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fishermb
February 25th, 2007, 12:16 AM
...With moving to New York. I'm 17 and still in high school, I want to move to New York after graduation, but I'm not sure if I want to go to college. Do you guys think that I could make a decent living without going to college?? Anyway, what I need to know is where is a cheap, but safe area in the city? I want to live in the city. Umm, I also need a job. I want to live in a loft if that helps. Please help.:)

I hope I don't sound too much like a parent (I'm actually only 22), but go to college! I just graduated in December and moved up to Manhattan for a great job with one of the biggest cable TV companies, but the pay is nowhere near what I really need to survive in this city with anywhere close to the lifestyle I lived during college. I'm starting a part-time masters program in fall while still working full time, because I've learned that more education will NEVER hurt you. The competition for good-paying jobs is already tough enough, I can't imagine that any decent sized company would look at 2 applicants - one with a high school diploma and one with a college degree, and give the job to the former.

And as far as living in the city, this is a great place to be when you live comfortably, but you don't want to be struggling,constantly surrounded by great restaurants and theater and nightlife that you can't afford. Rent is ridiculous. Just really weigh out your options. I know you're antsy to get to the city, but it's an extremely important decision to make...

milleniumcab
February 25th, 2007, 12:37 AM
^^^ I agree; College, College, College

lofter1
February 25th, 2007, 02:44 AM
Whether or not to go to college entirely depends upon where your interests lie.

To a great extent a college experience will be of great help as you move on through life.

Any college degree can help you to get better employment (employers seem to be wary of folks who haven't shown that they are willing to punish themselves for four years before entering the job market ;) ).

On the other hand, I had a sociology professor who said his biggest success would be to convince as many students as possible that college was the worst track to take and the best thing to do would be to get out and do real life -- but this was back in the dark ages when far fewer people were fast tracking themselves starting at age 16 along a prescribed path :cool:

lofter1
February 25th, 2007, 02:48 AM
... this is a great place to be when you live comfortably, but you don't want to be struggling ...

Struggling is part of the NYC experience. I've been here forever and the struggle is on-going. Sometimes it eases up -- and sometimes it just hits you in the face over and over. But that is part of the greatness of the City. It challenges you.

fishermb
February 25th, 2007, 09:37 AM
Struggling is part of the NYC experience. I've been here forever and the struggle is on-going. Sometimes it eases up -- and sometimes it just hits you in the face over and over. But that is part of the greatness of the City. It challenges you.

Maybe it's just me, but there are already enough challenges in life without needing to think about if you'll have enough money at the end of the month to pay rent and bills...

JournalistJessica
February 25th, 2007, 06:56 PM
I'm a 19 year old junior in college in Florida. I'm a journalism major, who for as long as I can remember, has been waiting to get my feet wet in the big city. So, I've decided that I want to move as soon as I graduate (or at least a year after).

I've been reading this sticky for a long time now, but have never posted my own questions. There's been some AWESOME advice given here, and from reading the posts I have an idea of areas I'd like to live in I'd prefer Manhattan, but who wouldn't? I'm thinking about Brooklyn Heights (yeah, I know, still pricey), or another cool, SAFE area in Brooklyn. Heck, maybe even Astoria, Queens.

My main concern, is not space, as I am a 19 year old (will be 20 or 21 when I move) without any furniture, just living with family right now. Basically, all I need is a space big enough to sleep. I've done some research on craigslist and I think I can get a studio for <$1200 (hoping)!

Again, I don't care about size, just SAFETY. I definitely want my own place. I've lived with people my whole life and never have had a place of my own, so I want one now.

My question is, I have saved up $15,000; Do I need to save more? Again, I am all about safety, even, and esp., when it comes to finances. I have no family to rely on, so if something happens, and I run out of money, well, you might see me in a cardboard box in Times Square. I don't want that to happen. :eek:

I'm not a big spender. I'm actually an extremely frugal girl. Do you think this would be ample enough savings to make my big move? How long do you think it could last? Would it be safe for me to move, and then, find a job? Do you think I will still need a grantor (I have no one)?

Thanks and sorry for the long post,
Jessica:D

fishermb
February 26th, 2007, 01:16 AM
I'm a 19 year old junior in college in Florida. I'm a journalism major, who for as long as I can remember, has been waiting to get my feet wet in the big city. So, I've decided that I want to move as soon as I graduate (or at least a year after).

I've been reading this sticky for a long time now, but have never posted my own questions. There's been some AWESOME advice given here, and from reading the posts I have an idea of areas I'd like to live in I'd prefer Manhattan, but who wouldn't? I'm thinking about Brooklyn Heights (yeah, I know, still pricey), or another cool, SAFE area in Brooklyn. Heck, maybe even Astoria, Queens.

My main concern, is not space, as I am a 19 year old (will be 20 or 21 when I move) without any furniture, just living with family right now. Basically, all I need is a space big enough to sleep. I've done some research on craigslist and I think I can get a studio for <$1200 (hoping)!

Again, I don't care about size, just SAFETY. I definitely want my own place. I've lived with people my whole life and never have had a place of my own, so I want one now.

My question is, I have saved up $15,000; Do I need to save more? Again, I am all about safety, even, and esp., when it comes to finances. I have no family to rely on, so if something happens, and I run out of money, well, you might see me in a cardboard box in Times Square. I don't want that to happen. :eek:

I'm not a big spender. I'm actually an extremely frugal girl. Do you think this would be ample enough savings to make my big move? How long do you think it could last? Would it be safe for me to move, and then, find a job? Do you think I will still need a grantor (I have no one)?

Thanks and sorry for the long post,
Jessica:D

Jessica-

It never hurts to save as much as you can before moving to a new city. It seems that most landlords want your income to be 40x your rent, though you can use a tri-state guarantor in most cases...few seem to take an out-of-tri-state one. My advice is to line up a job of some sort before you consider making the move. In fact, I'd suggest basing the move on when your job starts.

By the way are you at UF, or another school in Florida? I was born/raised in Miami and just graduated UF in December. Good luck!

JournalistJessica
February 26th, 2007, 10:04 AM
Jessica-

It never hurts to save as much as you can before moving to a new city. It seems that most landlords want your income to be 40x your rent, though you can use a tri-state guarantor in most cases...few seem to take an out-of-tri-state one. My advice is to line up a job of some sort before you consider making the move. In fact, I'd suggest basing the move on when your job starts.

By the way are you at UF, or another school in Florida? I was born/raised in Miami and just graduated UF in December. Good luck!

Thanks for the reply! I'm going to continue to save, but don't really think I'll be able to save much more up (don't have a job, just going to school).

Congrats of graduating! I was thinking about going to UF, but didn't want to move away, as I wanted to go to school nearby so that I could live with relatives and save my $ for the BIG MOVE!

I'll take your advice and spend some time over the next year tweaking my scarce resume.

Schadenfrau
February 26th, 2007, 10:53 AM
Your obsession with SAFETY seems a bit misguided, JournalistJessica. Crime travels- it's up to you to take actions to protect yourself. Staying in supposed "safe" neighborhoods is a start, but the safe neighborhoods are frequently magnets for people looking to commit random crimes.

JournalistJessica
February 26th, 2007, 05:42 PM
Your obsession with SAFETY seems a bit misguided, JournalistJessica. Crime travels- it's up to you to take actions to protect yourself. Staying in supposed "safe" neighborhoods is a start, but the safe neighborhoods are frequently magnets for people looking to commit random crimes.

Yeah, I know I kind I'm a little obessed about safety, but I actually live the "Murder Capital of Florida." The only factor that makes me not want to run from here right now, is that I live in a fairly safe neighborhood. There's neighborhoods here where shootings occur all the time. I could NEVER stand to live in an area like that. The neighborhood where I live, hardly ever sees crime, esp. murder.

So, all in all, I want to live in an area, where I don't have to be scared to death to maybe poke my head outside the door at night. There are neighborhoods here, where that is a concern.

From my limited research and reading through these threads, I gather that most parts of the Bronx is not for me, neither is certain parts of Brooklyn. Right now, I'm thinking Park Slope or Brooklyn Heights (I know, pricey).

Schadenfrau
February 26th, 2007, 05:47 PM
Honestly, you won't be able to afford anything in those areas for $1,200 a month. You would do much better to find roommates, though that's not what you're looking for right now.

Also, if you plan on being a journalist, you're not likely to be able to afford that much rent with an entry-level job. Are you graduating with a BA?

I'm 31 years old, work in publishing, and have lived in the Bronx for the past seven years. Keep that in mind when you're thinking about moving to NYC.

JournalistJessica
February 26th, 2007, 05:50 PM
Thanks for the replies. I'm starting to look into other possible neighborhoods, but most of the landlords want you to make at least $40k.

What do you guys think my chances are for finding a $40k job (any job will do), being a journalism major straight out of college (just a regular state univeristy, no Ivys)?

I don't really have any experience yet (19), hopefully I'll gain some by the time I graduate next year. Basically, I'm kind of hoping to just leap in anywhere (anywhere at all) in the journalism field. I don't care if the job isn't glamorous. I don't really care if it isn't a journalism job. I just want to move. I can advance, or switch jobs later on. I just need something that will pay my rent.

OmegaNYC
February 26th, 2007, 05:53 PM
What about working for ABC or NBC? Just throwing some ideas out.

Schadenfrau
February 26th, 2007, 06:06 PM
Sorry to ask again, but are you graduating with a BA? 20 is very young to be graduating from college.

fishermb
February 26th, 2007, 08:22 PM
What about working for ABC or NBC? Just throwing some ideas out.

My advice is that if you're in college, you should be thinking about internships right now (and I hope you plan to finish college). I can't imagine a bigwig name like ABC or NBC hiring a writer right out of college with no experience, unless of course you know someone...I did 3 internships during college, 2 of which were paid (they do exist!), and 1 which offered me a great full-time job here in the city. Nearly every single company offers internships, and a site like entertainmentcareers.net or Variety's Career section might give you an idea of what kind of stuff is available. It's always easier to move up from within a company, especially in the entertainment business. I'd be happy to talk to you more if you want to PM me.

JournalistJessica
February 27th, 2007, 10:57 AM
What about working for ABC or NBC? Just throwing some ideas out.

Both great ideas! I'd love to work at either.

JournalistJessica
February 27th, 2007, 11:04 AM
Sorry to ask again, but are you graduating with a BA? 20 is very young to be graduating from college.

Yes, I will be getting a Bachelor's degree, actually a BS in Mass Communications.

I started taking community college classes while I was in high school, so while I graduated HS last May, I already had 1 1/2 yrs. of college done. So, I spent the summer doing CC and graduated with an AA degree. Now I'm in big kid's college. And, yes, if all goes well, and my university offers all my J classes when I need them, I should graduate at 20.

I've taken into account that while this seems like an advantage, I do lack the experience (jobs, ect.) that most 22 yr. olds have when they graduate. However, due to pror family responsibilities, and my dream of NYC, I'm glad it worked out this way. I guess I'll just have an extra yr. or so to gain some life experience and resume fillers. Hoping the odds aren't against me in NYC...:rolleyes:

JournalistJessica
February 27th, 2007, 11:15 AM
My advice is that if you're in college, you should be thinking about internships right now (and I hope you plan to finish college). I can't imagine a bigwig name like ABC or NBC hiring a writer right out of college with no experience, unless of course you know someone...I did 3 internships during college, 2 of which were paid (they do exist!), and 1 which offered me a great full-time job here in the city. Nearly every single company offers internships, and a site like entertainmentcareers.net or Variety's Career section might give you an idea of what kind of stuff is available. It's always easier to move up from within a company, especially in the entertainment business. I'd be happy to talk to you more if you want to PM me.

Yep, finishing college quickly is priority #1. I will be completing my required internship next Fall or Spring, right before that I graduate.

Because I've gone the fast track route to my education, it didn't leave much time for work experience. I did, however, do an internship for a local company in HS. I realize that I probably won't get a very prestigious internship next year. In fact, I'll probably do what most students here do, intern for our local paper.

Because of my age when I graduate, I think I'll have plenty of time for getting experience the year or two after college. Right now I just want/ have to finish so I can really start my life. I'm tired of freeloading on relatives, and really can't get great experience in my city, so I need to go somewhere else. That said, I did think about maybe completing my required school internship in Miami, NYC, or D.C., but don't really want to spend the money, since I'm saving it up for the big move.

What do you think about my route? Just finishing college quickly with a good GPA and a few college newspaper clippings (and I mean few, since I haven't really been here that long), interning here wherever I can, just to meet my requirement, then moving to NYC to really get my career (and more importantly, life) started?

Is this even realistic, figuring in the high cost of living? Thanks for all the info.

Schadenfrau
February 27th, 2007, 11:40 AM
I think that rushing through your education would be a big mistake. Take advantage of the relatively looser schedule college allows you, and do these internships that you're planning. If anything, I think that being so young would put you at a disadvantage in the job market.

fishermb
February 27th, 2007, 05:15 PM
I definately agree with Schadenfrau. While it seems like an advantage to have more time to find a job, I don't think too many decent publications would want to hire a 20-year old with little work experience. I graduated in 3 1/2 years, and that was with 3 full-time internships. If I had only graduated with my BA in English in say 2 1/2 years, I don't think I'd have had any decent job offer coming out. Most of my friends seriously don't understand the trouble that they're in when they graduate in 2 months or so because they don't have any relative work experience to the field they want to be in. You're obviously ahead of the game, but I say that you should stretch out your college career until you're 21, take less classes and leave your extra time to finding an internship or job. It also seems like anyone who enjoys writing is running a blog or contributing to an e-zine, so scope out those options as well.

JournalistJessica
February 28th, 2007, 01:17 PM
I definately agree with Schadenfrau. While it seems like an advantage to have more time to find a job, I don't think too many decent publications would want to hire a 20-year old with little work experience. I graduated in 3 1/2 years, and that was with 3 full-time internships. If I had only graduated with my BA in English in say 2 1/2 years, I don't think I'd have had any decent job offer coming out. Most of my friends seriously don't understand the trouble that they're in when they graduate in 2 months or so because they don't have any relative work experience to the field they want to be in. You're obviously ahead of the game, but I say that you should stretch out your college career until you're 21, take less classes and leave your extra time to finding an internship or job. It also seems like anyone who enjoys writing is running a blog or contributing to an e-zine, so scope out those options as well.

Thanks for the advice. I definately see your point, and I enjoy the whole college experience, but my my need to get done quick is actually a valid need, as I'm staying with family right now, and due to family obligations (helping care for elderly members and such), am not able to work. With that said, as much as I would love to stay in college another 2 1/2 years, it's really not realistic. I'd end up blowing my savings by getting a place of my own (and I would have to get a place of my own).

My priorities are 1) Surviving [keeping food and shelter], 2) Finishing my degree. And, while I do have scholarships that pay my tuition, everyday I spend here, in school, is costing me more (in the present time, which is all that matters right now) than me actually working full-time because I'm not able to save much.

Also, there's hardly no good journalism opportunities here, so I'd be wasting time here just taking a non-j related job.

I'm the first in my family to ever go to college. I have to support, motivational or finacial, so it's all up to me, and to tell you the truth, I'm sick of this city anyway. While I would love to move to NYC (and think I have the $ to do so), almost any other East Coast city suit me better than here.

I'll take your advice and start looking into internships here. I actually did one around 1 1/2 yrs. ago when I was in HS. As for streching out school, I may very well be 21 when I graduate (does age really matter that much, or just experience, anyway?), as my university tends to slow us journalism majors down a due to certain courses not being offered in the summer (one reason why I had contemplated on getting the more accessible English degree).

JournalistJessica
February 28th, 2007, 01:21 PM
I think that rushing through your education would be a big mistake. Take advantage of the relatively looser schedule college allows you, and do these internships that you're planning. If anything, I think that being so young would put you at a disadvantage in the job market.

Thanks for replying. I agree that with most college kids this is true, but my schedule is already so jam packed as it is, with school and family, that I'm not really able to work right now (will be able to maybe this summer or next semester). I am a little worried about the age thing, although it is looking like I may very well be 21 when I grad (uni. slows us J majors down).

fishermb
February 28th, 2007, 03:40 PM
Also, there's hardly no good journalism opportunities here, so I'd be wasting time here just taking a non-j related job.



Not sure if you ever said what part of Florida you're in...but the Miami New Times? Miami Herald? Sun-Sentinel? St. Petersburg Times? Ocean Drive Magazine? What about radio stations? Local TV news? Surely there must be some opportunities worth looking into ...

Lolita88
February 28th, 2007, 05:28 PM
I dont think she lives in miami, I was getting ready to tell her a couple of options I thought of, but I think I read she would love to work in Miami...so i dont think she's from here. If she were than I believe the oppurtunities would be endless. :p

JournalistJessica
March 1st, 2007, 11:06 AM
Not sure if you ever said what part of Florida you're in...but the Miami New Times? Miami Herald? Sun-Sentinel? St. Petersburg Times? Ocean Drive Magazine? What about radio stations? Local TV news? Surely there must be some opportunities worth looking into ...

I'm in Jacksonville. We have the Florida Times-Union, which is a good, conservative newspaper--definately a start. However, they offer very view opportunities to new grads. I'll def see if an internship is avaliable, though. There are some good local stations, and I do have some contacts through those, so that's also a definate possibility for an internship. In the long run, though, I just want to get out of here. I don't want to get stuck in a career here.

