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Schadenfrau
April 25th, 2007, 11:03 PM
Never say "SoBro," it's so gross.

I assume you'll be taking the subway, Dreamin916, so which neighborhood will you be working in? The Bronx is a large borough with lots of different subway routes.

daedalus702
April 28th, 2007, 05:02 AM
Hello,

I'm moving to the area this summer as I'm taking a job in Wayne, NJ. I am trying to balance the commute to Wayne with closeness to the city. I've looked at Jersey City and Hoboken, but at this point Weehawken holds my interest. I'll only be making about $57K, so I want to keep rent below $1,250/month. I would like to rent a 1-bedroom or large studio that allows dogs. It seems like this would be pretty difficult in Jersey City, Hoboken, and Newport areas, but doable in Weehawken. That's a bit disappointing, as the former places are much more lively, so I hear.

Even aside from affordability however, Weehawken seems to make the most sense. First, I have gotten the impression that travel from Weehawken to midtown Manhattan is fast and convenient using $2/ride minivans that all the time along Boulevard East and through the Lincoln Tunnel. Does anyone have any experience with this?

Also, I imagine parking is feasible in Weehawken while impossible in Hoboken. I would love to be car-less, but of course the commute to Wayne, NJ requires a car.

Also, I wonder whether the NJ Transit light rail service (Hudson-Bergen line) might also make it easier to access shopping and restaurants in Hoboken or Jersey City during rush hour when the Lincoln Tunnel was backed up.

Any ideas? Am I off base on any of this? I would appreciate your input.

Looking on Craigslist and a few other sites, I have also noticed cheap studios of about 600 square feet selling for less than $200K. I could make a 20% down payment on something like that, but I'm not sure it makes sense to buy right away.

kittygirl
April 28th, 2007, 12:43 PM
I have found a condo that I am very excited about renting. It is located between Juliard and Central Park. Everything that I read about the Lincoln Square area sounds good - is there anything that I should be aware of before moving to this neighborhood?

Secondly - I won't be in NYC for a month. The owner of the condo has agreed to hold it for me until I can view it, if I pay him the refundable security deposit (worth 2 months rent) now. I really want him to hold the condo for me, but I am concerned about sending money to someone and never hearing from them again. Can you please give me some suggestions as to how to protect myself in this kind of situation? I have no problem giving him the deposit as long as I could get some sort of guarantee that he will show up next month to rent me the condo.

I appreciate your help - thanks!

ManhattanKnight
April 28th, 2007, 01:30 PM
Can you please give me some suggestions as to how to protect myself in this kind of situation? I have no problem giving him the deposit as long as I could get some sort of guarantee that he will show up next month to rent me the condo.

Run, Kitty. Run. As fast and as far as you can, if you are such a novice as your question suggests and you don't even know if this person actually owns this apartment, not just whether he will "show up next month" to rent it to you, or what the heck a "refundable security deposit" is that's being used to "hold" an apartment pending something or other. NYC is a hot rental market at this moment, and if this supposed apartment were such a prize, the owner/landlord probably wouldn't have to reach out to Bozeman, MT to find a worthy tenant. Caveat rentor.

Schadenfrau
April 28th, 2007, 02:39 PM
I'm confused- Kittygirl, didn't you say that you're unable to take the bus? You do realize that there's no subway that goes from the UWS to the UES (where you'll be working), right?

I'm also really suspicious of the idea that someone will hold an apartment for a month, just so you can have a look at it before deciding whether or not to rent. I've never heard of anything like that in my life. Lots of co-ops and condos have restrictions on subletting, so you'd better make sure this person can even legally rent to you.

Nothing about this situation sounds quite right.

bronzenine
April 28th, 2007, 06:12 PM
Yes. Definitely seems like a sketchy situation.

kittygirl
April 30th, 2007, 04:25 PM
Thank you all for responding. I also thought the situation seemed a little questionable, but I thought maybe this was common practice in NYC. Apparently it is not - so I will not send him any money.

Yes - I do need to be on a subway line. If I could increase my budget to around $1,800-$2,000 a month, would this be more reasonable? I would like to be located as conveniently to Hunter College, via subway, as possible. Keeping this in mind (and my new budget), could you please suggest some neighborhoods?

Thanks

Schadenfrau
April 30th, 2007, 04:31 PM
Why don't you try the Upper East Side instead of the Upper West? The prices are about the same, if not cheaper. The only subway you're going to be able to take for work is the 6- looking at anything on the west side is pointless.

ManhattanKnight
April 30th, 2007, 05:17 PM
The only subway you're going to be able to take for work is the 6- looking at anything on the west side is pointless.

That's correct, if you're limiting yourself to a one-train ride (since Hunter is on the East Side and the 4-5-6 is the only North-South subway on the East Side). If you're willing to transfer to another subway line from it, your possibilities expand considerably, including the West Side (but not the UWS), lower Manhattan and (even) Queens.

clubBR
April 30th, 2007, 10:02 PM
Hunters Point- one stop to Grand Central (5 minutes). Transfer to the 6
Astoria- take the N,W, or R train to Lexington Ave (10 minutes) and transfer to the 6. One stop up and you're at Hunter
Sunnyside/ Woodside- take the 7 train to Grand Central (15 minutes). Transfer to the 6

kittygirl
May 2nd, 2007, 06:18 PM
I would love to live in the upper east side if possible. I was only looking at the upper west side because it appeared to be cheaper - but the commute would be impossible, so I'm no longer looking there.

I wouldn't be that opposed to having a transfer. It's more important to me that I can live close to the station that I will need to walk to (say within 5 or so blocks). I would rather ride the subway longer or transfer once in the middle, versus walk a long distance to my nearest station.

Since I do need to get to the 6 train - if I want to keep my commute to one transfer, is Queens the best option? Would there be other neighborhoods in Manhattan or Brooklyn that you could suggest? I have decided to raise my budget to $2,000/month. I hope this is more reasonable.

Also - I am a little confused about the best way to go about viewing properties. I will be in NYC for a week in early June. Is it customary to have one broker show you properties for the entire week or should I plan to meet with several brokers throughout the week? Even if I view apartments with several brokers, I only have to pay fees to the one who listed the apartment I choose, right?

I am one month away from coming to the city to view housing and two months away from actually moving. What should I be doing at this stage?

Front_Porch
May 2nd, 2007, 06:34 PM
At this point, you should be getting a letter from your current landlord stating that you pay your rent on time and providing contact information in case your prospective landlord wants to get in touch with them.

You can theoretically use any broker you want, but at your price point the actuality gets a little murky -- I have spent half the day going all Ari Gold on Brooklyn brokers who seem to have forgotten what the rules were. Try hard to get a personal referral to someone who works the areas you are interested in, so that you have some leverage.

ali r..
{downtown broker}

Schadenfrau
May 3rd, 2007, 12:05 AM
Kittygirl, for your price points, you should really only be looking at the UES. You're likely to find a place where you could even walk to work. On the west side, you'd be considering places with at least 3 train transfers.

clubBR
May 3rd, 2007, 12:28 AM
You can find apartments for less than 2k in the UES. Visit www.craigslist.com (http://www.craigslist.com)

kittygirl
May 3rd, 2007, 01:02 AM
I have found listings for several 1-bedroom apartments that appear to be nice in the UES on both craigslist and in the Times for around $2000. I would love to live close enough to Hunter to walk to work. However, as soon as I started contacting brokers, I was told that for my budget I would have to consider Harlem and Brooklyn. In fact, today I was speaking with a broker who specializes in the UES and was told that I could possibly find a 1-bedroom for $2,000 but it would not be near the 6-train. So I figured that the apartment listings I am finding online must not be very nice if brokers are saying that my budget is not reasonable for this neighborhood - but then you guys reassure me that it is. I'm getting such conflicting messages. Are the brokers just trying to lead me to other properties for their benefit? What do you make of this?

clubBR
May 3rd, 2007, 01:12 AM
First, brokers want money. Craigslist is their worst enemy.
Second, the subway runs along Lexington Ave and the more affordable apartments will most likely be east of 3rd Ave. So at most, its a 3-4 block walk. That is gravy if you ask me
http://www.nycvisit.com/_uploads/images/MAPuppereast_op.gif

Front_Porch
May 3rd, 2007, 07:45 AM
Craigslist is NOT a broker's worst enemy -- we like having free sales ads and Craig himself is very lovely.

At your price point, you will be in a studio, kind of far east, and it may be a walk-up. But you certainly should be able to be in the 80s or 90s if that's what you want, especially if you will pay a fee.

A lot of brokers "troll" for customers by posting fake ads, both in the Times and on craigslist. You will learn, as you search, what brokerages tend to do this. Basically, if you see it in the Times and it has an address on it, it's real, and if it says Prime Upper East Side 1-BR! New Condo! Act Now! it's fake. Same for craigslist -- an exact address is the best hint that an ad is real.

You will be fine. I think we're scaring you too much.

GL!

Ali R.
{downtown broker}

pearl
May 4th, 2007, 10:47 AM
This is the permanent topic for those seeking advice for a planned move to the city. Please post your questions here.


is it better to move to the city then find a job, or should I find a job first?

Schadenfrau
May 4th, 2007, 11:03 AM
It depends on what kind of job you're looking for and how much money you've saved up. Also, can you visit the city for job interviews?

pearl
May 4th, 2007, 02:26 PM
I am a real estate agent in florida, so I will be looking to work for an real estate company as an admin assit. until I get my nyc license. I have about 20K saved...

Is it possible?

clubBR
May 5th, 2007, 01:56 AM
Secure the job then find a place to live close by. That makes things alot clearer. With that $20k make a down payment on a condo/co-op.

Lance75
May 5th, 2007, 07:07 AM
Secure the job then find a place to live close by. That makes things alot clearer. With that $20k make a down payment on a condo/co-op.

Let's consider:

Virtually all co-ops require a minimum of 20% down--often more. In addition to the down payment, you're often required to have fairly substantial liquid assets. A $20K down payment means you're looking at co-ops that cost $100,000 or less.

You might be able to squeeze into a $200,000 condo with the $20K. Unfortunately, since $20k equates to only a 10% down payment, you're either going to have to carry PMI until your equity in the condo reaches 20%, or take out a piggy-back second mortgage at a higher APR--both of which means more money. And, of course, the biggest issue--trying to find a condo that's $200,000 or less that isn't 2 hours from Manhattan.

I'm curious, clubBR--why, and more importantly, how are you proposing a person with $20K purchase real estate in NYC?

pearl
May 5th, 2007, 08:09 AM
Thanks so much for the info, and also, I am curious as to why purchasing..
I was thinking to rent at least for a year and renting my home here, in case I did not like my move.

I will be town Memorial weekend to look at different places to live, areas, apts, ect.
I understand that this may be a good time, since many vacant places will be having OPEN HOUSES>.

Also, I plan on taking my craigslist of homes and job openings. I also plan to get the Times and apt hunt..

Any other suggestions?

clubBR
May 6th, 2007, 04:32 AM
lol maybe $20k is stretching it. I was thinking maybe you had a superb credit score!!

Lance75
May 6th, 2007, 05:52 AM
lol maybe $20k is stretching it. I was thinking maybe you had a superb credit score!!

Dude, doesn't matter if your credit score is 850. You can't get much in NYC with only $20K down.

It's kinda odd that you're advising people to buy property, considering you seem very unfamiliar with the requirements/process/complexities of purchasing a co-op/condo...

clubBR
May 6th, 2007, 05:54 AM
ok buddy. i think youre bored
http://www.curbed.com/archives/2007/02/19/whats_selling_in_williamsburg.php

pearl
May 6th, 2007, 08:21 AM
Lance75

When I am ready to actually rent the apt, what are the papaer req. needed by the lanlord/ owner.
I think I have desided to try and not use a realty company, since the fess are soooooo high. I spoke with one company on Friday and I believe she aid the broker fee was 50% of the first years rent. Does this sound normal?
I do have my craigslist and I will have the Times. Any other suggestions?


Also, Since I am in town for Memorial weekend, any suggestions on fun things to do?

Thanks so much

Lance75
May 6th, 2007, 09:32 AM
ok buddy. i think youre bored
http://www.curbed.com/archives/2007/02/19/whats_selling_in_williamsburg.php



Note that I didn't write that you can't get anything for $20K down--I wrote that you can't get much. A Fedders building in Bushwick is pretty much the definition of "not much". Besides the fact that a condo development willing to accept only $10K down is a huge anomaly in NYC (seriously, that might be the only one), it's not really the point.

Just for kicks though, let's look at your condo:

The cheapest unit listed at the development you pointed to (the Maspeth) is $389,000 per their website. $10K is a bit over 2.5% down, we'll call it 3%. That means that even if you somehow manage to obtain a loan for the 97% AND manage to get the best possible rates, your monthly mortgage payment (P&I, PMI, CC) on the *cheapest* unit is approaching $3000. For a Fedders building. In Bushwick.

Not to mention that in order to qualify (and be able to make the payments) for a $379,000 loan, you'd have to be earning upwards of six-figures. Last time I checked, administrative assistants in real estate offices weren't pulling down $100,000 a year.

($3000, by the way, is much more than what my sister pays for her market rate one bedroom apartment in prime Manhattan--and she just resigned her lease this year at the higher rent level.)

So in all seriousness--just how and why are you suggesting Pearl buy a condo in NYC?

My guess is that you mistakenly believe that a development that allows a small down payment means that it's somehow affordable. I imagine that the only reason why you'd advise a person in Pearl's position (only has $20K in savings, isn't likely to be earning a huge salary in her admin asst job) to buy a home in NYC is because you're completely unfamiliar with the costs (monthly and otherwise) associated with purchasing a co-op or condo.

I wasn't so much bored as I was puzzled by your suggestion--and more recently, at your comment about having a "superb credit score". Just FYI, having a high credit score doesn't mean that co-ops, condos, and banks are going to lower their down payment and financial requirements for you. Again, it's that kind of comment that tells me that you don't know really know what you're talking about in regards to real estate.

Lance75
May 6th, 2007, 09:41 AM
Lance75

When I am ready to actually rent the apt, what are the papaer req. needed by the lanlord/ owner.
I think I have desided to try and not use a realty company, since the fess are soooooo high. I spoke with one company on Friday and I believe she aid the broker fee was 50% of the first years rent. Does this sound normal?
I do have my craigslist and I will have the Times. Any other suggestions?


Also, Since I am in town for Memorial weekend, any suggestions on fun things to do?

Thanks so much

Pearl, I'm no real estate expert, but Front Porch is--she's very knowledgeable and friendly, so you might want to address your questions to her.

A broker fee of 50%? You must have misheard them (at least I hope you did!). They probably said 15%, which is the standard fee (and sounds an awful lot like 50%).

pearl
May 6th, 2007, 12:46 PM
Thanks so much!!
Sorry to get u in a tussle with others:)

British_Gurl
May 6th, 2007, 04:05 PM
Hi.

I live in Birmingham, England. I have a little boy who is three years old and I'm expecting a baby girl in 4 months. I want to move to New York with my children; it's been a dream of mine since I was a little girl! But I want to move to a nice area with nice schools and to live in an apartment thats big but affordable! I have a job lined up over there but how much will I need before I can move full time?

Thanks!

clubBR
May 7th, 2007, 12:08 AM
I dont know much about real estate and i never said i did
why do you bicker

Lance75
May 7th, 2007, 02:15 AM
I dont know much about real estate and i never said i did
why do you bicker


If you "don't know much about real estate", then why is EVERY SINGLE ONE of your posts on this thread a suggestion, opinion, or advice about real estate?

I'm not bickering. I'm just perplexed about why you feel the need to speak so authoritatively about a subject you admit you're ignorant about.

clubBR
May 7th, 2007, 02:40 AM
Pearl, I'm no real estate expert.

Ok Lance

Lance75
May 7th, 2007, 02:47 AM
Ok Lance


"Ok Lance"? Is that supposed to mean something?

Well, I guess a nonsensical retort is better than ignorant advice.

Good job.

kittygirl
May 7th, 2007, 03:41 PM
Since I am looking at neighborhoods in both Brooklyn and Queens, in addition to the UES, would you suggest getting one broker to show me around to all of these areas? Or would you suggest meeting with a Brooklyn-based broker for one day and a Queens-based broker for another, etc.?

ManhattanKnight
May 8th, 2007, 11:16 AM
I have had no personal experience with rental apartment brokers but suspect that most probably do not operate city-wide. Let me mention something that's rarely discussed hereabouts but that those contemplating moving here should know about: roughly half of all rental apartments in NYC are rent-regulated, at prices that are often substantially below market rates. Undoubtedly, finding them is a challenge, but they are available for the persistent and lucky. Some of these are rent-controlled and are not available to new tenants. Others (the greater number) are rent-stabilized and are available to new tenants (and rent-controlled units become rent-stabilized when there is a change in tenants). A Google search for "rent-stabilized" and "New York City" will turn up tons of information.

Front_Porch
May 8th, 2007, 01:37 PM
The last data we have is 2005, unfortunately.

