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Front_Porch
January 30th, 2008, 12:09 PM
If you want to be uptown sure. If you want to be in the Village or Chelsea or Tribeca, private message me through here.

Also, if you want to buy, I'll be selling a 2-BR SoHo condo across from a garage where they know from Lamborghini, Maserati, etc. and will take good care of your baby.

ali r.
{downtown broker}

the_online_legend
January 30th, 2008, 05:57 PM
This condo is nice but I was looking for something ultra modern. And maybe a tad bigger...

Thanks though, any living suggestions are welcome as I really have little or no idea!




This will tide you over at $6000 per month, until you get something better.


http://link.brightcove.com/services/link/bcpid1315753319/bclid1315742636/bctid1333257701

lofter1
January 31st, 2008, 12:22 AM
I know just what you mean ^ something with glass and space and room to stretch is what is called for ...

Besides, having $3,000,000 in mad money lying around and taking up all that space in the Lambo is enough to make you go crazy, eh?

Front_Porch
January 31st, 2008, 12:06 PM
Legend --

I replied to your PM with a couple more details, and I am still researching the car-transport thing.

what is your timeframe for coming to the U.S.?

ali r.
{downtown broker}

the_online_legend
February 1st, 2008, 03:22 AM
I know just what you mean ^ something with glass and space and room to stretch is what is called for ...

Besides, having $3,000,000 in mad money lying around and taking up all that space in the Lambo is enough to make you go crazy, eh?

haha well yes something with nice wide windows and an open view would be marvellous.
And I value my money, it's not like I have $3 mill just LYING around... I worked hard for it.
Same for the Lambo ;)

But yes I find myself fortunate to be able to decide what I want to do with my life by moving to New York.

ALI - I'm moving in about a month...

Front_Porch
February 1st, 2008, 06:08 PM
legend--

I hear you. Let me talk to my owner; haven't forgotten about you.

ali r.
{downtown broker}

Photogirl
February 6th, 2008, 05:05 AM
Hey myself and a friend are moving to New York for 3 months in April. I was just wondering would anyone have any ideas if we will be able to find a 2 bedroom apartment easily enough. We would like to live around the Williamsburg/DUMBO area as i am a photographer and she is a musician. Any tips would be greately appreciated.Thanks in advance!

stace2star
February 6th, 2008, 11:43 AM
Hello! My fiance and I are planning on moving to NYC after we get married mid March. We will have a good sum saved up for the move, as we have been living with our parents for almost a year now. We both completed college last year - he has a degree in creative & technical writing and has been working as a sports writer/editor for a local paper. I hold a graduate degree in Arts Management with a few internships in marketing and have been working as an assistant in a Real Estate Office. The job market is horrible here in Florida and I'm hoping that NYC will bring better opporunties! He would like to staying in writing/editing and I would like to work for a theatre, museum, or non profit.

We would like to secure jobs for our move in April and I have a few questions:

1. Is employment neccessary before relocation to sign a lease? Would rent up front suffice? I know that there are strict rental requirements in ny. We are looking at areas of brooklyn, astoria, and hoboken.

2. Would it be any way near possible to set up interviews, fly up, and get a job within a week? Or is this pushing it?

3. If you were an out of state applicant, did you find any companies interested before you relocated?

4. Any insight into the nyc job market?

The whole finding a job and moving process seems a bit daunting and hard to plan. Any advice from past experiences would be great! :)

Thanks you,
Stacey

Front_Porch
February 6th, 2008, 06:25 PM
online_legend, are you still there?

This is half an answer.

Making this a general post in case anyone has the same question.

To transport a car from "A" to "B," it is handed over to a transport firm, which calls for a driver off a list of drivers it uses, drives the car into a container, ships it, and then has it driven off on the other end.

This is pretty much the procedure I used to ship Art Deco club chairs from London to New York.

When you're shipping anything overseas, it has to clear customs, which means time and paperwork.

The extra problems that you face with a luxury car (or in the case of a Lamborghini the jargon is "exotic car") are:

a) higher risk of theft
b) risk of driver misuse as they decide to play with your toy
c) exotic cars are extra-low slung, so they can't be put on all standard equipment

So you can't just use a regular shipper. Car thieves are good and are capable of taking an entire container to get to a brand new car (a friend who is a Hollywood screenwriter reports he lost a Porsche this way, even though it was Lojacked).

Also, because regular shippers use drivers who may or may not be bonded, you don't want to use just anybody, but would rather have a personal recommendation, even if it's second- or third-hand.

I then checked in with some of the big Lamborghini dealers in the U.S. -- such as Lamborghini of Orange County, which claims to be the biggest dealer in America -- and they won't answer the transport question.

Now I have a ping in to someone at an Exotic Car Rental agency, who owns a lot of $200K cars and moves them around, and I think he will.

If he won't, I will ask the high-end insurers.

Sorry this is taking so long; stay tuned for part two of the answer.

ali r.
{downtown broker and tireless exotic car researcher}

lofter1
February 6th, 2008, 08:22 PM
I'd think that transporting a car from overseas would be a piece of cake.

I mean, what could go wrong (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showpost.php?p=213190&postcount=178) :confused:

Front_Porch
February 7th, 2008, 07:41 PM
We have a winner! Zach at the Classic Car Club of Manhattan recommends Omega Shipping of Long Island City!

ali r.
{downtown broker}

adchick82
February 8th, 2008, 02:47 PM
Hello! My fiance and I are planning on moving to NYC after we get married mid March. We will have a good sum saved up for the move, as we have been living with our parents for almost a year now. We both completed college last year - he has a degree in creative & technical writing and has been working as a sports writer/editor for a local paper. I hold a graduate degree in Arts Management with a few internships in marketing and have been working as an assistant in a Real Estate Office. The job market is horrible here in Florida and I'm hoping that NYC will bring better opporunties! He would like to staying in writing/editing and I would like to work for a theatre, museum, or non profit.

We would like to secure jobs for our move in April and I have a few questions:

1. Is employment neccessary before relocation to sign a lease? Would rent up front suffice? I know that there are strict rental requirements in ny. We are looking at areas of brooklyn, astoria, and hoboken.

2. Would it be any way near possible to set up interviews, fly up, and get a job within a week? Or is this pushing it?

3. If you were an out of state applicant, did you find any companies interested before you relocated?

4. Any insight into the nyc job market?

The whole finding a job and moving process seems a bit daunting and hard to plan. Any advice from past experiences would be great! :)

Thanks you,
Stacey

I am in the process of relocating from out of state. I can only speak to my industry in regards to how quickly employment can be obtained and whether people are willing to consider you prior to relocation... but for what it's worth, this is how it went for me.

I work in advertising (specifically media planning), and went through a recruiter/headhunter - she was able to set up interviews w/ 5 agencies over a 2 day period in January - I started talking with her about 2.5 weeks prior to my visit. I received several offers from different agencies, and they were all aware that I was not yet living in the city.

However, the rumor is that there are something like 500 open media planning jobs in New York right now, so the agencies have serious motivation to look for talent located both in and out of the city. Other industries (and even other segments of the ad industry) have the luxury of only considering applicants who are already in New York - it's all about supply and demand.

Their biggest/only concern about hiring someone who hadn't yet relocated was how quickly I could be there. They were all fine with a 3-4 week time frame (I accepted a job on 1/28 and will start work on 2/25), but anything longer would've been pushing it.

I've heard of people who have had good luck starting at a temp agency and looking for positions that interest them long term - then trying to get a full-time offer from the company... since it sounds like you both have limited experience post-college, that might be the best way to go. I can't speak to the ease of signing a lease without being employed - students might be able to answer that question.

Good luck!

stace2star
February 11th, 2008, 10:46 AM
Thanks Adchick for the advice! Do you mind me asking who you used for a headhunter?

Thank again!

voodoochild
February 11th, 2008, 01:44 PM
What is a co-op? What is the difference between a co-op and a condo?
Co-Op's are units and when you buy one you have shares in the building itself. It is hard to get into some. I sold one in Staten Island once and it was $1,000 just to submit an aplication to the board. If they do not accept you you lose your money. Then if you do get in you have to pay monthly maintenance fees anywhere from $800-$2000 on top of your monthly mortgage. With a condo, you buy, no board to go in front of and the maintenance is $30-$120+.

FatCrackr131
February 12th, 2008, 12:55 AM
I have a few questions, but before I ask I will give you a little background info. Please, I don't want to hear about how stupid I am or how completely jackass and under prepared my plan is. I and my friend are going to be moving to New York sometime around April, I am going to be 17 and he is going to be 18.... We will have very little money saved up, if any. And we will probably own a vehicle. Also, we will likely be moving somewhere near Brooklyn and I am doing a little research to see just how screwed we will be and how difficult it will be to get off of our feet when we get there. We are not sure what New York is like so I do not know what to expect as far as housing and costs.....

1: What would be the best for of housing for us? Rent an apartment?

