move and get out of state fee's in another art school in NYC. :cool:

Oh wow, thanks for the info on the Art Institute. The price did seem a bit steep.
FIT looks fantastic and a great tuition! I believe I missed my desired date though (Fall 2007) so I am thinking about moving to NY first (hopefully this October) then attending FIT in their Spring 2008 classes.

Also, do you know Parsons tuition? I imagine being pretty large.

Schadenfrau
February 19th, 2007, 03:03 PM
All of you potential college students need to do some old-fashioned research about the schools you want to attend. There are plenty of resources that will show you the best options. Asking around on the internet is a horrible way to go about getting an education.

Gothamite
February 19th, 2007, 03:29 PM
All of you potential college students need to do some old-fashioned research about the schools you want to attend. There are plenty of resources that will show you the best options. Asking around on the internet is a horrible way to go about getting an education.

I have been doing research along with asking people about what they hear about colleges also. You cannot base knowledge of a college solely around their website or college directories because they can say whatever they want to say so you go to their college. Asking people isn't a bad way as long as you do both.

ryan
February 19th, 2007, 04:16 PM
You would be better off asking a person who has the job you want rather than random strangers on the internet. The quality of information about schools exchanged on this forum is underwhelming (though Lolita seems to have a good handle on her own plans).

Ambitious n Vicious
February 19th, 2007, 04:23 PM
Thanks!

Gothamite
February 19th, 2007, 04:42 PM
You would be better off asking a person who has the job you want rather than random strangers on the internet. The quality of information about schools exchanged on this forum is underwhelming (though Lolita seems to have a good handle on her own plans).

This is one of the many sites I have asked about these schools. I ask people that possibly live in the area what they know about them. I'm not naive guys lol. I've been doing college searches for a year now in LA, Chicago, Orlando, and New York. I'm not new to this but thanks for the advice.

Schadenfrau
February 19th, 2007, 05:50 PM
I have been doing research along with asking people about what they hear about colleges also. You cannot base knowledge of a college solely around their website or college directories because they can say whatever they want to say so you go to their college. Asking people isn't a bad way as long as you do both.

Why don't you look at a reputable list of college rankings? You won't find The Art Institute of New York on any of them, as it's not a real college.

Lolita88
February 19th, 2007, 06:39 PM
Thats good to know... since Fit is the reason for me moving to Ny. I heard about Parsons also... So is Fit the best and affordable school to go to?

Well I think FIT would be a good choice for me. However like art and beauty it is in the eye of the beholder, just cuz its good for me doesnt mean it will be good for you. You can find Parsons tuition on their website (Parsons.edu) just look at the online catalogue its somewhere near the back.





Why don't you look at a reputable list of college rankings? You won't find The Art Institute of New York on any of them, as it's not a real college.


OMG I couldnt agree with you more...I was blind but now I see!!!!!!! LOL:p

sam90
February 20th, 2007, 04:50 AM
Hey guys, spent all night reading this longgg sticky, very helpful people here! I have a few questions. I'm 16 and I'm almost done with highschool (homeschool) and I want to work at mcdonalds to save up at least 6000 dollars so I can move to New York City, because its been my dream for a long time. Is it ridiculous? is it not possible for 18 year old to live there? My friends laugh at me when i tell them my plans because they say NY is too expensive, is it true? Where can I live that its not so expensive? Is 6000 dollars enough? Appreciate any feedback.

lofter1
February 20th, 2007, 10:16 AM
If you come to NYC with the understanding that you will need to live in a roommate situation to start (and possibly a somewhat crowded and not the most comfortable situation for the first many months -- and possibly not so close to your most desired ultimate neighborhood) and that you are willing to put your nose to the grindstone and get yourself a job immediately upon arrival (when your young brain might be telling you "party now, the job can wait") then $6K to get you started is not unreasonable.

Just be aware that $6K will go fast. It's always good to keep a 2-3 month cushion of money tucked away just in case (not always possible, of course -- especially when first starting out).

NYC is fertile ground for curious and ambitious young souls.

If it is what you really want to do then go for it.