But at that time, there were 3.2 million rental units in NYC, of which 43,000 were rent-controlled. This was a 27% drop from just three years earlier.

So basically: you can't get a rent-controlled apartment; you aren't going to get one. If your grandma has one, you can live with her, get on the lease, and possibly inherit it, but you aren't going to get one through a broker or craigslist, so start daydreaming about something more likely, like becoming a movie star.

While half the units in NYC are indeed subject to some form of regulation (rent-stabilized), they don't turn over as often as market-price apartments do, so effectively, they make up less than half the market a potential renter sees. Also, some of them are in situations where readers of this board won't qualify for (for example, HUD-subsidized apartments) and in neighborhoods where readers of this board don't want to live.

Very few rent-stabilized apartments are located in prime Manhattan, especially in prime condition -- so Manhattan Knight is right that you should keep your eyes peeled for one, but again, it's not likely that you're going to find one.


More typically, in 2005 28.8% -- nearly a third -- of New York City households paid more than half their income in rent.

So the market is really tough; be prepared for a long slog.

ali r.
{downtown broker}

ManhattanKnight
May 8th, 2007, 02:56 PM
So the market is really tough; be prepared for a long slog.



I didn't intend to suggest otherwise to anyone, only to alert those not familiar with NYC to an important fact about housing here for which their experience elsewhere has probably not prepared them. According to the NYC Rent Guidelines Board (the agency that sets rates for rent-stabilized apartments), "Rent stabilized apartments comprise approximately 57% of rental apartments in the Bronx, 42% of apartments in Brooklyn, 59% of Manhattan apartments, 43% of Queens apartments, and 15% of Staten Island apartments." http://www.housingnyc.com/html/guide/stabilized.html (Those data are, apparently, for 2005.)

That link also connects to a discussion headlined:


RENT-REGULATED & MARKET-RATE HOUSING
What Is It & Where Can You Find It?


There are cross-links to city-wide lists of buildings with rent-stabilized apartments, arranged by ZIP Code and street address. I cite to the RGB out of convenience, not because it is a particularly authoritative or unbiased source of information on this subject.

Front_Porch
May 9th, 2007, 11:41 AM
I cite to the RGB out of convenience, not because it is a particularly authoritative or unbiased source of information on this subject.



I think your posts on rent-reg apartments are fantastic and I'm not attacking them -- I'm just lowering expectations because I find a lot of people who are thinking of moving to NYC have no idea what rents will be.

They look on craigslist, get snared by the bait-and-switch ads, and then show up with outsize requirements. Then I'm the person who gets called a charlatan when I can't magically produce a $1,300 Chelsea studio with a Sub-Zero in it.

ali r.
{downtown broker}

ManhattanKnight
May 9th, 2007, 02:24 PM
Thanks (though I didn't consider your comments to be critical). It frustrates me sometimes in reading this and similar threads when newcomers don't yet understand how really large and diverse NYC is, including its housing opportunities, and that there are roughly as many rent-stabilized apartments here as there are people in Denver and Seattle, combined, and more than one or two ways to find the good ones. For those with enough time and endurance, I still favor the old-fashioned technique of walking the streets of a neighborhood one likes and asking lots of questions (of doormen, supers, mail carriers, ordinary people). That's how I found my own place a long time ago, in one of my neighborhood's largest rental buildings, where I still see people regularly walking into the lobby and asking staff or other tenants about apartment availabilities and prices.

ajhollywood
May 9th, 2007, 02:48 PM
hi there im new to this site just found it .......it seems pretty cool though.....

well i would love to move to new york i feel my destiney is calling me there...but in all honestly i dont know the first thing about moving there...

if i buy a property there can i then work there or can i apply to work there, how long can i go and stay in new york as a working holiday???
questions questions.....
i am from belfast but have been living in london for about 9 years now.....i will be working for the next 5 months in cyprus as i am a singer....(yeah i know like so many others.......)
id really appreciate any help advice anyone may have on where i begin with my quest of moving to new york......
many thanks
aj hollywood ( real name ..............;) )

jimdc
May 9th, 2007, 05:57 PM
The wife and I are really excited about the possibility of moving from Washington DC to NYC. The job market is great here, but we are looking for excitment in a big city while we are still young. An introduction...I am an electrical engineer turned software developer one year out of college and she is a nurse two years out of college. Our combined salary is 140k (+ good overtime) and we are looking to live and work in Manhattan.

What is the market for software developers in NYC? Here in DC it is fantastic bc of defense...would I have as many options in Manhattan?

I see a lot of apartments in Manhattan for ~2k a month on craigslist (not to mention many for a lot more). Is living in a nice neighborhood with a lot of close by restuarants and near a subway be to much to expect at this price range? We could easily move our rent up to 3k if we can't get these. Wife is also insistent about the Washer/Dryer in unit...doesn't seem to be a lot of selection for that?

Where do we start for searching for neighborhoods? We've only been there once and have no idea where to start. We'd like to be nearish Central Park, near a subway, safe neighborhood.

Anyone out there move to NYC thinking it was going to be the best thing in the world and ended up hating it? We moved to DC thinking it would be a place to live forever and ended up hating it in 4 months. Being so young we are excited but scared that we will have a lower standard of living.

ManhattanKnight
May 10th, 2007, 07:54 AM
http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/05/10/nyregion/10rent-600.jpg
Robert Stolarik for The New York Times
Kate Harvey, left, and Rebecca Kotler Wein, lived in an office with seven roommates.


New York City Renters Cope With Squeeze

By CHRISTINE HAUGHNEY

Like the legions of aspiring poets, tap dancers and musicians who came before her, Nina Rubin, a 29-year-old graduate of Wesleyan University, has struggled to find halfway decent housing in New York. Earlier this year, she ended up in her most unusual home yet: an office.

After taking a job as an instructor at Outward Bound, Ms. Rubin, along with some of her co-workers, settled into the top floor of the organization’s Long Island City headquarters. She camped out in a bunk bed; others converted nearby office cubicles into sleeping spaces, or pitched tents on the building’s roof. To create some privacy, they hung towels and sheets around their bunks.

While Outward Bound officials stress that they view these cubicles and tents as temporary housing solutions, Ms. Rubin, who has since moved to Vermont for a short while, was grateful for a free place.

As the apartment-hunting season begins, fueled by college graduates and other new arrivals, real estate brokers say radical solutions among young, well-educated newcomers to the city are becoming more common, because New York’s rental market is the tightest it has been in seven years. High-paid bankers and corporate lawyers snap up the few available apartments, often leading more modestly paid professionals and students to resort to desperate measures to find homes.

While young people in New York have always sought roommates to make life more affordable, they are now crowding so tightly into doorman buildings in prime neighborhoods like the Upper East Side that they may violate city codes.

They are doing so in part because the vacancy rate for Manhattan rentals is now estimated at 3.7 percent, according to data collected by Property and Portfolio Research, an independent real estate research and advisory firm in Boston. It is expected to shrink to 3.3 percent by the end of this year and to 2.9 percent by 2011.

“It’s only going to get more difficult to rent an apartment in New York City,” said Andy Joynt, a real estate economist with the research firm. “While rents continue to rise, it’s not sending people out of the city. There’s still enough of a cachet,” he said.

While New York City has always had a vacancy rate lower than most other cities, rental prices jumped last year by a record 8.3 percent. Some potential buyers, scared by the national slowdown in housing sales, decided to rent instead of buy. The housing crunch has also been exacerbated by the steady growth of newcomers.

The relocation division of the brokerage company Prudential Douglas Elliman had found homes for 4,000 families moving to the New York, New Jersey and Connecticut area in 2006, a 15 percent jump from the year before, and many of them wanted to live in Manhattan.

Stephen Kotler, executive vice president of the division, said he expected business to increase by 15 percent again this year, based on the requests he has already received from banks, consumer-products companies and media firms. Even though his clients can afford high rents, he said, they do not have many choices.

“There’s going to be limited inventory and a lot of demand,” Mr. Kotler said. “There just hasn’t been enough rental product built,” he said, as, developers have said that the price of land and the costs of construction in the last few years have made it impractical to build rental buildings. They have instead focused on condominiums.

Renters without high salaries have not been shut out of the market. They are squeezing in extra roommates or making alterations as never before much to the frustration of landlords. The rents for one-bedroom apartments in Manhattan average $2,567 a month, and two-bedrooms average $3,854 a month, according to data from Citi Habitats, a large rental brokerage company, but rents tend to be far higher in coveted neighborhoods like the Upper West Side and TriBeCa.

Because landlords typically require renters to earn 40 times their monthly rent in annual income, renters of those average apartments would need to earn at least $102,680, individually or combined, to qualify for a one-bedroom and $154,160 to afford a two-bedroom.

Young people making a fraction of those salaries are doubling up in small spaces and creating housing code violations, said Jamie Heiberger-Jacobsen, a real estate lawyer with her own practice. She is representing landlords in 26 cases that claim overcrowding or illegal alterations in elevator buildings in Murray Hill, the Upper East and Upper West Sides and the Lower East Side. A year ago, she handled a half-dozen such cases.

Ms. Heiberger-Jacobsen said she was seeing the overcrowding not only in tenement-type buildings, but also in doorman buildings. “It really does create fire hazards,” she said. “You can’t just have beds all over the place.”
But more renters are finding that they cannot afford to stay in the city without resorting to less conventional living arrangements. For the last five years, Mindy Abovitz, 27, a drummer and graphic designer, has been living with four roommates in a 1,500-square-foot loft with one bathroom in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, which has become a haven for young people, that rents for $2,600 a month.

Her rent is a bargain, she said, because comparable spaces now cost as much as $4,500 a month. To accommodate everyone, the roommates created five bedrooms out of three by building walls from drywall and lumber. Then they soundproofed the walls with carpet padding to limit the noise.
Dividing the space has been an affordable solution, Ms. Abovitz said, though the loft becomes crowded when she and her roommates get ready for work or prepare meals. “The kitchen and the bathroom are where you find the most traffic,” she said.

Students on tight budgets find it especially tough to find housing. Last fall, Kate Harvey, a part-time nanny and a junior at N.Y.U., and eight friends saved on rent by camping out in vacant offices at Michael Stapleton Associates, a downtown explosive-detection security firm. For nearly three months, they told the guards at 47 West Street that they were interns, even as they trudged in near midnight or pattered through the lobby at 10 a.m. in pajamas and slippers.

Ms. Harvey’s father, George Harvey, who is the chief executive of Michael Stapleton Associates, had lent them the space, which included two kitchens and two baths, after his company moved into a new office before the lease on its old one expired.

They sneaked furniture into the 11th floor on the freight elevator, squeezed three beds into the former chief executive’s office and turned filing cabinets into clothing drawers. One student pitched a tent. They brought their cat, Sula, past the front desk. They knew pets were allowed, they said, because the company had allowed bomb-sniffing dogs.

While most of the students who were interviewed said that they came from families that were fairly comfortable financially, they said that area rents were so high that they could not afford both housing and tuition.

“It was nine girls and a cat,” Ms. Harvey said, sipping on steamed milk in a Greenwich Village coffeehouse. “At least three of the nine would have had a really hard time paying for school and staying there.”

Mr. Harvey said his daughter told him that some friends had spent the summer sleeping on friends’ couches and even in the N.Y.U. library because they could not afford rent.

“They were in some tough financial situations,” Mr. Harvey said. “It occurred to me that all this space was going to waste.”

Now Ms. Harvey and two roommates from the office are looking for a new place to live. Each can spend up to $800 a month. Ms. Harvey has been searching the Craigslist Web site for apartments, but so far she has had no luck.

She says she is hopeful that they will eventually find something in Brooklyn, perhaps in the outer reaches of Park Slope. “We’re definitely going to have to expand our definition of Park Slope,” she said.

Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company

rosenpan228
May 10th, 2007, 01:02 PM
I just finished reading that article...disheartening....although I think it's a bit dishonest considering the background of most of the kids profiled. They're well-off kids who have great support systems and are primarily students. Not your average person working and living in NY.

We currently live in Westchester and both work and go to school in NYC. We're thinking about getting selling our car and all the expenses it comes with and moving to the UWS. At this point, we're in the city all day, all night and commute to sleep. Would it be unreasonable to find an apt for $2800/mo ? That's about how much we can afford to spend. We've lived in the boroughs and do not want to do that again as the commute was worse than from Westchester.


Thank you!

ManhattanKnight
May 10th, 2007, 01:39 PM
I posted that article but have to say that, like much reporting on this subject, it seems exaggerated and even hysterical to me. In my own building, in a neighborhood that's generally more costly than the UWS, your $2800 would get you a decent-sized studio apt (but certainly not a 1-BR). One recently became vacant on my floor. I knew that three unrelated 30ish women had been sharing it. When I looked inside, there were still signs of a wall that they had put up (without the owner's knowledge I'd guess) dividing the place in half. So, there is some truth in the thrust of the Times story. Checking my building's managing agent's web site today, I see listings for a studio in a nice coop a block away for $2,550, 3 1-BRs in an East 45th St. condo for $2,600 apiece and a 1-BR in Murray Hill with terrific East River views for $3,250.

rosenpan228
May 10th, 2007, 01:53 PM
See, I would say that we'd be willing to spend up to $2900-3K/mo. At the absolute highest. And we also would prefer to live on the UWS...although I have no issue with going as far up as 115th or so. I have a friend who lives on the UWS and pays $2400/mo for a small one bedroom. It's not unrealistic to find something for $2900 or so???? I mean, I would like to have laundry in the bldg and maybe an elevator. But we certainly don't require a doorman.

Alonzo-ny
May 10th, 2007, 02:02 PM
Both summers i was in NY earning 1200 a month and i always had a place to stay.

ManhattanKnight
May 10th, 2007, 02:16 PM
We know that!

http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showpost.php?p=164419&postcount=530

Ninjahedge
May 10th, 2007, 02:29 PM
You may want to rethink the boroughs, but just try to find a place that is within about a 10 minute walk to an express line.

The prices will be naturally higher there, but still, if you can find a direct line from your place to your school, your commute would be under an hour (shorter than from some places IN Manhattan!)

Depending on where you are looking, there is always Hoboken and JC, with Hoboken having rent control on its older buildings (although the landlords will not tell you this) and JC having access through the PATH trains (same as Hoboken).

Just try to do a commute out to wherever you are thinking of going and see how easy/difficult the trip would be.

Hoboken can get a 1BR for under $2900 pretty easily.

rosenpan228
May 10th, 2007, 02:34 PM
Ok...so the consensus is that it is utterly impossible to get a 1 bdrm in MH on the UWS for $2900?

Front_Porch
May 10th, 2007, 06:24 PM
what about 323 West 96th, could you just go direct into there?

It looks like that would be in your price range and fit your requirements.

ali r.
{downtown broker}

disclaimer: I work Chelsea/Village/Tribeca/FiDi.

I do not work the Upper West Side, so I do not know any more than I've told you.

Alonzo-ny
May 10th, 2007, 07:29 PM
We know that!

http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showpost.php?p=164419&postcount=530

Hey! wait until you see the inside! best crack house on the block!

conezone
May 15th, 2007, 03:21 PM
Ok...so the consensus is that it is utterly impossible to get a 1 bdrm in MH on the UWS for $2900?


No. I live in a small 1 bdrm in the west 90's for under $2000. Paid a broker's fee though.

brady wolfrom
May 15th, 2007, 04:39 PM
Hey everyone. I'll be moving to New York with my grandparents in a week. Our apartment is on west 34th street. I'm curious as to what the area is like.. anybody else live near there or know the area? I'm soo excited.

jen16
May 15th, 2007, 10:03 PM
I've read through a lot of the posts on here, so much help already. So my question is a little different, and I'm sure there's not one right answer, but basically I'm trying to figure out how much I'm going to need to make in order to afford the city.

I'm moving officially in the beginning of June, but have already been paying rent for a little over a month...it's $1850 total, 2 bedrooms, so I have to pay $925 a month, not including utilities, cable/internet, other bills like credit cards, etc. I don't have a job yet, but I do have a few interviews set up for when I get down there after I graduate this month (from college, not high school). Obviously I won't be able to pick how much I get to make, I am trying to apply for positions that list the salary.

Anyone have a general idea of what I would need to be able to afford my apartment and everything else??

clubBR
May 16th, 2007, 04:16 AM
Hey everyone. I'll be moving to New York with my grandparents in a week. Our apartment is on west 34th street. I'm curious as to what the area is like.. anybody else live near there or know the area? I'm soo excited.
You're in Midtown South: the Empire State Building, Koreatown, the Diamond District, Bryant Park. Enjoy it

ta3formforged
May 16th, 2007, 06:45 PM
When should I come out to NYC to look for an apartment w/ a move-in date of 9/1? How many days do tenants usually have to alert their landlord that they are vacating the apartment?