2: How much is the average salary for a full-time job somewhere that does not require a high-school education or any form of prior experience?

3: How difficult would it be for 2 people from Washington state to move to New York without any money and try to get jobs and afford an apartment?

Front_Porch
February 12th, 2008, 08:16 AM
I feel like variations of this question keep popping up and I don't know what to say. This is the most wonderful city, and yet it is very expensive to live here and competition for good jobs is high.

If you move here without diplomas, money, or connections, you will end up working at Starbucks (which will at least get you health insurance) for $7 an hour and renting a bedroom in someone's home an hour away from midtown Manhattan.

I honestly can't think of a "salaried" job that you can get without a high school diploma.

Also, your housing choices are going to be lousy and lousier, because any landlord with a decent apartment to rent is going to want you to have money saved and a job.

My apartment in a decent suburban community an hour on the train from the city goes to students that have jobs, security deposits, AND co-signers.

Landlords can afford to be picky so you're going to be stuck with a bedroom or a basement that's an illegal rental.

If you want to keep your car in Manhattan, it will cost you between $350 and $500 a month just for the parking space, so don't forget one of you will have to take a second job to afford that.

That strikes me as a really hard life, and I would say stay in school, but I guess I'm not 17 anymore.

ali r.
{downtown broker}

adchick82
February 12th, 2008, 02:30 PM
Thanks Adchick for the advice! Do you mind me asking who you used for a headhunter?

Thank again!

It was an advertising-specific agency - unfortunately not something that would help you the fields you're interested in... you'll also find that headhunters (at least in the ad industry - I imagine it's pretty typical unless you're going into finance) don't place entry level candidates... it's just not worth it from a cost/benefit perspective... they are paid out at a rate of 15-20% of the person's annual salary if their candidate accepts an offer (paid by the hiring company, not the candidate) - so it's hard for them to justify spending time placing someone who will earn $35,000 annually in lieu of working to place someone who commands $65,000+.

Infectious
February 13th, 2008, 08:27 AM
I have a few questions...

FatCrackr131, I've got to be real with you here. If you're really thinking about moving to NY with little to no research on your own part, you're going to fail. Now I'm not saying you're stupid but I AM telling you how ridiculously under prepared your plan is, and that is...VERY under prepared. You know it's under prepared too and you want us to spare your feelings. Let me tell you something though, in the real world your feelings will not be spared. Get used to it.

First, I don't know what's preventing you from finishing HS but I recommend you fight through it and find a way to get through it. You said that you're "going to be 17" which leads me to believe you're about 16 at the moment. I mean are you seriously considering the move at 16 with no HS diploma and no previous job experience? You'd be lucky to find a job and if you did it wouldn't be anytime soon and in the meantime you'd have to find a place to live. You know that landlords often require to see pay stubs to know that you're good for the money? What pay stubs do you have?

And even if you sublet a place from someone they'd ask for at least first, last months rent and a security. This means that if you and your friend found a sublet for $1,000 a month total for the both of you, you would need at least $3,000 just to move in. And hey guess what...in the REAL world, you're the one paying for food, gas, parking, clothes, utilities, bills, transportation...etc so you would need another couple thousand to live off of while you look for your job.

Don't let me discourage you though. I'm sure there's some way to move to NY and survive, albeit you'll be sleeping in your car at night, shivering in the cold NY nights as a serial murderer comes a tapping at your car door. Destitute and in bad spirits you'll resort to peddling drugs on neighborhood street corners where eventually your criminal life catches up to you and you're arrested on drug charges. No worries now though, because they're hauling you off to jail where you'll have free room and board, three square meals a day and plenty of exercise while avoiding being shanked in the prison yard. This could be your life, with only a small variation. Don't let that be you. Your plan reeks of a substandard life, unfortunately a substandard life in NY equals a death sentence.

And because I know you're young and my generation apparently dislikes reading, I've assembled the answers to your three questions here.

1. The best housing for you would be a 5,000 square foot million dollar Manhattan loft. The most likely housing for you at this point...your car/COZY studio apartment.

2. I'm gonna go with what Front_Porch said here, $7. You see I have no way of knowing as I actually finished HS...silly me.

3. How difficult? Impossible.

I'm not trying to discourage you, seriously! I mean...obviously NY needs more teenage beggars on the street, we just aren't meeting our quota like we used to (damn beggars union strike). Seriously though, finish HS...work a job, save money, and do it the right way. Do your homework about NY, visit it at least once and THEN decide whether you really want to move. I mean the questions you asked could have easily been found out via Google. To live in NY you have to be resourceful, you have to be smart, you have to put up with a lot of people, many of whom aren't the nicest people on the planet. If you can't even take my reply, what makes you think you'll make it in NYC? Until then...it's not the place for you. Try Seattle.

Moral of the story: Finish HS.

voodoochild
February 13th, 2008, 09:05 AM
I second everything that was said above ^.

I have been DYING to move to NYC(I live 10 miles away in Staten Island) for about 6 years now. I am 28yrs old with a career I have been in for 10 years and I STILL can not afford to live anywhere decent in NYC. Not only is rent high there but the cost of living above and beyond housing is nuts.

As for school, you will regret never finishing. Go to college and get on the right career path and then move to the city. Maybe transfer to NYU or something like that in the future. Even a community college.

youngfashionista0038
February 15th, 2008, 02:32 PM
hello,i'm a student frm croatia..i study pharmacy,,and ,one day,I'd really really want 2 move to nyc...Is this possible,to come here and stay legally(because I know it's very hard to get visa 4staying here..:rolleyes:)...how is that possible...is being a pharmacist a good payed job in nyc...?thx 4 answering.....

Zerstoren
February 16th, 2008, 02:45 AM
Hello everyone,

It's great that everyone here is so helpful and informative!

Truth be told, ever since I was a little kid, New York has been a big goal for me. If it's your pleasure to know, moving to New York is #4 on my life-time to-do list, and is the first one not related to family or education!

Now, my problem is thus, I've no idea what sort of salary that I, a professor, could expect from one of the universities in NYU should the oppurtunity present itself to join a faculty. Is anyone aware of the typical income of a science or english literature (yes, both options are open to me) professor?

My requirements for housing are not spectacular. I've no interest in an enourmous loft that makes a mockery of suburban houses in terms of size. Since I have no experience with apartments, it's hard to guess the square footage that is optimum for me; my apologies if this confounds anyone's efforts to help me.

I would prefer to live in the city, which to my understanding means some portion of Manhattan. That aside, my other major concerns are safety and access to public transit.

Am I likely to find such an apartment on a professor's salary to be affordable?

Cheers,
Scott

Infectious
February 16th, 2008, 08:13 AM
Hello everyone,

Now, my problem is thus, I've no idea what sort of salary that I, a professor, could expect from one of the universities in NYU should the oppurtunity present itself to join a faculty. Is anyone aware of the typical income of a science or english literature (yes, both options are open to me) professor?

My requirements for housing are not spectacular. I've no interest in an enourmous loft that makes a mockery of suburban houses in terms of size. Since I have no experience with apartments, it's hard to guess the square footage that is optimum for me; my apologies if this confounds anyone's efforts to help me.

I would prefer to live in the city, which to my understanding means some portion of Manhattan. That aside, my other major concerns are safety and access to public transit.

Am I likely to find such an apartment on a professor's salary to be affordable?

Cheers,
Scott

Hey Scott! I don't live in NY, but I've visited a couple times and have read every single page of this thread so I'll see if I can't answer some of your questions.

As far as salary goes, a poster on this thread had this to say:



I have recently accepted a professor position at Hunter College and will be moving to NYC in July. I will be starting at $70,000/year... On this income, we are thinking that we could reasonable pay $1,200-$1,600/month for an apartment. Now they never said what course of study they were teaching but it gives you an idea as far as salary goes. My estimate for monthly apartment fees for you would be around $1700 maximum(your potential salary divided by 40, I also subtracted 50 for a more conservative estimate) in order to live comfortably, now if you were willing to give up some things you might be able to go higher. Now I'm not too familiar with apartment prices in Manhattan, other than they're WAY out of my budget as a recent college graduate but to be honest with you, I think that unless you're willing to live in the Northernmost parts of Manhattan, you'd be hard pressed to find an affordable place. I've seen small one bedroom studios in Manhattan for $1700. Of course, Brooklyn and Queens are just a just a hop, skip, and a jump from Manhattan and have much more affordable apartments. You could easily get a 2br Apartment in Brooklyn for $1700 a month.

As far as transportation goes, I wouldn't worry about it too much, there are subway stations all over the place and plenty of buses when the subway stations are a little further than desired. NYC and the surrounding Burroughs are pretty easy to get around without a car, and hey since you'll be saving so much money not maintaining a car, you can put your money towards better things; like a better apartment! If you live the true NY lifestyle you should have no problem living in NY. I wish you the best. I'm trying to make the move too now that I've finished college. :)

regidalo
February 16th, 2008, 09:44 AM
We are moving from Europe to New York this summer, and would like to settle in Brooklyn. We have to young teenagers, aged 13 and 14, and we would like them to attend public schools. Is there some kind of public office we apply to for admissions?