BryanC
February 20th, 2007, 11:31 AM
id love to work in NYC.... i've got an MCP, and been working in IT, anyone suggest any ways to get my CV around?:cool:

sam90
February 20th, 2007, 06:36 PM
wow thanks a lot lofter. I gave up a lot for this I really hope it works out. I'll save up all my money. Whats jobs do you recomend for a newbie there? where can I find people that want to be roomates? ( I dont have a lot of friends that want to move to NY), and from reading this thread Jackson Heights seems really nice, I will consider going there.

Lolita88
February 20th, 2007, 07:29 PM
Sam90 try craigslist.org then click new york city for roomates

sam90
February 20th, 2007, 07:33 PM
wow thanks again! You guys are really helpful, never knew the internet was so big!

fishermb
February 21st, 2007, 10:41 AM
Can anyone comment on these websites that list no-fee apartments but charge you a monthly fee/subscription to view them? Sketchy?

Lolita88
February 21st, 2007, 06:42 PM
Can anyone comment on these websites that list no-fee apartments but charge you a monthly fee/subscription to view them? Sketchy?


With sites like craisglist, the new york times, and such out there, that provide the same service for free...I wouldnt waste my time or money on those other sites.

goherd
February 22nd, 2007, 03:44 AM
I'm relocating to the Nyack area to begin a job at a golf course. Any opinions about this area?

Thanks

Jason

Schadenfrau
February 22nd, 2007, 09:08 AM
It's nice and suburban. I hope that's what you're expecting.

Dirt McGirt
February 22nd, 2007, 03:35 PM
Hi - I've found this thread extremely informative, but hoped to get some feedback tailored to my individiual situation. Would very much appreciate any input on this presumably long post! So thanks in advance!!!

Background: American, currently in London, moving to NYC in 2 months for the first time. Married, in mid-20's. Salary will be 115k base plus 25k sign-on and minimal bonus. My wife will be changing jobs but I expect she'll be around 60k - 80k. For simplicity lets say 180k combined. We'll probably be working 50-70 hour weeks. We also have decent savings (few hundred k) not that we plan to spend any re: rent.

Desired apartment: 1br, would like to be around $2,800/month but probably have some flexibility to go up if we really need to get what we want. For compromises, we're fine with living in a non-doorman walkup, which I believe should allow us to save some money ceterus parabus. We probably like the appearance of a pre-war walkup best to begin with.

Also, my company will pay 3k for a broker, so we'll be using one. My job is at around 57th & 5th, and I would like to have a fairly easy commute to work, but since I'm not working a ton of hours it doesn't need to be next door, either.

Basically I'd like to narrow down the areas we want to look at. Here's what we'd like:

Relatively safe area with some character, 95% sure in Manhattan (my wife gives me really bad faces when I mention Hoboken or Brooklyn). Some area not too busy - e.g. I'd rather not walk outside our apt. building & be swarmed by crowds of pedestrians like in some parts of midtown. A tree-lined street with 4-6 story pre-war buildings with character would be ideal. Possible pluses for the apt. would be a loft, exposed brick, balcony, but none of those are deal breakers. I'd prefer the neighboorhood not to be overly trendy - I like casual bars to get a beer and relax and restaurants that are nice but a good value. Being close to some shops & restaurants with character would be nice. Previously in the U.S. we did shop at whole foods, pay $15/lb for the good coffee, etc. and it would be nice to be close to some similar places in nyc but I don't spend $15 for a mixed drink or care to go to gallery openings or any bar with a guest list.

From having visited the city, here's our impression of a few neighboorhoods, along with probably some misconceptions I picked up. We only looked at neighboorhoods, not apartments, so whilst we have some idea about neighboorhoods we know much less about apartments, namely what $X in X area gets you, and it's a bit hard to really pick this up from the classifieds.

Far West Village: We really liked it, but I expect way too expensive given what we want. Liked the character, being close to a park (Hudson River) as I run quite a bit, good restaurants, etc. Probably not the easiest commute to work.

Greenwich Village: Basically same as above.