Thanks!!

róisín
May 17th, 2007, 08:54 AM
hey all.. i'm almost definitely moving to New York in august- i've been accepted onto the new journalism masters course at CUNY. whilst i have my financial situation fairly well sorted- for the first semester at least- i'm planning on going to CCNY towers for a while. ANyone give me any idea of how good vaule for money this is?

i know nothing really about new york apart from what i've seen in woody allen movies.. and whilst i've tried to read a lot of the threads on here, i was wondering if someone could send me a little tailor made message about what new york is like.. the reputation of cuny? what has been said about the jschool? I'm 22 years old and have already completed my undergraduate degree in English and History of Art.. What would it be like for someone moving from Ireland? Any other ex-pats out there?

I'm sure a lot of this is mentioned elsewhere, and sorry to make you guys repeat the answers.. but guranteed, I do appreciate it!

Also, I'll be on a F-1 visa- so i guess this means I probably won't be able to work in my friend's family's irish pub in times square?

It seems everyone is a Lawyer or Journalist in NY.. its a good thing I'm so charasmatic.. :D :rolleyes:

What would the average print journalist get paid in NY? i have yet to organise an internship for summer 2008.. but i guess its never too soon to think ahead.

yikes. sorry for such a ramble! look forward to reading your replies! xx

SaraB
May 18th, 2007, 04:32 PM
hey everyone! so i'm brand new to this site and i was reading a bunch of the posts but theres so many and I'm sure what I'm going to ask has been asked before but I'm going to give it a shot anyways.

I'm 19, I live in Canada and want to move to NYC even if I only do it for a year because its a dream I've always had and I know I'd regret it if I don't at least try it. I've seen apts on craigs listfor 1000/month that yeah ok they're nothing special but a studio and I'm just wondering how reaonsable that is because there are a lot of ppl in my life against this and saying that there's no way there are apts for 1000/mth in Manhattan.

Another question I'm not sure how many ppl can answer is about Visa's. I need a working Visa because I'm coming to Canada and when I went to the embassy they said I need to find a job first. What are my chances of that? Do agency's hire from other countries? Just overall I don't know where to start etc. I know for a fact that living in New York City is not cheap, but what is real? Any advice would be fantastic or just random info/opinions.

Thanks in advance everyone!

718Bound
May 21st, 2007, 11:28 AM
I've read through a lot of the posts on here, so much help already. So my question is a little different, and I'm sure there's not one right answer, but basically I'm trying to figure out how much I'm going to need to make in order to afford the city.

I'm moving officially in the beginning of June, but have already been paying rent for a little over a month...it's $1850 total, 2 bedrooms, so I have to pay $925 a month, not including utilities, cable/internet, other bills like credit cards, etc. I don't have a job yet, but I do have a few interviews set up for when I get down there after I graduate this month (from college, not high school). Obviously I won't be able to pick how much I get to make, I am trying to apply for positions that list the salary.

Anyone have a general idea of what I would need to be able to afford my apartment and everything else??

Why have you been paying rent a month before you have moved? Has a freind of yours you want to move in with made the move early? I cannot think of any other reason why you want to be paying rent before you have moved. Unless you are loaded that $925 a month you are shelling out would be some nice back up cash while you are interviewing.



hey everyone! so i'm brand new to this site and i was reading a bunch of the posts but theres so many and I'm sure what I'm going to ask has been asked before but I'm going to give it a shot anyways.

I'm 19, I live in Canada and want to move to NYC even if I only do it for a year because its a dream I've always had and I know I'd regret it if I don't at least try it. I've seen apts on craigs listfor 1000/month that yeah ok they're nothing special but a studio and I'm just wondering how reaonsable that is because there are a lot of ppl in my life against this and saying that there's no way there are apts for 1000/mth in Manhattan.

Another question I'm not sure how many ppl can answer is about Visa's. I need a working Visa because I'm coming to Canada and when I went to the embassy they said I need to find a job first. What are my chances of that? Do agency's hire from other countries? Just overall I don't know where to start etc. I know for a fact that living in New York City is not cheap, but what is real? Any advice would be fantastic or just random info/opinions.

Thanks in advance everyone!

Sara, there are ALOT of topics here on Visa's and immigration if you do a search.

jen16
May 21st, 2007, 04:53 PM
Why have you been paying rent a month before you have moved? Has a freind of yours you want to move in with made the move early? I cannot think of any other reason why you want to be paying rent before you have moved. Unless you are loaded that $925 a month you are shelling out would be some nice back up cash while you are interviewing.


Yep, unfortunately my roommate was finished with school before me, so she needed to be out of her school housing by then, so the lease needed to start earlier than I could be there. So that has definitely not been very fun for me paying rent there and at my current apartment at the same time lol

clubBR
May 21st, 2007, 05:23 PM
Yep, unfortunately my roommate was finished with school before me, so she needed to be out of her school housing by then, so the lease needed to start earlier than I could be there. So that has definitely not been very fun for me paying rent there and at my current apartment at the same time lol
That is such a waste of money. But, atleast once you get to NY, you dont need to worry about a residence

718Bound
May 22nd, 2007, 01:16 AM
Yea it sux you have to pay the money and are not living there... I guess living with a freind is worth the money. When do you graduate? This month right? If you are lucky enough you can fly out(I don't know where you live but jetblue is pretty cheap and if you can afford an appartment you are not living in) and schedule interviews (like a bunch) whenever you have a few days in a row free. I mean you already have a place to stay :D Explian to them that you are graduating soon (or have already) and make sure you stress you ARE MOVING INTO AN APARTMENT YOU HAVE BEEN PAYING FOR! Alot of employers may not want to hire you because you don't live in the area... So if you do come and interview before you actually move make sure they are aware of that. Best of luck! & let us know how it goes.

fishermb
May 22nd, 2007, 04:20 PM
and make sure you stress you ARE MOVING INTO AN APARTMENT YOU HAVE BEEN PAYING FOR! Alot of employers may not want to hire you because you don't live in the area... So if you do come and interview before you actually move make sure they are aware of that.

Definite include your local address on your resume

kittygirl
May 23rd, 2007, 05:21 PM
I have found information regarding the pet laws of New York state requiring all dogs to be licensed, but I haven't found anything regarding cats. Does anyone know if there are any necessary steps that I need to take regarding the state pet laws with my two cats once I get to NY?

Thanks.

Schadenfrau
May 23rd, 2007, 05:24 PM
Cats don't need a license.

lalaland
May 25th, 2007, 06:48 PM
Hi everyone,

My fiance and I are moving to Manhattan from LA in a few months. We're just finishing grad school and so want to pay reasonable rent. With a max of around $2300, can we get a basic 1br on the Upper West Side? We don't need a doorman, elevator, etc...just a place that's not super tiny and that has a decent kitchen that we can actually cook in. Needs to be close to 72nd or 96th st for easy access to Penn station for commuting reasons. From talking to people and looking online, it seems like we can get a decent no-frills place for around this price (we plan to use a broker). For those of you who live around there, what do you think? Thanks!!

clubBR
May 26th, 2007, 06:48 AM
Looking for a 1bdrm for $1200/month. Below 96th in the UES. Possible along 1st Ave and East End Ave?

Schadenfrau
May 26th, 2007, 02:51 PM
I don't think you're going to find that. Look north, BR.

restlessdesign
May 28th, 2007, 02:58 PM
How much do you guys spend on food (groceries + dining) on average each month? My friend tells me that a jar of spaghetti sauce can cost $7...is she making stuff (she doesn't actually live there) or do I really need to budget more than $700/mo on food?

Sunnygirl
May 28th, 2007, 08:37 PM
How much do you guys spend on food (groceries + dining) on average each month? My friend tells me that a jar of spaghetti sauce can cost $7...is she making stuff (she doesn't actually live there) or do I really need to budget more than $700/mo on food?

Have you ever heard the phrase "If you have to ask you can't afford"... kind of the same thing with your spaghetti sauce, if you have to ask if it really costs $7... you probably can't afford.

But with that being said, yes, things are incredibly expensive in major cities like NYC, LA, etc... However, you have to remember, that a resident, you will also learn the places to go to find good deals... sometimes searching out the bargain is half the fun; and really what better place to do it than NYC.

lofter1
May 28th, 2007, 10:29 PM
You can get ANY kind of spaghetti sauce in NYC -- from $2 / jar > $20 + / jar ...

Just gotta learn what works for your budget.

clubBR
May 29th, 2007, 06:27 AM
Wheres the safest, most affordable neighborhood close to the 2,4,5, or 6 train?

krulltime
June 1st, 2007, 08:32 AM
^ Hmmm... well there are not really 'most affordable' neighborhoods that will be 'the safest' close to those lines along Manhattan. If you are looking for cheap, even Harlem is kind of expensive, then you will have to look in the Bronx or somewhere in Brooklyn.

clubBR
June 1st, 2007, 10:39 AM
Lol screw it. Thanks though krulltime- I was thinking Morris Park (in between Morningside Heights and Marcus Garvey Park). I found a few listings but I dont know if I'm just pursuing a bad neighborhood.

Schadenfrau
June 1st, 2007, 11:14 AM
ClubBR, you live here: hop on the subway and check it out for yourself.

clubBR
June 1st, 2007, 11:35 AM
ClubBR, you live here: hop on the subway and check it out for yourself.
LOL you dont know how lazy I am!!

TNGIRL
June 1st, 2007, 03:09 PM
Hi Everybody!

I just got a University Housing assignment at West 122nd Street. What is this neighborhood like? Any good restaurants? How about places to do grocery shopping?
Thanks!

Schadenfrau
June 1st, 2007, 03:34 PM
You're near a great grocery store- maybe the largest in the city:
http://www.fairwaymarket.com/

You're also very close to many of my favorite cheap restaurants.

The famous Dinosaur BBQ:
http://www.dinosaurbarbque.com/nycIndex.php

Pisticci for fantastic Italian:
http://newyork.citysearch.com/profile/35716504

Max Soha for less-reliable Italian:
http://maxsoha.com/

Kitchenette for comfort food:
http://nymag.com/listings/restaurant/kitchenette-uptown/

And you're somewhat close to the best Ethiopian in the city:
http://www.awashnyc.com/

Lolita88
June 1st, 2007, 05:46 PM
Hey guys, with my move coming around sooner than later, I was wondering what in your opinion (other than just roaming around) are must do things when your fresh to the city?

:pThanks in advanced

everybodylovesrocky
June 2nd, 2007, 12:51 AM
Hey all,

I'm a college student from Atlanta, graduating in December. I'm hoping to move to NYC with my longtime boyfriend around that time. I have a couple of questions:

1. In terms of finding a job, I have most experience with music/radio public relations and promotions, but I'm flexible within PR and journalism. I have a few connections in NYC, but I don't know how early I should be pursuing those. I've kept in decent touch with my contacts, but in terms of actually asking about/applying to jobs, should I be waiting until September/October to send out resumes, or start ASAP? I feel like companies won't even know what openings they'll have in early January 2008 if I start applying too early. What are your thoughts?

2. My guy is planning on grad school when we move. Does anyone know of good theology (non-ministry, more professorial) Master's programs in New York? If that's too specific, I guess I'm more asking what kinds of good grad programs are in the area.

3. Also, in the same vein, my boyfriend will want to find some work while he's doing grad school, and he has a B.A. in History from a pretty good school. Any advice on what he should be looking for? Meaning, does he have a chance at a desk job or should he be applying to any McDonald's he can find? He's terrified of the New York job market (I have to say, so am I).

Thanks for any advice, guys! Sorry if these have been answered in the past- I tried to read all 90 pages of this thread, but so far I've only gotten through the first 15. Haha!

Alexis

fishermb
June 2nd, 2007, 02:09 AM
Hey all,
1. In terms of finding a job, I have most experience with music/radio public relations and promotions, but I'm flexible within PR and journalism. I have a few connections in NYC, but I don't know how early I should be pursuing those. I've kept in decent touch with my contacts, but in terms of actually asking about/applying to jobs, should I be waiting until September/October to send out resumes, or start ASAP? I feel like companies won't even know what openings they'll have in early January 2008 if I start applying too early. What are your thoughts?

Alexis

I'd suggest over the next month or 2 sending out some emails just saying hello and telling them you'll be moving to NY around the end of the year. Ask them if they know of any jobs that might be opening up later, or maybe if they know someone at other companies they could refer you too. As far as applying for actual posted jobs, I probably wouldn't apply for anything listed before September, and make sure to note your 'upcoming anticipated graduation' on your cover letter/resume. E

clubBR
June 2nd, 2007, 02:53 AM
Hey guys, with my move coming around sooner than later, I was wondering what in your opinion (other than just roaming around) are must do things when your fresh to the city?

:pThanks in advanced
4 days ago-
1. call out people, i like to mix 3 girls and 3 guys- or just my girlfriend
2. on 32nd St. Maru bar is a trendy music bar that has a vip karaoke room and the upstairs is a tube.
3. take taxi to st.marks, eat at any japanese or indian restaurant. visit the comic book stores and all that crazy stuff. then walk towards tompkins square park, light a doobie. listen to some guy playing the guitar
4. take subway home

if thats not new york i dont know what is

Punzie
June 2nd, 2007, 03:20 AM
Hey guys, with my move coming around sooner than later, I was wondering what in your opinion (other than just roaming around) are must do things when your fresh to the city?

One thing you must do is come to the very first Wired New York meet that's held.:p:D

Lolita88
June 2nd, 2007, 11:35 AM
One thing you must do is come to the very first Wired New York meet that's held.:p:D


will do and I like the sugestions below you lol well most of them :p

astro21
June 2nd, 2007, 02:56 PM
Hello everyone,

I'm moving to NYC this August to start work at a Midtown-located law firm. I'm married but my wife will not work so I'd like to spend up to $2,700 per month for a 2-bedroom appartment. I'm not too familiar with NYC and have therefore little knowledge about which area I'd like to live, although I've noted the following three: Astoria, Upper West Side, and the Financial District. I've been using Craiglist to gauge the price of apartments, and was surprised to see that that a lot of apartments in the Financial District listed on Craiglist are no-fee and look like confortable lofts, for prices similar to my budget. Why is that? I would have imagined that the Financial District would be a very expensive place to live. Does anyone have any take on that?

I've heard good things about Astoria, but what areas of Astoria are actually the most attractive ones?

Is it really difficult to find an apartment without going through a broker? The 15% fee seems so incredibly expensive to me, I'd obviously like to do away with that...

Finally, regarding paperwork, credit and so on, I'm fresh out of law school but do not have any debt. The only thing I can show is a letter from my employer indicating my yearly salary. Is that usually enough or do I need to show that I have funds in my bank account?

Thank you so much in advance for any advice you can give me.

A. (a Brit in the US...)

econ_tim
June 3rd, 2007, 12:07 AM
pending an application, it looks like i'll end up on the upper east side starting in august. i can't wait to move!

econ_tim
June 3rd, 2007, 12:11 AM
Hello everyone,

I'm moving to NYC this August to start work at a Midtown-located law firm. I'm married but my wife will not work so I'd like to spend up to $2,700 per month for a 2-bedroom appartment. I'm not too familiar with NYC and have therefore little knowledge about which area I'd like to live, although I've noted the following three: Astoria, Upper West Side, and the Financial District. I've been using Craiglist to gauge the price of apartments, and was surprised to see that that a lot of apartments in the Financial District listed on Craiglist are no-fee and look like confortable lofts, for prices similar to my budget. Why is that? I would have imagined that the Financial District would be a very expensive place to live. Does anyone have any take on that?

I've heard good things about Astoria, but what areas of Astoria are actually the most attractive ones?

Is it really difficult to find an apartment without going through a broker? The 15% fee seems so incredibly expensive to me, I'd obviously like to do away with that...

Finally, regarding paperwork, credit and so on, I'm fresh out of law school but do not have any debt. The only thing I can show is a letter from my employer indicating my yearly salary. Is that usually enough or do I need to show that I have funds in my bank account?

Thank you so much in advance for any advice you can give me.

A. (a Brit in the US...)

Financial District is cheaper than some other neighborhoods because it is fairly deserted at night, although that is slowly changing. Still, I don't think there will be many true 2 bedrooms at your price. Astoria is the best bet of the neighborhoods you listed, but I don't have any idea of which places to look. If you are moving in August, though, you better get your search in high gear as landlords are starting to know which apartments will be vacant then. You can find a suitable place without a broker (I did), but you'll need to be able to visit the city and spend some time searching.

Front_Porch
June 3rd, 2007, 12:07 PM
Hello everyone,

I'm moving to NYC this August to start work at a Midtown-located law firm. I'm married but my wife will not work so I'd like to spend up to $2,700 per month for a 2-bedroom appartment. I'm not too familiar with NYC and have therefore little knowledge about which area I'd like to live, although I've noted the following three: Astoria, Upper West Side, and the Financial District. I've been using Craiglist to gauge the price of apartments, and was surprised to see that that a lot of apartments in the Financial District listed on Craiglist are no-fee and look like confortable lofts, for prices similar to my budget. Why is that? I would have imagined that the Financial District would be a very expensive place to live. Does anyone have any take on that?