Front_Porch
February 17th, 2008, 11:58 AM
regidalo -- http://schools.nyc.gov is the website for you

ali r.
{downtown broker}

nyc_obsessed
February 17th, 2008, 11:02 PM
first of all I have read EVERY page of this thread on and off over the past several weeks, although I have skimmed over most of the ones of posters coming from other countries.

ok so I have done TONS of research, I pretty much live on my computer looking up anything and everything about NYC. I know Manhattan like the back of my hand, I know all the different neighborhoods and play tourguide when I go (I have been there 5 times in the past 4 years with family and friends who have never been and I show them around like i'm a native lol) anyways i've wanted to live there most of my life, oh yeah i'm 27.

So I am finishing up college ( I am graduating next month with an associates in Web Design, I also have an associates in Liberal Arts from a different school) I have been working full time in a high volume Box store (retail) for the past 10 years also. I have supervisor experience and am currently the Visual Specialist for the store. I don't think I will have a hard time finding work in retail in Manhattan...Am I wrong here in thinking that? I am not sure I want to persue a job in Web Design I found I don't like it last semester. I do love what I do now and might want to persue a career in Retail?
Given my research I know that NYC is expensive. I do want to live on my own if possible because I own two small dogs I can't part with. I have only looked into apartment buildings that allow small dogs under 25lbs. I don't know much about outside buroughs but have learned alot about Astoria and LIC and some areas in Brooklyn. I don't want to live in Harlem or the Bronx.

Forgive me if I missed it but I haven't seen anything on many NJ cities? I heard Newark was not safe at all, what about like Jersey City or Hoboken, Hackensack, West New York etc.. Or I don't know much about Staten Island, does anybody on here know of anybody who lives there? I have been there once for lunch at a friend of a friends house and it seems very suburban, are there parts that I can find a decent apartment? I don't really want to have a car, I know about the Staten Island Ferry (obviously) and have been on it several times, is there reasonable apartments close to the ferry so I don't need a car?

About jobs, I have been stalking Careerbuilder and Monster.com, I make about $12 in Michigan where I work, can I expect to find a similar job in a retail Visual position (which there are lots of openings on those sites) for more money? I am hoping I can find a "entry level" web design job that makes more money once I am in the city, but I want to find something in retail to give me an income.

As much as I know about the city, I am clueless as to how I am going to make this move work. I plan on moving by the end of summer. I have a feeling I am going to need a roommate, I will do whatever it takes to make it happen. OH YEAH, is there a big roach problem? I did see one post of roaches and that made me squirm, nobody else mentioned it, is this really a problem still? Sorry if I seem naive on this because I don't hear about it anymore, that post was the first I heard about it in years.

I have so many questions, I hope I get a response I will appreciate any feedback :)

Jen

nyc_obsessed
February 17th, 2008, 11:08 PM
I forgot to mention I have looked into Roosevelt Island, I really like this little Island, does anybody know anybody who lives there? I know it's small, it looks like a nice area to live though, and gorgeous views of the skyline :)

THANKS!
Jen

Front_Porch
February 18th, 2008, 05:46 PM
Nyc_obsessed:

I married into a Staten Island family (in fact, I got married there). It is lovely but often feels more like NJ than like Brooklyn or Queens. It is hard for me to imagine that you would do well there without a car, because even if you live in the neighborhood right near the ferry where are you going to get your groceries? What about when you want to buy a lamp?

On the other hand, maybe finding a roommate with a car might be the way to start.

Roosevelt Island is a bit of a commute so the residents there are generally people who work on the East Side, often diplomats who work at the UN or medical personnell who work at the East Side hospitals.

It all depends on where you are going to end up commuting to -- if you work downtown, Jersey City would be fairly convenient for you. Newark is a huge city, and has some bad parts, but also some very nice ones, and is probably safer overall than you think it is.

Roaches are generally not a huge problem, although they can be more so with pets because food and water are out all the time.

ali r.
{downtown broker}

s4s4r3
February 19th, 2008, 10:58 PM
Hi you guys, I have a question for you, I am looking at a Executive Assistant in the Fashion Industry, and I have been trying to figure out the Salary compared to the cost of living and the average annual salary that I could find for a starting position was $57,600. Is that good, can I survive on that? I have housing setup with a friend to move into her house completely paid for (She is moving to Maui and doesn't want to sell) that should shave $1200 a month off my costs.

Please give me feed back!
Thanks!
Seth

BrooklynRider
February 19th, 2008, 11:27 PM
$57,600 is a decent starting salary for an Exec Assistant.


To the poster above asking about Jersey, Hoboken, Jersey City, and Weehawken are all areas you might want to look into for housing. They are directly across the Hudson from Manhattan and have good transportation to Manhattan.

brianac
February 20th, 2008, 06:03 AM
The Hunt
A First Foray Into New York

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/02/16/realestate/600-hunt.jpg Ruby Washington/The New York Times

A seemingly nice building on Ninth Street went unseen. An owner in Christodora House didn’t allow smoking in the unit. An apartment on East 10th Street overlooks Tompkins Square Park. Zeyd Rahman is awaiting a delivery of furniture to fill his new home. More Photos > (http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2008/02/17/realestate/0217-HUNT_index.html)

By JOYCE COHEN (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/c/joyce_cohen/index.html?inline=nyt-per)
Published: February 17, 2008

OPTIMISTIC about getting settled in his new home and starting work, Zeyd Rahman began his apartment hunt the moment he arrived in New York last month.

Multimedia
http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/02/17/realestate/190-hunt-ss.jpgSlide Show (http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2008/02/17/realestate/0217-HUNT_index.html)The Hunt (http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2008/02/17/realestate/0217-HUNT_index.html)

His company, which was transferring him from London, put him up temporarily at a Howard Johnson hotel on East Houston Street. As soon as he got to his room, he went online and searched Craigslist.org for a studio or one-bedroom rental.

He had heard that everyone in New York used that Web site to seek housing.

“The minute you get on,” he said, “it feels that it is the right place because there is so much stuff,” neatly sortable by neighborhood and price.

“I thought I could just do this on my own,” he said.

But his e-mail messages and calls went unreturned. The best listings seemed to be outdated or unavailable. “I must have looked at 100 things online” before managing to land an appointment to see a place, Mr. Rahman said. “There’s a lot to filter.”

Mr. Rahman, 29, who grew up in West London, graduated from the University of London and went to work in marketing. He lived with roommates in an attached row house in Islington, in North London, where his share of the rent was approximately $1,200 a month.

The place was too small for the four roommates plus assorted visitors and girlfriends. Everyone wanted to watch his own television shows. “The fridge was too small, but there was no place to put another one,” Mr. Rahman said. He was thinking about buying a house of his own.

But that idea evaporated after a visit to New York last summer. It was so appealing that he asked for and received a transfer here from his employer, the global marketing agency Iris Nation.

His company gave him a relocation package and two weeks to get settled.
Mr. Rahman figured it was wise to live within walking distance of his office, which is on Broadway near Bleecker Street, in a neighborhood with “enough going on around it so life will be interesting but not too crazy,” he said. He expected to spend, at a minimum, $2,000 a month.

His first appointment was for a place on East Ninth Street. The building looked nice from the outside. The agent, who met him out front, said she also had other nearby places to show him.

“Almost by way of small talk, she said, ‘Where are you from?’ and I said, ‘I’ve just come over from London yesterday,’ ” Mr. Rahman said. She asked whether he had a credit history in the United States or a bank account or a Social Security number, all of which he would need to rent an apartment. No, no and no.

But his employer would provide initial financing and act as guarantor, he told her. “She completely lost interest and just left,” Mr. Rahman said, leaving him standing on the pavement.

He was surprised to be given no chance to negotiate but assumed it wasn’t worthwhile for the agent to bother with a tenant who didn’t have the requisite paperwork.

“I know estate agents in the U.K.,” he said, “and they have a reputation of pushing things on you.” He started to realize things might be different here.

A colleague told him that $2,300 was a cutoff point. Below that, he would find only cramped apartments in bad neighborhoods. It seemed to be true. He saw a few tiny places on the Lower East Side, where the streets felt raucous. “Seamy is the wrong word,” Mr. Rahman said, “but you can imagine coming back every night and having to pick your way through punk bars and tattoo shops.”

He was glad to encounter the Christodora House on Tompkins Square Park, which he considered the heart of the East Village. A woman was renting out her one-bedroom condominium in the elevator doorman building.

“I had never been in a lift that nice,” Mr. Rahman said. Though the $2,400 apartment was small, “it was an amazing building and had a nice feeling about it — bright and clean.” It was by far the best he had seen, in a prime location, too.