Miami is really nice, great career opportunities, too. So, I'll also see about maybe doing my internship there. Ultimately, I think my longing to move is more based on my sanity than career opportunities (lol).

I made a list of cities I would "consider" moving to. Miami is the only one in the south on there (I've heard mostly good things about Atlanta, too.) I just want to leave this region, see new things, meet to people. I think up north would suit me well, if not NYC, then maybe DC or Boston, but you can tell I've got my heart set on the Big Apple.

JournalistJessica
March 1st, 2007, 11:09 AM
I dont think she lives in miami, I was getting ready to tell her a couple of options I thought of, but I think I read she would love to work in Miami...so i dont think she's from here. If she were than I believe the oppurtunities would be endless. :p

You're right, the opportunities in Miami are endless. In fact, if I lived in Miami I probably wouldn't even be talking about moving. It's beautiful there, and I have considered moving there (It's so much more trendy and friendly than here), but I kinda want to leave the south, nothing against this region; There are parts that I truly love and it is my home, but I want to experience more than is here. We live in our own culture down here, as I'm sure you guys do up there. I just want to experience the NYC life for a while.

Lolita88
March 1st, 2007, 02:45 PM
Well I live in Miami and I wanna leave so dont feel bad lol :p

JournalistJessica
March 1st, 2007, 05:42 PM
Well I live in Miami and I wanna leave so dont feel bad lol :p

You're lucky. Miami is my favorite place in Florida. It's so hip, and the nightlife is amazing. Jacksonville will always hold a special place in my heart, but I definately think it's about time I spread my wings and start living my own life.

And it's so great to hear that another Floridian wants to move to New York. Everyone here thinks I'm crazy. They all say, "You won't last a winter up there." Call me the eternal optimist, but I actually think that snow could be fun as long as you know how to dress. Yeah, I'm looking forward to it all...lol:D

Bojangleman
March 1st, 2007, 06:20 PM
Don't worry; it hardly gets cold at all in New York.

Of course, I've spent five of the last six years in Montana. :cool:

212
March 1st, 2007, 06:54 PM
I'm in Jacksonville. We have the Florida Times-Union, which is a good, conservative newspaper--definately a start. However, they offer very view opportunities to new grads. I'll def see if an internship is avaliable, though. There are some good local stations, and I do have some contacts through those, so that's also a definate possibility for an internship. In the long run, though, I just want to get out of here. I don't want to get stuck in a career here.


Hi, Jessica. The most important thing for you, I think, will be getting that first professional internship. Once you do well at that, you'll climb the ladder quickly. Employers value experience. Stay with the field you like. You'll do better work when you enjoy it -- and when you do better work, you'll be promoted and be better paid.

Many schools can set you up with a good local internship for college credit. It's true that you're paying for the privilege of working, but believe me, in the long run it pays off a hundredfold. You gain critical experience and professional allies who can help you down the line. If your current school doesn't offer many chances for internships in your field, then consider transferring to a school that does -- in a city where you'd like to be.

In the meantime, I hope you're working at the college paper, radio station or TV station. Employers like to see that kind of experience, too.

fishermb
March 1st, 2007, 09:33 PM
You're lucky. Miami is my favorite place in Florida. It's so hip, and the nightlife is amazing. Jacksonville will always hold a special place in my heart, but I definately think it's about time I spread my wings and start living my own life.

And it's so great to hear that another Floridian wants to move to New York. Everyone here thinks I'm crazy. They all say, "You won't last a winter up there." Call me the eternal optimist, but I actually think that snow could be fun as long as you know how to dress. Yeah, I'm looking forward to it all...lol:D

I just moved from Miami up here...in the middle of winter...I could be playing golf right now, but I'm loving every moment here so far. Definately glad to be here and try this lifestyle out for a few years, though a little while down the road if a good job opens back up down south, I'll be there in a flash.

lofter1
March 1st, 2007, 09:53 PM
Yeah, I'd say it wouldn't be such a good sign if you just moved here and all you could think about is golf ...

fishermb
March 2nd, 2007, 11:00 AM
Yeah, I'd say it wouldn't be such a good sign if you just moved here and all you could think about is golf ...

I think you're missing the point of my post...

kliq6
March 2nd, 2007, 11:01 AM
I just moved from Miami up here...in the middle of winter...I could be playing golf right now, but I'm loving every moment here so far. Definately glad to be here and try this lifestyle out for a few years, though a little while down the road if a good job opens back up down south, I'll be there in a flash.

why waste your time if youd be gone in a flash and thinking of golf, dont think your NY material!

bob_az
March 2nd, 2007, 12:12 PM
hello there! i am moving to NYC in 2 months, and am trying to figure out where in manhattan i want to live. i have been and visited numerous times and seen neighborhoods i really liked, but it's hard to know what it's like to live there 24/7 and know all those little things that affect daily life (noise issues, crime issues, etc).

i have been lucky to get a well-paying job and have some serious savings, so at this point price isn't the biggest issue, although i'm no millionaire. im thinking about renting to begin with, until i get to know manhattan much better and figure out where i'd want to settle at.

here's what i am looking for in a neighborhood. im 25, young professional, fun guy in general. i like living near the great restaurants, bars, etc., but don't want to live right in the middle of it. i also want to avoid the whole post-college scene - id want to live in an area of young professionals who are sophisticated and enjoy nice things, not beer guzzling frat boys (no offense to anyone! been there, done that, ready to move on). though i one day want a family, im not anywhere near that time yet, and don't want to be surrounded by strollers and moms (again no offense, just want a different demographic).

during my time visiting manhattan, i loved tribeca and parts of the west village. soho was great but i think it's way too in the middle of a pedestrian foot mall. i have been on related's rentals website, and they have some great offerings in tribeca, including www.tribecatower.com. what areas in tribeca are nice, what areas are not so nice. any corner's or areas in tribeca to avoid? i work hard and want peace when i get home, and i live in san francisco now so i understand the makings of a big city, the fact that nothing is ever quiet, etc. i also saw a nice rental just behind the time warner center that seemed pretty well put together. and another great one in gramercy. the problem is there are so many options and locations! based on what you think my preferences are by what i have written, can you steer me in the right direction. i am a homebody a lot of the times and my home is my sanctuary, so i really want to do the best job possible finding a great living situation.

enough of my ramblings - what do you all think? locations, any suggestions on best places to avoid, best places to look? please help! there are so many options, i get confused easily. as much detail as possible would be great.

thank you so very much in advance - i really appreciate all of your help. NYC'ers are the nicest people i have ever encountered no matter what anyone else has said!

Schadenfrau
March 2nd, 2007, 12:26 PM
Gramercy Park or Tribeca sound perfect for you. The West Village is frequently overwhelmed by the frat types and strollers.

kliq6
March 2nd, 2007, 12:27 PM
homebody wanting to move to NYC, another interesting chartacter. id look on the UWS and UES if your into less actvity and staying in. Where do yo ulive now?

bob_az
March 2nd, 2007, 12:33 PM
klig - maybe i misspoke. i love to go out and have fun, am very social, etc. but when i mean homebody, i mean that i really value and cherish my home surroundings. i like the comforts of home, etc., and am subsequently willing to invest a lot of time, energy and money. i love to have a great time, but i also love coming home and just totally chilling out. forgive me if i made it sound differently. do you have any suggestions? i lived in san fran right now but am born and raised for the most part in phoenix.

schadenfrau - thanks for your input! any good ideas on buildings in these neighborhoods? corners to avoid, best places to go for living accomodations, etc.? there are tons in tribeca and gramercy!

Schadenfrau
March 2nd, 2007, 01:02 PM
I wouldn't be much help with specific buildings, but you seem like the sort of person who would probably appreciate pre-war buildings as opposed to the new luxury sort. For the most part, the construction is better, and you won't hear so much of your neighbors.

Look for units that don't face avenues- side streets are going to be more peaceful, and garden-facing units will be even more quiet. At the prices you're suggesting, you should go with Corcoran or Elliman. They generally have a lock on the nicest rentals at those price points.

Front_Porch
March 2nd, 2007, 01:06 PM
I work downtown and Tribeca would not be my first choice for a single 25-year-old guy; I think you'll find it's Strollerland, full of Wall Street families.

The good news is that it's the most expensive area in the city, so for the $4,700 a one-bedroom at Tribeca Tower will cost you, you can easily be in any other neighborhood. I would say the West Village near the Meatpacking District would offer a quiet apartment near a lot of nightlife, or the nicer areas of Gramercy -- it somewhat depends on whether you want to be near the East or West side trains, and whether you want to try to congregate near other people of a similar occupation (there are a lot of hospitals/med centers on the east side, so Gramercy might be fun if you're a young doctor.)

SoHo would also be a good choice, though it's crowded on weekends, and I just placed my last client with a similar profile to yours in Chinatown, where he got a two-bedroom, two-bath for under that price, but feels like it's a hop and a skip to SoHo and NoLita.

ali r.
{downtown broker}

fishermb
March 2nd, 2007, 06:03 PM
why waste your time if youd be gone in a flash and thinking of golf, dont think your NY material!

The fact that I moved here for a great job, to experience the city for a few years and I also happen to enjoy playing golf...if that doesn't make me NY material, umm...sure then I'm not NY material. But I guess you being on this forum telling someone who is or isn't NY material makes you fit the bill right?

Schadenfrau
March 2nd, 2007, 09:39 PM
Lord, I've got a weakness for so many Americana-esque things that are not readily available in NYC- in fact, after some time, these things grow to grand proportions in my mind. Strawberry soda? Fries that automatically come with tartar sauce? Cheap oysters? Roadside attractions? Still, I'd venture that I'm New York material at this point.

ablarc
March 3rd, 2007, 11:49 AM
The fact that I moved here for a great job, to experience the city for a few years and I also happen to enjoy playing golf...if that doesn't make me NY material, umm...sure then I'm not NY material. But I guess you being on this forum telling someone who is or isn't NY material makes you fit the bill right?
Sure, you're NY material, fishermb; New York welcomes all types and works its magic. Certainly, staying for a few years is as sound a plan as hanging around forever. And anyway, you might end up trading in Plan A for Plan B.

Front_Porch
March 3rd, 2007, 03:35 PM
Cheap oysters?

Arthur Avenue in The Bronx.

Schadenfrau
March 3rd, 2007, 05:15 PM
Sorry, but no dice, Front Porch. Anytime I've tried they've had a weak selection and high prices, at least compared to the Pacific Northwest versions I'm used to.

Front_Porch
March 3rd, 2007, 09:15 PM
Wow, when we went last year I think we got six blue points for $3 off a sidewalk vendor . . .must have gotten lucky.

My other suggestion was going to be that I heard the Magic Johnson theater in Harlem has strawberry soda, but I've never been.

Schadenfrau
March 3rd, 2007, 09:22 PM
That is a great, albeit suspicious price, FrontPorch. Thanks for your tips here.

kaitlynt
March 11th, 2007, 10:17 PM
hi everybody,

i was just in the city last week for a number of interviews (is it usually that bitterly cold?? yowza!), and have received an offer from my top choice. yay! they would prefer me to be there in about a month, which i can understand ... but whew, what a whirlwind this is going to be. for you experienced new yorkers, i have two questions:

1) my salary will be in the neighborhood of 75k. i plan to spend 1200/month on rent, and would like to still contribute from every paycheck to my roth ira, 401k and general savings. based on these financials, what sort of financial "comfort" does it look like i'm facing? i'm not extravagant, though i still appreciate some creature comforts (tivo, a nice pair of shoes every now and then, high speed internet, saturday at the moma). i know that some months will be better than others, and of course, the city will slap me around every once and a while (that challenge is what i'm looking forward to!), but i'd like to be in a state of at least mild personal comfort. thoughts?

2) my parents are going to help me for the first year or two, until i get a feel for the city and cultivate a network from which i can more comfortably find a roomate (rather than blindly on craiglist or whatever), and match whatever i contribute for rent (read: 2400/month). i'd like to find a doorman studio in midtown west/clinton or the lower half of the UWS. does this sounds possible, and if so, any suggestions for lovely buildings to look at? in the next month?

thanks all. catch you on the flip side in the city!

Gothamite
March 14th, 2007, 11:33 AM
Ok, me and 4 other people (5 in total) are looking for a 3 bedroom apartment in New York. We were looking at the following places: Brooklyn, Bronx, and Queens. I bascially need to know if these areas are decent and clean areas to live in. Are the pretty close to Manhattan or a Subway, and are they safe?

I have heard bad things about Bronx and Queens, is that just paranoia or are they really bad? If they are in what ways? We aren't high maintence people at all, we just want to be in a decent and safe area.

We are looking in the $1,500 - $2,000 price range.
Thanks for any help!!!

Schadenfrau
March 14th, 2007, 11:38 AM
Is that $1,500 to 2,000 each?


ETA that the Bronx and Queens are large areas. You're going to need to be far more specific if you want to know what different neighborhoods are like.

Gothamite
March 14th, 2007, 12:05 PM
Is that $1,500 to 2,000 each?


ETA that the Bronx and Queens are large areas. You're going to need to be far more specific if you want to know what different neighborhoods are like.

No, thats all together. 3 bedroom with 5 people splitting rent.
Well, I dont really know the names of areas so if you can, could you give me some names of areas to avoid?

Schadenfrau
March 14th, 2007, 12:16 PM
Sorry, but I won't. It seems pretty clear that you haven't done your homework on this subject at all.

For the prices you're talking about, you're not likely to find anything remotely near a subway, much less in a neighborhood that you would consider "clean" or safe.

I realize that you're very young, but if you're going to live on your own, you need to take responsibility for doing some research and making logical plans.

Gothamite
March 14th, 2007, 12:21 PM
Sorry, but I won't. It seems pretty clear that you haven't done your homework on this subject at all.

For the prices you're talking about, you're not likely to find anything remotely near a subway, much less in a neighborhood that you would consider "clean" or safe.

I realize that you're very young, but if you're going to live on your own, you need to take responsibility for doing some research and making logical plans.

I didn't ask you to judge me. I have been looking and researching for months and I HAVE found some in Brooklyn, Queens, and Bronx for those prices. You have no idea who I am so don't act like you do.

I asked a simple question because there isn't going to be an apartment website that is going to say DON'T LIVE HERE, so I thought I may ask someone that is willing to help. I may be "uneducated" but rather that than rude. Why are you here if you aren't willing to help, isn't that the point?

Schadenfrau
March 14th, 2007, 12:28 PM
If you've found these apartments, why don't you tell us which neighborhoods they're in instead of demanding that people rattle off an irrelevant list of which neighborhoods are "bad"?

That certainly makes a lot more sense than taking someone who condemns an entire borough with any sense of seriousness.

Gothamite
March 14th, 2007, 01:19 PM
If you've found these apartments, why don't you tell us which neighborhoods they're in instead of demanding that people rattle off an irrelevant list of which neighborhoods are "bad"?

That certainly makes a lot more sense than taking someone who condemns an entire borough with any sense of seriousness.

Well, I'm sorry, I wasn't aware there was a criteria I had to follow. Thanks for the help.

Schadenfrau
March 14th, 2007, 01:26 PM
So, what are the neighborhoods?

lofter1
March 14th, 2007, 01:51 PM
Schadenfrau wasn't being rude -- just pointing out that your questions were far too general. Tell people about specific neighborhoods that you are curious about -- you mention 3 entire boroughs that are larger than most cities in the US. If you've done the research as you've stated then share it. People here are very welcoming to inquisitive posters and offer great and specific information -- but less welcoming when it is put upon them to write a book in reply.

ps: Welcome to NY!!

Gothamite
March 14th, 2007, 01:56 PM
Schadenfrau wasn't being rude -- just pointing out that your questions were far too general. Tell people about specific neighborhoods that you are curious about -- you mention 3 entire boroughs that are larger than most cities in the US. If you've done the research as you've stated then share it. People here are very welcoming to inquisitive posters and offer great and specific information -- but less welcoming when it is put upon them to write a book in reply.

ps: Welcome to NY!!

There is still a better way to ask than to judge me on my age and supposed nieveity.

ryan
March 14th, 2007, 02:08 PM
We aren't a service; we're just random people giving out advice. It's annoying when we're asked to do all of the work figuring out someone else's plans. If you had read this entire thread before you posted - and then asked a more informed question - you would have received a much better reply.

UNC_Convert
March 14th, 2007, 03:16 PM
Hey all, I'll be moving to the big M in late August, and I was wondering how much time I should give myself to look for an apartment. I have the bar exam in late July, so I was hoping to do the apartment search immediately after that (giving myself 3-4 weeks to find an apartment). I don't know if this would help your advice, but I'm looking for a studio apartment, about $2500/mo, preferably in the Hell's Kitchen/Gramercy/Chelsea/Murray Hill areas (as they're closer to work); am I narrowing my search too much within the month-long timeframe? Any help would be immensely appreciated; you guys are the best!

Front_Porch
March 14th, 2007, 03:52 PM
I am happy to help you, although chances are your hiring firm has a relocation firm that they work with -- check with your H/R people, they might already have a broker they pay for that services the whole firm.

Since your expectations are realistic -- thanks in advance for not wanting a two bedroom -- you can find an apartment in two days. It's probably better that you give yourself a week, so you can get a little bit of the feel for the different neighborhoods. If you don't want to pay a broker's fee (negotiable, but typically 12 to 15% of a year's rent) you'll have to go direct to landlords in small buildings, so give yourself two weeks.