I'd say those $2700 Financial District craigslist listings are fake, thought I'd like to be wrong. A.J. Lawrence was showing loft-like apartments on Water for $3K, but I don't remember a way to construct two bedrooms with windows in them, and that's the closest thing I can think of.

Market for a true 2-bedroom in that neighborhood and adjacent is likely to be closer to $4K, so I doubt 2-bedrooms at your price exist.

As you visit apartments you will get a better nose for what is a fake listing, and what firms to stay away from, but one good rule is this: if a rental broker truly has the listing, they should be able to give you the address of the apartment, not just the neighborhood. The phrase "walk to Tribeca" and a photo of a gym -- that's not necessarily a real listing. A specific address like "20 West Street" -- much more like to be real.

It is certainly possible to skip a broker's fee, but it requires spending days pounding the pavement in your neighborhood of choice. On your budget I was go straight to the outer boros.

ali r.
{downtown broker}

PS: Why isn't your "midtown law firm" picking up your broker's fee?

astro21
June 3rd, 2007, 03:42 PM
My firm pays for the relocation fees but only for the cost of moving in (i.e., movers). I did not know that it was common for firms to pay brokers' fees (sorry, I don't know much about US practices). If you think it is quite normal, then I'll definitely enquire about it, I've got nothing to lose.

So those cheap Financial District apartments are probably just a trap for fools like me. It does seem strange that they never give you the address of the place, and I'll definitely take your advice about being careful of ads which never mention an exact address.

I could actually put more than my budget, but I'd rather save money than spend it in rent. Although $2,700 might seem fairly standard for NYC, for me it's a small fortune.

I've also been looking at Brooklyn, in particular Prospect Heights, which seems to be a nice area and about a 30-minute commute to Midtown. Does anyone actually know the area, and could give any recommendation or warnings?

Thanks so much for all your help.

A.

Front_Porch
June 3rd, 2007, 08:37 PM
Prospect Heights is a fine Brooklyn neighborhood. When I lived in Park Slope in the '90s, Flatbush was a bit of a dividing line, but both neighborhoods are far better now than they were then, and that stigma seems to have blurred a great deal over time. Can't tell you about the schools.

ali r.
{downtown broker}

belle
June 4th, 2007, 02:03 AM
Hey there, I was hoping someone could give me a little advice... I am moving to New York from San Francisco in August for graduate school. I am moving with someone from the Bay Area (she is also going to grad school in New York), so at least I already have the whole room-mate situation worked out.

The two questions I have are:
How is Crown Heights as far as neighborhoods go in Brooklyn? (primarily in terms of safety and proximity to NYU)

Secondly, we are considering renting an apartment essentially sight unseen. We were hoping to go through a broker that came highly recommended, and base our decision on pictures? Just how bad of an idea is this? Its fairly common practice in California, but from everything I have read and heard the rental market in New York is an entirely different beast than the one I am used to wrestling with.

I would appreciate any advice. Thanks so much!

ta3formforged
June 4th, 2007, 04:05 AM
When should I come out to NYC to look for an apartment w/ a move-in date of 9/1? How many days do tenants usually have to alert their landlord that they are vacating the apartment?

Thanks!!
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/images/misc/progress.gif

ta3formforged
June 4th, 2007, 04:23 AM
Has anyone had any experience with Rent Direct New York?

http://www.rent-direct.com/

Thanks!

Front_Porch
June 4th, 2007, 10:14 AM
Belle--

Crown Heights is a little bit far from NYU, but it has some lovely townhouses to balance that out. I had a friend who got the deal you dream of in terms of high ceilings, gorgeous carved moldings, etc.

The area certainly became known for ethnic unrest in the city years ago, but my young single female friend never had any trouble from anyone of any sort -- it was the commute she complained about.

If you have a broker you trust, I think it's okay to rent off pictures. I took my first apartment in NYC (back in the Ice Age) without even that -- completely sight unseen.

ali r.
{downtown broker}

belle
June 4th, 2007, 04:43 PM
Ali R~
Thanks so much for your response. That makes me feel a lot better. I think I'll do some more research on actual commute times from Crown Heights to Manhattan now that I have some feed back on the neighborhood. Hopefully things work out sight unseen:) Thanks again

leeleeandsamv
June 5th, 2007, 06:23 PM
Hey, my boyfriend and I have wanted to move to nyc for years and we are finally trying to make the plans. We figure we will have enough money saved up in about 7 to 12 months. We want to find a pretty cheap studio or one bedroom apartment in a nice neighborhood. We can afford about 1100 dollars a month rent wise but are so lost on how to find a good apartment, a good neighborhood and a job. Also about how much should we save to be comfortable moving in for about a month. We are also planning to go to school part time while we are there. If there are any hints, tips, or ins and outs that you could let me know. Thanks so much.

Lolita88
June 5th, 2007, 07:34 PM
Hey, my boyfriend and I have wanted to move to nyc for years and we are finally trying to make the plans. We figure we will have enough money saved up in about 7 to 12 months. We want to find a pretty cheap studio or one bedroom apartment in a nice neighborhood. We can afford about 1100 dollars a month rent wise but are so lost on how to find a good apartment, a good neighborhood and a job. Also about how much should we save to be comfortable moving in for about a month. We are also planning to go to school part time while we are there. If there are any hints, tips, or ins and outs that you could let me know. Thanks so much.


Now this is based on the advise I have gotten on and off this forum, but it may help as im also making the move...If you are planning on living in manhattan for that price you'd be lucky to find a decent studio ( I know Im bummed about that too) but it may get you more in one of the other borough's. As far as jobs go, try posting your resume on one of those sites like career builder or hot jobs or monster since to rent anyways most lanlords (unless you have a gaurantor) are going to want proof from your job of how much you make. Also for how much to save up the answer is simple...As much as possible...and the way that I have done research on certain areas is by both asking qustions about them and then just typing the name into google and reading as much as possible (yes its tedious work but its worth it:D) I hope this helps at least a little bit...(have I been paying close enough attention guys?)


P.S.
Definetly try to plan a trip before the move just to check out the places that interest you most, so you're not just going on other people's opinions but can form your own. :p

Lolita88
June 5th, 2007, 07:36 PM
Oh yeah and beware of housing and job scams:p

Bukowski
June 6th, 2007, 12:50 PM
Ok. so I'm mid twenty's whiteguy that lives in Texas. I am going to be moving to NYC in the next few months. Right now, the plan is to stay with a friend somewhere in Brooklyn, and then we will probably get our own place. She just moved to NYC about a year ago, and still doesn't know the city that well.

What part of town should I move too? thoughts?

kliq6
June 6th, 2007, 12:52 PM
Ok. so I'm mid twenty's whiteguy that lives in Texas. I am going to be moving to NYC in the next few months. Right now, the plan is to stay with a friend somewhere in Brooklyn, and then we will probably get our own place. She just moved to NYC about a year ago, and still doesn't know the city that well.

What part of town should I move too? thoughts?

Alot of people im seeing onhere coming to NYC from Texas. What do you do for a living and what do you earn? That will go a long way into where you will live

ta3formforged
June 6th, 2007, 02:26 PM
Is there a reason why my questions get ignored?

Front_Porch
June 6th, 2007, 02:45 PM
I ignored you because I thought you were trolling for rent-direct. Don't know what anyone else's reasons were.

ali r.
{downtown broker}

leeleeandsamv
June 6th, 2007, 04:57 PM
Ya, we are really looking at moving to brooklyn, some places we have looked at were, crown heights, flatbush, east new york, williamsburg - and inwood manhattan -- so are any of these red flags?

Leah

clubBR
June 6th, 2007, 09:43 PM
Ya, we are really looking at moving to brooklyn, some places we have looked at were, crown heights, flatbush, east new york, williamsburg - and inwood manhattan -- so are any of these red flags?

Leah

No, they are fine neighborhoods. But I would stay away from E. New York though

ta3formforged
June 6th, 2007, 11:58 PM
I ignored you because I thought you were trolling for rent-direct. Don't know what anyone else's reasons were.

ali r.
{downtown broker}


"Trolling?" Not familiar w/ that term, but I just want to know if Rent Direct is a legit service or if I should stay away from it and try Craigslist or bite the bullet and go w/ a broker. Just curious if anyone had any luck w/ that service....I'm not trolling.

Also, my other question was if I want to get an 8/15 or 9/1 move-in date, when should I visit NY to find an apartment? I'm thinking the end of July, but I would like some feedback.

ailhan
June 7th, 2007, 09:14 AM
Hi,

There is a chance that I can move to NYC for three years in this september and if that happens I will be working at United Nations Plaza.

Although I may end up somewhere in Europe I just wanted to do my homework and do a research about NYC just in case that happens.

My salary would be most probably 6000 $/month or a little more. I have a wife and a son. My wife may also work but I do not depend on that for now.

So here are my questions?

1. Excluding rent, how much money will be enough for a family of 3 to live in NYC?
2. will a 2500 - 2700 $ budget for rent be enough to have 2 bedrooms apartment in manhattan? (considering that I will work at United Nations Plaza). If not what would be the best options?
3. I am used to live in less secure parts of big cities. But when the family comes in I cannot be that relaxed. So where would be the most secure place considering my budget for rent? and would it help if I increase my rent budget to 3000 $.

thanks in advance.

ailhan

Front_Porch
June 7th, 2007, 10:00 AM
ta3formforged --

Sorry if I snapped at you, I really thought you were a spammer. I cannot speak about services that end-run brokers because, hey, I'm a broker, I've never used one . . .anybody else?

End of July should be fine for the move-in dates you propose. Give yourself a day just to visit neighborhoods, and remember if you want to see something advertised in the Times, you'll need 24 hours notice to get an appointment.

also, on the off chance that you're going to want to take an apartment the minute you see it, bring your checkbook, a letter from your current employer with your salary on it ("Clark Kent is currently employed as a reporter at the Daily Planet, making a salary of $XX") and a letter from your current landlord stating that you are a responsible tenant who pays your rent on time.

ali r.
{downtown broker}

Front_Porch
June 7th, 2007, 10:03 AM
Hi,


2. will a 2500 - 2700 $ budget for rent be enough to have 2 bedrooms apartment in manhattan? (considering that I will work at United Nations Plaza). If not what would be the best options?

thanks in advance.

ailhan

Given where you'll work, your budget, and your desire for safety, you should check out Roosevelt Island -- it's technically part of Manhattan, but cheaper because the commute is a pain during non-rush hours. However, $3K should get you a lovely two-bedroom.

If you want to pay a lower percentage of your salary towards rent -- and you might -- you should consider looking in Queens.

ali r.
{downtown broker}

clubBR
June 7th, 2007, 10:53 PM
Front Porch, you dominate this thread

ailhan
June 8th, 2007, 04:39 AM
*
thanx. right to the point reply

Front_Porch
June 11th, 2007, 09:49 AM
Front Porch, you dominate this thread

I don't mean to. It's just that if I'm out-of-town for a couple of days, this is the first thread I hop onto because I feel like I can be of the most help here.
(Plus, frankly, the Orion scrum has slowed down A LOT.)

ali r.
{downtown broker}

ryan
June 11th, 2007, 11:32 AM
You shouldn't feel sorry - you give people patient, informed replies. Nothing wrong with that.

ta3formforged
June 11th, 2007, 12:01 PM
My fiance and I are planning to move to either the UWS or UES on 9/1--will we be able to get a moving truck to our place? A few places have said we may need to get a shuttle which would add at least $500 to our move. Should we just get a smaller U Haul type truck and do it ourselves? What is the best time of the day and the best day of the week to actually move in?

Thanks!

Front_Porch
June 11th, 2007, 12:48 PM
You need to check with your building. Many buildings don't want to tie up their elevators, so they restrict move-in hours and do not allow move-ins on weekends.

Also, NYC is way, way safer than it used to be, but you might want to bring a third person along to watch the truck while you guys are moving your stuff inside.

ali r.
{downtown broker}

didgeridoo
June 11th, 2007, 08:53 PM
hey everyone,

just a quick question; if i were to move to NYC with a friend and we were to rent a one/two bdrm apartment in manhattan (i was thinking chelsea), what would you think the rent would be? utilities? what would you say would be a good yearly salary, in order to live comfortably (i don't mean splurging on shopping trips, but being able to go the dinner ocassionally, see a movie, explore the city)?

i know you guys have probably been asked this question tens of thousands of times, so i apologize for that.

thank you so much, any info is appreciated.

btw, could a new yorker/ possible chelsea resident give me an idea of what it's like living in chelsea? the feel, the people, the surroundings, etc. i heard it's a lot slower than other parts of manhattan, which i like to hear.

again, thank you, thank you, thank you.

bronzenine
June 11th, 2007, 09:53 PM
chelsea is a very pretty, mostly residential neighborhood. it also has a very high gay population. this is not a reliable estimate, but i'm guessing a 1 bdrm would be upwards of $1800/month?

Lance75
June 13th, 2007, 11:26 AM
An $1800 one bedroom? Man, at that price I'd rent ten myself and sublet every one of them for a big fat profit.

A friend just moved into a 480 sf studio in Chelsea. Monthly rent? $3150 a month. And it's not even prime Chelsea.

Granted, it's new and lux, but I imagine true one bedrooms are going to run about $3k a month.

Dmain_Event
June 13th, 2007, 04:04 PM
Hey guys, I already posted this question in this forum a bit earlier, but I was told to post it here. I haven't been able to get to the computer for about a week now and I am kind of out of the loop posting wise, when it comes to this forum.
Anyway, by august 25, all my obligations in my current location will have been met (the only remaining one would be student loans... which are relatively cheap right now).
Currently, my job search in New York City is not producing any leads. I am wondering if that is because I don't live in the city? If that is the case, should I just move to the city get a job as a waiter or something and a couple of roomys while I search for my ideal job? Or should I just stay where I am at (in a city that is cool, but is a bitch to get around in:mad:) get a crappy job while I search for my ideal New York City Job.
I think that I could pull it off. If I can find some roomates in time. What do you guys think?
Thanks.

Front_Porch
June 13th, 2007, 04:41 PM
hey everyone,

what would you say would be a good yearly salary, in order to live comfortably (i don't mean splurging on shopping trips, but being able to go the dinner ocassionally, see a movie, explore the city)?



Isn't "comfortable" always 10% more money than you have?

Seriously, once you decide where you're going to live and know what your monthly housing costs will be, a salary of 50x that should enable you to live comfortably.

So if you get a one-bedroom in Chelsea that costs you $3,500 a month (which is about right for big and nice), you will feel comfortable making $175K. If you rent in Jackson Heights, Queens for $1,200 a month, you should feel comfortable making $60K. Although you'll obviously go out to cheaper places, you should still have money to go out.

Good luck!

ali r.
{downtown broker}

frogoutofwater
June 16th, 2007, 04:44 PM
I will be moving to New York later this summer and will be working at 7 World Trade Center. Ideally, I'd like to live somewhere south of the mid-30s and would love to be able to walk to or from work (30 minutes would be a near daily walk; 45 minutes away would be an occasional walk). I'm not claustrophobic, but I get uncomfortable in enclosed spaces when it's really crowded. So, a long trip standing up on a crowded subway, especially with one or more transfers would be a daily misery. However, I also realise that I might need to expand the boundaries of where I'm willing to live in order to get something decent in my price range (up to $5500 for a 2 BR).

I know from having lived in other large cities (Toronto, London, Paris) that a stop or two can make a huge difference in how comfortable your commute is. (For example, I used to live near a subway stop in Toronto where, in the morning, half the subway cars turned at my stop and headed back downtown, which meant that every other subway car during rush hour was empty when I got on it. Likewise, in London, I used to get on a subway line 1 stop before many people got off, which generally meant that I could sit down and get away from the crowds).

Based on where I'll be working, can anyone suggest particular neighbourhoods that are particularly good or particularly bad in terms of an easy commute down to 7 WTC, especially in any neighbourhood north of the 30s, or in Brooklyn or Queens? Thanks

media35
June 17th, 2007, 08:05 AM
Finally someone with a realistic budget for Manhattan! For $5500 a month go to this website http://www.glenwoodnyc.com/flash.htm . Their apartments are top-notch, the building management great, and they have locations all over the city. You can avoid a broker fee dealing with them direct. As for recommending locations to live in, with the difficulty of finding an apt. in the city maybe you should find the apt first then decide if the location is OK. (if it's close enough to walk, food stores nearby, etc). A crowded subway is not a pleasant experience, esp. in the summer heat.

Front_Porch
June 17th, 2007, 10:12 AM
Try Battery Park City -- again, you can get direct (non-brokered) rentals, though we in the industry think you pay more per month to get them. You'll be able to walk when the weather's nice, though it's kind of windy in the winter.

ali r.
{downtown broker}

frogoutofwater
June 17th, 2007, 10:50 AM
Finally someone with a realistic budget for Manhattan!