“No Smoking” was the first thing he noticed on the application form. It never occurred to him that he wouldn’t be able to smoke in his home. All of his London roommates smoked. (Only last summer did England ban smoking in enclosed public places.)

Could he hang his head out the window to smoke or go outside every time? Nope.

Then, he found a listing for a one-bedroom on East 10th Street for $2,400. It felt like a New York apartment and seemed spacious, “even though it probably isn’t that big,” he said. It cost more than he wished to spend, but he decided that, at least for his first year in New York, he was willing to pay more for a nice place in the right neighborhood. This, too, overlooked Tompkins Square Park.

He filled out the application as best he could and explained his situation. The rental agency, Tower Brokerage, seemed amenable.

He returned to the apartment for a second look “to make sure I wasn’t overdoing it in my head or giving it attributes it didn’t have,” he said. “I don’t trust myself in these kinds of situations. I get excited by first impressions without checking the details. I didn’t do the things you’re meant to do, like test the taps or check the shower.” He couldn’t quite remember whether the kitchen had a sink. (It did.)

The brokerage scrutinized his application. It ran a credit check — on his boss. The management company required a security deposit of six months, or $14,400, which his company advanced.

Mr. Rahman moved from the Howard Johnson and had a mattress delivered to his new home. He awaits the delivery of more furniture. On the block, he was glad to discover the storied Life Cafe, which is “almost becoming an extension of my house,” he said. Only once did he have a night of real noise, apparently from a bar a few doors down. “I hope it is a freak thing,” he said.

His colleagues have already visited him at home. “They said it has got so much character and is really nice,” he said, even if it’s not a tremendous bargain. But, hey, London is expensive, too. “I’d be hard pressed to find something as nice as my flat in a comparable area,” he said.

Copyright 2008 The New York Times company

nyc_obsessed
February 20th, 2008, 06:07 PM
Thank you both for your replies! Front_Porch thank you for responding, I was hoping you would!

Anyways I forgot to ask, I heard from the grapevine not sure if it is true that there are companies in new york that can help you locate a job in the price range that you are looking for to afford housing costs? Say if my rent were 2000 a month they would try and set me up for interviews that would allow me to pay my rent? I did hear this from like two or three people but you know how that can go....just wondering!

Thank you!

Jen

Fahzee
February 21st, 2008, 12:25 PM
^ I'm not saying that companies like that don't exist, but I've never heard of anything like that. Be careful of scams, or anyone who wants a money upfront.

IMO You're better off sticking to Monster, Mandy, and all the rest to find employment

One small point - and this is NOT a steadfast rule: many creative jobs in this city are freelance positions - i.e. you're hired for a specific project (like building a new webpage for a retail company, for instance), and you have to look for a new job once the project is finished.

The day to day website maintenance jobs tend to be more permanent positions - but those are generally programing jobs, not design jobs.

the only exception to this that I've seen are website CONTENT jobs - media companies like Viacom, AETN, UNiversal, various news outlets, etc upload hundreds of hours of new content each month, and they all employ a litany of programmers AND designers to keep the sights looking fresh. Most of the people hired are still freelance - but the freelance contact is open ended, meaning you basically have a permanent job (although one with limited healthcare, and all the other negatives of being freelance)

EDIT: NYC-Obsessed - I reread your post, and realized you may have made up your mind that Web design isn't for you. There's a lot of retail in this city, although I'm not sure how people go about finding openings. You'll find the majority of the big box stores in the outer boroughs, or in NJ/ Long Island.

nyc_obsessed
February 21st, 2008, 04:40 PM
wow, thank you so much for giving me that information, I didn't realize that most web design jobs in the city were freelance! But yeah I would love to get into a retail setting in the city, not necessarily a box store, i just have worked in one for 10 years, I would LOVE to work for Barney's or Bergdorf Goodman's....Or any other store along 5th ave would be awesome :) I have been looking into the outer boroughs for places to live, like staten island or long island, I just want to be in Astoria, or Manhattan if for the simple fact that I don't want a car! But i'm going to keep looking!

718Bound
February 21st, 2008, 05:58 PM
Long Island is not an outer borough... Many people live on Long Island and work in the city, but Long Island is not actually part of the city even although two boroughs are on the actual Island... Take it from someone who grew up on Long Island, you are going to need a car! I am living upstate now and planning on moving to NYC and will not even consider Long Island... Yea it's home, but I could not imagine the commute daily on the LIRR or driving in. Growing up I have seen friends parents do it... Their cars would be gone way before we would have to be to the bus stop in the morning to go to school and usually see them coming home while at their house 7, 8, 9 o clock at night... Maybe providing a better life for their children by living out on on Long Island, but why would someone without a family want to put up with the commute? not something I would want to do!


I have been looking into the outer boroughs for places to live, like staten island or long island, I just want to be in Astoria, or Manhattan if for the simple fact that I don't want a car!
You do know Astoria and Manhattan are not the only places to live in NYC that you do not need a car? Right? Astoria is nice and fun, but is getting expensive... Get an idea of where you will be working and look at neighborhoods in Brooklyn and Queens that run along the subway line that will bring you into the area you work in easily...

Not trying to be mean or a downer, but if you are planning on working retail, you can probably rule out living in Manhattan... Unless you want to pay most of your money to rent... Even then you are missing out on alot... Try to take a visit some time to nyc and visit some neighborhoods in the outer boroughs and see what you like... You can find an affordable place... Maybe not Astoria, Park Slope, or Williamsburg but a safe neighbor hood with a decnt commute to work and to other areas when you want to have some fun...

Best of luck!

The Benniest
February 22nd, 2008, 12:29 AM
Question about jobs. I am very young at the moment, and will want to be moving to New York either during college (transfer student) or immediately out of college. If I were not to work in retail, where do young adults (ages 20 - 23) work? I almost guarantee that I will be working in some kind of retail to help me get started on rent prices, but as time goes on, I would like to branch out in my dream/goal of graphic design/photography.

Also ... has anyone here ever heard anything about photography "shops" or jobs around Manhattan? I would love to live in Manhattan and would love to work in there as well, it's just finding the job to pay the rent that will be the problem for me.

Any help would be great. Thanks,
Ben

718Bound
February 22nd, 2008, 10:46 AM
There is nothing wrong with retail... I was just trying to tell nyc_obsessed that if (s)he is planning on working retail living in Manhattan is more of dream then a reality... You will be in school though... So you will probably already figure your cost of living into student loans.... Again nothing wrong with retail, many jobs I have come across seem to pay very low and trying to live off that in NYC is a scary thought... You would probably need 2 or 3 jobs to get by...

I myself plan on working retail when I first move... Ask anybody who has moved before, it is not easy to get hired when you do not live in the NYC area. So I plan on taking a retail job so I don't blow all the money I have saved just on living until something better comes along.

While on the subject does anyone know any employment services that place people right off the bat into retail settings?

nyc_obsessed
February 23rd, 2008, 09:15 AM
While on the subject does anyone know any employment services that place people right off the bat into retail settings?

I actually asked a question similiar they said there was no such thing, unless I just didn't word it right. Anywys thank you for your advice, and yes I know that there are more neighborhoods that I could live in without a car, I am just not familiar at all with the other boroughs. Manhattan I have down pat! :) I did actually know that long island isn't a borough, I guess I just wasn't thinking when I was typing. But thank you for telling me about the commute to LI, I definitely don't want to do that then. I am actually coming to the city this summer around june/july to neighborhood search and apartment hunt. I know that it is hard to get a job without being in the city, are they good about setting up possible interviews for when you will be in the city? In previous posts I know a lot of people said they made the move and then searched for a job. A lot has said this is the best way to do it, but I want to be a little more prepared, is it possible to do it before making a move? I did get some advice from previous posts about subletting while looking for a job, so I have some options :)

Thank you for your input on retail, you weren't being mean or discouraging, I have come off my cloud of having a penthouse on 5th lol and i've become realistic that I can't afford Manhattan until I get into a higher position, I have found retail jobs however with my experience on careerbuilder and monster that start at 60 to over 100 grand a year. I know that won't happen right away though.

s4s4r3
February 23rd, 2008, 12:34 PM
Okay, I have added everything up and after taxes I will make $3,171.27 a year, is that enough to live on? As I mentioned I have housing taken care of, meaning, I have a friend who is moving out (she owns) and is going to let me live there rent free.
My total income would be $38,055.24 and I have attached below a break down of the taxes so that you can tell me if it is accurate.

Monthly Gross Pay $4,800.00

Federal Withholding $852.00
Social Security $297.60
Medicare $69.60
New York $255.90
NY SDI $2.60
City Tax $151.03
________________________________

Net Pay $3,171.27
Annual Salary After Taxes: $38,055.24

Thank you,
Seth

Billy_G
February 23rd, 2008, 03:14 PM
Hello. I live in Greece and I'm planning in moving in nwe york, in a few years. Altough i will carry some money, I want to know where are the cheapest neighborhoods in NY, if there are jobs for high school graduates.