Also realize that August is vacation time, so the most successful brokers are at the beach -- and not showing properties -- on weekends. Try to leave yourself some weekend days to hunt around.

ali r.
{downtown broker}

ryan
March 14th, 2007, 03:53 PM
Aw, we've got you scared to ask anything! I found my apt the first day I went looking, but I don't think that's typical. Certainly many people do just fine in your timeframe. I'll defer to front_porch on how far your budget will go specifically, but it doesn't seem unreasonable to me.

ryan
March 14th, 2007, 03:54 PM
She's too good.

Front_Porch
March 14th, 2007, 04:02 PM
No, I just like renters . . . you cruise around in cabs, make friends, and then, boom! onto the next thing.

Buyers and sellers move at a stately (and less fun) pace .. .

ali r.
{downtown broker}

ablarc
March 14th, 2007, 06:34 PM
ps: Welcome to NY!!
Be not forgetful to entertain strangers: for thereby some have entertained angels unawares.




Howdy, Gothamite; don't go away.

Lolita88
March 14th, 2007, 07:28 PM
People here are very welcoming to inquisitive posters and offer great and specific information


I could not agree more.

Seriosly without really reading anything, just looking at adds and pics, you'd be amazed at how much info you'd find.

BTW and this is not to be rude, just real, dont be so lazy, the people on here are great, just work with them!:p

Lolita88
March 14th, 2007, 07:29 PM
Oh and the last part of that post was meant for Gothamite, I dont think I made that clear. :p

wstreetbiz
March 15th, 2007, 09:48 PM
Hello,

I would like to move to new york city this summer. I am from southern California and love driving. Would it be very difficult to live in new york city and drive? Also, do most apartment buildings offer parking as long as I'm willing to pay for it?

Thanks in advance.

bronzenine
March 15th, 2007, 10:38 PM
Yes, everyday driving in new york is ridiculous.. after a day driving in new york you probably wouldn't like driving much anymore. most people take cabs/subway/walk and cars are really just for vip celebs to roll in on.

ablarc
March 15th, 2007, 10:45 PM
Almost the whole time I lived in New York I owned a car. I wouldn't recommend it for transportation, but you can take some lovely joyrides evenings and weekends.

If you can afford to garage it ($$$), why not?

ManhattanKnight
March 15th, 2007, 11:20 PM
Hello,

Also, do most apartment buildings offer parking as long as I'm willing to pay for it?


Some apartment buildings in Manhattan have garages; most don't. Most are within a short walk from one or more garages that are open to the public, for a fee. A big fee.

Schadenfrau
March 16th, 2007, 12:56 AM
If you love driving, don't move here. That's the end of the story.

daydream nation
March 16th, 2007, 07:00 AM
Hi,

I'm a 23 year-old girl, considering moving to the city. I've lived in L.A. and London previously-- I moved to L.A. with just $300 in savings and London with $450, so I've been cash-poor in the big city and still made it work etc etc etc.

Anyway, my situation is a little bit unusual. I own a condo in CA worth about $400,000 with no mortgage or outstanding loans, but I have almost no cash. My condo is rented out for $1,450 a month so I have regular income from that. My tenants have been living there for seven years, so it's a very stable arrangement.

However, I would be moving to New York without a job. I have a BA in English, and I'm a musician. In the past, I've worked all kinds of different jobs to pay the bills, but I have never (and probably will never) have a professional vocation that pays tons of money.

I'm looking to share an apartment with people. Ideally, I would like to have my own room, but if I need to share a room with one or two other people for a while, that's fine too. I've done that before and didn't mind.

I've read a lot about Williamsburg, and it seemed like it might be a good fit for me. But (and I feel ridiculous asking if there are enough hipsters somewhere..) I'm worried it might not be indie enough. I've been living in Hoxton for the past three years, and I really need an area with lots of performance spaces, bars with live music licenses, creative young people, and an indie rock bias.

This is totally critical to me-- the dearth of that sort of thing was why I left L.A. I've stayed with friends of mine who live in Austin and in the Mission District of S.F. and both areas have a rep for that sort of thing but when I got there there was just nothing going on.

As an American citizen, visa issues are making it very difficult for me to continue to pursue a career as a musician in London, and I need to move somewhere where I can put a new band together (I play electric guitar) and there is a decent local music community to make contacts within.

Is Williamsburg where I should go? Is it still a dynamic place, or is it starting to splinter? If I can pay about $850-$900 in rent a month, including bills, will I be able to afford a single room in a shared apartment there?

Cheers!

ryan
March 16th, 2007, 11:14 AM
$850-$900 is plenty of $$$ for a share - which I'm sure you'll be able to find on craigslist. Williamsburg is actually a pretty big area - the northside neighborhood around Bedford avenue is just a small corner - which you probably won't be able to afford. Hipsters live all the way out on the L now, so I'm sure you'll find an area that's indie enough for you. Or you can live in Greenpoint like me and just walk across McCarren park.

I'm sure you could live anywhere though - a lot of the performing will probably be in Manhattan - everyone commutes.

ryan
March 16th, 2007, 11:17 AM
If you love driving, don't move here. That's the end of the story.

Can't say it in so few words, but unless you have someplace specific to drive to (summer place, etc) there's not anywhere really worth driving to. If there is, someone please tell me as I'm pretty used-up as far as daytrips go.

Save your money to fly somewhere.

Schadenfrau
March 16th, 2007, 11:41 AM
I got the impression that WStreetBiz was talking less about day trips and more about NYYankee-style driving from door to door.

fishermb
March 16th, 2007, 12:14 PM
While on the topic of Williamsburg...I am trying to figure out where I'll move when my sublease is up on May 1st. I really want to try and find a studio, and I am finding that while there are options in Manhattan in my price range of $1500/month, they seem to be in areas I'm not interested in (UES, Harlem and above, etc.).

So I'm considering Brooklyn, as I much prefer having my own place than sharing (although if it becomes necessary to share, I'll do what I have to do, location is more important to me right now), and I too like the creative, indie-type of atmosphere of Williamsburg. Is my budget reasonable to find a decent place there? I'm not looking for square footage, I'm looking for a decent space to sleep and have some sort of kitchen to cook dinner. Any other suggestions in BK with a similar atmosphere to Williamsburg that might also be in my range?

Grazie-

ryan
March 16th, 2007, 05:09 PM
I still like Ft. Greene. The architecture is so beautiful, the park is nice, and it's on the upswing. I would live almost anywhere in Brooklyn before the UES or north Manhattan. Where are you commuting to?

fishermb
March 16th, 2007, 05:31 PM
I still like Ft. Greene. The architecture is so beautiful, the park is nice, and it's on the upswing. I would live almost anywhere in Brooklyn before the UES or north Manhattan. Where are you commuting to?

My office is on Bryant Park, so BDFV or anything that goes to Times Sq. is closest to me. Can you tell me a bit about Ft Greene? I suppose I'm a bit uneducated when it comes to Brooklyn...as far as what's important to me, I'm looking for a young community, things like a quality (natural/organic) supermarket and good restaurants, but also an area that is not crazy loud (I have trouble sleeping, I need to get out of midtown). Location and quality also mean a lot more to me than square footage, I'm 22, single and don't have any pets.

ryan
March 16th, 2007, 05:49 PM
I don't think you'll find a good grocery store in any "hip" part of Brooklyn - outside of Red Hook. Northside Williamsburg has tops, which is decent. Greenpoint avenue Greenpoint has The Garden, which is a really great store. From there you'd be 25-30 minutes (G to the V) from Bryant Park. But there's only a few pretty blocks in Greenpoint - otherwise it fits your criteria, and you'd get a nice place for $1500.

Ft. Green/Clinton hill might not have the groceries, but it is the neighborhood I'd choose if i were just moving to NYC. Still a bit sleepy, but a nice strip of restaurants...can walk to BAM... and it's very, very pretty.

http://www.nyc.gov/html/dcp/gif/neighbor/neighl.gif

fishermb
March 16th, 2007, 06:51 PM
I didn't necessarily mean a super market...there's no hip area in brooklyn that has a small organic market? I'm planning to take the subway over to different parts this weekend (assuming the snow lets up) and see what interests me, thanks for the info ryan.

wstreetbiz
March 16th, 2007, 07:03 PM
I got the impression that WStreetBiz was talking less about day trips and more about NYYankee-style driving from door to door.

I just want to drive everywhere I go; school, market, out, etc. Even if I'm going 5 mph in the city, I'll still have a good time because of such a nice setting. Mainly, I'm wondering if it's possible. As in, is there parking available at markets, movie theaters, restaurant, etc.? I am aware of the traffic and the costs.

Thanks,
WstreetBiz

lofter1
March 16th, 2007, 07:11 PM
I didn't necessarily mean a super market...there's no hip area in brooklyn that has a small organic market?


Green Markets (http://www.ny.com/dining/green.html) (aka Farmers Markets) in Brooklyn:

Borough Hall
Court & Remsen St
Tues, Sat 8am-6pm

Albee Square
Fulton & Dekalb Ave
Wed 8am-3pm
July to October

Grand Army Plaza
Entrance to Prospect Park
Sat 8am-4pm

Windsor Terrace
Prospect Park West & 15th St
inside park entrance
Wed 8am-4pm
May to November

Bedford-Stuyvesant
Nostrand & Dekalb Ave
Sat 8am-3pm
July to October

Williamsburg
Havemeyer St & Broadway
Thurs 8am-5pm
July to October

McCarren Park
Lorimer & Driggs Ave
Sat 8am-3pm
June to November


Food Coops, Natural Food stores, Health Food stores for organic food and health food (http://www.organicconsumers.org/foodcoops.htm)

• DOWNTOWN NATURAL MARKET (http://www.organicconsumers.org/linkpage.cfm?memid=4306) - FULL SERVICE HEALTH FOOD STORE. (Brooklyn)

• EatRaw (http://www.organicconsumers.org/linkpage.cfm?memid=4107) - Raw, Wild & Organic Foods & Information to help You Detoxify, Cleanse & Revitalize Your Life!. (Brooklyn)

• Flatbush Food Co-op (http://www.organicconsumers.org/linkpage.cfm?memid=186) - a full-line whole foods grocery store with a strong emphasis on organic products.. (Brooklyn)

• Imhotep's Health & Living Food St (http://www.organicconsumers.org/linkpage.cfm?memid=6486) - Full service natural food store and restaurant. (Brooklyn)

• Leaf of Life Health Food Shoppe (http://www.organicconsumers.org/linkpage.cfm?memid=18580) - Leaf Of Life Vitamin Shoppe. (Brooklyn)

• Park Slope Food Coop (http://www.organicconsumers.org/linkpage.cfm?memid=183) - Brooklyn's largest coop grocery - members only. (Brooklyn)

• Perelandra Natural Food Center (http://www.organicconsumers.org/linkpage.cfm?memid=18414) - Full service natural foods supermarket specializing in organics & serving Bklyn Heights since 1976. (Brooklyn)

fishermb
March 16th, 2007, 08:33 PM
Gracias lofter.

lofter1
March 16th, 2007, 08:47 PM
da niente

( thank google ;) )

ablarc
March 16th, 2007, 08:48 PM
I just want to drive everywhere I go; school, market, out, etc.
Unless you have a chauffeur, you'll find this impossible; parking is both difficult and expensive. In next to no time you'll be taking the subway.


Even if I'm going 5 mph in the city, I'll still have a good time because of such a nice setting.
Maybe...right up until it comes time to park.


Mainly, I'm wondering if it's possible.
Not really possible.


As in, is there parking available at markets, movie theaters, restaurant, etc.?
No.

But as I said, you can have pleasant joy rides at off hours.

Don't know if those will compensate for the hassle and expense.

If I were doing it, I'd not own a car and rent one on weekends; you'd still come out ahead, and you'd always have a nice, clean car.

wstreetbiz
March 16th, 2007, 08:58 PM
So the best way to do it is chauffeur and car for joyriding but you can't park. Is there even valet? What does someone like donald trump do? Chauffeur?

Thank you very much for your help.
WstreetBiz

ablarc
March 16th, 2007, 09:03 PM
Is there even valet?
Only a few places.


What does someone like donald trump do? Chauffeur?
I guess.


Thank you very much for your help.
Sorry it wasn't what you wanted to hear.

Schadenfrau
March 17th, 2007, 12:23 AM
So the best way to do it is chauffeur and car for joyriding but you can't park. Is there even valet? What does someone like donald trump do? Chauffeur?

WstreetBiz

Lord help us all.

You do understand that Manhattan doesn't have parking lots, right? There is most certainly not valet.

lofter1
March 17th, 2007, 02:19 AM
You can call a car service -- let them drive you around.

fishermb
March 17th, 2007, 11:40 AM
Can someone give me a general idea of what lifestyle in Brooklyn Heights is like? I'm afraid my only exposure to this area is in the movie Heights...a friend of a friend is subletting a room by Schermerhorn St at Court St and I don't really know much about the neighborhood, young crowd? good places to eat? quiet? etc. Merci-

Front_Porch
March 17th, 2007, 12:31 PM
I think of Brooklyn Heights as young Wall Street couples on their first kid, but maybe that's just me.

ali r.
{downtown broker}

ryan
March 17th, 2007, 12:35 PM
Brooklyn Heights is pretty but boring. The promenade is nice, but there are few restaurants or bars. What is there is frumpy. People are UES-ish. It's an easy walk to Smith/Court/Atlantic, though, where you'd find lots of life. Personally I'd just live over in Cobble/Boerum/Carroll Gardens and save the promenade for the occasional walk.

fishermb
March 17th, 2007, 04:49 PM
So I just got back from wandering around a bit...I walked around Cobble Hill which I liked a lot (Smith/Court St.), Boerum, BK Heights which was nice but definately a bit quiet, parts of Atlantic Ave seemed interesting but when it crossed into Flatbush it got a bit too hectic for me. I started off on 9th st and 4th ave which I'm pretty sure is Park Slope and worked north from there...are there nicer parts of Park Slope? Are the better parts closer to Prospect Park? I did realize I'll need a few more days like today to check out other areas before taking the next step. Thoughts?

ryan
March 17th, 2007, 07:59 PM
You didn't see Park Slope at all. 5th ave and 7th ave are the primary commercial strips and it gets prettier the closer you go to the park. You could start at the same spot and walk over to the Botanical Garden. I like Cobble/Boerum hill too. To get to Ft. Greene you would have continued down Atlantic past flatbush and made a left turn. You'd be surprised how quick it turns tranquil and residential.

fishermb
March 18th, 2007, 02:48 PM
Checked out Park Slope, definately not for me. I met a friend for dinner in BK Heights last night and I'm starting to like that area more and more, I'm looking for quiet and the location is ideal. Will try to get over to Williamsburg/Greenpoint next weekend just to see what the area is like.

Schadenfrau
March 18th, 2007, 03:09 PM
If Park Slope isn't quiet enough for you, don't even bother with Williamsburg. Ryan's advice for you is spot on, and I'd think that Brooklyn Heights would be your ideal location.

trdcarlos
March 18th, 2007, 05:09 PM
Hmmm, Awesome, just an awesome section you guys put up in here.

Well here's my situation:

Right now, I'm living in Orlando, FL. I'm currently debating between two places, Miami and New York City, in which I lived in for the first 15 Years of my life.

Getting to the point, however, in in the I.T Field. I'm right now at my first ever I.T Job at a call center. I'm about to finish my A.S in Computer Info Science, and have no certs, but I am working towards a A+ before I move.

My Questions are:

Currently, adding basic necessities & financials together, New York Comes out winning because I would not need a car. Based on your opinions, is this assumption correct?

Second, my current salary is $13/hr. With approx. 1 Year of Real World Experience and 4 to 5 Years of Independent Experience in I.T, how much would I be looking to earn? Assuming that I'm going for a Help Desk Position, non Managerial Position?

Third, For a 24 Yr Old, would New York be a better overall choice, Financially and in Practicality?

Thank you very much for the input!

fishermb
March 18th, 2007, 06:11 PM
Hmmm, Awesome, just an awesome section you guys put up in here.

Well here's my situation:

Right now, I'm living in Orlando, FL. I'm currently debating between two places, Miami and New York City, in which I lived in for the first 15 Years of my life.

Getting to the point, however, in in the I.T Field. I'm right now at my first ever I.T Job at a call center. I'm about to finish my A.S in Computer Info Science, and have no certs, but I am working towards a A+ before I move.

My Questions are:

Currently, adding basic necessities & financials together, New York Comes out winning because I would not need a car. Based on your opinions, is this assumption correct?

Second, my current salary is $13/hr. With approx. 1 Year of Real World Experience and 4 to 5 Years of Independent Experience in I.T, how much would I be looking to earn? Assuming that I'm going for a Help Desk Position, non Managerial Position?

Third, For a 24 Yr Old, would New York be a better overall choice, Financially and in Practicality?

Thank you very much for the input!

I've only been living in New York for about a month, but I spent the first 22 years of my life in Miami, so I can give you some advice. I'd imagine the same will be said about NY, but $13/hr will not get you too far in Miami. Most likely you'd be looking at sharing an apartment in areas of West Kendall or Coral Gables, that will be pretty high traffic and not the nicest of buildings. You might also consider areas just outside of Miami, like Doral, Hialeah, and Homestead which will be cheaper but a 20 or so minute drive into Miami.