Luckily, it's easier to have a realistic budget when you move to New York mid-career (and work in financial services). But we're still facing price shock. Currently, we rent a 1600 sq foot, 3 BR apartment with a giant storage "cave" in Paris (with fireplace, 12 foot ceilings, French windows etc) a 15 minute walk from my office in an upscale neighbourhood, for a little less than $4000 a month. And back home in Toronto, we own an 1800 sq foot brand new townhouse, 30 minutes commuting time from work, that has a monthly cost of about $2800. I've lived in New York before (in a shoebox alcove studio in the east 60s) before, but Mr frogoutofwater is expecting space, charm, style and a large kitchen in Manhattan.

We will try out Battery Park City for a month (temporary accommodation), as well as a commuter town (Riverdale - housesitting for friends).

But, so that I can expand our apartment-hunting range, can anyone suggest a neighbourhood that is further away from the financial district (and possibly delivers more space for our $) but still has a tolerable commute (e.g. due to being close to an express bus, or an express stop on the metro) and is liveable (in terms of available shops and services, and in terms of safety)? Would the commute from the new buildings going up in Long Island City be a pain with the connection at Grand Central? Which would be the most accessible parts of Brooklyn? I've also seen some rental buildings advertised on the West side of the city above the 40s (eg Archstone West End)? I would like to avoid the Hell's Kitchen / Times Square areas (too crowded), but would the "lower" Upper West Side, or even the "upper" Upper West Side have any pockets that would make for a tolerable commute?

Finally, one last question. I've seen quite a few apartments being advertised in the Rose Rentals building at Leonard Street. Some of the layouts look interesting (because they are 2 BR plus a den in our price range). But the apartments don't seem to be being rented very quickly. Is there something unappealing about the building?

Thanks.

lofter1
June 17th, 2007, 11:04 AM
Is that the new building at 88 Leonard (http://wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=5403&highlight=leonard)? If so I believe that constrction is on-going there, which (along with the fact that it is a large building) could be one reason that there are still lots of units available.

frogoutofwater
June 17th, 2007, 11:19 AM
Is that the new building at 88 Leonard (http://wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=5403&highlight=leonard)? If so I believe that constrction is on-going there, which (along with the fact that it is a large building) could be one reason that there are still lots of units available.

Yes, that's the one to which I was referring. Depending on when they finish construction, the timing could be good for us. We don't expect to move into semi-permanent digs until early-mid September.

media35
June 17th, 2007, 12:17 PM
Luckily, it's easier to have a realistic budget when you move to New York mid-career (and work in financial services). But we're still facing price shock. Currently, we rent a 1600 sq foot, 3 BR apartment with a giant storage "cave" in Paris (with fireplace, 12 foot ceilings, French windows etc) a 15 minute walk from my office in an upscale neighbourhood, for a little less than $4000 a month. And back home in Toronto, we own an 1800 sq foot brand new townhouse, 30 minutes commuting time from work, that has a monthly cost of about $2800. I've lived in New York before (in a shoebox alcove studio in the east 60s) before, but Mr frogoutofwater is expecting space, charm, style and a large kitchen in Manhattan.

We will try out Battery Park City for a month (temporary accommodation), as well as a commuter town (Riverdale - housesitting for friends).

But, so that I can expand our apartment-hunting range, can anyone suggest a neighbourhood that is further away from the financial district (and possibly delivers more space for our $) but still has a tolerable commute (e.g. due to being close to an express bus, or an express stop on the metro) and is liveable (in terms of available shops and services, and in terms of safety)? Would the commute from the new buildings going up in Long Island City be a pain with the connection at Grand Central? Which would be the most accessible parts of Brooklyn? I've also seen some rental buildings advertised on the West side of the city above the 40s (eg Archstone West End)? I would like to avoid the Hell's Kitchen / Times Square areas (too crowded), but would the "lower" Upper West Side, or even the "upper" Upper West Side have any pockets that would make for a tolerable commute?

Finally, one last question. I've seen quite a few apartments being advertised in the Rose Rentals building at Leonard Street. Some of the layouts look interesting (because they are 2 BR plus a den in our price range). But the apartments don't seem to be being rented very quickly. Is there something unappealing about the building?

Thanks.

Since you are all over the map, and will have experience living in two spaces before you have to make a more permanent move I suggest you use a broker. You won't waste your time chasing empty leads, and since you are with a financial institution they should be used to picking up the broker fee for a relocation. Two months will give you plenty of time to see how crowded the subway lines are and if you can tolerate it.

frogoutofwater
June 17th, 2007, 12:53 PM
... since you are with a financial institution they should be used to picking up the broker fee for a relocation.

No, they're not. They're paying a relatively modest signing bonus (well, actually, it seemed reasonably large until I figured out how much would be deducted for taxes, etc.) So, any money we save by not paying a broker we can use for other purposes (e.g. the customs and duties associated with shipping wine and champagne from France). I would not rule out using a broker because I know (from reading this forum as well as from other sources) that some brokers deliver real value - and some apartments are available only through brokers.

Lance75
June 17th, 2007, 12:58 PM
I'm surprised no one's suggested Brooklyn Heights for Frogoutofwater yet.

Very easy commute to 7 World Trade Center (two or three stops on the subway), incredible neighborhood (charming and quiet), and the occasional walk to/from work over the Brooklyn Bridge is probably one of the most pleasant and scenic in NYC.

cjb1979
June 17th, 2007, 02:54 PM
Hello,

So I have read the threads here and found them to be full of information. I have noticed quite a bit of helpfull tips and advice. So I hope that someone can give me some now. I am single professional living in Colorado. I have wanted to move to New York for some time now and it seems that now is the time (next few months). The question is: Is it worth it? Is it possiable for me? I am single 28, working in healthcare (EMS). I dont make globs of money. What I am looking for is just a small place in Manhattan to go to work and live life in New York City. Nothing more nothing less. Any suggestions?

econ_tim
June 17th, 2007, 03:45 PM
Is it worth it?

No one on these forums can answer that for you. We can help with more mundane questions, though.

ThisIsntMyRealName
June 17th, 2007, 05:15 PM
I wouldn't recommend moving here unless you are making at least 85k as a single person. Also, I guess it depends on whether you like roommates. Manhattan is difficult to get with a low salary. One other possibilty is if you are independently wealthy. I wouldn't move to NYC unless I could afford to live in Manhattan.


Hello,

So I have read the threads here and found them to be full of information. I have noticed quite a bit of helpfull tips and advice. So I hope that someone can give me some now. I am single professional living in Colorado. I have wanted to move to New York for some time now and it seems that now is the time (next few months). The question is: Is it worth it? Is it possiable for me? I am single 28, working in healthcare (EMS). I dont make globs of money. What I am looking for is just a small place in Manhattan to go to work and live life in New York City. Nothing more nothing less. Any suggestions?

Front_Porch
June 17th, 2007, 05:54 PM
We're still facing price shock. Currently, we rent a 1600 sq foot, 3 BR apartment with a giant storage "cave" in Paris (with fireplace, 12 foot ceilings, French windows etc) a 15 minute walk from my office in an upscale neighbourhood, for a little less than $4000 a month.



Price shock is right. I can get you that for $13K, give or take.

Another problem with 88 Leonard might be Church Street -- some people think it's cool, some people look at the vendors and shudder.

Or maybe it's the 12- by 15-foot living room.

In general, you will get more space for your money if you stay out of the cachement area for PS 234 (roughly Tribeca), which, even though it is overstuffed, is one of the top elem schools in the city.

If you want a 2-BR on the bigger end of the scale, I'd take a look at Dumbo if I were you.

ali r.
{downtown broker}

vdb7855
June 17th, 2007, 06:30 PM
I'm planning to move to ny to teach school, just transferring my certificate, and I know the cost of living there is HIGH but is it possible to find a pretty decent and reasonably priced place in Manhattan and work in manhattan? :confused:

cjb1979
June 17th, 2007, 06:31 PM
Thanks for the quick replies. Everyone on the board is very considerate. Someone said that if you cant live in Manhattan then is probably not worth coming. Are the other bouroughs that bad? Also I used to live in San Francisco, are the prices simmilar? And I have no qualms with roommates? Is it possiable to live outside Manhattan when someone first moves there and then look at moving later on? Thanks!!

fishermb
June 17th, 2007, 08:06 PM
I'm surprised no one's suggested Brooklyn Heights for Frogoutofwater yet.

Very easy commute to 7 World Trade Center (two or three stops on the subway), incredible neighborhood (charming and quiet), and the occasional walk to/from work over the Brooklyn Bridge is probably one of the most pleasant and scenic in NYC.

I'm actually just catching up with last few days of this thread and was going to suggest BK Heights as I recently moved to the area a few months ago and absolutely love it. Right now me and my roomate share a 3 bed, 2 bath with nice size living room, dining room and seperate kitchen. We pay $3150 a month, have a doorman and live 3 streets from the 2/3/4/5/R, plus a short walk to A/C/F.

Definitely check the area out, some good restaurants, short walk to Cobble Hill (even better restaurants), the Promenade is great, area has history and it's quiet and has a neighborhood-y feel.

bronzenine
June 17th, 2007, 10:26 PM
Thanks for the quick replies. Everyone on the board is very considerate. Someone said that if you cant live in Manhattan then is probably not worth coming. Are the other bouroughs that bad? Also I used to live in San Francisco, are the prices simmilar? And I have no qualms with roommates? Is it possiable to live outside Manhattan when someone first moves there and then look at moving later on? Thanks!!

that bit about the boroughs definitely isn't true. brooklyn has gotten a LOT nicer and is very affluent in some parts. even queens has begun to be, and is in some places, gentrified. the only boroughs i wouldn't want to live in are staten island (the long commute) and the bronx (i wouldn't feel all that safe even though it isn't terribly dangerous). i am not familiar with the SF market, but i'm guessing new york's is more expensive. i think new york's market is pretty similar to LA. it is very possible to live in another borough, or even in new jersey, while you look for an apartment. but i wouldn't get an apartment with a broker's fee if you only plan to stay for month or too.

macreator
June 17th, 2007, 11:01 PM
Thanks for the quick replies. Everyone on the board is very considerate. Someone said that if you cant live in Manhattan then is probably not worth coming. Are the other bouroughs that bad? Also I used to live in San Francisco, are the prices simmilar? And I have no qualms with roommates? Is it possiable to live outside Manhattan when someone first moves there and then look at moving later on? Thanks!!

The other boroughs are not that bad at all. There are a lot of great neighborhoods outside of Manhattan. They include quite a few in Queens, Brooklyn, and the Bronx. Staten Island too if you're willing to do the commute. A friend of mine lives in Forest Hills and loves it --- I visit him quite often and it is a great area. Brooklyn has Park Slope, Brooklyn Heights, Bay Ridge. You just have to look around.

kittygirl
June 18th, 2007, 02:41 AM
Hi,

I have found a place that I'm interested in that is near the intersection of Myrtle Ave and Bedford Ave in Brooklyn. My broker tells me that this area is Clinton Hill, but my maps are placing it in Bed Stuy. I've heard that brokers will lie about neighborhood placement - is this true? Do you think I'm being flat-out lied to or are the neighborhood lies just blurry? I'm concerned because I've heard bad things about Bed Stuy - but also that it has an undeserved bad reputation... so as a newbie to the area (coming from the Midwest) I'm not sure what to think...

Can anybody give me any advice, thoughts, warnings, etc. about this area? I know that the commute to Manhattan will not be very convenient, but the apartment is nice enough that I would be willing to deal with it (my husband will be working from our home, so we need the extra space). So now I am wondering what life is like in this particular area - any safety issues or concerns? It appears to be undergoing a lot of construction, which is making the neighborhood seem noisy and not very residential. But my broker says this will all calm down soon and that the area will be really nice after all of the renovations. Is this true? Do any of you think that this would be a nice place to live?

I appreciate your thoughts!

clubBR
June 18th, 2007, 04:20 AM
Hi,

I have found a place that I'm interested in that is near the intersection of Myrtle Ave and Bedford Ave in Brooklyn. My broker tells me that this area is Clinton Hill, but my maps are placing it in Bed Stuy. I've heard that brokers will lie about neighborhood placement - is this true? Do you think I'm being flat-out lied to or are the neighborhood lies just blurry? I'm concerned because I've heard bad things about Bed Stuy - but also that it has an undeserved bad reputation... so as a newbie to the area (coming from the Midwest) I'm not sure what to think...

Can anybody give me any advice, thoughts, warnings, etc. about this area? I know that the commute to Manhattan will not be very convenient, but the apartment is nice enough that I would be willing to deal with it (my husband will be working from our home, so we need the extra space). So now I am wondering what life is like in this particular area - any safety issues or concerns? It appears to be undergoing a lot of construction, which is making the neighborhood seem noisy and not very residential. But my broker says this will all calm down soon and that the area will be really nice after all of the renovations. Is this true? Do any of you think that this would be a nice place to live?

I appreciate your thoughts!

You should scope out the neighborhood. Visit when its day and more importantly at night. if the hood is too risky dont invest. if it seems OK, then most likely it wont change.

Schadenfrau
June 18th, 2007, 08:53 AM
It doesn't make much sense to place a lot of value on whether or not the neighborhood is considered Clinton Hill or Bedford-Stuyvesant. Consider the specific block and nearby amenities, because it's not like neighborhoods have borders separated with armed guards.

Punzie
June 18th, 2007, 09:03 AM
I second that ^^^.

Also, when a neighborhood becomes gentrified, it's sometimes renamed.

Front_Porch
June 18th, 2007, 10:28 AM
Kitty-girl

In broker-speak, Bedford Ave. is indeed the border between Bedford-Stuvyesant and Clinton Hill.

Bed-Stuy is not, in itself, a neighborhood to stay away from.

The dicey part of the equation, I would say, is Myrtle -- which had a bad rap for years (as "Murder Avenue") and has been coming back over the past five years, block-by-block.

I could see living there, but you should understand there will be a mixture of shuttered retail and shiny new retail (and lots of brokerage signs). Can you use Google Street to take a look at it, or get your broker to send you street shots?

ali r.
{downtown broker}

NY_Fran
June 18th, 2007, 10:33 AM
Hi
I'm probably moving to NY later this year with my husband who is being relocated. Having lived in NY before on secondment with my company, we know we want to live on the UWS or in Hell's Kitchen.

My question is about needing a guarantor. When I came over, my company arranged everything and put me in corporate housing for the length of my stay. Everything was very easy and so I didn't have to worry about finding an apartment. Unfortunately, my husband's company doesn't often do international relocations so we aren't going to get the same set up as I did. Which is fine, as this is going to hopefully be a longer term relocation so we are happy to find somewhere we want to live.

However, we do need to know what we should be asking the company in terms of assistance. From reading through the majority of posts, it seems we should make sure we ask them to pay realtors fees, but I'm concerned about guarantors. Neither of us have a credit history in the US, and I won't be able to get a job until I get my EAD which can take 3 months, and my husband's salary alone is unlikely to be enough to match the 50x rent that seems to be quoted for overseas relocaters. We have savings so can pay some upfront, (which is how we plan to finance me not working for 3 months - I can't wait!) but I was wondering who we could get as a guarantor. We own a flat in London that we don't plan on selling, and have good credit history here in the UK, but I imagine that's not going to help much.

Any advice from anyone who has relocated from overseas or any realtors who deal with this sort of thing would be much appreciated!

Thanks!

ChicagoTommy
June 18th, 2007, 12:46 PM
Longtime reader, first time poster. My wife and I are seriously considering a move to New York in the next year. We currently live in Chicago but we both think it might be time to give New York a shot. That being said, we have some questions that I thought many of you might be able to help us with:

1. Is it reasonable to try and find a one-bedroom apartment for between $1000-$1200? If so, where? And if so, is it the size of a box?

2. We currently live in Chicago which is expensive, but not as expensive as New York. Other than the cost to own or rent a place, is New York much more expensive in other areas like groceries, gas, food, etc?

3. We have a decent amount of money saved up and ideally we would like to buy a place rather than rent. If we wanted to spend less than $300,000 on a place to buy, what areas should I be looking in?

Any advice or suggestions to any of the above would be greatly appreciated. I am sure some of these questions have been answered in other parts of this thread, but I have not been able to get through the entire 95 pages.

Cheers!
Tommy

kliq6
June 18th, 2007, 01:23 PM
I wouldn't recommend moving here unless you are making at least 85k as a single person. Also, I guess it depends on whether you like roommates. Manhattan is difficult to get with a low salary. One other possibilty is if you are independently wealthy. I wouldn't move to NYC unless I could afford to live in Manhattan.

Agreed Single to really enjoy yourself here you must make 80,000, couple 120,000

kliq6
June 18th, 2007, 01:26 PM
Longtime reader, first time poster. My wife and I are seriously considering a move to New York in the next year. We currently live in Chicago but we both think it might be time to give New York a shot. That being said, we have some questions that I thought many of you might be able to help us with:

1. Is it reasonable to try and find a one-bedroom apartment for between $1000-$1200? If so, where? And if so, is it the size of a box?

2. We currently live in Chicago which is expensive, but not as expensive as New York. Other than the cost to own or rent a place, is New York much more expensive in other areas like groceries, gas, food, etc?