The Benniest
February 23rd, 2008, 08:55 PM
There is nothing wrong with retail... I was just trying to tell nyc_obsessed that if (s)he is planning on working retail living in Manhattan is more of dream then a reality... You will be in school though... So you will probably already figure your cost of living into student loans.... Again nothing wrong with retail, many jobs I have come across seem to pay very low and trying to live off that in NYC is a scary thought... You would probably need 2 or 3 jobs to get by...

I myself plan on working retail when I first move... Ask anybody who has moved before, it is not easy to get hired when you do not live in the NYC area. So I plan on taking a retail job so I don't blow all the money I have saved just on living until something better comes along.

While on the subject does anyone know any employment services that place people right off the bat into retail settings?
Any idea how long after moving into the New York City area that you move to only 1 job, where you will be good and living?

BrooklynRider
February 25th, 2008, 12:05 AM
Also ... has anyone here ever heard anything about photography "shops" or jobs around Manhattan? I would love to live in Manhattan and would love to work in there as well, it's just finding the job to pay the rent that will be the problem for me.



Lots of places like Duggal, graphics service bureau, or C2Media, for example.

The Benniest
February 25th, 2008, 12:19 AM
Lots of places like Duggal, graphics service bureau, or C2Media, for example.
Okay thanks. I'll check these out.

Question: For someone who has never lived in NY City or even been there (yet), where/what would be a good place to live coming in as a NOOB new yorker? I've been debating on searching and looking into prices in Midtown/Downtown Manhattan, Brooklyn and some parts of Queens. Other places I've seen on sites like NYCDwellers (http://www.nycdwellers.com/) include: Beekman, and Murray Hill. From a map I got, I can see that Murray Hill is quite close to Midtown, which is a definite PLUS for me. :)

Also, about rent. What is a good and fair price range to start looking at? If I choose to go to a 4-year liberal school here in Iowa, I will be around 21-22 years old and will be able to have a steady job. As said above, I will (am planning) on getting more than one job when I first move to get started but I was just curious. Where are the really expensive areas in New York City? If at all possible, I would *love* to live in Manhattan.

Any suggestions and tips would be greatly appreciated. Thanks,
Ben

media35
February 25th, 2008, 08:22 AM
"Establish NYC residency as soon as you get here. That way, you'll be eligible for lower tuition and financial aid at the CUNY schools for the fall semester of 2009. The CUNY system can offer you a higher quality education than almost any place in Iowa."

This comment is so typical of the New York Attitude it is a cliché. Our favorite saying in the Midwest to New Yorkers, is “ oh please do tell us what is wrong with our city, our schools, you name it”. We can’t wait to hear how it is done in New York. Don't bet on CUNY being better than any of the colleges in Iowa.

The Benniest
February 25th, 2008, 08:27 AM
"Establish NYC residency as soon as you get here. That way, you'll be eligible for lower tuition and financial aid at the CUNY schools for the fall semester of 2009. The CUNY system can offer you a higher quality education than almost any place in Iowa."

This comment is so typical of the New York Attitude it is a cliché. Our favorite saying in the Midwest to New Yorkers, is “ oh please do tell us what is wrong with our city, our schools, you name it”. We can’t wait to hear how it is done in New York. Don't bet on CUNY being better than any of the colleges in Iowa.

I do not media35. I don't necessarily like someone saying that due to the fact that they do not even live here. I'll make the decision when I move, and where I go to college before/after I move.

BrooklynRider
February 25th, 2008, 01:22 PM
Okay, I have added everything up and after taxes I will make $3,171.27 a year, is that enough to live on?

Just as a matter of clarity, your math looks correct - but it is $3171.27 per month.

It should be more than enough to live on and you could probably have a savings account on the side.

Housing always eats the biggest chunk of earnings in NYC.

I'm not sure of the utlity arrangements, but figure the following:

Monthly expenses
$70 Electric (for Fall, Winter Spring.)
$130 Electric (for Summer w A/C running)
$30 Gas
$76 Monthly subway card
$50 Cable Internet
$50 Cable TV
$ ? Your phone bill

You can go to the supermarket and buy groceries to keep meal costs down, but I think you'll make ample to eat out as desired.

Movies are $12.50
Museums are generally $6.00 to $20.00.
Theater is $20 to $75
Cocktails are $5 to $12

Anything else you are figuring on?

BrooklynRider
February 25th, 2008, 01:40 PM
Ben,

Punzie's way is one alternative.

I suggest you pursue the education that meets your study requirements - whereever the school happens to be. You might have plenty of opportunities in Iowa or any other state in the country.

I New York, a good job is not always dependent on college education, but a good college education makes employment easier. Graduating from a top school in your field of interest will get you the highest possible salary.

Not knowing what your study interests or career aspirations might be, it would be erroneous to suggest that a CUNY school is right for you. School is still a time for fun, learning and the very important lessons of time management, stress management, public speaking, team work, and how to listen. They are courses of study, but they are absolutely necssary to thrive in NYC.

I would also be wary of moving to or accepting any living situation in which you do not pay rent. Again, Punzie might have experience to the contrary, but I believe that getting board by doing chores or helping a home owner is closer to endentured servitude than the excitement of moving to NYC on your own.

Unless you come from a family of wealth that could support you, it is likely you would have to seek roommates to defray housing costs. Yuo could probably find a place on your own, but it would be in the farther reaches of Bronx, Brooklyn, or Queens.

Depending on your career path, you could consider coming to NYC in summer months to undertake internships and develop the experience and industry connections that will get you employed when school ends. Summer will offer lots more in housing as you could find more sublets and simple furnished room rentals.

Manhattan is going to be expensive. Murray Hill used to be an affordable student haven, but no more. I admire your choice of Beekman, but that are is not cheap. If your heart is set on Manhattan, Upper Manhattan will be cheapest (above 110th Street). Even in Upper Manhattan there are very expensive areas.

I do agree with Punzie that money in the bank will make a huge difference. Most landlords will require a guarantor before you move in. They want someone with a credit history to assume responsibility for rent if you fail to pay.

Eight million people live in NYC, so it is not beyond anyone's capability to succeed here. It is very different from the midwest and smaller towns because the huge population means interdependence. It is also (obviously) very culturally diverse. For some folks, it can be quite a shock to be on a subway car and half the people are speaking languages other than English.

Seeing your posts throughout WiredNewYork, I think that you have the makings of a very successful New Yorker.

The Benniest
February 25th, 2008, 03:20 PM
Not knowing what your study interests or career aspirations might be, it would be erroneous to suggest that a CUNY school is right for you. School is still a time for fun, learning and the very important lessons of time management, stress management, public speaking, team work, and how to listen. They are courses of study, but they are absolutely necssary to thrive in NYC.
The field of interest I would like to pursue is Graphic Design and/or Photography. I have a passion for both. A school I have been looking partially at in NYC is the New York Institute of Photography (http://www.nyip.com/). Has anyone heard anything about this school?

I would also be wary of moving to or accepting any living situation in which you do not pay rent. Again, Punzie might have experience to the contrary, but I believe that getting board by doing chores or helping a home owner is closer to endentured servitude than the excitement of moving to NYC on your own.
This is something I've been very lenient on in deciding about. I'm not the kind of person who likes to do chores, nor liking to do chores for other people. So I think I would get tired of doing this very quickly. I think either a roommate or a cheap, nice apartment is right for me, which is what I have been looking for.

Manhattan is going to be expensive. Murray Hill used to be an affordable student haven, but no more. I admire your choice of Beekman, but that are is not cheap. If your heart is set on Manhattan, Upper Manhattan will be cheapest (above 110th Street). Even in Upper Manhattan there are very expensive areas.
My mind is in ALL different places about there to live. I want to live here because of this, I wanna live there because of that ... it's confusing at the moment. If I'm going to live in Manhattan, I do not want to live as far up as Inwood or Washington Heights. However, if those are the cheapest places in that, I guess I'll have to make sacrifices. As time moves on, I can make my way down to where I really would like to live ... midtown/downtown.

I see that Murray Hill is in the area of Park Ave. and the Chrysler Building, which would be nice to live around. What is the estimate rent price range in this area? Beekman is just something I came across while browsing NYCDwellers. There seem to be some really nice apartments in this area and I would like to continue my search for a "cheap" one. :p

I do agree with Punzie that money in the bank will make a huge difference. Most landlords will require a guarantor before you move in. They want someone with a credit history to assume responsibility for rent if you fail to pay.
Yes, this is something I am planning on doing. I just don't want to do it, until I know exactly where I will go to college. I have two colleges I am looking at at the moment, one being a 4-year and the other: 2-year. If I choose to go to the 4-year (where I've been already been accepted), it will be about $12,000 a year for tuition, and the 2-year will be well under that at approx. $2,000 a year. If I do go to the community college, that will give me a much better perspective of how much money I will have when I graduate and make my way to NY.