The disadvantages? Gas is up near $3 a gallon right now (my parents were complaining to me a few days ago about this), insurance is higher in Miami than in most parts of the country, though once you turn 26 it drops a bit. Traffic has become so bad that I'd try to avoid US1 anytime between 8AM and 8PM. Going out can be expensive - nice restaurants and clubs on South Beach regularly charge $15 for a drink - though there are many places to eat and drink that are much cheaper. It's advantagious to know Spanish as you will go many places where people don't speak English, it can be frustrating, but I learned over time and don't really mind now.

The good - You can be on the beach and the golf course about 360 out of 365 days of the year (there is usually a week or 2 sprinkled here or there in the 40s/50s). The culture is diverse and amazing, a great new Performing Arts Center (ballet/opera/orchestra) was just built downtown, we have the Heat, Dolphins, Panthers and Marlins, Miami Hurricanes, no city or state income tax.

Since you have easy access to Miami right now (3-3.5 hour drive on the Turnpike), I'd say try to line up some interviews, see what's available in your field and maybe you'll find the pay higher or lower, and then better be able to make a decision.

econ_tim
March 19th, 2007, 02:45 AM
Wow! This site, and this thread in particular, sure has a lot of good information. (Yes, I did read the whole thread.)

I'm 26 and live in Cambridge, MA, and I just accepted a job in Manhattan. The start date is flexible - I'm thinking about moving in August and starting work in September.

I've been researching apartments, but I'm still very early in the process. My base salary will be 150k, and I was hoping to spend around $2,500 for a 1BR apartment in Manhattan. After reading the posts, it seems like a more realistic range is $2,750-$3,000. I did find a number of what seemed to be good 1BRs on the nytimes listings for $2,500. Are these fake, or otherwise undesirable?

I don't expect to live in the poshest areas, but I would like good subway access. I'll be working in midtown, so most lines should be fine. The neighborhoods I've been looking at so far are Hell's Kitchen, Chelsea, Financial District, and - to a lesser extent - UWS and UES. I'm trying to avoid broker fees, and I read the thread here on no fee apartments, so I will be contacting a lot of landlords and management companies directly. I have also looked at the websites for several "luxury" buildings built in the past 5 years and concluded that they cost more than I would like to spend.

Anyway, some of you seem to have very good information. Am I right in thinking that I can find somewhat more affordable apts with decent amenities (e.g. 63 Wall St.) in the financial district? And how much can I expect to save by living in 15-20 year old highrises vs. the new construction luxury buildings? I realize my questions are fairly general at this point, but I still have a lot to learn. I'm sure I'll have more questions later.

fishermb
March 19th, 2007, 07:52 AM
Am I right in thinking that I can find somewhat more affordable apts with decent amenities (e.g. 63 Wall St.) in the financial district?

One of my best friends lives in 63 Wall St., she is in a Studio+Home Office and pays $2850 a month. It's a nice apartment, the kitchens and bathrooms are well done, and it's nice to have a doorman and gym in your building. The financial district gets kind of dead at night, but if you're looking for quiet that can be a positive. I'd imagine that other FD luxury buildings are in the same price range, I'm sure you can find a studio (without home office) for under $2500 if you want to be in a luxury building.

kliq6
March 19th, 2007, 10:08 AM
Wow! This site, and this thread in particular, sure has a lot of good information. (Yes, I did read the whole thread.)

I'm 26 and live in Cambridge, MA, and I just accepted a job in Manhattan. The start date is flexible - I'm thinking about moving in August and starting work in September.

I've been researching apartments, but I'm still very early in the process. My base salary will be 150k, and I was hoping to spend around $2,500 for a 1BR apartment in Manhattan. After reading the posts, it seems like a more realistic range is $2,750-$3,000. I did find a number of what seemed to be good 1BRs on the nytimes listings for $2,500. Are these fake, or otherwise undesirable?

I don't expect to live in the poshest areas, but I would like good subway access. I'll be working in midtown, so most lines should be fine. The neighborhoods I've been looking at so far are Hell's Kitchen, Chelsea, Financial District, and - to a lesser extent - UWS and UES. I'm trying to avoid broker fees, and I read the thread here on no fee apartments, so I will be contacting a lot of landlords and management companies directly. I have also looked at the websites for several "luxury" buildings built in the past 5 years and concluded that they cost more than I would like to spend.

Anyway, some of you seem to have very good information. Am I right in thinking that I can find somewhat more affordable apts with decent amenities (e.g. 63 Wall St.) in the financial district? And how much can I expect to save by living in 15-20 year old highrises vs. the new construction luxury buildings? I realize my questions are fairly general at this point, but I still have a lot to learn. I'm sure I'll have more questions later.

Unrelated question, how is the job market in Boston, I heard the town is slipping a bit?

trdcarlos
March 19th, 2007, 10:11 AM
I've only been living in New York for about a month, but I spent the first 22 years of my life in Miami, so I can give you some advice. I'd imagine the same will be said about NY, but $13/hr will not get you too far in Miami. Most likely you'd be looking at sharing an apartment in areas of West Kendall or Coral Gables, that will be pretty high traffic and not the nicest of buildings. You might also consider areas just outside of Miami, like Doral, Hialeah, and Homestead which will be cheaper but a 20 or so minute drive into Miami.

The disadvantages? Gas is up near $3 a gallon right now (my parents were complaining to me a few days ago about this), insurance is higher in Miami than in most parts of the country, though once you turn 26 it drops a bit. Traffic has become so bad that I'd try to avoid US1 anytime between 8AM and 8PM. Going out can be expensive - nice restaurants and clubs on South Beach regularly charge $15 for a drink - though there are many places to eat and drink that are much cheaper. It's advantagious to know Spanish as you will go many places where people don't speak English, it can be frustrating, but I learned over time and don't really mind now.

The good - You can be on the beach and the golf course about 360 out of 365 days of the year (there is usually a week or 2 sprinkled here or there in the 40s/50s). The culture is diverse and amazing, a great new Performing Arts Center (ballet/opera/orchestra) was just built downtown, we have the Heat, Dolphins, Panthers and Marlins, Miami Hurricanes, no city or state income tax.

Since you have easy access to Miami right now (3-3.5 hour drive on the Turnpike), I'd say try to line up some interviews, see what's available in your field and maybe you'll find the pay higher or lower, and then better be able to make a decision.Thank you very much on the advice.

I do in fact plan to send resumes to both locations, after my A.S of course which should be in little less than a Month from now.

However like I said, Money is an issue and I'll take all the Savings I can get, and right now, New York Comes out winning due to the fact that Unlike Miami, I would not need a car. I can hop on the Subway into Manhattan to get to my job, and really, I do plan on going for my bachelors up there as well, same with Miami.

But thanks, greatly appreciate the advice. Anymore is always welcome

econ_tim
March 19th, 2007, 10:24 AM
Unrelated question, how is the job market in Boston, I heard the town is slipping a bit?

I had two comparable job offers in Boston, but chose the one in NY because I want to live there at some point in my life, so why not now? I don't know how the job market is in general here, but things don't seem down. In fact, we're having a bit of a building boom right now. Of course we can't compete with NY on that front.

kliq6
March 19th, 2007, 10:31 AM
I had two comparable job offers in Boston, but chose the one in NY because I want to live there at some point in my life, so why not now? I don't know how the job market is in general here, but things don't seem down. In fact, we're having a bit of a building boom right now. Of course we can't compete with NY on that front.

Thanks, native Bostonian? Enjoy NYC when you get here, maybe youll become a lifer unlike most that try it for a few years and leave

econ_tim
March 19th, 2007, 11:07 AM
Thanks, native Bostonian? Enjoy NYC when you get here, maybe youll become a lifer unlike most that try it for a few years and leave

I'm originally from TN, but I've been in Boston for almost 5 years now for graduate school.

kittygirl
March 20th, 2007, 05:04 PM
Don't worry; it hardly gets cold at all in New York.

Of course, I've spent five of the last six years in Montana. :cool:

Hi,

I'm new to this post - but as I was reading through I noticed that you said you have spent five of the past six years in Montana. Where? I am currently in Bozeman. I just accepted a professorship at Hunter College in NYC for this fall. So my husband and I will be moving in July. I'm guessing this will be quite the culture shock for me! But I am really excited and this is something that I've wanted to do for a long time. I would appreciate hearing how another person made the transition!

Thanks,
kittygirl

fishermb
March 20th, 2007, 06:37 PM
Can anyone comment on www.nofeenycrentals.com (http://www.nofeenycrentals.com) ? They charge $80 to access contact information. I'm checking out other no-fee sites and am ready to go out and find my studio, but I dont want to just throw away money if these sites aren't too legit.

laslilangel
March 21st, 2007, 10:12 AM
So I've looked through a lot of this site and know similar questions have been answered already, so sorry asking again.

I'm about the graduate this May and for the past few years planned on moving to NY. Finally I was able to find a roommate and she just recently got us an apartment in Manhattan, I'm not an expert on the city and what all the neighborhoods are like, but for the location and size, it's an amazing price. Anyways, I was just wondering how most people actually move everything to their NY apartments. Since it's only my stuff I'll be moving, it won't be a whole lot, mostly just my bedroom furniture, a couch, and some other random things. Is it worth it to pay a mover to do this all?? I'll be moving from about 6-7 hours away, so it's in driving distance, I've just never actually had to drive in the city before and wasn't sure how it would be if my family rented a small moving truck and took everything ourselves.

Also, this isn't as important, but can anyone give me an estimate for what to expect for monthly bills...gas, electric, basic cable/internet, all that kind of stuff. I don't want an exact answer, but I'm just trying to get an idea of a budget started, especially since I still don't have a job yet lol.

ryan
March 21st, 2007, 10:46 AM
Can't help you with bill estimates, but I can assure you that it's fine to have your family move you into your new place.

In NY we tend to hire out a lot of work that people in other parts of the country do themselves (like laundry, cooking and moving). So most NYers would tell you to just hire movers - and it would of course be a nice luxury to do so - but if you don't want to pay for it, you don't need to.

fishermb
March 21st, 2007, 11:42 AM
Also, this isn't as important, but can anyone give me an estimate for what to expect for monthly bills...gas, electric, basic cable/internet, all that kind of stuff. I don't want an exact answer, but I'm just trying to get an idea of a budget started, especially since I still don't have a job yet lol.

You should check into if any utilities such as gas are included in your rent. Verizon and Time Warner both offer "triple play" packages that include a local phone line, digital TV and hi-speed internet for around $100-125 a month.

Front_Porch
March 21st, 2007, 12:25 PM
If you are in an apartment at an "amazing price," you might not have a large freight elevator at your disposal.

Make sure your couch fits in the passenger elevator and/or won't get stuck on the stairs.

Otherwise, you'll have to get your couch cut in half and reassembled. There are a number of different services that do this -- it tends to run around $125.

ali r.
{downtown broker}

rincony
March 21st, 2007, 03:10 PM
Sorry but I am looking for an apartment less than $800 in NYC. Dont' mind to live where ther are other latinos. I am from Venezuela and I speak spanish and english well. I lived in Philadelphia and I hate that city so much. Please tell me where i can move for that price. I dont want to live in queens because I know some people there that I dont want to see that they live there. I want to explore in brooklyn or the bronx. I know Manhattan is too expensive but if there is $800 apartment I move there too.

Thanks you for your help. :)

kliq6
March 21st, 2007, 03:18 PM
Bronx and Queens for that price, nothing in manhattan for less then 1000

rincony
March 21st, 2007, 03:29 PM
Dont want queens now. So bronx you thiink I can get a two bedroom for $800? I want to rent one room to another friend too. So we both pay the rent. Thanks.

Schadenfrau
March 21st, 2007, 03:31 PM
Try in the middle and far-eastern areas of the Bronx. You're priced out of anything too close to Manhattan.

rincony
March 21st, 2007, 04:34 PM
Thank you. do you know what trains are close to the areas you told me. I want to live closer to train to come to manahttan.

Schadenfrau
March 21st, 2007, 04:45 PM
Check a subway map, check Craigslist for rentals, pick some neighborhoods you can afford, then ask questions about the neighborhood.

rincony
March 21st, 2007, 04:48 PM
:confused: craglist? where is that?

Schadenfrau
March 21st, 2007, 04:49 PM
Dont want queens now. So bronx you thiink I can get a two bedroom for $800? I want to rent one room to another friend too. So we both pay the rent. Thanks.

Sorry, but you won't be able to find a 2-bedroom for that price.

rincony
March 21st, 2007, 04:52 PM
Ok 1 bedroom and friend can sleep in living room. We do that. ;)

laslilangel
March 22nd, 2007, 12:29 AM
If you are in an apartment at an "amazing price," you might not have a large freight elevator at your disposal.

Make sure your couch fits in the passenger elevator and/or won't get stuck on the stairs.

Otherwise, you'll have to get your couch cut in half and reassembled. There are a number of different services that do this -- it tends to run around $125.

ali r.
{downtown broker}

luckily we're on the first floor, so no stairs/elevator to worry about, and my roommate is almost positive it should fit through all the doorways fine...but she's going back to take measurements next week.

thanks everyone else for the advice about moving and bills tho!

lofter1
March 22nd, 2007, 01:29 AM
NYers always think about the high cost of moving -- that's one reason so many of us stay in the same place once we find something we like. Not so easy here to rent a U-Haul, pull it up and load everything on.

davlai3
March 22nd, 2007, 03:02 AM
I want to start off by saying that this is a wonderful resource for anyone considering a move to NYC. I am thrilled that I have come across this thread.

My boyfriend and I are considering a move to the city. We currently live in Erie, PA and the job market isn't very appealing. I am 24 and he is 23. We both have college degrees (BA in Communications and a BA in Math) with minimal experience in our fields (1-2 years) and have approximately $10K-12K saved for a move in August of 2007. I have read a great deal of this forum and have picked up a lot of great tips, but I do have a few questions.

The most important aspect of our move is clearly focused on career opportunity. Is it reasonable that we could find entry-level positions in our fields in the ballpark of $28-30K per year? I figure that $60K combined would certainly be enough to afford a $1000-1200 moderate one bedroom apartment in one of the surrounding areas (we will not have a car). We want a safe area that is close to the subway and no more than 40 minutes from Manhattan.

I have looked at apartments.com and found these three apartment complexes. I would certainly appreciate any feedback or information that you would have regarding these managed properties in Brooklyn. Are the areas safe and what is their approximate commute time to Manhattan? Anything reason I should avoid these places? Thanks in advance for the info! :) Also feel free to suggest any places that you feel would be a good fit based on our situation.

Flatbush Gardens
1403 New York Ave.
Brooklyn, NY 11210
http://www.apartments.com/summary.aspx?property=164931.3&srank=2&state=ny&helicon=0&rgn2=78&area1=y&area2=y&area5=y&rent_minimum=900&rent_maximum=1500&am49=0&page=summary&prvpg=7&srt1=0.29&srt2=0.87&srt3=0.53 (http://www.apartments.com/summary.aspx?property=164931.3&srank=2&state=ny&helicon=0&rgn2=78&area1=y&area2=y&area5=y&rent_minimum=900&rent_maximum=1500&am49=0&page=summary&prvpg=7&srt1=0.29&srt2=0.87&srt3=0.53)

Patio Gardens
580-590 Flatbush Ave.
Brooklyn, NY 11225
http://www.apartments.com/summary.aspx?property=129003.1&srank=6&state=ny&helicon=0&rgn2=78&area1=y&area2=y&area5=y&rent_minimum=900&rent_maximum=1500&am49=0&page=summary&prvpg=7&srt1=0.29&srt2=0.87&srt3=0.53

Ebbetts Field
1720 Bedford Ave.
Brooklyn, NY 11225
http://www.apartments.com/summary.aspx?property=129003.2&srank=7&state=ny&helicon=0&rgn2=78&area1=y&area2=y&area5=y&rent_minimum=900&rent_maximum=1500&am49=0&page=summary&prvpg=7&srt1=0.29&srt2=0.87&srt3=0.53

Schadenfrau
March 22nd, 2007, 09:19 AM
I don't know those particular buildings, but is there any reason you're looking for apartment complexes? You'd spend a lot less money renting in a regular old apartment building.

naturalized
March 22nd, 2007, 11:38 AM
NYers always think about the high cost of moving -- that's one reason so many of us stay in the same place once we find something we like. Not so easy here to rent a U-Haul, pull it up and load everything on.

On the contrary. Uhauls can be rented for same day service for 19.99 (for a cargo van) plus gas and .99 cents a mile. I recently moved from Union square/gramercy area to the financial district for about $50... the only real trouble was picking up and returning the van at 103rd and Lex - a small price to pay.

davlai3
March 22nd, 2007, 05:36 PM
I don't know those particular buildings, but is there any reason you're looking for apartment complexes? You'd spend a lot less money renting in a regular old apartment building.

Really? I just guessed that it would be easier to live in a managed property. I have always lived in apartment complexes with things like 24 hour maintenance, etc. I would be open to a regular apartment building, but isn't that more risky. I would think it would be easier to be taken advantage of (but that is a naive guess because I don't know).

Are there any reasons that you might suggest avoiding a managed complex as opposed to a regular apartment? Are they anyless safe? Btw we are a gay couple, but I wouldn't think discrimination would play a factor in securing an apartment.

Thanks again for your info. :)

Schadenfrau
March 22nd, 2007, 05:44 PM
The vast majority of apartments in NYC are not in large apartment complexes, so you'd really be limiting yourself to an unreasonably small number of properties- probably less than 10% of what's available.