3. We have a decent amount of money saved up and ideally we would like to buy a place rather than rent. If we wanted to spend less than $300,000 on a place to buy, what areas should I be looking in?

Any advice or suggestions to any of the above would be greatly appreciated. I am sure some of these questions have been answered in other parts of this thread, but I have not been able to get through the entire 95 pages.

Cheers!
Tommy

Question One, answer is no, unless you want to live in Inwood.
Question 2- Oustide of train fare which is similar, add 25 percent to everything ( utilities, food etc)

ASchwarz
June 18th, 2007, 01:33 PM
Bay Ridge is nice and safe and has one bedrooms for $1,200.

There are many nice options at that price range in Brooklyn, Queens and the Bronx.

ChicagoTommy
June 18th, 2007, 01:35 PM
Bay Ridge is nice and safe and has one bedrooms for $1,200.

There are many nice options at that price range in Brooklyn, Queens and the Bronx.
Thanks a lot!! I have found some neighborhoods within the range to rent or buy a place but I am NOT sure about them. Could anyone give me a thumbs up or down on the following neighborhoods:

Elmhurst
Rego Park
Kew Garden Hills
Flushing
Howard Beach
Bayside
Briarwood
Forest Hills

Thanks again!

Schadenfrau
June 18th, 2007, 01:52 PM
Where will you be working and how long of a commute do you want? Some of those neighborhoods are quite far out.

ASchwarz
June 18th, 2007, 01:53 PM
Thanks a lot!! I have found some neighborhoods within the range to rent or buy a place but I am NOT sure about them. Could anyone give me a thumbs up or down on the following neighborhoods:

Elmhurst
Rego Park
Kew Garden Hills
Flushing
Howard Beach
Bayside
Briarwood
Forest Hills

Thanks again!

Those are all pretty good neighborhoods in Queens.

I am surprised you could find something in Forest Hills at that price range. Forest Hills is probably the nicest of the bunch (Manhattan-like amenities, super-safe, 20 minutes by express subway to Midtown). Forest Hills is traditionally Jewish but is now diverse and has many ex-Manhattanites.

Rego Park is next to Forest Hills and similar, but slightly cheaper with more Russian immigrants and and overall Russian feel. Good subway access to Manhattan and less upscale retail than Forest Hills.

Kew Gardens Hills is very Jewish with many Israelis. It isn't directly on the subway; you have to take a bus to the subway or an express bus to Manhattan. It isn't as dense as Forest Hills or Rego Park. Very quiet and family-friendly. Many businesses shut down on Saturday for the Sabbath.

Elmhurst is a bit closer to Manhattan than Forest Hills, Rego Park and Kew Gardens Hills. It's possibly the most diverse neighborhood in America. Tons of immigrants, primarily from Asia but many also from Latin America and Europe. Fantastic ethnic eating and pretty safe. On the downside very crowded streets and subways and definitely not Middle America. This is a very dense neighborhood and incredibly interesting if you like diversity.

Flushing is similar to Elmhurst. It is super-diverse, crowded and heavily immigrant. The Asian population in Flushing is even bigger than in Elmhurst. Downtown Flushing is developing into an Asian mini-Manhattan, with new apartment buildings rising everywhere. There are distinct Chinese, Korean and South Asian sections. Flushing can be expensive, especially near the subway station. Cheaper prices are found as you head out further from downtown Flushing. Flushing has excellent express subway and commuter rail access to Manhattan.

Howard Beach is further out and more suburban-feeling than than Forest Hills, Flushing, etc. It is heavily white, especially Italian, and used to have a conservative reputation, but now not so much. If you have a car this is a decent place to live. Unfortunately, it's a pretty long subway or express bus commute to Manhattan.

Bayside is in northeast Queens, and is the next neighborhood out from Flushing. Bayside does not have subway service, but it has frequent 24-hour LIRR commuter rail into Manhattan. Bayside is less dense and less diverse in Flushing, but it is growing in both density and diversity, as Flushing expands east. Traditionally white and increasingly Asian, very safe and excellent schools.

Briarwood is a little further out from Forest Hills and is on the E and F subway lines. Like Rego Park, it has many Russians, but Briarwood is a little less dense and a little longer commuter. I imagine it's also a little cheaper. Decent, safe but unremarkable neighborhood. In addition to Russians, it has pretty good diversity.

ChicagoTommy
June 18th, 2007, 01:56 PM
Where will you be working and how long of a commute do you want? Some of those neighborhoods are quite far out.
Neither myself nor my wife have jobs yet. I work in the magazine publishing industry so I am hoping I can find something. My wife is a paralegal so I am hoping she will be able to find something as well.

As for a commute, I do NOT want to be on a train for an hour each way. How long of a commute is from some of those areas to midtown Manhattan?

Thanks!

ASchwarz
June 18th, 2007, 02:01 PM
The neighborhoods on your list with short commutes are Forest Hills, Rego Park, Elmhurst and Flushing. Briarwood, Bayside and Kew Gardens Hills are so-so. Howard Beach will be a longer commute.

Schadenfrau
June 18th, 2007, 02:01 PM
Probably about an hour for some of those neighborhoods. Unless you're willing to look at the Bronx or southern Brooklyn, your price range doesn't leave you with much choice. There's also no guarantee that either of you will be working in midtown.

If you're looking for work in publishing, you really shouldn't move here until you secure a job. It's very competitive, and unless you've got a spectacular resume, it's going to be tough.

ChicagoTommy
June 18th, 2007, 02:23 PM
Thanks for the replies. I am going to try and secure work before going if possible. I guess right now we are just thinking about the move, but it is something we are leaning towards. We will see what happens though. Thanks again!

If anyone else has any advice or has some neighborhoods to look, please let me know.

Thanks!

Lolita88
June 18th, 2007, 09:00 PM
Ok so with my move under a month away (and I must admit I knew this would happen) my parents are trying to bribe me to stay here:(. I am so against it but I feel like in a way its not a bad option (as they are saying they would pay for all of my educational expenses here) however, New York is where I feel I need to be, Where I want to be. My mind is made up, but a tiny part of me feels like if they are trying so hard to keep me here, is there really that good of a reason? Some one plz just tell me that I am right in the way I feel, because New York is the best! I dont care about struggling for a while, Im honestly just looking for some back up :p lol I know its silly. thanks for reading guys

Schadenfrau
June 18th, 2007, 09:16 PM
You're the only person who knows what's best for you, so any supposed backup you find on here would only be reinforcing what you already feel. If you're going to live on your own, you need to be confident in your own decisions and not rely on others for support.

Front_Porch
June 19th, 2007, 10:08 AM
My question is about needing a guarantor . . . I'm concerned about guarantors. Neither of us have a credit history in the US, and I won't be able to get a job until I get my EAD which can take 3 months, and my husband's salary alone is unlikely to be enough to match the 50x rent that seems to be quoted for overseas relocaters. We have savings so can pay some upfront, (which is how we plan to finance me not working for 3 months - I can't wait!) but I was wondering who we could get as a guarantor.

Thanks!

Your best solution is to stay in corporate housing until you both have an income -- with two jobs and an earnings history, you can probably talk your way into a looser, 40x income test rather than a 50x.

Also, get your credit history in the UK -- maybe have your bank write a letter that you've been a customer in good standing for XX years . ..

If you still end up having trouble, you'll end up in apartments where the landlords specifically deal with foreign nationals . .. when you see ads, the code word is "diplomat" ... those apartments tend to be nearer the UN, in Murray Hill and on Roosevelt Island.

Seriously, though, you should be fine. Sorry you have to move 2ice.

ali r.
{downtown broker}

Long Island Lover
June 19th, 2007, 11:57 AM
Hi there!

I'm not too sure this thread is still active, but it can't hurt to try.

My boyfriend lives on Long Island and I'm from Toronto, Canada. There is so much more that New York has to offer me than for him to move here, so we're going to be getting married in the future and I'll be going to live there instead.

I've been many times and I absolutely love Long Island & New York City. I have also traveled to Newburgh (my cousins live there).

I have a ton of questions and hope that people can help!

1. Has anyone ever had to move a one bedroom apartment to New York? I'm baffled at how much it will cost. I have a lot of stuff I could get rid of (like my dining room set and a few other pieces of heavy furniture). I have a younger brother who expects these things so it's not a problem.

2. Is it a problem to get a pet across the border? (I'm such a dork, I named my cat Manhattan!). I've read that there are procedures for this, I'm wondering if anyone ever went through it themselves.

3. I know the cost of living is much higher on LI & NY. My one bedroom now costs me 825 a month, but an apartment there will cost 1000. I'm assuming when I get a job there I would be making about 40 - 50 grand and my boyfriend would be making the same. Would 80 or 100 grand be good enough to hold down an apartment on Long Island (or maybe Manhattan), as well as have money left over for entertainment?

That's about all I can think of for now. If anyone has any advice I would be so thankful.

-Rachel

Schadenfrau
June 19th, 2007, 12:17 PM
Is there any reason you're looking for an apartment in Long Island? The prices are quite high, and you'll need a car there.

An apartment in Manhattan will run you far more than $1,000, even for a studio. You'll either have to spend more or look in the outer boroughs.

indigoeyes
June 19th, 2007, 03:06 PM
I was wondering if anybody can help me with these add's i have been seeing on Craigs list for rooms for rent in the $125-150 range in the harlem area.

Schadenfrau
June 19th, 2007, 03:11 PM
I'm guessing that price is per week and the room in question is in an SRO:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Single_Room_Occupancy

indigoeyes
June 19th, 2007, 04:25 PM
Yes they are for rent weekly.
Have you seen these adds on Craigs list?

Schadenfrau
June 19th, 2007, 04:29 PM
No, but should I have? Should we have all seen the ads posted on Craigslist, touting rooms in Harlem for $125-$150 a week? Do we all need to be aware of what a great deal these things are?

Please advise.

kittygirl
June 19th, 2007, 04:41 PM
Kitty-girl

In broker-speak, Bedford Ave. is indeed the border between Bedford-Stuvyesant and Clinton Hill.

Bed-Stuy is not, in itself, a neighborhood to stay away from.

The dicey part of the equation, I would say, is Myrtle -- which had a bad rap for years (as "Murder Avenue") and has been coming back over the past five years, block-by-block.

I could see living there, but you should understand there will be a mixture of shuttered retail and shiny new retail (and lots of brokerage signs). Can you use Google Street to take a look at it, or get your broker to send you street shots?

ali r.
{downtown broker}

Thanks for your reply ali - I have visited the area for myself. From what I could see, there just appeared to be a lot of construction going on. It didn't have that real "residential" feel - but my broker told me about the renovations and how things in the area are turning around - and that most of the area is actually residential, even if it doesn't look like it. I just wanted to get other opinions.

It alarms me that you specifically mention Myrtle Ave as being a dicey area. You say it's been coming around block by block... do you know anything about the area around Bedford Ave and Spencer? Is this area in the parts that you would consider as having come around in the past 5 years?

I appreciate your thoughts - thanks.

Long Island Lover
June 20th, 2007, 02:13 PM
Is there any reason you're looking for an apartment in Long Island? The prices are quite high, and you'll need a car there.

An apartment in Manhattan will run you far more than $1,000, even for a studio. You'll either have to spend more or look in the outer boroughs.

My boyfriend lives on Long Island, so I'm assuming he wont go too far from home when he gets a job. Also, he will most likely be driving when I move there.

On the other hand, I may end up getting a job in Manhattan, but only time will tell. :)

718Bound
June 21st, 2007, 01:00 PM
I was wondering if anybody can help me with these add's i have been seeing on Craigs list for rooms for rent in the $125-150 range in the harlem area.

I have called on these ads some are brokers listing rooms for rent in buildings/apartments owned by comapies renting them out... Some are in peoples private apts. that they listed through the broker. I was told it would cost me 300-600 to move into room depending on if the landlord wanted 1-2 weeks upfront, a security deposit, whatever and fee for the agencey usually 1 week for the company.

If you go this route please keep me updated I would love to know the rooms that they offer.

However, some are just people renting out rooms in their apartmnt themselves. Not to long ago I stayed in a room a guy was renting out in a 4 bed 2 bath apartment in Brooklyn for the same price and I couldn't have been happier.


My boyfriend lives on Long Island and I'm from Toronto, Canada. There is so much more that New York has to offer me than for him to move here, so we're going to be getting married in the future and I'll be going to live there instead.


My boyfriend lives on Long Island, so I'm assuming he wont go too far from home when he gets a job. Also, he will most likely be driving when I move there.

On the other hand, I may end up getting a job in Manhattan, but only time will tell

I never commuted from LI to NYC but I grew up on LI so I figured I would throw my 2 cents in.

What town does you boyfriend live in? Depending where you live and the area of Manhatan you work in your commute can be as different as night and day. If you live in Nassau county it might not be so bad but if you live in Suffolk going farther out east your commute is going to be a bitch.

You also have to decide what lifestle you want... suburban or city. If I may quote my cousin telling my sisters husband (who has never been to NYC or LI... who thought they were one in the same) "New York City and Long Island are two different worlds"

roxxybaby
June 21st, 2007, 02:29 PM
Hi all,

I am moving to NYC from SW Connecticut in the fall - Metro North is killing me. Two questions: Does anyone know a ballpark range that I should expect to pay a moving company for a 1-bedroom apt. move? and Are brokers' fees negotiable? I have friends who have negotiated in the past but I've heard it's gotten harder to get them to bend in the last couple of years.

Thanks for your help!

Long Island Lover
June 22nd, 2007, 03:32 PM
I never commuted from LI to NYC but I grew up on LI so I figured I would throw my 2 cents in.

What town does you boyfriend live in? Depending where you live and the area of Manhatan you work in your commute can be as different as night and day. If you live in Nassau county it might not be so bad but if you live in Suffolk going farther out east your commute is going to be a bitch.

You also have to decide what lifestle you want... suburban or city. If I may quote my cousin telling my sisters husband (who has never been to NYC or LI... who thought they were one in the same) "New York City and Long Island are two different worlds"

He lives in Suffolk, and yeah, it's like 2 - 3 hours commute. The first time I went into the city, we fell asleep on the train... and coming back, we almost missed our transfer ><.

He's recently mentioned maybe moving to Queens because it's in the middle. I'm from Toronto, so I am very used to having the bus arrive every 15 minutes (as opposed to his area, every hour), shops nearby, and the subway a stones throw away.

However, Long Island is very beautiful and living there (with a car) wouldn't seem so bad... I'm used to commuting at least an hour to get into downtown Toronto, I did commute longer though (about two hours) when my father was in the hospital... I'm more used to it.

Front_Porch
June 22nd, 2007, 06:46 PM
Hi all,

Are brokers' fees negotiable? I have friends who have negotiated in the past but I've heard it's gotten harder to get them to bend in the last couple of years.

Thanks for your help!

Technically, legally, ALL broker's fees are negotiable ALL the time. In practice, if you use a broker to find an apartment and there's a listing broker, that fee gets split in half: so your 15% of a year's rent becomes 7.5%, 7.5%.

In practice, if your broker cuts to 12%, they still owe the other broker 7.5%, so they are only bringing in 4.5%. If the house still demands a full cut (my boutique firm does not do this, but I have heard some chains do) your agent is left with .75%.

In other words, on a $3,000 one-bedroom, you are paying $5,400 and you think that's a fortune -- but typically, only $1,350 is going into your agent's pocket -- if he/she has spent a week on you, suddenly they are not getting rich. (And I have renters I have been working with since February!)

If the agent collapses the fee down to 12% (which was common in the old days) you only pay $4,320; but the other firm is still taking $2,700. That leaves $1,620 for your agent's side of the deal, and if their agency wants their $1,350, your agent gets only $270 -- that's why negotiating on fees is so tough.

Your strongest position is if you truly weren't much work -- your agent spent only a day on you -- or if you rented a listing that was also repped by their firm.

Also, frankly, you're in a stronger position if you look like a future buyer or a great referrer and thus a source of future business. I am very good to salespeople, because they have big contact lists and big mouths, and they can help me grow my business.

ali r.
{downtown broker}

danielna
June 23rd, 2007, 12:59 AM
My girlfriend and I are moving to Manhattan in one week. Our apartments are all taken care of, but we want to move ourselves via U-Haul in order to save some money. Does anyone know the best way to get a moving truck into/around Manhattan and the deal with parking on the street in the Gramercy/Murray Hill area?

lofter1
June 23rd, 2007, 09:22 AM
First thing you should do is check and see if there are any limitations set by the building (hours / elevators / etc.) and then figure out the parking ...

ashleyh4
June 24th, 2007, 11:19 AM
Hey,

I'm movig back to NYC and have been away for the past 4 years. I saw that new building The Epic advertised and it looks great, but the last time I was in that nieghborhood of 31st and 6th avenue, it wasn't the greatest. Does anyone know if this neighborhood has gotten better? It doesn't thrill me to imagine being close to Madison and herald Square, but the building looks amazing.

Please let me know, if anyone can tell me about this neighborhood...such as, is there now a supermarket nearby, etc.?