Eight million people live in NYC, so it is not beyond anyone's capability to succeed here. It is very different from the midwest and smaller towns because the huge population means interdependence. It is also (obviously) very culturally diverse. For some folks, it can be quite a shock to be on a subway car and half the people are speaking languages other than English.
I'm sure this won't be a problem for me. I love diversity and like listening to languages that I don't understand. I mean, they could be cursing at me and I would still think it's cool. :D

Seeing your posts throughout WiredNewYork, I think that you have the makings of a very successful New Yorker.
Thank you. It's posts like this ^^ that really get me motivated.


Thanks for your reply BR .. as always. :)
Ben

MidtownGuy
February 25th, 2008, 06:02 PM
I moved to New York when I was 20 with no place to live. Now I'm a designer and I live in midtown. You say this is what you want so I will try to give you some advice.

If you REALLY want to make it work as easily and painlessly as possible, NYC is where you should go to college for art and design. The fashion and design companies here feel very confident hiring from New York schools like F.I.T., Parsons, etc. that are well connected with the industries they are a part of. The relationship between design schools and the companies that recruit from them is very close. Future employers are situated on the very streets surrounding the schools, your professors will either be working in the industry or be well connected to people that are. You will be able to secure internships at companies that specifically recruit from FIT, Parsons, or other respected local schools; they don't spend much time looking further afield because they don't need to...they know this is where the serious young designers are. When you graduate, there will be a job bank at school with listings placed by design companies. Your professors may already have contacts at those companies.

Being in design school is about way more than the brick and mortar building your classes are in. It is about the city around you, which serves as inspiration, source of materials, and contact with the industries in which you will work. You will have field trips to some of the greatest museums in the world where you will sketch from a real Picasso instead of a slide projector in the midwest. When you want encouragement from professionals, someone like Donna Karan is giving a lecture at your school. To sum up, you are SURROUNDED by the people and organizations that have similar goals. The other students in your classes will be from Paris, Seoul, London, Johannesburg, you name it, because they were drawn here too, like moths to the light. Anyone who tells you that getting a NYC design job after attending school in Iowa will be as easy as if you had atended FIT or Parsons is just very unaware of this field.

When you go to college here, you will likely have institutional help with housing, and you will have a period of time to get established...forming a social network, meeting potential future roomates, co-workers, business partners, etc. By the time you graduate, you already have leads right here, in the city where you want to be. You don't have to "start all over".

What is the alternative? Years in a school in the midwest that may or may not get you a good design or photography job in NYC, followed by years of "saving up" for the big move; eventually arriving here without any personal contacts in the design industry and an educational resume that makes you look less seasoned than the hip design students who spent the last 4 years studying right here in the middle of all the trends. Also competing for design jobs are all of those Europeans and Asians, highly trained, who also want to move here and have design careers in New York. They will also be your competition, not just the New York students. Give yourself every advantage that you can, and that includes the right school.

Many companies who have their corporate headquarters elsewhere will keep their design departments located in New York. They've found they just can't lure the design talent away from New York. This is for all of the reasons above and more. If you are really serious about design, I just don't see how there can be any debate.

You would start by putting together a portfolio, which will be a requirement for being considered for acceptance at the good art schools.

For other fields like business or law or medicine, attend school in the midwest if you like. I don't pretend to know much about those fields and it probably doesn't matter geographically. Design is different.

In NY the best way to get through school is not a part time retail job where pay is low and hours will conflict with classes...instead, many poeple find being affiliated with a catering agency is the best way. Hours are very flexible, often at night, and you can get 16-25 dollars an hour, more if you know how to mix drinks. You make your schedule day to day. My next door neighbor is in his first year of graduate school, made possible because he gets $22 an hour working gigs like Cipriani on weekends and some nights. He meets lots of interesting people and can support himself when combined with a few loans.
Modeling is just not realistic for most, I'm afraid. I have contact with a lot of models because they come to my studio to have me retouch their photos. They complain about spending most of their time going to casting calls all day, and guess what many of them do to actually pay the bills...catering or bartending!;)

I wish you the best of luck, and anyone else who wants to move here. For me, once I settled on being an artist, I moved my butt here and never looked back.

MidtownGuy
February 25th, 2008, 06:17 PM
I just wanted to clarify- I'm not sayng anything bad against schools like RISD or Savannah, just talking about the easiest way to get esablished here, in NY.:)

The Benniest
February 25th, 2008, 07:11 PM
MidtownGuy, I very much appreciated your post. Thanks a lot.

I took a look at some schools that you mentioned in your post, including F.I.T. and Parson's. Unfortunantly, the majors of Photography and Graphic Design are closed for Fall 2008, which is exactly what I need. :confused:

Are there any other universities/colleges IN New York that are good design/photography schools? Some of the schools I've already looked into include New York University and the New York Institute of Photography. I was looking at the requirements (http://collegesearch.collegeboard.com/search/CollegeDetail.jsp?collegeId=3186&profileId=1) for NYU and they seem out of the question for me ... unfortunately. It'd be really nice to go to that school. As asked before in this thread, has anyone ever heard anything about the Institute of Photography?

Thanks again,
Ben

BrooklynRider
February 25th, 2008, 11:19 PM
Great post MidtownGuy.

Pratt is a respected design school.

The Benniest
February 25th, 2008, 11:20 PM
I had a suggestion brought up tonight while talking with my mom. I've explained this to MidtownGuy, that my grades in high school are not the absolute "best" and my GPA is looking the same as the grades. I'm quite dissapointed at this and would really like to get it UP before applying to any New York schools. This being, because I do not want to get denied at schools like F.I.T. or Parson's. Or even NYU if I do get the requirements!

If I were to go to a community college here for 1 year and try very hard to get up my GPA and start to create a nice, balanced portfolio, would I still have a good chance in New York? Like I said, I don't necessarily want to apply to a New York design/art school with the GPA I have now. I do not think I would have a very good chance of getting in.

Lemme know,
Ben

adchick82
February 26th, 2008, 12:27 PM
Benniest - I can't speak to whether you will be able to get into the design schools as a transfer student, but I can speak to the mechanics of how you apply as a transfer student.

At most colleges/universities, you are required to apply as a transfer student if you've obtained a certain number (typically 24-30) of credit hours at a college/university/community college. At that point, your high school GPA won't be what they look at - the biggest impact it would have is that they'll just verify that you actually graduated.

So, if Midtown Guy can vouch for the potential ramifications of applying as a transfer student (and it wouldn't be a huge problem/disadvantage), then doing a year at a community college could be the perfect solution for you, both in terms of putting together a better academic package and being able to save money.

Of course, they might put far more credence in your portfolio than in your GPA, but I was an advertising major at a public university in Texas, so I'm not much help on that front ;)

718Bound
February 26th, 2008, 01:43 PM
If I were to go to a community college here for 1 year and try very hard to get up my GPA and start to create a nice, balanced portfolio, would I still have a good chance in New York? Like I said, I don't necessarily want to apply to a New York design/art school with the GPA I have now. I do not think I would have a very good chance of getting in.

Lemme know,
Ben

Ben- Why not go go to a community college for two years and get your associates and then apply to a four year school? That way you have time to work on your grades and save ALOT of money.

718Bound
February 26th, 2008, 01:49 PM
Ben, another thought... I don't know where you plan on attending community college, but instead of going to community to prepare for a school later in New York why no just attend a CUNY community college? Think of it this way if you attend community college in your home state of Iowa it might give you something to shoot for (NYC). Or you might be miserable thinking "I cannot wait to get to NY" affecting your mindset and mood in turn affecting your grades. Why not study in a place you want to be... It may make you happier and affect your grades!

85forever
February 26th, 2008, 06:17 PM
I'm lucky i found this page while it was still fresh.
Just a 'lil intro about myself. Im from Sydney, Australia. 22 years old. I've been really keen on moving outta Oz for a long time and have always have a fascination about NY.
So here's my situation I'm hoping some of you guys can help me out on a little...
I've completed a Bachelors Graphic Design University degree and am currently working as a webdeveloper/ web content administrator - more on the IT side than design but I enjoy both and am good at both. I am also about to launch a small indie t-shirt label (just something I started building during Uni and finally have some money to play with).
But, NY is where I want to be and where I really want things to happen for me and I’m trying to figure out how to go about this. I’m glad I came across the posts about NY design colleges/universities by Midtown and others. I’m just wondering if it’s possible for me to do a Masters or some kind of extra study in one of the NY schools you guys have mentioned?
I know an Aus Citizen can visit the US with a 3 month Visa. But I’d like to study for longer as I know a Masters may take more than 6 months. Does anyone know if there are any exemptions for someone looking to do extended studies more than 3 months? It’s through the studying that I am really hoping to land a job and maybe be allowed to work and live in NY – and hopefully continue my little clothing label on the side i know NY is agreat place to play with small hobbies..