JD Ariza
March 22nd, 2007, 10:29 PM
Hi, I'm 19 years old and have had my heart set on moving to NYC ever since I was 13. I'm transferring to Brooklyn College. I'm staying with either one of two friends for free, which is a blessing.
Can anyone suggest to me where I can get a job of some sort?

bmc
March 22nd, 2007, 10:59 PM
:confused: craglist? where is that?

Check the NYC Apartments section (http://newyork.craigslist.org/about/apts.html) on Craigslist (http://newyork.craigslist.org).

ManhattanKnight
March 23rd, 2007, 12:00 AM
Just a few thoughts, davlai3 --

You guys are 23 and 24 and about to move to one of the most exciting places in the world; please try to excise "risky," "24 hour maintenance," and "anything less safe" from your inventory of fears and must-haves. This is NYC, not Erie, PA! ;)

I'm not familiar with the 3 buildings/housing projects that you mention. To me, though, they look suffocatingly dull (and ugly), and I'll venture a guess that the average age of their residents is closer to 85 than 25. You can do a lot better. Something less mausoleum-like and closer to the physical and energetic heart of the City.

Since I'm a gay man living in one of the City's historically most gay-congenial neighborhoods, housing discrimination based on sexual orientation hasn't been a factor in my life, but I think that it would naive to believe that it has disappeared entirely or evenly throughout the City. If you have gay friends or friends of friends here, by all means ask them about their own experiences and knowledge of different neighborhoods.

And last, spend a weekend or a few here before your move, getting a feeling for the City, its neighborhood and people, and before you decide where in this vast and varied place you'll make your home. There's no finer season in NYC than Spring (unless it's Fall). Come, enjoy, thrive!

ryan
March 23rd, 2007, 12:26 AM
ditto manhattanknight. I actually think my landlord liked me and my partner more b/c we are gay (he's not, by the way, I just think he likes the cache). You'll find lots of young gays along the L train in Brooklyn - especially Williamsburg - and in Astoria (maybe that's just my circle?). Jackson Heights has a long history as a gay Latino neighborhood. NYC is one of the most gay friendly places in the world, so you won't have to worry about being discriminated against in the same way any more.

Stop looking at apts on apartments.com and get on craigslist. You'll find something much, much better.

Front_Porch
March 23rd, 2007, 09:22 AM
Housing discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation is capital I Illegal in New York City.

If you think you are turned down for an apartment just because you are gay, call 311 and ask to be directed to the city office where you can file a complaint.

ali r.
{downtown broker}

JournalistJessica
March 23rd, 2007, 05:58 PM
All of you have given me such great advice and I am looking forward to making my big move from Florida to NYC (or maybe Hoboken or JC) sometime between May-August 2008, after college.

Anyway, there's one thing I hadn't really thought about. I'm a fairly conservative Christian. With that said, I have friends of all beliefs and social values, but as you can guess, here in the Deep South, I also have a large percentage of people around me who share my values. Anyway, I'm just wondering what good neighborhoods would be in NYC for a Christian with traditional values. I don't mean to sound close-minded. I'm not. It's just that I was raised with certain values, wouldn't be able to shake them off now, so it would be really nice to be around a few others that shared my beliefs.:p

I started thinking about this yesterday when a liberal friend and I were in a debate. He said, "You are going to have such a culture shock when you encounter all those liberals in NYC." Now, I'm having second thoughts about even moving. I mean, part of the reason I want to go is to experience the Northern culture for a while, but I also can't leave me own fairly conservative beliefs behind.

Please tell me I won't be the only republican in NYC.:confused:

ryan
March 23rd, 2007, 06:29 PM
I know a republican. She felt "outnumbered" or something to that effect. Most of us move here to stay away from conservative christians. I'm sure you won't be the only one, but you won't find a neighborhood full of yourself. Hope you don't mind the gays or the jews...or people who aren't white or born in this country.

JournalistJessica
March 23rd, 2007, 06:59 PM
I know a republican. She felt "outnumbered" or something to that effect. Most of us move here to stay away from conservative christians. I'm sure you won't be the only one, but you won't find a neighborhood full of yourself. Hope you don't mind the gays or the jews...or people who aren't white or born in this country.

Sorry, I didn't mean to sound offensive. On the contrary, I have gay friends, and well as those of other religions. The only thing is that here, I also have many friends, if not most, who share my own values. Really, I'm not too conservative, just a Christian, and what I probably just need is to get into a really good non-denominational church wherever I move in the NYC area. That would probably fullfill my need to have a group Christian friends.

212
March 23rd, 2007, 08:54 PM
Sorry, I didn't mean to sound offensive. On the contrary, I have gay friends, and well as those of other religions. The only thing is that here, I also have many friends, if not most, who share my own values. Really, I'm not too conservative, just a Christian, and what I probably just need is to get into a really good non-denominational church wherever I move in the NYC area. That would probably fullfill my need to have a group Christian friends.

NYC is big enough that anyone can find friends with similar values here. ;)

Your current church might be able to recommend one in NYC. Or, you could turn to a free social networking site like Meetup.com, where people with like interests plan get-togethers. Just now I did a search for "Christian" on Meetup and found several active groups in town.

lofter1
March 23rd, 2007, 11:27 PM
No matter your denomination it is most likely that you will find a congregation to serve your needs. I suggest you try a google search. That could steer you in the direction where you're looking to go.

Schadenfrau
March 24th, 2007, 02:21 AM
All of you have given me such great advice and I am looking forward to making my big move from Florida to NYC (or maybe Hoboken or JC) sometime between May-August 2008, after college.

Anyway, there's one thing I hadn't really thought about. I'm a fairly conservative Christian. With that said, I have friends of all beliefs and social values, but as you can guess, here in the Deep South, I also have a large percentage of people around me who share my values. Anyway, I'm just wondering what good neighborhoods would be in NYC for a Christian with traditional values. I don't mean to sound close-minded. I'm not. It's just that I was raised with certain values, wouldn't be able to shake them off now, so it would be really nice to be around a few others that shared my beliefs.:p

I started thinking about this yesterday when a liberal friend and I were in a debate. He said, "You are going to have such a culture shock when you encounter all those liberals in NYC." Now, I'm having second thoughts about even moving. I mean, part of the reason I want to go is to experience the Northern culture for a while, but I also can't leave me own fairly conservative beliefs behind.

Please tell me I won't be the only republican in NYC.:confused:


Honestly, you shouldn't bother moving here if you expect anyone to rally around your "beliefs." If you're looking for a group of cheerleaders to rally around what you already know, stick where you are. You're obviously much more closed-minded than you consider yourself to be, because the whole that's-the-way-I-was-raised BS just sounds like an excuse for narrow-minded thinking.

NYC isn't going to conform to you, so either prepare yourself or abandon ship. If you're taking a count, I vote for the latter option. If you can't tell the difference between believing as a Republican and being raised as a born-again Pentecostal, go back to square one and spare everyone but yourself and those who taught you. Children absorb their lessons; adults learn their lessons. You pick your option, JournalistJessica.

JournalistJessica
March 24th, 2007, 02:42 PM
NYC is big enough that anyone can find friends with similar values here. ;)

Your current church might be able to recommend one in NYC. Or, you could turn to a free social networking site like Meetup.com, where people with like interests plan get-togethers. Just now I did a search for "Christian" on Meetup and found several active groups in town.

Thanks. That's a really good idea. I'll check it out!

JournalistJessica
March 24th, 2007, 03:03 PM
Honestly, you shouldn't bother moving here if you expect anyone to rally around your "beliefs." If you're looking for a group of cheerleaders to rally around what you already know, stick where you are. You're obviously much more closed-minded than you consider yourself to be, because the whole that's-the-way-I-was-raised BS just sounds like an excuse for narrow-minded thinking.

NYC isn't going to conform to you, so either prepare yourself or abandon ship. If you're taking a count, I vote for the latter option. If you can't tell the difference between believing as a Republican and being raised as a born-again Pentecostal, go back to square one and spare everyone but yourself and those who taught you. Children absorb their lessons; adults learn their lessons. You pick your option, JournalistJessica.

Thanks for the reply. You certainly made me evaluate myself for a moment. First off, I am a born-again Pentecostal/non-denominational, and secondly, I am Republican. If this alone makes classifies me as being close-minded, then I guess I am. But I don't think it does. I keep my opinions to myself, unless anyone joins a friendly debate with me. In all truth, I much more likely to argue about religion than politics, as I do know my Bible, but am just beginning to understand the government (just started voting).

I embrace people of other cultures and value systems, but like people from other groups, I would just like to have some friends around me that share my own values (who doesn't?). Sorry if I didn't make it clear. I do not want to start a rally, and am not endowing myself with the responsibility of bringing Christianity to NYC.

Although there are things I love about the South (i.e. South Beach, fried foods, the way my accent fits in with everyone elses), the thing I am most looking forward to getting away from for a while is the segregation. The city where I live is greatly segregated and while I think this is somewhat unintentional, nevertheless there are entire sides of town encompassed by just blacks, and others by just whites. This has created a HUGE social gap here, and I believe it is definately one of the reasons why we have such a large murder rate. I definately want to get away from this for a while (if not forever. lol. ) I want to live in a city that is full of diversity. I just think I am getting cold feet, and am probably just over worried.

I googled some churches in the NYC area and came up with quite a few non-denominational ones.

JournalistJessica
March 24th, 2007, 03:05 PM
No matter your denomination it is most likely that you will find a congregation to serve your needs. I suggest you try a google search. That could steer you in the direction where you're looking to go.

Thanks. I just did a search and found a number of churches that seem great!

212
March 24th, 2007, 04:38 PM
Although there are things I love about the South (i.e. South Beach, fried foods, the way my accent fits in with everyone elses), the thing I am most looking forward to getting away from for a while is the segregation.


Jessica, have you seen WNY's South Beach thread? The very insightful ablarc narrates a tour:
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=11820


Anyway, if you love South Beach, I doubt you'll have a religious problem with NYC. Per capita, they sin more in South Beach than we do here.

ablarc
March 24th, 2007, 06:30 PM
JournalistJessica, welcome to the forum. It’s obvious you’ll make great contributions; your mature, level-headed response to a bigoted attack is proof of that:


Thanks for the reply. You certainly made me evaluate myself for a moment. First off, I am a born-again Pentecostal/non-denominational, and secondly, I am Republican. If this alone makes classifies me as being close-minded, than I guess I am. But I don't think it does.
Nor do I. I’m sorry you got whacked.

Don’t think that’s typical of New Yorkers.

The rest of your post is equally wise, forgiving, open minded and grown up.

Go to it, girl; I’m sure you’ll be one of our most cherished contributors.

In my book you already are.

ablarc
March 24th, 2007, 06:58 PM
I just think I am getting cold feet, and am probably just over worried.
Not a reason in the world for you to feel this way. Youíre certain to make out OK. You've clearly got what it takes. In your heart.

He mocks proud mockers but gives grace to the humble.

fishermb
March 24th, 2007, 07:42 PM
Jessica, have you seen WNY's South Beach thread? The very insightful ablarc narrates a tour:
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=11820


Anyway, if you love South Beach, I doubt you'll have a religious problem with NYC. Per capita, they sin more in South Beach than we do here.

As someone who grew up just outside of South Beach (man I'm missing my Miami right now), I think it would be impossible to enjoy SoBe culture and have a problem with NYC.

JournalistJessica
March 24th, 2007, 11:40 PM
JournalistJessica, welcome to the forum. It’s obvious you’ll make great contributions; your mature, level-headed response to a bigoted attack is proof of that:


Nor do I. I’m sorry you got whacked.

Don’t think that’s typical of New Yorkers.

The rest of your post is equally wise, forgiving, open minded and grown up.

Go to it, girl; I’m sure you’ll be one of our most cherished contributors.

In my book you already are.

Thanks. I just have a problem with being over worrisome, especially about such a huge move. I've been completely on my own for a while now, but never really felt complete independence, nor fear of the unknown, as I attend college in the same city as I grew up in. But I figure life is about taking chances, and worst case scenerio, I'll just wind up back home. But best case scenerio, I will have a good job, a decent apartment (even if it is the size of a showbox and in Jersey), and a new start to my life.

By the way, I checked out those photos on the other thread. I planned to go to Miami Beach over Spring break, but have decided to X out weekend vacations for the next year in an effort to save cash.

londonlady
March 25th, 2007, 07:58 AM
Hi I am graduating in May and really want to move to New York as I am sick of England!!! What kind of stuff do I have to do? I am completely clueless. I also don't have any idea about the cost of living and housing ect. I know it seems like a hug thing to ask but could a native new yorker answer my queries please?? Thank you!!

ryan
March 25th, 2007, 10:52 AM
Great advice Ablarc, encouraging the Born-again Pentacostal girl to move to NYC. Her concerns were finding a community of people who shared her beliefs and being the only republican in NYC. I notice you didn't say anything about her actual concerns - you're just encouraging conflict. I'm sure that was fun for you, but she is an actual person asking for actual advice.

Jessica, you haven't said anything offensive, but you aren't going to find like-minded people in NYC - at least not easily, and certainly not in large numbers. Schadenfrau isn't going to be the last NYer to give you a hard time. Republicans I know keep quiet and almost seem ashamed of their beliefs. I have strong opinions and I like to talk about them - I wouldn't want to move to a place where I wouldn't find a lot of people to talk politics. If you're ok with that, go for it - just be prepared for culture shock and probably some feelings of isolation.

Schadenfrau
March 25th, 2007, 12:12 PM
Ryan is correct in pointing out that JournalistJessica hasn't said anything offensive, but that's no reason to encourage her to move to a place where she's not likely to find much of anything she seems to be looking for.

Those non-denominational churches aren't likely to be home to many Republicans or born-agains. As someone who actually attends church in NYC, I can tell you that the churches here are generally reflective of the population as a whole, meaning that they have almost nothing in common with traditional, conservative churches. In other parts of the country, "non-denominational" is frequently interpreted as "born-again Pentecostal." In NYC, it generally means "so liberal they can't be a member of a larger church organization." You're way more likely to find an NYC church group protesting the RNC or the Iraq war than you are spotting them protesting an abortion clinic or gay marriage.

Also, the idea of finding a NYC neighborhood teeming with young, middle-class born-agains on fire for Christ is ludicrous. The only neighborhoods I can think of with large born-again populations are poor areas with majority Latino demographics, because that's who is born-again in this city, and I doubt that's what JournalistJessica has in mind.

NYC is alienating enough for anyone who has just moved here alone, but it's likely to be crushing if someone's moving here with the intention of finding a community of people with right-wing values and conservative Pentecostal beliefs. Ablarc can talk about feelings "in your heart" and otherwise, but it should probably be pointed out that he's posting that from the South, nowhere near the places he's referencing.

Portia1776
March 25th, 2007, 03:26 PM
Hi everyone! I tried doing a search for this topic and didn't find results, so please forgive me if this is a redundant question. My husband and I are moving to Greenwich Village this August. One question I do have (I am sure I will have more as time gets closer and nerves kick in) but what banks are most prominent out there? Unfortunately the banks that we currently use are not in NY so we have to switch. What banks have the best access such as more ATMs and branches throughout the city (especially near the village).

I appreciate your help!

Thank you

conezone
March 25th, 2007, 04:25 PM
I would consider telling someone not to move here because they are a Republican or born-again Pentecostal to be closed minded and amazingly self contradicting.

JournalistJessica
March 25th, 2007, 04:54 PM
Great advice Ablarc, encouraging the Born-again Pentacostal girl to move to NYC. Her concerns were finding a community of people who shared her beliefs and being the only republican in NYC. I notice you didn't say anything about her actual concerns - you're just encouraging conflict. I'm sure that was fun for you, but she is an actual person asking for actual advice.

Jessica, you haven't said anything offensive, but you aren't going to find like-minded people in NYC - at least not easily, and certainly not in large numbers. Schadenfrau isn't going to be the last NYer to give you a hard time. Republicans I know keep quiet and almost seem ashamed of their beliefs. I have strong opinions and I like to talk about them - I wouldn't want to move to a place where I wouldn't find a lot of people to talk politics. If you're ok with that, go for it - just be prepared for culture shock and probably some feelings of isolation.

Yeah, I understand. I'm hoping to land a decent entry-level job with a newspaper. Since my ultimate goal is to be a journalist, not a politician, I have to accept the fact that I really can't be too flamboyant with my personal beliefs anyway, no matter where I live, and I'm okay with that. Even here and now, just writing for my college paper, I don't frequently discuss politics on campus because I don't want people to feel as though my news coverage is bias in any way.

ThisIsntMyRealName
March 25th, 2007, 05:22 PM
I moved here from the South as well (I am not religious). Let me say, you're in for a culture shock. Some of the differences that I've noticed, being a journalist, youre going to be POOR, unless your family has got some serious cash. It just doesn't take much to live in an upper middle class neighborhood down south, around here, if you're planning on a family, you really have to be pulling down a lot of change, I would even go so far as to say $300K+ a year for a nice upper/middle class family area (Stamford, Greenwich, Summit, NJ, UES). Being poor, you'll have to live in a questionable area, and I mean some areas in this place would qualify as a real slum down south. This is based on appearances, prescence of housing projects, and so on. Crime happens, its easy to get ripped off. There are a lot of poor people here and a few superrich types. Another thing I've noticed, the people are way, way more openminded. Lets see, I've seen people humping each other on the subway, outside along the street as well. Get used to a lot of gays and a few transsexual types and less families. The people here are altogether weird (only in NY!). Some people are rude, the way they drive, and interact, but not everyone is. The weather is colder (its still chilly outside now). Another thing I've noticed is that its much, much more diverse. The south is just more segregated. Around here, there are huge numbers of immigrants, and they are all mixed in in various places. The south on the other hand is divided into whites and US born blacks only. Of course, if you can stomach these facts and afford it, it can still be fun.