Thanks in advanced.

kel_atx
June 24th, 2007, 06:02 PM
Hi all,

Same song and dance you've heard from a thousand other people on this forum - I'm 25 and planning to relocate to New York in about 8 months. I work in advertising, currently residing in Austin,Texas. At the moment, I pay $900/month for a 1-1 apartment on an annual salary of $37,000 (roughly 30% of my annual salary goes to rent). I certainly don't have a rockstar lifestyle, but after student loan & car payments, along with bills (electric, water, internet, cable, etc.), it's rare that I have to turn down a night out at a bar or having dinner somewhere aside from my kitchen. In other words, I'm comfortable.

I realize that part of the problem with moving to New York is having money up front - I will have approx. $5,000-6,000 saved by the time I relocate. It's extremely likely that I'll be in corporate housing for the first month, allowing me to apartment hunt when I'm already in the city. A signing bonus is also likely, so I'm looking at the $5K in savings, and the fact that I can bank 80% of my first two paychecks (est. salary of $65-70K/year).

Am I insane to think that this is feasible? Any advice you can give? I'll (obviously) be dropping the car payment, which is another $350/month in the bag, regardless of the new salary level. I spend about $90/month in gas, which I'm hoping will cover the majority of my day to day work-related commuting expenses in New York. I've got friends who work in the industry there, and I'll be pursuing a job via a recruiter/headhunter, so I will NOT be moving until I have a signed and sealed offer :)

Thanks so much!

Schadenfrau
June 24th, 2007, 08:06 PM
You'll be absolutely fine.

HansonNY
June 24th, 2007, 11:39 PM
Yeah, you should be fine. You can live comfortably on a salary like that in New York. Many people live comfortably on less.

ashleyh4, the area around Herald Square is a pretty safe area both day and night. Though, at night it can sometimes be nearly desolate so that can be a safety concern. Also, the area has a lot of foot traffic and tourists since it in Midtown. Being near the Garment District and Times Square you're likely to get early morning noises of trucks delivering goods and the sounds of other traffic. Plus, there's a lot of highrise development going on in the West Side right now so that can also be noisy. To the best of my knowledge I can't think of a large grocery store in close to that area.

I would recommend Morningside Heights or Harlem because you'll find cheaper deals up there. Morningside Heights is a nice area and is near Columbia University. Harlem isn't too expensive (yet), is safe despite the picture Hollywood has painted of it, and has all the amenities a residential neighborhood should have.

If you want to stay close to Midtown than Clinton/Hell's Kitchen area would work as good alternatives.

I also recommend flipping through a copy of the book Newcomer's Handbook for Moving and Living in New York City (2005 edition). Hope that helps.

clubBR
June 25th, 2007, 02:39 AM
the area around Herald Square is a pretty safe area both day and night. Though, at night it can sometimes be nearly desolate so that can be a safety concern.

What?

Herald Square is Earths crossroad. It is as safe as can be

NewYorkDoc
June 25th, 2007, 05:02 PM
Are there any places that dont require a co-signer? My parents dont make very much so how am I supposed to get an apartment that the co-signer has to make 150,000 a year? Also, I heard once that some places only require a credit check. Where can I find these?

luke77
June 25th, 2007, 05:47 PM
Hi everyone,

I'm a new grad moving to the city for a new job in finance in Tribeca. From reading past threads, it seems like my best bet is to take a temporary sublet while I get accustomed to the city, which is fine by me. I will need to live in Manhattan near my job because I'll be working long hours, so I'm prepared for high rents and small rooms, but that comes later...

My question is, how do I get a temporary sublet without being in the city? I know noone in NYC that can help me out or that I can stay with temporarily - I'm from NC. Can I arrange a sublet by email and then move in the day I come up - would someone on craigslist be willing to do this, you think? The only alternative I can think of is to stay in a hotel...but I'm not sure I can afford that. Any suggestions for the best way to go about things?

Thanks very much,
Luke

fishermb
June 25th, 2007, 08:39 PM
My question is, how do I get a temporary sublet without being in the city? I know noone in NYC that can help me out or that I can stay with temporarily - I'm from NC. Can I arrange a sublet by email and then move in the day I come up - would someone on craigslist be willing to do this, you think? The only alternative I can think of is to stay in a hotel...but I'm not sure I can afford that. Any suggestions for the best way to go about things?

Thanks very much,
Luke

I moved up to the city without ever seeing my apartment or meeting my potential roomate. I sublet a room from craigslist in a 2-bedroom apartment for 2 months in Hells Kitchen when I first moved up here. I spoke to my future roomate on the phone a few times, sent him a picture of myself, and said anything I could to assure him that I was a normal, decent person. If you're planning to sublet in a share, that's pretty much all you can do. If you're looking to sublet a studio or 1-br by yourself, the person subletting the place shouldn't have much of a problem with you not being able to visit in person.

kevinbluer
June 28th, 2007, 06:18 AM
Hi all,

Am moving to New York from London in October and having only visited once (about 3 years ago now), know very little about the city.

Just wandered what's people thoughts where on areas for living, whether to go it alone or flatshare, things to look out for, recommendations, etc. I am late 20's, really in to checking out bars, restaurants and general fun...so would be accepting of the more hectic areas. Also I'll have a budget of around £1,500 a month...

Am sure this has no doubt been discussed before, so pointers to exisiting responses to posts, would be just as appreciated.

Huge thanks in advance...and I'll happily by beers for anyone who can help :-)

Regards,
Kevin [currently sat in an office in a rainy London]

Schadenfrau
June 28th, 2007, 09:23 AM
Can you translate the pounds into USD?

kevinbluer
June 28th, 2007, 09:44 AM
Can you translate the pounds into USD?
Opps, that was meant to be USD...still got my head in pounds mode! In fact it will probably be up to $2,000 a month...

Thanks for the response,
Kevin

dennisonNYC
June 28th, 2007, 11:01 AM
Hi Guys!

First of all, this seems like such a friendly, open place and I'm so grateful you are all helping out the newcomers!

I'll get right to my question: What's the scoop on Washington Heights/Inwood? There are loads of apartments available there in my price range, but I'm wary because something that seems too good to be true usually is.

Crime?
Aesthetics?
Commute to midtown?
Streets/areas to avoid?
Makeup of population?

Thanks in advance and I look forward to talking with all of you a lot more!
-dennisonNYC :rolleyes:

kliq6
June 28th, 2007, 11:20 AM
My girlfriend and I are moving to Manhattan in one week. Our apartments are all taken care of, but we want to move ourselves via U-Haul in order to save some money. Does anyone know the best way to get a moving truck into/around Manhattan and the deal with parking on the street in the Gramercy/Murray Hill area?

Where are you coming in from?

Schadenfrau
June 28th, 2007, 11:23 AM
DennisonNYC, those areas are pretty block-by-block, really. Some are very quiet, others are busy. It's such a large area that you would really need to give a more specific location.

The commute is fine if you're going to the west side, probably about half an hour to midtown in most places.

TNGIRL
June 28th, 2007, 12:45 PM
I'm moving to the Morningside Heights, 122nd Street, at the end of July and we too were planning on bringing our stuff in a small U-Haul truck.

Our plan is to come across the George Washington Bridge and then down to 122nd street.

Does this sound like the best/easiest plan?

clubBR
June 28th, 2007, 12:59 PM
I'm moving to the Morningside Heights, 122nd Street, at the end of July and we too were planning on bringing our stuff in a small U-Haul truck.

Our plan is to come across the George Washington Bridge and then down to 122nd street.

Does this sound like the best/easiest plan?

Yes. Take the Henry Hudson Pkwy down to 125th St.
122nd St. in Morningside Heights is an awesome neighborhood. Across the street from Broadway are Housing Projects but it is still somewhat safe. You can tell the area is only beginning to gentrify. Go to the deli on 124th and Broadway, and get yourself a cheeseburger w/ soda for $3.00! Very tasty meal for so low a price

dennisonNYC
June 28th, 2007, 01:44 PM
DennisonNYC, those areas are pretty block-by-block, really. Some are very quiet, others are busy. It's such a large area that you would really need to give a more specific location.

The commute is fine if you're going to the west side, probably about half an hour to midtown in most places.

Yeah, that makes sense. I don't have any specific streets in mind yet because I don't plan on moving until Jan/Feb. I'm just beginning to research different parts of the city!

General Q: How far is too far for a young single female to walk from the subway-home at night? I may be coming in very late (2am) some nights as I will be working in events.

2 blocks max? Whaddya think?

Schadenfrau
June 28th, 2007, 01:55 PM
2 blocks max is ridiculous, and limits you to very few options.

The length of the walk really doesn't matter, it's how comfortable you're going to be with the walk.

Slightly off-topic, but why do so many people describe themselves as "young, single, (oftentimes white), females"? I rarely hear anyone describe themselves outside of that range, and it seems somewhat like setting up for victim-mode.

I understand the general female fear of rape, but being single or young as nothing to do with either of those qualifiers. It's not as though if a woman is partnered, she's got a bodyguard escorting her from place to place.

dennisonNYC
June 28th, 2007, 02:48 PM
Slightly off-topic, but why do so many people describe themselves as "young, single, (oftentimes white), females"? I rarely hear anyone describe themselves outside of that range, and it seems somewhat like setting up for victim-mode.

I understand the general female fear of rape, but being single or young as nothing to do with either of those qualifiers. It's not as though if a woman is partnered, she's got a bodyguard escorting her from place to place.

Thanks for the input, Schadenfrau. I don't just fear rape. I fear harassment and mugging as well. I feel that anyone (m or f) walking around alone at 2am should be concerned about those things. I don't plan on being a victim, that's why I'm looking for help as I prepare for the big city.


HOSTELS: What has everyone heard? The good, the bad, the ugly? I will need a place to stay for a couple weeks while I look for an apartment. Thanks to all!

kliq6
June 28th, 2007, 02:59 PM
NY is a reletively safe town even at night . I would be more concered about moving here in Jan or Feb if you come from a warm climate!

Schadenfrau
June 28th, 2007, 03:15 PM
It sounds like you're being smart about things at least, Dennison. Muggings are rare, but get used to mild cat-calls and the ever-popular, "Psst...psst..."

Harassment rarely goes beyond that, but the frequency can be surprising to people moving here for the first time.

Punzie
June 28th, 2007, 03:26 PM
HOSTELS: What has everyone heard? The good, the bad, the ugly? I will need a place to stay for a couple weeks while I look for an apartment. Thanks to all!
Please repost your questions about hostels on these topics:

General Questions:
Hostels (http://wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=5090)

Specifically about safety:
Are Hostels Safe to Stay in? (http://wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=5668)

.

718Bound
June 28th, 2007, 08:07 PM
Please repost your questions about hostels on these topics:

General Questions:
Hostels (http://wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=5090)

Specifically about safety:
Are Hostels Safe to Stay in? (http://wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=5668)

.



Wow what information! The ony thing better than knowing what a Hostel cost 3 years ago is knowing how safe it was 2 1/2 years ago.:rolleyes::D

Punzie
June 28th, 2007, 08:23 PM
Wow what information! The ony thing better than knowing what a Hostel cost 3 years ago is knowing how safe it was 2 1/2 years ago.:rolleyes::D
Oh, I know...:rolleyes::D That's why I did not say, "Learn about hostels on these topics."

It's: "Repost your questions on these topics.":)

718Bound
June 28th, 2007, 08:54 PM
haha Anyway my advice to the poster about hostels is search craigslist for weekly rentals and try to go that route until you find a more permanent situation. You might find for the same amount of money that gets you just a bed and shared bathroom with the floor, you could be renting a room in someones apartment. Only draw back is there is no feed back system for renting a room like there is for Hostels... So you don't really know if it s a good situation or not.

Schadenfrau
June 28th, 2007, 11:10 PM
I'd go with a hostel before a weekly rental, personally. People who are looking to rent by the week aren't generally looking for a long-term roommate.

dennisonNYC
June 29th, 2007, 11:00 AM
Thanks for the help, guys (and gals!)

Here's another zinger for you New Yorkers: How's the tap water out there? (Poor 22 year-olds can't afford Evian):o

econ_tim
June 29th, 2007, 11:45 AM
Thanks for the help, guys (and gals!)

Here's another zinger for you New Yorkers: How's the tap water out there? (Poor 22 year-olds can't afford Evian):o

http://static.howstuffworks.com/gif/productImages/3/7/00000116437-BritaAqualuxPitcher-large.jpeg

dennisonNYC
June 29th, 2007, 03:34 PM
Thanks, econ. I already have a Brita filter but who knows, maybe I could save money on those pesky filters by wrapping my mouth directly around the faucet? Ha, ha.

Schadenfrau, Q for you: I know you work (or used to work) as a magazine editor and I'm very interested in that field. Trouble is, my background (and internships) are all advertising/pr/communications. I've done a lot of editing for these firms, however. What is my shot at getting an editorial assistant job in Manhattan? Anything I can do now to help my chances? ALL advice is appreciated. Thanks much! :cool:

Schadenfrau
June 29th, 2007, 05:39 PM
Frankly, the chances are probably pretty small at this point. You'd do well to work a few internships at smaller magazines to get some experience. What's your educational background?

Punzie
June 30th, 2007, 02:24 AM
Danielna's question about an elevator fee was turned into a new topic in Q&A and moved here:

Freight Elevator Fee (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=14234)

Wicked Cricket
July 1st, 2007, 09:38 AM
Next year, when I finished my study as a primary-school teacher, I want to move to New York for some time. I want to stay for as long as my wallet can handle it. I expect to have about 9000$ by that time. A few questions.

-How long do you think I can make it by living in NYC without spending big? I am a 20-year old student so I know how to live life to the fullest without having that much money.
-Is there a possibility for a foreign person to work in New York? What should I do to accomplish that? I heard there are Dutch people wanted at the post office because they van ride a bicycle and thus avoid traffic. Is there any possiblity for me to work in some legal way(a real job so no baby-sitting or anything) in NYC? I really don't feel like acting like a tourist for a long time, I want to make some income and feel like a real New Yorker!
-How long can I stay and work in New York without having to be a "real" American citizen before I have to leave the country?

I hope I asked my questions in a way that's easy to understand even though I had a hard time finding the words. Thanks in advance!

MidtownGuy
July 1st, 2007, 10:48 AM
get used to mild cat-calls and the ever-popular, "Psst...psst..."

I used to love getting those.

Schadenfrau
July 1st, 2007, 01:59 PM
I heard there are Dutch people wanted at the post office because they van ride a bicycle and thus avoid traffic.

That is possibly the best urban legend I've ever read on these boards. Sorry to burst your bubble, but the ability to ride a bike is not limited to those of Dutch heritage.

Wicked Cricket
July 1st, 2007, 02:30 PM
You're probably right!

Maybe someone can aswer my other questions as well?:)

dennisonNYC
July 1st, 2007, 02:58 PM
Schadenfrau,
I'm graduating from a prestigious state university in December, bachelor of Journalism with an emphasis in strategic communication. I have two internships in advertising plus one in film promotions. I also just started another in event planning/PR. If mags are a tough jump, maybe I'll just stick to my field. (sigh)

---
Meanwhile, I'm on page 71 of this thread and still reading. Lots of worthwhile info and I really want to thank all of you New Yorkers who are helping us out. Good karma!

ta3formforged
July 1st, 2007, 07:06 PM
For a nice 1 bedroom UES for $2,500, how much of a security deposit would I expect to pay? 1 month, 2 months?

econ_tim
July 1st, 2007, 08:37 PM
For a nice 1 bedroom UES for $2,500, how much of a security deposit would I expect to pay? 1 month, 2 months?

1 month is the standard, but be prepared to pay up to three times the monthly rent up front (first and last month's rent and security deposit).

nyugirl
July 1st, 2007, 11:30 PM
So I've posted these questions on the general question and answer board, but I thought that I might post them here as well and see if I can get a few more responses from those that only frequent this thread.

So like everyone else on here I am planning on moving to new york next month (august) and am sooooo horrible overwhelmed by the whole process. I'm coming to the city for 3 days next week to try to find a place....

1) will that be enough time?
2) how should I go about finding a place if I don't use a broker?
3) what do I need to bring with me? (esp. if my guarantor isn't with me)
4) how much money do I need to have on hand when I go to look? in what form (ie. cash, check, cc, etc)
5) are all aparments listed on the new york times website controlled by brokers?

Any help would be SOOOOO greatly appreciated!

Thanks,
NYUgirl

nyugirl
July 1st, 2007, 11:48 PM
also, could someone give me some info about williamsburg? is it a good place to live? safe? stuff to do? cheaper rent than manhattan?

Schadenfrau
July 2nd, 2007, 12:24 AM
You're arriving on the 4th of July, right? I really don't think that you're going to have enough time to find an apartment, especially if you're looking for a 3-bedroom. As I posted before, you're not likely to find that- especially in the areas you're considering.

Other people will be able to offer more specific advice about brokers and financing, but I really think you should reconsider pretty much everything you're doing right now.