Upper West: Probably my wife's favorate. Like the character of the neighboorhood, close to Central Park, lots of nice shops without being over the top. However, also fairly expensive I believe (both in rent and anything else you buy there like groceries, coffee, etc.) and I've heard it's not too convienent for my commute to Midtown East. True?

Upper East: Was actually expecting to like it more than we did - a bit boring and many of the areas weren't as nice as we expected (a few blocks east of Park obviously). However, seems to be good value for the $$$ and my commute should be convienent. Also, we didn't walk around too much so we may not have seen some of the more interesting parts. I'm also OK with walking a while to the subway on Lexington, but we weren't really impressed by the neighboorhoods around 2nd or York that we saw.

Midtown: Too busy, lacks any feel of being a neighboorhood.

Chelsea: Really liked the buildings and side streets. We didn't see a whole lot of stuff in the neighboorhood itself that we liked (i.e. shopping, restaurants) but that may have been not knowing where to go. Probably too expensive given our price range, as well.

That's all we had time to see. From doing additional research, Murray Hill and the East Village also look attractive, though I've heard many of the buildings in the East Village tend to be very small and is more of a younger crown w/ NYU. We'd probably like 600 sq ft + as far as size goes.

Anyway, apoligies for the length of the post. Anyone have any insights into, well, really anything? What neighboorhoods seem the best given what we like, if our price range is reasonable, etc?

Front_Porch
February 22nd, 2007, 04:09 PM
You've thought through this pretty well, but as you fear, downtown charm is expensive.

For sub-$3K, I can get you on Morton Street in prime Far West Village -- leaves and all -- but it's not going to be big: the kitchen's in the living room, for one thing.

Chelsea's a little cheaper, because it's bigger, but it's still tough. The last rental we had in Chelsea Gardens, one of the gorgeous Chelsea pre-wars you're picturing, went for $3K even, partly because it was on the ground floor. There is one rental available on a decent Chelsea block -- a 2 BR -- but you'd have to go up on your $$, and they want a 2-year lease for it.

So if you want to stick to your budget, head to the Upper West Side. You can get the floor-through you're picturing, a one-bedroom on a park block, with a working fireplace thrown in. I'll PM you.

ali r.
{downtown broker}

JRo27
February 22nd, 2007, 05:10 PM
I am going to be moving to New York soon. I am looking at just outside of the city, Westchester County, Tarrytown, Port Chester, etc.

However, I'm not sure where to look, excactly. Craigslist? Apartments.com? I would love to know the "good" places to search online. When I moved to Chicago I used craigslist and chireader.com because EVERYONE in Chicago used those. Does New York have resources like that?

Any advice would be appreciated!!

http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/images/misc/progress.gif

bmc
February 22nd, 2007, 06:41 PM
I am going to be moving to New York soon. I am looking at just outside of the city, Westchester County, Tarrytown, Port Chester, etc.

However, I'm not sure where to look, excactly. Craigslist? Apartments.com? I would love to know the "good" places to search online. When I moved to Chicago I used craigslist and chireader.com because EVERYONE in Chicago used those. Does New York have resources like that?

Any advice would be appreciated!!

http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/images/misc/progress.gif

Craigslist is probably the best free online place to look for apartments in NYC (and surrounding areas).

londonboy714
February 24th, 2007, 04:43 PM
...With moving to New York. I'm 17 and still in high school, I want to move to New York after graduation, but I'm not sure if I want to go to college. Do you guys think that I could make a decent living without going to college?? Anyway, what I need to know is where is a cheap, but safe area in the city? I want to live in the city. Umm, I also need a job. I want to live in a loft if that helps. Please help.:)

sam90
February 24th, 2007, 11:42 PM
...With moving to New York. I'm 17 and still in high school, I want to move to New York after graduation, but I'm not sure if I want to go to college. Do you guys think that I could make a decent living without going to college?? Anyway, what I need to know is where is a cheap, but safe area in the city? I want to live in the city. Umm, I also need a job. I want to live in a loft if that helps. Please help.:)

ya dude I'm 16 and peeps here said its possible, I dunno what job I'm gonna get but I need at least 6000 dollars before I go there according to theese forums, so im working my ass off.