That’s my plan, please don’t hesitate to put it to me straight- whether im dreaming or the idea sucks, or if its do-able.. as long as its constructive.

Thanks.

The Benniest
February 26th, 2008, 06:43 PM
adchick82, thanks for your reply on transfer students. I'm sure that will help tons if I do decide to go to school here for a year and then transfer to a design school in NY. :)

Ben- Why not go go to a community college for two years and get your associates and then apply to a four year school? That way you have time to work on your grades and save ALOT of money.
This is yet another possibility. There are so many possibilities right now for a person my age wanting to move to New York, who, in about 5 months will be in college/university.

My biggest concern that I've mentioned a lot in this thread is money. And, like you said, going to college at a 2-year school here in Iowa would give me a chance to build quite a bit of money.

Ben, another thought... I don't know where you plan on attending community college, but instead of going to community to prepare for a school later in New York why no just attend a CUNY community college? Think of it this way if you attend community college in your home state of Iowa it might give you something to shoot for (NYC). Or you might be miserable thinking "I cannot wait to get to NY" affecting your mindset and mood in turn affecting your grades. Why not study in a place you want to be... It may make you happier and affect your grades!
718Bound, you have a major point here about grades and what not. To answer your first question, if I do happen to go to community college here, it would be at DMACC (http://www.dmacc.cc.ia.us/) (Des Moines Area Community College), in Des Moines.

I was introduced to CUNY by Punzie, in a conversation I had with her, and since then, have not looked anything up on the university. I took a look this afternoon after school and had no idea that CUNY were in boroughs like Brooklyn and Manhattan, which I was very impressed with. I'm going to be looking at, requesting information from, and researching CUNY tonight, seeing that this, like DMACC, could be a very serious consideration.

Thank you for reply 7128Bound,
Ben

The Benniest
February 26th, 2008, 10:19 PM
As BrooklynRider suggested in this thread to a question of mine, that if my heart is really set on living in Manhattan, I should look into Upper Manhattan.

While looking at NYCDwellers tonight, I found a really affordable, nice apartment in Harlem. Now, my question is, and I hope I don't make anyone mad, but is Harlem a safe community/neighborhood? Also, being the n00b that I am, I had no idea what Harlem and Morningside Heights were as close as they are to Central Park, which tells someone like me that it's not far at all from midtown, depending on how you get there. :p

To give you an example of what the price ranges (per month) were that I observed are: $1,200, $1,150, and $1,195. Very affordable and perfect the income that a college student will be bringing in. 2/3 prices I listed are in Morningside Heights, and the other is in Harlem. However, I find NYCDwellers quite difficult to browse for apartments on, because I'll write down the listing code, go back to look at it again, and it will say that that listing code doesn't match anything they have. :( I think this might be the cutting off point for that site. Anyone have any other good "apartment-searching" websites? Any help would be appreciated.

So...going back to the original question about Harlem and it being safe or not. Is it?

Thanks for any replies!
Ben

The Benniest
February 27th, 2008, 12:19 AM
If I may ask, how often does something like THIS (http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y290/benthal/b6e28d86.jpg) happen? This is a beautiful apartment and the costs of $1,550/month look very cheap. I'd move there in a heartbeat! I've attached bigger versions of all of the pictures below.

:rolleyes:

nyc_obsessed
February 27th, 2008, 09:17 PM
However, I find NYCDwellers quite difficult to browse for apartments on, because I'll write down the listing code, go back to look at it again, and it will say that that listing code doesn't match anything they have. :( I think this might be the cutting off point for that site. Anyone have any other good "apartment-searching" websites? Any help would be appreciated.

So...going back to the original question about Harlem and it being safe or not. Is it?



Well from what i've read and heard from many sites, Harlem is considerably safer than it used to be, there are still rough areas, but over all it is much safer. That apartment looked awesome! need a roommate? i'm moving there hopefully by the end of summer :)

I have been searching newyork.craigslist.org, villagevoice.com, newyorktimes.com and not sure how reliable this site is, but ny.oodle.com, I search them daily. Pretty easy to use, I agree NYCDwellers is difficult to use, i'm not a fan.

Hope this helped?;)

The Benniest
February 27th, 2008, 11:12 PM
Well from what i've read and heard from many sites, Harlem is considerably safer than it used to be, there are still rough areas, but over all it is much safer. That apartment looked awesome! need a roommate? i'm moving there hopefully by the end of summer :)

I have been searching newyork.craigslist.org, villagevoice.com, newyorktimes.com and not sure how reliable this site is, but ny.oodle.com, I search them daily. Pretty easy to use, I agree NYCDwellers is difficult to use, i'm not a fan.

Hope this helped?;)
Hi nyc_obsessed. Yes, your post helped some. :) Just after posting my many posts (:p), I searched Harlem on Wikipedia and read about the CRIME RATE (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harlem#Crime) and how it's dropped quite dramatically through the recent years.

About a roommate for the apartment I linked too, I think that may come as a problem, seeing that the apartment is 1 bedroom. If it wasn't 1 bedroom and was that cheap still, I'd probably consider it. :)

Thanks for the links. I'll take a look at them.
Ben

Schadenfrau
February 28th, 2008, 10:39 AM
Honestly, you'd do better to spend more time looking for an apartment you can afford and less time thinking about crime rates.

kliq6
February 28th, 2008, 11:40 AM
Great post MidtownGuy.

Pratt is a respected design school.

Midtown, just curious where did you move to NY from?

The Benniest
February 28th, 2008, 10:21 PM
I can definitely relate to this concern. There are plenty of crabby home owners who treat free boarders like indentured servants. But there are also laid back home owners who give free boarders a reasonable number assignments and let them set their own schedules.

Ben is most worried about money and a place to live when he first arrives here; it follows that he should seriously consider finding an easygoing homeowner to work for on a monthly basis until he finds a reasonable apartment.
Like Punzie says in the first paragraph about the crabby/nice landlords, with my luck, I would get stuck with the crabby people resulting in me leaving the apartment complex and having no back up plan on living. Another reason why I would like to live in my own apartment, and paying my own expenses.

I am worried about money, being only eighteen and still in high school for a few more months. I like how you said that I should keep the option open to work for a nice homeowner until I find a reasonable, affordable apartment.

Ben

Billy_G
March 1st, 2008, 04:00 PM
Hey so will anyone tell me about the rent on new york? Anybody knows if it is easy to be hired in a job like a waiter or something like that? And please can anyne tell me how can I come to New York and get a green card, without having a relative in America? Thanks everyone!!!

kristynmarie
March 2nd, 2008, 10:39 PM
Hey Everybody!

I've just landed my dream job in NY. It pays 40k. I just bought a new truck so I'm wondering if I'd be better off looking for a new place in NJ vs. Brooklyn due to parking? Also, I'm more concerned about how I'll be getting back n forth to work. If I was to live in Jersey would the train be the best way to go? I know once I'm in the city I can just hop on the subway to get where I'm going. I'm a bit overwhelmed by mass transit in NY & NJ. Any advice is mucho appreciated!

kristynmarie
March 3rd, 2008, 11:10 PM
A Jeep Liberty.....so it's a reasonable size vehicle. Would you recommend the best places to look for apartments in the Brooklyn/Queens area. Thanks again!

718Bound
March 4th, 2008, 11:15 AM
A Jeep Liberty.....
Are you locked into a loan? Why do you feel you need to move with a vehicle? $40k a year... living expenses... Then the cost of the vehicle... Did you ever get a quote to see how much insurance will be? I don't know about Ohio but the research I did insurance is over 3X higher in NYC then it is upstate. That is only basic insurance... I don't even want to think about how much they will charge you if you have a loan and are required to have full insurance... Or if you have the vehicle paid off and decide to go with basic insurance and someone does great damage by hitting it while parked on the street and takes off. Then you have to think about gas being predicated at going to $4 a gallon this summer and driving an SUV... So even if you are planned on driving it to work, public transportation would be so much less compared to gas and parking costs...

If you plan on using public transit anyway to go to work what is the point of having a vehicle? To have it sit on the street while you pay outrageous insurance just to have a car?

There are many reasons to move to NJ, but this is the first time I have heard to have a place to park your Jeep Liberty... You would actually live in NJ, work in NY (be double taxed?) just to pay higher insurance, use public transit anyway just so you can have your Jeep in your driveway???

Don't get me wrong! (Maybe besides you?) I am one of the biggest Jeep lovers on this forum.. I have to fight the urge every day to go down to the dealership and sign papers for a (05+) Grand Cherokee that I love so much... but i don't because I don't need that financial commitment because I too plan on moving soon, the insurance rates would kill me (in NYC) until I get a good job, and why pay for gas and the trouble of driving in NYC when you live in a city with such a fantastic transit system!?!