Yeah, I understand. I'm hoping to land a decent entry-level job with a newspaper. Since my ultimate goal is to be a journalist, not a politician, I have to accept the fact that I really can't be too flamboyant with my personal beliefs anyway, no matter where I live, and I'm okay with that. Even here and now, just writing for my college paper, I don't frequently discuss politics on campus because I don't want people to feel as though my news coverage is bias in any way.

ablarc
March 25th, 2007, 05:36 PM
JournalistJessica: http://www.nyci.org/site/

.

JournalistJessica
March 25th, 2007, 06:37 PM
I moved here from the South as well (I am not religious). Let me say, you're in for a culture shock. Some of the differences that I've noticed, being a journalist, youre going to be POOR, unless your family has got some serious cash. It just doesn't take much to live in an upper middle class neighborhood down south, around here, if you're planning on a family, you really have to be pulling down a lot of change, I would even go so far as to say $300K+ a year for a nice upper/middle class family area (Stamford, Greenwich, Summit, NJ, UES). Being poor, you'll have to live in a questionable area, and I mean some areas in this place would qualify as a real slum down south. This is based on appearances, prescence of housing projects, and so on. Crime happens, its easy to get ripped off. There are a lot of poor people here and a few superrich types. Another thing I've noticed, the people are way, way more openminded. Lets see, I've seen people humping each other on the subway, outside along the street as well. Get used to a lot of gays and a few transsexual types and less families. The people here are altogether weird (only in NY!). Some people are rude, the way they drive, and interact, but not everyone is. The weather is colder (its still chilly outside now). Another thing I've noticed is that its much, much more diverse. The south is just more segregated. Around here, there are huge numbers of immigrants, and they are all mixed in in various places. The south on the other hand is divided into whites and US born blacks only. Of course, if you can stomach these facts and afford it, it can still be fun.

$300K? That's alarming. Actually I'm the first person in my family to ever attend college and will pretty much be on my own, as I am now. So I can't expect any type of financial help from anyone. I'm okay with living very frugal for the first few years and I don't care how small the place is. Still, I do not expect to be making more than $40-$50K straight out of college (probably not even that much) and do not want to live in a slum type area.

I have been checking out Astoria, Queens and well as Brooklyn Heights, and there's always Hoboken and Jersey City (just started researching the latter). I've seen some apt. and studios in all these areas on craigslist for $1k-1200 per month, really small ones ever less (yeah, won't believe it till I see it).

I'm going to visit NYC late May for a long weekend. Hopefully I'll get a better idea. I don't care about giving up some luxaries and living on the cheap, but after working on a bachelor's degree for four (or three) years, I don't want to go hungry or live in the ghetto:( .

JournalistJessica
March 25th, 2007, 06:39 PM
JournalistJessica: http://www.nyci.org/index.html

Thanks for the link. Seems like a good community church. I'm going to try to visit it in May when I come to visit.

ablarc
March 25th, 2007, 06:54 PM
Thanks for the link. Seems like a good community church. I'm going to try to visit it in May when I come to visit.
You'll be overwhelmed by the warmth and good vibes, and you'll make gobs of new friends right away; they're very big into fellowship.

You should take much of what ThisIsntMyRealName says with a grain of salt, along with all the other Cassandras and naysayers; you obviously aren't about to start a family and live in Scarsdale. I have a close relative in Williamsburg (Brooklyn) who loves New York, is younger than you and gets by on about $35,000.

Look into getting roommates.

And don't worry about New Yorkers giving you a hard time; there are plenty of nice people in New York --and you'll find a heaping helping of them at the New York Church.

fishermb
March 25th, 2007, 08:08 PM
I have been checking out Astoria, Queens and well as Brooklyn Heights, and there's always Hoboken and Jersey City (just started researching the latter). I've seen some apt. and studios in all these areas on craigslist for $1k-1200 per month, really small ones ever less (yeah, won't believe it till I see it).

I'm going to visit NYC late May for a long weekend. Hopefully I'll get a better idea. I don't care about giving up some luxaries and living on the cheap, but after working on a bachelor's degree for four (or three) years, I don't want to go hungry or live in the ghetto:( .

Two of my co-workers live in Astoria, one who has been there for years and the other who moved from (increasingly expensive) Manhattan, but absolutely love it.

I personally am looking into Brooklyn Heights (just submitted an application for a place today!) as I want a quieter area than Midtown where I am now but I will say that it's a tough area to find housing because price is not all that much lower than Manhattan, and most of the selection is 1-bedrooms, not many studios, which might be out of your price range. I will follow others advice and say that it might be a good idea to start thinking about roomates, it will make rent in a better neighborhood more realistic.

Also keep in mind that a general rule (though not always followed) is to spend 25&#37; of your pay on rent, and a lot of landlords will require you to make 40x the rent in order to sign a lease somewhere, so if you find a $1,000 studio, plan on making $40k a year (and most will take a guarantor, but in most cases only from tri-state, not from Florida). Just some things to keep in mind as when it actually comes time to get an apartment, it winds up being a much bigger ordeal than you could possible imagine.

ablarc
March 25th, 2007, 09:16 PM
I have a close relative in Williamsburg (Brooklyn) who loves New York, is younger than you and gets by on about $35,000.
Just talked to him to get the scoop on his circumstances. He rents a 2-Bedroom in Williamsburg with 2 roommates for $1600. His share is $600, and that's also what the other bedroom's occupant pays --while the guy who sleeps in the living room pays $400.

The building is a freshly-renovated multi-story factory, so it's SoHo-style loft living. Lucky dog. Eight minutes walk to the subway, one block from Bedford Avenue.

If you want, I can inquire if there are vacancies in the building.

Get a roommate; you can probably find one at the Church, especially if you write or e-mail them in advance. They're very engaged, helpful and pro-active, they'll probably find you a potential roommate by the time you get to New York --or just ask when you get there; all the members know everybody at this church --like in the First Century-- and they're just dying to help you out.

Networking? You bet.

Like having a family waiting for you in New York. You'll be right at home among friends. They can probably also direct you to a job. This is no ordinary church.

daydream nation
March 26th, 2007, 03:25 AM
Hi guys! Thanks for your responses to my other post. I've got a few more questions which I couldn't find answers to elsewhere. If anyone could answer some of them, that'd be great...

-How likely is it that I would have a washing machine in my apt (not my apt building, but my actual apt)? If it's uncommon, then around how much is it to have clothes service washed by a laundromat?

-How useful/safe is taking the bus? Would I really be taking the bus much, or would I probably just use the Subway?

-As far as I can tell, there's no Target or Walmart in NYC. Are the NJ ones within reasonable distance or do I need to just get used to shopping elsewhere?

-Is there a radio station that plays NYC bands? Like, is there a 'local music' program on a station once a week or something?


-

fishermb
March 26th, 2007, 08:05 AM
-How likely is it that I would have a washing machine in my apt (not my apt building, but my actual apt)? If it's uncommon, then around how much is it to have clothes service washed by a laundromat?

-How useful/safe is taking the bus? Would I really be taking the bus much, or would I probably just use the Subway?

-As far as I can tell, there's no Target or Walmart in NYC. Are the NJ ones within reasonable distance or do I need to just get used to shopping elsewhere?

-

I'll answer what I can...it is very unlikely that you will have a washing machine in your apartment, unless you are renting in a brand new luxury hi-rise building (and even then only some are being built with W/D in apt as opposed to in building).

Whether you take subway or bus depends on where you're going. I personally have never had to take a bus once.

There is a Target in Brooklyn, and I'm hoping we never see a Walmart.

JournalistJessica
March 26th, 2007, 08:44 AM
Just talked to him to get the scoop on his circumstances. He rents a 2-Bedroom in Williamsburg with 2 roommates for $1600. His share is $600, and that's also what the other bedroom's occupant pays --while the guy who sleeps in the living room pays $400.

The building is a freshly-renovated multi-story factory, so it's SoHo-style loft living. Lucky dog. Eight minutes walk to the subway, one block from Bedford Avenue.

If you want, I can inquire if there are vacancies in the building.

Get a roommate; you can probably find one at the Church, especially if you write or e-mail them in advance. They're very engaged, helpful and pro-active, they'll probably find you a potential roommate by the time you get to New York --or just ask when you get there; all the members know everybody at this church --like in the First Century-- and they're just dying to help you out.

Networking? You bet.

Like having a family waiting for you in New York. You'll be right at home among friends. They can probably also direct you to a job. This is no ordinary church.

Thanks so much for all the help. ;) I'm looking forward to visting this summer. Williamsburg definately seems like a great neighborhood for me. I'll take a walk around during my visit.

I'm going to talk to my advisor today at the university to inquire about any internships I might be able to do in NY. Although I do not graduate until May 2008, I think I will probably be able to finish all of my classes by December, only leaving the internship. Who knows? Maybe I'll try to come in Jan. to complete my internship there. Now just to save more...:D

Schadenfrau
March 26th, 2007, 09:40 AM
-How likely is it that I would have a washing machine in my apt (not my apt building, but my actual apt)? If it's uncommon, then around how much is it to have clothes service washed by a laundromat?

-How useful/safe is taking the bus? Would I really be taking the bus much, or would I probably just use the Subway?

-As far as I can tell, there's no Target or Walmart in NYC. Are the NJ ones within reasonable distance or do I need to just get used to shopping elsewhere?

-Is there a radio station that plays NYC bands? Like, is there a 'local music' program on a station once a week or something?
-

1. Not likely at all. Laundry pickup/delivery generally runs between $1-$1.50 a pound.

2. The bus is safe and it's fine. It's especially useful if you're going crosstown or between boroughs that aren't Manhattan and something else.

3. There are two Targets in NYC- in Brooklyn and the Bronx. Most people don't shop at either, and Wal-Mart is definitely out of the question. I'm not sure what you'd need there, but I would seek out new places to shop.

4. I'm not sure about the schedule, but WFMU is a good local college radio station:

http://www.wfmu.org/

milleniumcab
March 27th, 2007, 11:14 AM
. What banks have the best access such as more ATMs and branches throughout the city (especially near the village).

I appreciate your help!

Thank you

I switched to Commerce Bank some time ago and very happy with them.. They are open 7 days a week and have many branches in the city...Good Luck with your move..

ryan
March 27th, 2007, 11:58 AM
Just say no to Bank of America. They suck (http://www.bankofamericasux.com/).

fishermb
March 27th, 2007, 05:50 PM
Myself, as well as my family, have been extremely happy with Bank of America for well over 15, 20 years. If you think that people only have problems with BoA and not any other bank, you are seriously misled. There's a reason it is the largest commercial bank in America...

josephclark
March 27th, 2007, 06:14 PM
Hey everybody.... I am brand new to the board... it seems like a great place... anyway, of course, I am moving to New York in a few days and I am going to be driving a 16ft. moving truck from Kansas City. Does anybody know a place in the city that I can park a moving truck over night? any input would be fantastic! Thanks...

joe

ryan
March 27th, 2007, 07:10 PM
There's a reason it is the largest commercial bank in America... Yes, corporate greed and an era of deregulation. Other banks have better customer service and fewer fees.

lofter1
March 27th, 2007, 07:37 PM
... anybody know a place in the city that I can park a moving truck over night?

To narrow it down a bit: what part of NYC are you moving to?

josephclark
March 27th, 2007, 08:54 PM
well I'm moving to Brooklyn... but I need to park the truck overnight in manhattan. I'll be staying in Times Square... so the closer to there, the better, but anyplace is good as long as it's secure and will accomidate a 16ft. moving truck, you know.... thanks so much for the response.

ryan
March 27th, 2007, 09:08 PM
JosephClark, you're plotting quite the masochistic move... do yourself a favor and cancel those times square reservations and get a room at a motel in Jersey. Wake up at 4am and try to beat rush hour through Staten Island. Parking a truck in times square would be incalculably unpleasant and costly.

Times square isn't on the way to Brooklyn from anywhere.

josephclark
March 27th, 2007, 09:22 PM
yeah, believe me, I know it's a little crazy... but it's a looooong story that involves my Mother.... and I swear... this is not a joke or anything, but it's complicated. If I didn't have to do the Times Square thing first, I wouldn't... but it's not entirely up to me. If you know what I mean.... anyway, so do you guys know a place in manhattan where I can park a moving truck over night? Any help you can give would be fantastic!

Joe

fishermb
March 27th, 2007, 09:25 PM
Yes, corporate greed and an era of deregulation. Other banks have better customer service and fewer fees.

That's one man's opinion...I personally don't need some mom and pop bank. When it comes to my money I don't need a 'cool' bank, I personally have had nothing but the best customer service, and never pay fees on anything.

josephclark
March 27th, 2007, 09:28 PM
or here's another idea.... my apartment is in Flatbush... so does anyone know a place I can park a truck over-night in or near Flatbush? I could drive straight there and park the truck and then take the trek back to Times Square to meet my parents.... any suggestions?

Joe

Schadenfrau
March 27th, 2007, 11:49 PM
Here are two tips:

1. Tell your parents to hop on the subway and meet you in Flatbush. Better yet, tell them to take a cab. There's no need for you to escort them around the city, and if you claim there is a need, tell them to head back to Kansas City post haste.

2. The very idea of a "cool bank" is maybe one of the stupidest things I have ever heard.

milleniumcab
March 28th, 2007, 12:43 AM
http://local.yahoo.com/details;_ylt=As1VXEoHCtUz0YdLu0zguT2jNcIF?id=24495 288&ed=Sgy3dv93iHmsg3HbzWoAsmV_.ZKMc_FInywQxyT750Wh1dA 5heo5LC5DMHjS7T0UTQ--&csz=Brooklyn%2C+NY&state=NY&distance=0.44&stx=Parking+Services (http://local.yahoo.com/details;_ylt=As1VXEoHCtUz0YdLu0zguT2jNcIF?id=24495 288&ed=Sgy3dv93iHmsg3HbzWoAsmV_.ZKMc_FInywQxyT750Wh1dA 5heo5LC5DMHjS7T0UTQ--&csz=Brooklyn&#37;2C+NY&state=NY&distance=0.44&stx=Parking+Services)


http://local.yahoo.com/details;_ylt=AkX9L6laRCX1wemZwYlvsC2jNcIF?id=11351 281&ed=Sgy3dv93iHmsg3HbzWoAsmV_.ZKMc_FInywQxyT750Wh1dA 5heo5LC5DMHjS7T0UTQ--&csz=Brooklyn%2C+NY&state=NY&distance=0.37&stx=Parking+Services


http://local.yahoo.com/details;_ylt=AmwaLnVfiNLRARJt.YqIw2mjNcIF?id=11349 957&ed=Sgy3dv93iHmsg3HbzWoAsmV_.ZKMc_FInywQxyT750Wh1dA 5heo5LC5DMHjS7T0UTQ--&csz=Brooklyn%2C+NY&state=NY&distance=0.25&stx=Parking+Services

try these for parking in Flatbush... good luck..

lofter1
March 28th, 2007, 01:33 AM
Re: Parking the Truck

Check this out ...

Manhattan (http://www.parkfast.com/manhattan.html)

Brooklyn (http://http://www.parkfast.com/brooklyn.html)

Jersey (http://www.parkfast.com/new_jersey.html)

NYpotat
March 28th, 2007, 12:11 PM
Hi everyone,

I'm moving to NYC in 2 months. I've got 4k saved up, a roommate to go with me, really good credit, and am pretty sure I'll be living in Astoria. What I do not have lined up yet is a job, and this is mainly because I want a temp job... yes, want a temp job. I want a job that I'm allowed and expected to leave for 3 hours during a work day, and just not get paid for those 3 hours.

So my question is - does anyone know a job outside of temp that would allow that, or, what temp agency would you recommend?

I've got a decent but not wonderful resume: bachelor's degree, 1.5 years of customer service, type at 100 wpm, so I think I could find a job, even a temp job to pretty easily fulfill half of a studio / 1 bedroom Astoria rent.

Thanks all!

marisa
March 28th, 2007, 12:23 PM
Next fall I'll be moving to NYC in order to graduate from high school in a country other than mine (Portugal), but I don't know much about Manhattan public schools so I was wondering if anybody could help me out with my choice!

I was advised to go to Stuyvesant, because I'm studying Sciences, but I don't know if I can be admited there because of the examination they require (SSHSAT). Since I'm foreign would they have a special Admission Test?

Any answer would be nice! Thanks ***

:)

marisa
March 28th, 2007, 12:27 PM
I'm not a New Yorker (yet) but I think going to www.newyork.craigslist.org (http://www.newyork.craigslist.org) may help you find some temp job that will fit for you!

Good luck! =)



Hi everyone,

I'm moving to NYC in 2 months. I've got 4k saved up, a roommate to go with me, really good credit, and am pretty sure I'll be living in Astoria. What I do not have lined up yet is a job, and this is mainly because I want a temp job... yes, want a temp job. I want a job that I'm allowed and expected to leave for 3 hours during a work day, and just not get paid for those 3 hours.