Basically, I think my standard advice from here on out is going to be: find a roommate-situation first, then rent yourself an apartment after you get an idea of what the city is like. Let your two friends fend for themselves for now. It's no wonder you're overwhelmed, as you're trying to accomplish something that's in all likelihood impossible.

Punzie
July 2nd, 2007, 12:41 AM
So I've posted these questions on the general question and answer board, but I thought that I might post them here as well and see if I can get a few more responses from those that only frequent this thread.
(More for the record than directed to you.)

Exact reposts new members are not allowed on this website. This poster, however, revised her post, clarified her existing questions, and asked new ones in the post, so it's permitted to stay on here.

Punzie
July 2nd, 2007, 01:16 AM
also, could someone give me some info about williamsburg? is it a good place to live? safe? stuff to do? cheaper rent than manhattan?
Please ask safety questions in Safety in New York. - Wired New York Forum. (http://wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=13227)

Browse the thread on Williamsburg Residential Development (http://wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=5003).

Consider most areas in Brooklyn that are on subway lines to NYU. Consider places in Western Queens that are very near the E/F/R/V/N/W trains -- they go to the NYU area with no subway transfers. Keep on looking on Craigslist -- plenty of people have gotten good places there. Don't rule out subletting a small house (in Brooklyn or Western Queens) for the three of you. Check the safety of every neighborhood you're considering in the Safety topic.

Much of this^^ should be done before you arrive in NY on July 4th.

During spare moments, study maps and atlases of NYC. Knowing the layout will always be extremely useful.

jo123
July 2nd, 2007, 06:42 PM
hello,
first of all i have been reading some questions and answers and i would just like to say i think it is excellent how friendly and helpful you all are.:)
i am moving to a quite town 2 hours north of new york city, i will be working for a family there, looking after their kennels and dogs basically. im only 18 and as it is quite quiet, and not working with anyone and not going to college, im a bit worried about making friends and what to do in my spare time, what do you think?
also i will be on a very low wage, but i do not have to worry about accomadation, food or anything like that, all my money is really for anything i want. i wasn't really worried about money but a lot of people have said the cost of living is very expensive. i was hoping to put a bit of money away for when i get back to england. but now a bit concerned i will not even be able to afford to get my hair cut.:confused: he he. so is the cost of things out there a lot more then here?
one more thing are there many horse riding schools out there? i used to ride a while ago and would like to get back into it.
thank you

unwilde
July 3rd, 2007, 02:48 PM
Hey everyone!
I have a question about moving to New York City. I've always wanted to live in NYC even if just for a few years. I'm training to be a nurse and from what I've checked out on some hospital websites the jobs seem plentiful and pay around 60,000 (or Beth Israel atleast). So I was wondering if 50,000- 60,000 was enough to rent a studio in a decent part of Manhatten? I don't want Park Ave., but I don't want to be in a rough part either. I'd also like to be able to afford internet, cable, and maybe eating out or seeing a theatre show every once in a blue moon. (I love to bike so I don't worry about parking.) So would this be possible or is this poor Southern gal dreaming too big? Thanks in advance! :)
- unwilde

Schadenfrau
July 3rd, 2007, 02:54 PM
What do you consider rough?

Also, the correct spelling is ManhattAn. I'm not sure why so many people mix that up.

Are you going to be an RN? And are you absolutely determined to have your own space only in Manhattan, not a share in another part of the city?

unwilde
July 3rd, 2007, 03:06 PM
rough= knee deep in cocaine
Yes, I will be a RN and while I might consider a roomie I'd prefer my own place.
I think Brooklyn would be nice as well, but I know less about it then ManhattAn. (Which isn't saying much.)

Schadenfrau
July 3rd, 2007, 03:14 PM
Cocaine is for fancy neighborhoods, so that's not really much of a standard to judge things by.

You could live in a studio in the outer boroughs easily for that salary- Manhattan not so easily.

nyugirl
July 3rd, 2007, 03:35 PM
As things are apt to do, everything has changed since my last post!! We are now looking for 2 bedroom apartments as one of our roommates got student houing and for some crazy reason decided to take it. Also, I finally broke down and decided to use a broker. I called them just to feel some things out and they were so helpful that I just decided to bite the bullet and pay someone to help me out! The weight that came off my shoulders was soooooo relieving. And we're coming on July 11th. I'm looking forward to it.

My question is.....is it alright to use more than one broker or is considered bad to do that?

NYUgirl

718Bound
July 3rd, 2007, 04:23 PM
rough= knee deep in cocaine


Oh silly Southernerns thats snow not cocaine.:cool:

Ivy-Radical
July 3rd, 2007, 05:10 PM
Hi,

I am considering moving from SF to NY with only $3,000, bad credit, and a liberal arts Ivy League education. I am a 26/M.

I made the money tutoring SATs and reading, and that's the type of job I'd look for. Many companies offer in-home tutoring, so I'd want to live in a central place with the easiest, widest access to people with families.

I do not want to use a car. I have almost no possessions. I wouldn't mind living with other people in a very small place.

I don't even mind crime-ridden areas that much, but I guess I'd prefer less. I lived in the Mission District for a couple of years in SF.

I am looking for a place that has a history and present of radical politics in New York. I have never been to the city.

I read leftist books, and want to find others who do so.

Is it possible to live poor with my tolerant standards and low needs in NY? And move there w/o losing my 3k immediately?

If that's too little $$, given my situation, what would be enough cash, for what big costs?

Best Wishes.

Schadenfrau
July 3rd, 2007, 06:30 PM
Ivy-Radical, you are either an angel sent from internet heaven or you are a troll sent to torment me. (Please see my recent rants about new city residents.) You, on the other hand, are a PERFECT candidate to move to New York City. And not because you are a leftist, but because you're a realist. Let me guess: Brown?

If you're looking for an easy commute to affluent families, you will want to live either in uptown Manhattan or the Bronx. This also fits in well with your desire for affordable living situations and radical politics. The families you'll likely be working for will probably live on the Upper West or East Sides. From uptown Manhattan, commuting from the east to west sides is pretty impossible unless you're willing to walk or take the bus. Many neighborhoods above 149th Street in the Bronx allow easy subway access to both the east and west sides of Manhattan. Try searching Craigslist for shares in these areas to get an idea of what's out there.

3K in savings is definitely on the low side, as you could be expected to pay any combination of first month's rent, last month's rent, and a deposit on agreeing to move into an apartment. How long the 3K stretches really depends on how low your share would be.

I had also never been to NYC before I moved here, and that was nearly 13 years ago. If you're not just yanking my chain, I have a feeling that you would do just fine, as well.

Ivy-Radical
July 3rd, 2007, 08:01 PM
Schadenfrau, Thanks for the encouragement and advice -- boy, do I want to go to New York -- but the interviews for full-time teaching positions are coming in, and it'll be hard to turn down 45k/year even if I have to live in San Jose.

I suppose I could find a similar position in New York, if I tried. I better start sending out some more resumes, and maybe I'll fly out for an interview for a little vacation and sneak peek.

Come a year from now, In'sh'allah, I'll have 10k in the bank, and a year real teaching experience, and then I'll have enough money to overturn the capitalist scum that run New York and everywhere else.

No, not Brown. I'm the ONLY leftist ever to graduate my school. Think more Right.

How about for timing of the move? Can I arrange an apartment, never having seen it? How would that work? --- Or should I get some weekly room somewhere in the last week in July, and then hope that I find a place for August?

Schadenfrau
July 3rd, 2007, 08:20 PM
Come on- we all know Bob Jones isn't an Ivy. And I think that even Princeton had a few leftists back in the last century.

Really, though: California's going to be just as bad, if not worse financially. (And that's not even getting into my own issues with the state.) With that degree, you might as well start sending your resumes here now. The money will get you just as far.

Portia1776
July 3rd, 2007, 09:48 PM
Hi everyone!

I just have to say that this forum has been such a help to me as I read all these questions and responses. Next month my husband and I are moving to Greenwich Village. Long story short we are basically moving with just out luggage (furnished apartment), since we will have a lot of luggage, I am a little afraid to do the train/metro from the airport and would prefer some sort of shuttle. My original plan was to do SuperShuttle...however I started looking at some car services that seem pretty comparable to SuperShuttle prices (ex. http://www.dial7.com/rates.html) Does anyone have any pointers or experiences with car services and or supershuttle? I would love any advice.

Thanks again!!

MidtownGuy
July 3rd, 2007, 10:52 PM
jo123 wrote:
...im only 18 and as it is quite quiet, and not working with anyone and not going to college, im a bit worried about making friends and what to do in my spare time, what do you think?
also i will be on a very low wage, but i do not have to worry about accomadation, food or anything like that, all my money is really for anything i want. i wasn't really worried about money but a lot of people have said the cost of living is very expensive. i was hoping to put a bit of money away for when i get back to england. but now a bit concerned i will not even be able to afford to get my hair cut. he he. so is the cost of things out there a lot more then here?
one more thing are there many horse riding schools out there? i used to ride a while ago and would like to get back into it.

Hello. If you could tell us the name of the upstate town in which you are staying, we will be able to give you more specific advice. Especially regarding transit links into the city. Where you will be, it will feel like a thousand miles from the city, it is quite rural up there with wilderness and rolling mountains.You'll have no problems finding horses to ride. The people are friendly too.
As far as expensive, not at all where you will be. The prices for simple things are so much cheaper than in New York City. You'll probably be able to save money just fine.
Make lots of trips down into the city, there's so much to see here.

I'll be curious to hear how you're doing up there...keep us posted.

dennisonNYC
July 5th, 2007, 11:52 AM
Hey guys,

Has anyone heard of a boarding house/quality SRO situation for young people? I'm 22 and would be fine with a private matchbox room featuring a twin bed, and shared bathrooms and kitchens. I know of a few hostels, but I was thinking of a more permanent living situation. Any ideas?

Thanks to all!

lpage007
July 8th, 2007, 05:20 PM
Hello all, looking to put a move to NYC in my 3-5 year plan and am kind of a plan-ahead person so trying to start my research now. I was looking at Forest Hills/Forest Hills Gardens, the prices look a LITTLE too good to be true on the places I visited online, is this a safe neighborhood? How is commute into Manhattan/Downtown?

Schadenfrau
July 8th, 2007, 06:12 PM
If you use the search function for these boards, you'll find plenty of information about the area.

ASK423
July 9th, 2007, 05:04 PM
Young student in early 20s here looking for a change. :) I was wondering what would be the cheapest and most practical/safe area of NYC to look for an apartment?

jo123
July 10th, 2007, 07:51 AM
hi midtown guy. thanks for your help. i will be living in a place called red hook. i think it is a quite quiet place but not 100% sure

Front_Porch
July 10th, 2007, 05:23 PM
I was looking at Forest Hills/Forest Hills Gardens, the prices look a LITTLE too good to be true on the places I visited online, is this a safe neighborhood? How is commute into Manhattan/Downtown?

Forest Hills Gardens is one of the most expensive neighborhoods in Queens. It has a quiet, leafy feel and is noted for its Tudor architecture.

It would not be out of line to pay $2 million or more for a detached single-family house there.

The neighborhood next to the Gardens, (which is simply called "Forest Hills,") is also a nice place to live, with good schools and shopping. There are some very heavily trafficked streets, which you should be aware of if you have kids.

Because they are such brand names, if prices are too good to be true, it's because you are seeing a neighborhood labelled as "Forest Hills" that shouldn't be.

The commute to Midtown is very fast when the trains are running, and much worse when they are not.

I'd say half an hour on the train itself, but the possibility of walking from the train station to wherever you are going and waiting for trains might and another 30 minutes to that.

ali r.
{downtown broker}

JollyRanger
July 13th, 2007, 10:42 AM
How is Williamsburg, preferably the area from the Montrose L stop down to Flushing Avenue/Bushwick intersection? Is safety an issue? Can I walk at like 10 pm with a laptop case from Montrose L stop down to Flushing?

Also, how bad is the commute in the morning hours from the Montrose L stop to 14th and 1st? Would I be waiting a long time to get a train at the stop?

THANKS.

snowcamping
July 15th, 2007, 11:36 PM
To all of you who tried to get a job before moving:
Is it actually possible?

I mean, I've applied to 30+ jobs (that I'm totally qualified for) in the last two months and haven't heard a thing.

nyugirl
July 16th, 2007, 12:00 AM
Hi everyone! Well we found a place on the upper east side and absolutely love it! We have to put down 5 months rent up front, the first month and then the last 4 because we are students...is that common? Also, we're looking at using sliding glass doors to close off a bedroom, where would you find those?

Thanks,
NYU girl

clubBR
July 16th, 2007, 03:03 AM
Hi everyone! Well we found a place on the upper east side and absolutely love it! We have to put down 5 months rent up front, the first month and then the last 4 because we are students...is that common? Also, we're looking at using sliding glass doors to close off a bedroom, where would you find those?

Thanks,
NYU girl

Sliding glass doors- try home depot or lowes

Where on the UES? 5 months rent??

clubBR
July 16th, 2007, 03:04 AM
To all of you who tried to get a job before moving:
Is it actually possible?

I mean, I've applied to 30+ jobs (that I'm totally qualified for) in the last two months and haven't heard a thing.

If you have the money, you should move first

clubBR
July 16th, 2007, 03:06 AM
How is Williamsburg, preferably the area from the Montrose L stop down to Flushing Avenue/Bushwick intersection? Is safety an issue? Can I walk at like 10 pm with a laptop case from Montrose L stop down to Flushing?

Also, how bad is the commute in the morning hours from the Montrose L stop to 14th and 1st? Would I be waiting a long time to get a train at the stop?

THANKS.

If you are serious about your safety, you should go to Williamsburg yourself and try out the scene

fishermb
July 16th, 2007, 07:49 AM
To all of you who tried to get a job before moving:
Is it actually possible?

I mean, I've applied to 30+ jobs (that I'm totally qualified for) in the last two months and haven't heard a thing.

I personally had a job lined up several months before I moved out here, and unless you have a fair amount of money saved up, I would not recommend moving here jobless.

ta3formforged
July 17th, 2007, 01:01 AM
What is the best way to have money ready to pay for an apartment? Cashiers checks, travelers checks, or wire transfer? Is it any different if one uses a broker?

Thanks!

snowcamping
July 17th, 2007, 05:08 AM
I've saved up as much as I can working a minimum wage on-campus job. I have an idea of how much I'll need to survive until I find steady employment, but how much do you think I should have as a minimum?

roxxybaby
July 17th, 2007, 12:40 PM
What is the best way to have money ready to pay for an apartment? Cashiers checks, travelers checks, or wire transfer? Is it any different if one uses a broker?

Thanks!

You'll need a cashier's check in most cases. Some brokers take credit cards too.

Shapeless_Like_Water
July 18th, 2007, 03:33 PM
Hi, first post. I was hoping to get some input. I'm going to be driving my car to the brooklyn/queens area to meet up with different potential roommates and hopefully move in that same day. Is it a pain to find parking in general? As I'm going from place to place, am I better off paying for a parking spot at a lot/structure and getting around another way?

Another thing is I haven't been able to find rates for parking in lots/structures on the internet, maybe I'm just looking in the wrong sites. any ideas welcome.

kliq6
July 18th, 2007, 03:37 PM
Hi everyone! Well we found a place on the upper east side and absolutely love it! We have to put down 5 months rent up front, the first month and then the last 4 because we are students...is that common? Also, we're looking at using sliding glass doors to close off a bedroom, where would you find those?

Thanks,
NYU girl

Thats sounds way out there!

nyugirl
July 18th, 2007, 11:23 PM
It sounded a little out there to me too....but I guess the rationale behind it, being that we are both students and they have had problems with students who default on their leases once school is out, makes some sense. The good thing about it is that we wont have to pay rent from March on and we're working with a good reputable broker. I was just curious because I was like how many normal people actually have that much cash available up front? It's kinda crazy!

lofter1
July 19th, 2007, 12:07 PM
If you are converting an existing space to make temporary rooms doubt that you can use sliding glass doors without doing some damage to floors / ceilings /walls when inserting the sliding doors.

The wisest / least invasive way to convert a room into a smaller space is to use the pressurized panels -- but most likely they'll have to be installed by a pro.

Be careful your changes don't do damage to the space and which you will have to pay for when you move out. And do be aware that creating these egress-free interior spaces are most likely in violation of NYC Fire Code -- and you run the risk of putting yourself and your fellow inhabitants at some additional degree of danger should calamity arise.

At least give some thought to "How would we get out?"

nyugirl
July 19th, 2007, 10:37 PM
rapunzel-you can start the new thread...I didn't want to do it because I didn't want to post a duplicate to what I posted here, which I know is not allowed, but since it's ok it would be great to have it on the main page.....but you can do it since you probably know more about it all than me :)

lofter-I don't think that it will do damage, at least the ones that I'm looking at claim they don't. My broker actually suggested to me that we do the sliding glass doors instead of a pressurized wall since that would be the less expensive option. I guess we'll see, thanks for the tip though, I would hate to have to pay damages!

NYU girl