So my question is - does anyone know a job outside of temp that would allow that, or, what temp agency would you recommend?

I've got a decent but not wonderful resume: bachelor's degree, 1.5 years of customer service, type at 100 wpm, so I think I could find a job, even a temp job to pretty easily fulfill half of a studio / 1 bedroom Astoria rent.

Thanks all!

milleniumcab
March 28th, 2007, 10:33 PM
I was advised to go to Stuyvesant, because I'm studying Sciences, but I don't know if I can be admited there because of the examination they require (SSHSAT). Since I'm foreign would they have a special Admission Test?

Any answer would be nice! Thanks ***

:)

Why don't you get your answers from the horse's mouth?...:D

www.stuy.edu (http://www.stuy.edu)

ms.kass
March 31st, 2007, 10:38 AM
Hi guys,

I'm 22, currently a molecular biologist, and more recently, a NYC teaching fellow candidate. I currently live in Raleigh, NC. I'm hoping to get selected for a position teaching in NYC. I have some questions for veteran NYC dwellers!!

1. Can I live in a safe (hopefully) cute neighborhood making $42,000 a year?

2. Anyone know anything about lower income schools in the Bronx? (I would be teaching highschool Biology.)

3. Does anyone know a person who is a NYC teaching fellow, how were their experiences?

4. I would describe myself as a hopeful, nice, caring, genuine person (tough as well). Is that conducive for NYC living?

Thanks guys! AnyONE that can shed some light on my situtaion is greatly appreciated.

ablarc
March 31st, 2007, 10:53 AM
I would describe myself as a hopeful, nice, caring, genuine person (tough as well). Is that conducive for NYC living?
Those traits are conducive to living anywhere. ;)


AnyONE that can shed some light on my situtaion is greatly appreciated.
Brace yourself.

ThisIsntMyRealName
March 31st, 2007, 11:02 AM
Read my warnings to fellow Southerners a few pages back. There are good things about NYC if you can afford it. For example, the transportation system, the culture, the food, the museums, the entertainment, and so on.



Hi guys,

I'm 22, currently a molecular biologist, and more recently, a NYC teaching fellow candidate. I currently live in Raleigh, NC. I'm hoping to get selected for a position teaching in NYC. I have some questions for veteran NYC dwellers!!

1. Can I live in a safe (hopefully) cute neighborhood making $42,000 a year?

2. Anyone know anything about lower income schools in the Bronx? (I would be teaching highschool Biology.)

3. Does anyone know a person who is a NYC teaching fellow, how were their experiences?

4. I would describe myself as a hopeful, nice, caring, genuine person (tough as well). Is that conducive for NYC living?

Thanks guys! AnyONE that can shed some light on my situtaion is greatly appreciated.

ms.kass
March 31st, 2007, 11:25 AM
i actually wouldn't classify myself as a southerner. originally from Denver, CO. however, i have lived in NC most of my life, but don't share your typical "southerner" narrow minded ideals.

i wouldn't to move to NYC if i thought i couldn't hack it. i just need some guidance on where to look to live, ie. nice affordable apts.

i'm not looking to live lavishly at all, just in desperate need of some life experience and inspiration.... bored out of my mind with the same ole stuff.

ablarc
March 31st, 2007, 12:09 PM
^ Told the wrong person to brace.

djh0002002
April 1st, 2007, 08:40 PM
Where is a good place to live for 600 a month with 1, maybe 2 roommates?

NewYorkDragon
April 1st, 2007, 08:59 PM
Go to newyork.craigslist.org, click on rooms / shared, put $600 in as your max and search.

212
April 1st, 2007, 10:34 PM
Ms. Kass, some nice neighborhoods are doable on $42K -- if you get two or three housemates, so you're splitting $3,500 to $5,000 rent. Look for a place that's on a subway line to your school. Your best bets are probably the Upper East Side or Upper West Side -- but definitely the cheaper buildings in the less convenient parts of those neighborhoods.

http://www.streeteasy.com/nyc/rentals/nyc/no_fee%3A0%7Cprice%3A2000-5000%7Carea%3A135%2C139%7Cbeds%3E%3D3%7Chas_addres s%3A0

If I were you, I'd look for fellow teachers to room with. New teachers tend to get the toughest classes in NYC, and as for mentoring, your results may vary. So you'll want to be with peers and help each other along.

TNGIRL
April 3rd, 2007, 10:14 PM
We are moving to NYC towards the end of July 07. I will be attending Columbia and we would like to find an apt. nearby for around 1000 -1500 a month.

Any info. on the surrounding neighborhoods? Safety and access to transportation?

Also, would anyone recommend having an apt. broker? We are moving from Tennessee and are hoping to come up for 3 days in late May to apt. hunt.

Schadenfrau
April 3rd, 2007, 11:16 PM
TNGirl, are you going to be an undergrad or grad student? How do you feel about roommates? From what you've said so far, it sounds like you'd be better off with them, but I think we need more information.

ablarc
April 4th, 2007, 06:07 AM
Hello everyone, I'm moving to New York in June, and will be living on west 97th street. Could anyone tell me how that area is? safety wise, etc. Just want to make sure I'll be in a good neighborhood. Thanks a lot. :)
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=9310

fishermb
April 4th, 2007, 08:06 AM
Just an update from those who have helped me through the last few weeks...after checking out about 20 or 30 open houses in various areas, I've decided to go with Brooklyn Heights for my next move, found a great place on a nice quiet block, close to everything I need. That was not the most fun I've had, but I'm glad it's over and taken care of and I can delete craigslist off my favorite places :)

Schadenfrau
April 4th, 2007, 09:16 AM
I'm glad you found a place, fishermb. You'll have to take some photos of the area once you move in.

TNGIRL
April 4th, 2007, 09:01 PM
I am going to be in Grad. school and I'm married so roommates are not an option. We would like rent to be in the 1000 - 1500 price range but could go up to 2000.

Any info. on the neighborhoods surrounding Columbia would be great but in particular I'm wondering about west upper manhattan.

Schadenfrau
April 4th, 2007, 09:10 PM
"West Upper Manhattan" is the only neighborhood around Columbia. For the price you're willing to pay, you could find a studio/one-bedroom in Morningside Heights/Harlem, which is ideal for your situation.

NewYorkDragon
April 4th, 2007, 10:55 PM
So,...as some of you may or may not know -- I'm moving to N.Y. next year. I'm planning to start saving up real soon and I was wondering just how much I should save up?

I know that New York can be very expensive and the more you can save before making the move, the better. But, I'm just trying to get a base number here.

I'm not a business guy so I won't be making 75 grand a year. I'm moving to N.Y. to get my acting career started, but I do plan on having a full-time job until I get in.

I was thinking around the 5-7K range, and more if I can. I think that'd get me breathing room. Plus, you figure in I'll be pulling in a weekly income from a job I find once I make the move.

Any help on this subject is appreciated. P.S. -- if it helps, I plan on living in the Harlem/Morningside Heights area with a roommates. Figured you'd need to know what my rent would be, before helping out.

Thanks.

fishermb
April 5th, 2007, 07:47 AM
NewYorkDragon: the simple answer is save as much as you can. You never know how much your job is going to pay, or how long it may be before you get a paying acting gig. You may find that you want to take acting classes or something, and if you're pay check is only enough to cover your rent and food, you'll wish you had saved more money. I wound up being lucky because I had saved up quite a bit of money, but am making enough at my job that I haven't had to touch any of it.

kliq6
April 5th, 2007, 10:06 AM
So,...as some of you may or may not know -- I'm moving to N.Y. next year. I'm planning to start saving up real soon and I was wondering just how much I should save up?

I know that New York can be very expensive and the more you can save before making the move, the better. But, I'm just trying to get a base number here.

I'm not a business guy so I won't be making 75 grand a year. I'm moving to N.Y. to get my acting career started, but I do plan on having a full-time job until I get in.

I was thinking around the 5-7K range, and more if I can. I think that'd get me breathing room. Plus, you figure in I'll be pulling in a weekly income from a job I find once I make the move.

Any help on this subject is appreciated. P.S. -- if it helps, I plan on living in the Harlem/Morningside Heights area with a roommates. Figured you'd need to know what my rent would be, before helping out.

Thanks.

Move to california for acting, fact is besides a few soaps and Boradway ( which not many are really fit for) there are not many openings for actors. There is a reason there is no shortage of waitresses, they cant find acting jobs here!

OldStudent
April 9th, 2007, 01:57 PM
Hello,
This is an invaluable forum, thanks to all the posters for such helpful information.
Bio:
Here's my story. I'm 35 yrs old, live in the suburbs of San Diego, Ca and single. About two years ago I started going to community college to find some kind of educational path in life and to change careers. Finally, I'm eligible to transfer to a University as a Business student. Problem is I'm burned out, bored and I really need a change.
**That lodestone of humanity, New York City, has also been calling me for years. **
As of Now:
I have some MS Office and beginning bookkeeping skills. I have some debt.
Plan/Goal:
I'm going to make the move in August/September. I'll have a very small fortune to cushion me ($2000). I'm packing light. I just want to get by and have my New York City fascination fulfilled.
Back up Plan:
If I can't get a job that pays the rent, I'll have to leave. It's just that simple.
Indulgence:
Perhaps take a course at a community college??
Excuse my Ignorance:
Rent= $600+ How should I do this? Pay before I arrive? Move to NYC and get a hostel for a week or two while I search for a place and job?? Should I just compromise and go to Philly ; ).
Location=???
Work= I have no idea, except I keep looking at craigslist. Iím ignorant.

Any help or dialogue for this OldStudent will be greatly appreciated. I thank you in advanced.

212
April 10th, 2007, 06:18 AM
OldStudent: Find something that doesn't bore you, and become one of the world's best at it. Then move here.

OldStudent
April 10th, 2007, 10:13 PM
Good Evening 212,

Thank you for the reply.

I should clarify that ,although burned out, I'm not bored with my major. I'm bored with where I live.
As for becomming the best at what I do. I'll try my absolute hardest!!!:)

Regards,

OldStudent

JournalistJessica
April 11th, 2007, 01:12 PM
Hi everybody,

So I've been doing some additional housing research and came upon some ads for apartments in Weehawken. These seem to be less than any apartments or studios I've heard of in Hoboken, or even parts of some NYC buroughs I'm interested in like Astoria and Williamsburg.

Weehawen seems like a good alternative to Hoboken. Does anyone have any experience living/visting there?

How's transporation? Would I need a car? I'm 19 with very little driving experience so if I did have a car I would never attempt to go into NYC with it.

So far it doesn't seem like the commute from the bus and PATH would be too bad, under 45 minutes. Then again, I don't know the best routes so it could be more or less time.

Thanks,
Jessica;)

Schadenfrau
April 11th, 2007, 01:35 PM
Do you mean Weehawken?

ryan
April 11th, 2007, 01:54 PM
Weeboken=South Weehaken in realtorspeak?

Front_Porch
April 11th, 2007, 03:20 PM
Oh, dear, realtorspeak. I was on curbed yesterday and actually found myself using "Little Chitaly" in a sentence.

ali r.
{downtown broker}

JournalistJessica
April 11th, 2007, 06:00 PM
Do you mean Weehawken?

Yeah, lol, I meant Weehawken. I've been looking on CraigsList for places in the area. I guess my brain was just fried from a test this morning.

JournalistJessica
April 11th, 2007, 06:02 PM
Weeboken=South Weehaken in realtorspeak?

No, had a blonde moment (and I'm not even blonde). lol. I was typing on my school's computer faster than my brain processes. Meant Weehawken.

Schadenfrau
April 11th, 2007, 06:04 PM
I really think you should look for apartments in NYC. Why would you seek out a commute of bus-PATH-subway when you could simply use the subway only?

No one your age has their own apartment, and you'll be far better off with roommates. With the prices you're talking about, it's somewhat doubtful that you could afford your own place. And frankly, you don't have a job yet, so the money in question could be less than you've got in mind.

ryan
April 11th, 2007, 07:06 PM
Hoboken has a bit of a frat/sorority vibe. If that's you're thing you might like it.

JournalistJessica
April 12th, 2007, 07:12 PM
I really think you should look for apartments in NYC. Why would you seek out a commute of bus-PATH-subway when you could simply use the subway only?

No one your age has their own apartment, and you'll be far better off with roommates. With the prices you're talking about, it's somewhat doubtful that you could afford your own place. And frankly, you don't have a job yet, so the money in question could be less than you've got in mind.

Ok. Thanks. I think I'll take your advice and just stick to the NYC area. I have no problem with having roomates, but I would like to have my own room and preferably have no more than two roomates, but it doesn't really matter. As long as I have food to eat and a warm, dry place to sleep, no complaints here.:D

Schadenfrau
April 12th, 2007, 09:03 PM
You won't have any trouble finding your own room with one or two other roommates. Even if you like your own space, the city can be a lonely place at first, so you'll appreciate the company.

212
April 12th, 2007, 09:18 PM
I'm not bored with my major. I'm bored with where I live.
As for becomming the best at what I do. I'll try my absolute hardest!!!:)



That's the spirit. So let's see, $2,000 and no job, plus debts ...
My advice would be, if you're acing your classes, apply to a NYC university that's best for your field, and aim for scholarship money. Really you want to be on some kind of career track here. Once you're into the university, sell the car, find an apartment to share with other students, and work nights and weekends to pay the rent ...

chef
April 14th, 2007, 07:20 PM
ok, so i have a new finance gig in new york, and would like to buy a place. i can't afford more than 6k a month (and thats stretching), which means about a 1~1.5 mil apt. i really hate old buildings, so i think a new pre-construction is the way to go. i need to be near (or within an easy commute of) Grand Central.

just to give an idea, i saw the website for 325fifth, which i thought was beautiful, but they are sold out of the affordable units.

i'm looking for a large 1bed or a 2 bed (need home office space)

any ideas ?

fishermb
April 15th, 2007, 10:16 AM
chef: you should try the NY Real Estate section of this forum (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=28) there is lengthy discussion of pretty much all real estate development going on here in the city.

clubBR
April 16th, 2007, 01:31 AM
ok, so i have a new finance gig in new york, and would like to buy a place. i can't afford more than 6k a month (and thats stretching), which means about a 1~1.5 mil apt. i really hate old buildings, so i think a new pre-construction is the way to go. i need to be near (or within an easy commute of) Grand Central.

just to give an idea, i saw the website for 325fifth, which i thought was beautiful, but they are sold out of the affordable units.

i'm looking for a large 1bed or a 2 bed (need home office space)

any ideas ?

You should try looking in Hunters Point, Long Island City. Its right across the East River and one subway stop from Grand Central. Also, there are tons of pre-construction going on due to boom in development

melissamango
April 17th, 2007, 08:22 PM
Just wanted to see if there are any people out there who are relocating to New York from San Francisco or if you've already done so, please share experiences or advice! Oh.. and here is my blog:

http://melissamango.blogspot.com (http://melissamango.blogspot.com/)

Many thanks,
Melissa

Dmain_Event
April 17th, 2007, 09:07 PM
Hey guys, I am a grad student about to graduate from Pitt in April. I am looking to move to the city soon (hopefully before july). I actually have a couple of questions. I was on a website just browsing for rent prices and I found a couple of places in Manhatan (Harlem, West harlem, upper east side, East Village, Some places in Queens like flushing and other places close to manhatan) That came in as cheep as 800/month for a 1 bedroom!!!!! I can't seem to find the webpage that I saw it on anymore so that might be a clue as to what is going on. My question is, is that reasonable or some kind of hox? Also, I don't neccesarily have a job lined up just yet. But I do have a little bit of money saved up. Do you think I could move out there first get a place and then search for a job? Or should I have a job lined up first? Let me know what you think.
Thanks.

starlitebright
April 18th, 2007, 11:21 AM
Hi- this is a great forum you have here, reading over the past posts has certainly answered a lot of NYC questions I did not even know I had.

What I am looking for at the moment is neighborhood suggestions. I will be moving to NYC in late August or September with my boyfriend- he will be working at the UN, and I will also likely be working in mid-town as well (so reasonable proximity to Grand Central would be great). We will be making a few trips down over the summer to see places (and in my case, to interview).

What I want to know is: what are a few good neighborhoods for us to take a look at? I know it is probably not reasonable to try and live in Manhattan- I would be happy to be a bit further out if it means we could have a larger one bedroom or even a two bedroom. Budget is around 1400-2000 a month. We live in downtown Boston now, so are used to the wonderful parts of city living (the food- public transportation- etc) as well as the not as great parts (high rents- at least some crime in every neighborhood- etc). I would love to find a fairly young and active neighborhood in Brooklyn or Queens (or Manhattan, but not holding my breath there)- we are both in our mid twenties, and not quite ready to be surrounded by families or older folks. The commute is key here- we will both be working long hours, and do not want to be stuck on the train for more than 45 min or so each way- plus would like to be able to go out in other boroughs from time to time.

Thanks in advance for your help!

Schadenfrau
April 18th, 2007, 11:34 AM
If the commute is key and you're working in midtown, you're looking at either Long Island City or Astoria, both in Queens. A Brooklyn commute would not be quick, especially past rush hour.

Lance75
April 18th, 2007, 01:32 PM
I wouldn't rule out Brooklyn completely. The commute from Park Slope to Midtown is roughly half an hour, which isn't too bad. I have a friend who makes the commute on the (awfully slow) R train from the south Slope to the mid-40s and he says the ride is less than 25 min (I think he's probably being optimistic).

See "The Commute" section in this article about living in Park Slope:
http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9D03E1DF1330F937A25752C0A9619C8B 63&sec=&spon=&pagewanted=2

There are other Brooklyn neighborhoods which are much closer to Manhattan--Brooklyn Heights and Boerum Hill, for example--that would allow an even quicker commute.

Lance75
April 18th, 2007, 01:35 PM
Sorry, I somehow missed your budget.

$2000 isn't likely to get you a large 1 bedroom in the areas I mentioned, much less a 2 bedroom...

Lolita88
April 19th, 2007, 08:12 PM
Hey guys, long time...anywho...

I was wondering how likely is it to move up in the world of fashion before having my degree?

Thanks:p

Lolita88
April 19th, 2007, 08:14 PM
Oh yeah and I saw on www.nycdwellers.com (http://www.nycdwellers.com) studios in Wash Heights for about $800 is this too good to be true?

cleverley
April 20th, 2007, 11:49 AM
Hi all,

This is my first post so ill try not to break any rules, i thought this thread would be the best place to ask my question instead of starting a new thread.(though dont be offended if i get restless and do it anyway)

Right,

I'm a 21 year old English bloke and im about to start a job as a PCSO (Police Community Support Officer) in Kent. Im just about to finish a 3 year BSC degree too. My plan is to work as a PCSO for a year which will get me £19,600/ $39,200.
Now with rent and tax etc i reckon i could save upto £10,000/$20,000 in order to move. I lived just outside NYC 2 years ago for the summer and loved it in Manhattan. I would really like to work within the same area as the police etc or help out in schools but im not so fussed if i cant. i know there are certain jobs i cant do as an authoritative figure unless im a citizen (which im happy to do even if it takes 3 years).

im really trying to find a job that i can live safely on in NYC before i get my citizenship and apply for the police. im also hoping that by saving the money it can get me sorted for deposits/car/furnishings.

so i was hoping some of you may be able to point me in the right direction for jobs or at least give me an idea of what to aim for. considering a lot of people migrate to new york this is the best site ive found for information.

cheers in advance.

John

kittygirl
April 20th, 2007, 07:14 PM
Hello,

I have recently accepted a professor position at Hunter College and will be moving to NYC in July. I will be starting at $70,000/year and my husband will be making around $35,000-$40,000/year. On this income, we are thinking that we could reasonable pay $1,200-$1,600/month for an apartment. We would prefer two bedrooms, if possible, but could settle for one. I have done ALOT of reading and research and have able to find places in our price range in various parts of Brooklyn, Queens, and the Upper West Side (including Harlem)... but I have a lot of questions about these areas.

We wouldn't mind living outside of Manhattan, but we have two criteria that are very important to us. First, we are coming from Montana and want to move to a safe neighborhood where we can be comfortable while we adjust to city life. Secondly, I will need to take the subway every day to Hunter College (68th and Park Ave). I have severe motion-sickness problems and therefore cannot ride the public buses. Subways, however, do not affect me. So it is important that we live within 6 blocks of a subway station.

Since I am so subway-dependent, are there neighborhoods in my price-range/safety-needs that you could recommend? Is it reasonable to think that I could commute from areas of Brooklyn or Queens to Hunter College in around 30 minutes? Also, it appears that it would be easier to commute via subway from Brooklyn and Queens, versus the Upper West Side/Harlem area. Is that true? I know that the Bronx would probably be the easiest commute, but I don't have enough experience in the city to feel safe there.

Lastly, my husband and I will be flying out to NYC the first week in June to look for housing. Since I am looking at such a variety of boroughs/neighborhoods, how can I go about finding a broker to help me? It seems like each broker/agency specializes in one area of the city. Is it possible to find someone to show me a variety of places? Also, is it reasonable to find an apartment in one week?

I appreciate any advice that you can give me - thank you in advance!

Schadenfrau
April 21st, 2007, 01:46 AM
Though you find the Bronx "unsafe," the Manhattan neighborhoods you're going to be considering have a higher crime rate. If you can find an apartment for that price in Astoria, good luck.

Your specifications exclude you from looking in Washington Heights or Harlem proper- those are west-side neighborhoods, and you won't find housing with that easy of a commute there. You would absolutely need to take a bus.

Bite the bullet about "safety" and live in Spanish Harlem, or take a one-bedroom on the far UES, if you can find one for that price. At the costs you're talking about, you're going to need to sacrifice some of your Montana comfort zone.

Lolita88
April 22nd, 2007, 11:32 AM
:p Where exactly is spanish harlem? ( I mean as far as streets between what and what)

bronzenine
April 22nd, 2007, 06:54 PM
roughly, spanish harlem/'el barrio' stretches from e96th to e125th, and fifth ave to the east river.

Front_Porch
April 22nd, 2007, 07:35 PM
Kitty Girl:

a $20K housing budget on an income of $110K is very low -- I fear you will be disappointed in everything you see. Expecting to spend 25% of your gross on housing is more reasonable, and a lot of what you see will push you closer to 30%.

Schade is right that the Bronx is worth looking at; there's also a little pocket of new Harlem condos around Madison and 116th, and the neighborhood is ok, and then you could walk east for your train and west for your restaurants, and that might work -- I would expect 2-BRs there are running around $2,500 at this point; for that price you could also get a 1-BR rental in Forest Hills Gardens, which I would say is more like 45 minutes to Hunter, but it was designed as a middle-class enclave and still has that feel of nice leafy streets -- and it has good schools.

Unfortunately, you are right, no one broker is going to have good connections in all three of those neighborhoods, so you will have to do some hoofing around yourself. A week ought to be enough, though.

ali r.
{downtown broker}

macreator
April 22nd, 2007, 08:03 PM
I've heard from a few friends of mine that have moved/or looked in NYC in recent years that there are some good rentals in terms of price on the Upper East Side if you're willing to be East of 3rd Avenue and north of 86th street. Plenty safe area with great services (2nd avenue isn't lacking with regard to restaurants). And the Lex line is just a few blocks off. The only thing that could be an issue is construction on the Second Avenue Subway taking place soon in the 90's on Second Avenue.

Lolita88
April 22nd, 2007, 08:11 PM
roughly, spanish harlem/'el barrio' stretches from e96th to e125th, and fifth ave to the east river.


thanks:p

kittygirl
April 22nd, 2007, 10:43 PM
Thank you for your replies. Is Spanish Harlem considered safe? Could you tell me more about this area?

Thanks.

Schadenfrau
April 22nd, 2007, 11:12 PM
You really need to see the neighborhood for yourself, as everyone is going to have a different opinion about the place. Check the NYPD crime stats about areas you're considering, and then take your own judgment into consideration. No one is going to be able to tell you what you think is safe.

If you want a two-bedroom (or even a one-bedroom) for the price and specifications you're quoting, Spanish Harlem is pretty much your only option.

cleverley
April 23rd, 2007, 04:24 AM
Hi all,

This is my first post so ill try not to break any rules, i thought this thread would be the best place to ask my question instead of starting a new thread.(though dont be offended if i get restless and do it anyway)

Right,

I'm a 21 year old English bloke and im about to start a job as a PCSO (Police Community Support Officer) in Kent. Im just about to finish a 3 year BSC degree too. My plan is to work as a PCSO for a year which will get me £19,600/ $39,200.
Now with rent and tax etc i reckon i could save upto £10,000/$20,000 in order to move. I lived just outside NYC 2 years ago for the summer and loved it in Manhattan. I would really like to work within the same area as the police etc or help out in schools but im not so fussed if i cant. i know there are certain jobs i cant do as an authoritative figure unless im a citizen (which im happy to do even if it takes 3 years).

im really trying to find a job that i can live safely on in NYC before i get my citizenship and apply for the police. im also hoping that by saving the money it can get me sorted for deposits/car/furnishings.

so i was hoping some of you may be able to point me in the right direction for jobs or at least give me an idea of what to aim for. considering a lot of people migrate to new york this is the best site ive found for information.

cheers in advance.

John

is no one able to help then?

UK-NY
April 23rd, 2007, 03:10 PM
Hi there,

I have jst discovered this site whilst taking the 1st steps @ looking to move to the city from UK. I am a young guy in his early 20s. Looking at the previous posts u all seem very helpful so thought id c if anyone can help with a few of my concerns.

1. Does anyone know about requirements for Visas etc. or where I even apply?
2. I am trained as a dancer however understand completely how hard this business is in the states. I have some GCSEs from high school, if this means anything - what other/alternative full time work could i look for to keep me living? Does retail assistance pay the price? Is it easy to get paid gigs playing in coffe houses/bars of an evening (guitar/singing - not dancing!!!)
3. Would I have problems finding an apartment without much of a credit background?
4. What is the expense of a subway travelcard that allows unlimited travel per month?

I hope someone can help with at least 1 or 2 of my questions - apologies for bombarding u wiv a 101!

God Bless!

Alonzo-ny
April 23rd, 2007, 04:01 PM
For the 2 UK people trying to move to NY, its seems as if you dont have much in the way of qualifications. I am moving over from Scotland this summer for 1 year but i plan on applying for a greencard. I think it will be extremely hard for you to move without a job waiting for you, rules here www.usembassy.org.uk in general if you dont have a job set up and dont have family in NY you need to invest 1,000,000. As i have a degree and and have lived in NY for the past 2 summer through BUNAC work america program and now am interning at an architectural company i have found it generally easy but your careers dont seem to have such an easy path. Check CIEE.org to see if your eligible for any of their programs.

The only other option i could suggest is book a flight, use the 90 days you will have on the visa waiver, use craigslist to find a sublet you can afford for that time period and hope you find a job and can quickly get a visa/greencard. I dont know if this could work but it may be your only option. Not for the faint hearted if your not familiar with NY.

ManhattanKnight
April 23rd, 2007, 04:06 PM
Hi there,

I have jst discovered this site whilst taking the 1st steps @ looking to move to the city from UK. I am a young guy in his early 20s. Looking at the previous posts u all seem very helpful so thought id c if anyone can help with a few of my concerns.

1. Does anyone know about requirements for Visas etc. or where I even apply?
. . . .

4. What is the expense of a subway travelcard that allows unlimited travel per month?

I hope someone can help with at least 1 or 2 of my questions - apologies for bombarding u wiv a 101!



For a start on the many issues potentially arising under (1), take a look at the "Visas to the U.S." section at the US's London embassy's web site -- http://www.usembassy.org.uk/. For (4), look at http://www.mta.info/metrocard/mcgtreng.htm. For the others, read more at WNY; they've been discussed here extensively from a variety of viewpoints.

UK-NY
April 23rd, 2007, 04:59 PM
Many thanks for the speedy responses guys!

Il look into the short stay on the VWP but its not looking good! I know I dont have many US recognised qualifications and this indeed is sure to make things very difficult - i do however have a very good head on me and am sure that if I was given an opportunity could please the majority of employers - but what are the chances?! (Rhetorical!)

I have worked in the city before - i performed on broadway but it was through a UK company and I dont have any visa documents for that time so Im not quite sure how this was arranged?

I have canadian blood in me - if I could follow this back and proove do u think there is a possibility I could claim US citizenship?!

:confused:

Alonzo-ny
April 23rd, 2007, 05:31 PM
Canadian blood wont help unfortunately! If your good at what you do im sure there might be some kind of internship out there for you at one of the institutes for your field of expertise. Just do some research and you'll hopefully find something. Unfortunately legal immigration to the US is a painful long bureaucratic process and if you dont have a degree it will be hard. But dont give up keep looking! I used to think it was impossible too but there is always light at the end of the tunnel

cleverley
April 24th, 2007, 04:01 AM
ok, i have an american aunt but my uncle is british and they live just outside new york city, does that count?

also i cant think of what other qualifications apart from a BSC that i could get.

and i do plan to have $20,000 to start myself off with.

will these things help?

Alonzo-ny
April 24th, 2007, 06:24 AM
If you have a degree you stand a good chance. You should try applying for a greencard, but this will take time. Check up on CIEE.org and you could sign up for the professional training program and find a job related to your degree and when you get there apply for the greencard and this would probably be faster. There are alot of websites dedicated to visas, go to the us embassy in london website or type US visa into google and read as much as you can and come back here with your questions!

Lolita88
April 24th, 2007, 03:30 PM
is this a good area

Warwick Court
141-153 West 139th Street ?:p

Lance75
April 24th, 2007, 05:42 PM
Obtaining a U.S. greencard is EXTREMELY difficult. There are only 3 ways to get a greencard (4 if you count asylum, but it doesn't apply to any countries in western Europe).

The first way to obtain a greencard is for a spouse, sibling, or parent who has American citizenship to petition on your behalf. No uncles, cousins, etc. can petition for you--neither can mere greencard holders. Also, I don't know what they're teaching in British schools, but Canada is not part of the United States.

The second way is to get sponsorship from an employer. However, finding an employer to sponsor you is difficult, the process itself is long and arduous, and the only jobs that an employer can sponsor a foreign national for are jobs that American citizens are unwilling, unable, or unready to take (i.e., chicken sexing).

The government differentiates between skilled (doctors, PhD's, nurses) and unskilled workers, and skilled workers get greencard application priority dates much faster. Right now, the greencard waiting period for UNSKILLED workers is about 6-7 years. That's 6-7 years before you're even eligible to apply for a greencard even with a sponsor. For skilled workers, it's about 4 years.

The third way is to win the greencard lottery. I have no idea how many lottery slots are allotted to the UK (all of Europe is allotted 3000 slots), but as there are many people who enter the lottery, the chances of getting picked is awfully slim. Still, if your name gets chosen, it's the easiest way to get a greencard.

If you are truly interested in living and working in the US, you need to seek the advice of an immigration attorney and not make plans based on what strangers on the web tell you.

For example, I realize Alonzo-ny means well, but the idea of coming for 90 days on a visa waiver program to try to find a sponsor is not a good one. Let's put aside the fact, for a moment, that finding a sponsor is very difficult (and virtually impossible for unskilled workers).

On the off chance that you somehow manage to find a sponsor who meets all the criteria, there's still more bad news--until the sponsorship kicks in, you cannot legally work in the USA unless you've obtained a temporary working visa (virtually impossible to get if you don't have a university degree). Right now, it's about a 4 year wait for the sponsorship to kick in. Because one cannot work legally until the sponsorship kicks in (unless you have the temp work visa), most sponsored workers go back to their home country--to advance their careers, obtain more education, etc--until the sponsorship starts (about 4 years).

If you decide to stay in the US until your sponsorship kicks in, you still cannot legally work in the meantime and you MUST leave the country every time your visa waiver expires (every 90 days). Overstaying your visa has serious consequences. If you overstay for 6 months, you cannot return to the US for 3 years. If you overstay for 1 year or longer, you will not be able to return to the US for 10 years.

If you take a job without the proper visa and the INS finds out, you will automatically lose your eligibility to apply for a greencard. Most likely, you will also be permanently banned from stepping foot on US soil again (unless you have a waiver from the Secretary of Homeland Security, which might as well be impossible). Working in the US without proper authorization is a HUGE deal.

In other words, there is no easy way and no short cuts to getting a greencard (unless you marry a citizen, that is). Seriously, the laws and regulations are so complex that your best bet is to find a good lawyer who specialized in immigration law and see what your options are.

I hope I didn't discourage the rest of you. It can be done, it's just incredibly complicated, tedious, and difficult.

Good luck-

ryan
April 24th, 2007, 07:05 PM
If you are truly interested in living and working in the US, you definitely need to seek the advice of an immigration attorney and not make plans based on what strangers on the web tell you.

probably the best advice you'll ever get from a stranger on the web.

milleniumcab
April 24th, 2007, 10:43 PM
I agree..:)

Lolita88
April 24th, 2007, 11:55 PM
is this a good area

Warwick Court
141-153 West 139th Street ?:p

anyone?

ddreamin916
April 25th, 2007, 10:14 PM
Hello all-

I am moving to NYC for a job. The job is in the Bronx... From what I can tell from previous visits, commuting from Astoria, Lower Manhattan, or Brooklyn can be upwards of an 1 hour to an hour and half.
Should I just live in the Bronx?
Is my perception of the length of travel incorrect?
Where should I live in the Bronx?
I really like Astoria and parts of Brooklyn, but I haven't spent anytime in the Bronx.
Which neighborhoods are "recommended" there?

I think that's all.

Thanks!

clubBR
April 25th, 2007, 10:23 PM
Hello all-

I am moving to NYC for a job. The job is in the Bronx... From what I can tell from previous visits, commuting from Astoria, Lower Manhattan, or Brooklyn can be upwards of an 1 hour to an hour and half.
Should I just live in the Bronx?
Is my perception of the length of travel incorrect?
Where should I live in the Bronx?
I really like Astoria and parts of Brooklyn, but I haven't spent anytime in the Bronx.
Which neighborhoods are "recommended" there?

I think that's all.

Thanks!

The neighborhood of Mott Haven is an up & coming neighoborhood in South Bronx dubbed "SoBro" by real estate agents. Riverdale is in the northwest corner of the Bronx and is known for it affluence. The neighborhoods along Allerton Ave is situated in mid-central Bronx and has bustling diverse immigrant communities. Pick and choose