If you can sell it and use the money to put down on a nice apartment (and have some money saved just in case)... Work and take the subway for awhile, when you are more stable buy that Jeep!:) If you are locked into a loan, it depends how far in you are... I hope you decided to sign for that loan before you decided to move to NYC...

kristynmarie
March 4th, 2008, 04:41 PM
Thanks for the info! Upon further review and the advice of friends that have lived there, I have decided against purchasing my Jeep:( I have wanted one since I was old enough to drive but it's just not reasonable at this point. SIGH! I have also decided against NJ and will more than likely be moving to Brooklyn or Queens. I figure the money I save from not having a car and not having to take the train I can put towards finding a better place. BTW, I'm working at Columbus Circle. I'm not worried so much about commute time as I am about the cost. I am assuming that if I live in Brooklyn I can get to work by taking the subway? How much is that a month? Taking this all in I feel like my head is going to explode! I can't tell ya how much your assistance is appreciated. Cheers!
--Kristyn--

BrooklynRider
March 4th, 2008, 11:47 PM
A monthly unlimited subway metro card for 30 days is $81.

The Benniest
March 5th, 2008, 07:23 PM
I was looking at the article for Midtown on Wikipedia, and I came across a picture of the Peter Cooper Village apartment (http://www.apartmentratings.com/rate/NY-New-York-Peter-Cooper-Village-Apartments.html) complex(es). Anyone know how much these apartments can get up too? I would LIKE to live alone if I move, but knowing my money situation(s) .. I won't be. Soo... average rent price/month for 1-2 people?

I read through some of the reviews on that site, and some are complaining, and some are happy to be living there and think it's great. So I don't know what to think...

Any help is appreciated.
Ben

adchick82
March 6th, 2008, 02:04 PM
I looked into a share situation for a converted 1 bedroom at Stuy Town (same developer/owner/management/whatever), and it was roughly $2,500/month (plus bills) total for both people for one of the renovated (non-rent controlled) apartments... And that was with a lease that had been in effect for 2 years...

Front_Porch
March 7th, 2008, 11:05 AM
According to the Post, one-bedrooms at Stuy Town/Peter Cooper Village are now running about $3,000 a month, with the possibility of one-month free (what we in the biz call an OP bonus) if you sign a lease.

$3,000 for a one-bedroom isn't particularly cheap or expensive -- with ST/PCV you get some nice amenities -- the complex is off to itself in a way that offers some suburban-like green space -- but it's also less centrally located than some other competing apartments.

More here:

http://www.nypost.com/seven/03052008/news/regionalnews/free_rent_for_stuy_towners_100527.htm

ali r.
{downtown broker}

The Benniest
March 7th, 2008, 07:39 PM
Ok thank you (again) Ali. Your help is, as always, appreciated.

The Peter Cooper Village Apts seem like a "been-living-in-ny" for a while kind of idea. For me at least.

*goes back to search for cheap apartments in Manhattan* :(

kristynmarie
March 8th, 2008, 09:17 PM
I'm considering Sunnyside as an alternative to Astoria and Long Island City. Can anyone give me any information on whether or not it's a good area?

As to Ben:
I hear ya! I've been looking and I'm getting more and more nervous about the cost of finding a decent place:(

Best of luck!

The Benniest
March 8th, 2008, 09:25 PM
I'm pretty much set on when I move, I'm going to need a roommate ... without a doubt.

How hard is it to find a roommate? Are there listings in the local newspapers? Where are other places I can find them?

Thank you,
Ben

lewis9234
March 9th, 2008, 04:54 PM
Hi everyone,

I'm from England and i'm about to finish college. I have 4 A levels and will soon be off to uni. I was thinking about going to uni in London, but I would really like to go to uni in NYC and do a course in journalism. Can you tell me what universitys there are in NYC? What are they like? how much they cost? and any other info that I would need.

thankyoux

The Benniest
March 9th, 2008, 05:15 PM
Here is a list of colleges/universities in New York City that I found on Wikipedia.

List of colleges and universities in New York City (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_colleges_and_universities_in_New_York_City )

Almost all of the colleges on that page ^^^ have links to other wiki pages, so you might try furthering your search there. I'm sure that on the individual college pages, there are links to their home page.

Hope this helps,
Ben

NYLivin
March 9th, 2008, 07:59 PM
Hi everyone,

I would love any advice, encouragement or help. My husband and I are trying to find a new place to live (we are currently in student housing, but my husband is graduating). We both work in Midtown West and honestly, for the first couple years, our main concern is the commute and price. Ideally I would prefer to stay in the midtown area as we both are going to be working ridiculous hours. Are we realistic in thinking that we can get a studio/1bedroom for under $2500? What areas would you suggest that would be a short commute, but more bang for the buck than midtown?

Thank you all so much for any guidance!

kristynmarie
March 10th, 2008, 05:06 PM
"seriously consider finding an easygoing homeowner to work for on a monthly basis until he finds a reasonable apartment"

Can anyone give me info on where I can find homeowners that are looking for help in exchange for room and board?

Front_Porch
March 10th, 2008, 06:32 PM
I would try craigslist

ali r.
{downtown broker}

nicolanicola
March 10th, 2008, 07:13 PM
Lewis9234, hi.

I'm no expert but I'm from the UK and also considered university in the US - went through the whole application process, in fact - and as far as I know from my research, it is very VERY expensive. Think tens of thousands of dollars per year.

Also you will probably need to take the US standardised tests (SATs) to get in as A Levels generally aren't considered evidence enough of your ability. It's a long, expensive slog unless you are lucky enough to qualify for some sort of scholarship.

In the end I decided to stick with the relatively cheap and very good UK university system and now, a year after graduating I am finally moving to New York.

You could also look at a course in the UK which includes a year-long placement in the U.S. - I know there's a lot of those.

Either way - good luck!

IhaveNoName
March 11th, 2008, 08:10 AM
I apologize if this has already been addressed, but I am moving from virginia (right outside DC) to park slope in brooklyn. Does anyone have moving company recommendations? What kind of price estimate should I be expecting? Thanks in advance for any info!

The Benniest
March 12th, 2008, 12:08 AM
Not very familiar with moving services/trucks, but one that comes to mind is U-Haul (http://www.uhaul.com/).

Might want to check them out..

wahigringo
March 12th, 2008, 12:44 AM
Hi all,

Not sure if this is the best place for this, as I've lived in NYC for a few years, but the lady friend and I are looking to relocate to Brooklyn and I am looking for some advice on neighborhoods.

Background: We have lived in upper Manhattan since we got here and it's ok, we like the space, but there's not a lot going on. Most of our friends live in Brooklyn and we'd like to be nearer to them as well as more restaurants, nightlife etc.

I would be working near 125th in Harlem so I'd want to be near an express train (A,D,2,3) or maybe the L since that's an easy transfer.

We have been looking at W'burg (out to the Grand Ave stop on the L), South Slope and surrounding areas, or maybe even some places a little further out. Can anyone comment on whether good businesses, bars, etc are springing up further out along these lines, and what the areas are like? We're going out this weekend to look around, but I thought I'd ask too.

We're looking for a large 1BR or a 2BR, trying to keep it under 1800 but could afford more if we wanted to. I'd rather save on rent and pay down some loans if possible. Thanks.

missg
March 12th, 2008, 07:32 PM
hey all! i'm thinking about relocating back to nyc from arizona. i have four young children and i need to be near a good community college to transfer nursing schools as well as public schools for the kiddos(although i'm sure anything back there is better than here!!). i actually have section 8 housing that i would like to transfer as well. does anyone have any ideas on good safe areas that i can start my search? any help would be most greatfully accepted!:D

ashbomb
March 14th, 2008, 11:18 PM
Hello, all, this is my first time posting here. So, here goes.

I live in central Florida, near Tampa, in a quiet suburb. Let me not forget to mention I'm only turning 14 this year. I know, I know, I'm so young, but I have big dreams. So anyway, one side of my best friend's family lives in Long Island. She told me New York is like our downtown (really small) times a million. From that time I was obsessed with New York City, and I've been determined to get there. I haven't been there yet, but I'm begging the 'rents to take me this year, because I've been wanting to go since I was maybe 9 years old.

Anyway, I hope I didn't bore you all to death yet. On to my actual question:
I know I'm only 14, but I really would like to move to New York City after I graduate college, most likely.
So, is there anything I can do now, even though I have another 10 years?
And also, I'm looking at possibly becoming a lawyer when I'm older. Are there good law schools in NYC?

Thank you so much, I hope someone actually read this.

The Benniest
March 15th, 2008, 12:23 AM
Hi ashbomb.

It's good to have big dreams about anything .. including moving to New York City. I don't like there at the moment (I'm 18), but would really like to move either after college or transfer in the middle of college.

I googled for New York Law Schools and easily found THIS. (http://www.top-law-schools.com/new-york-law-schools.html) That should help a lot. If you have any other questions, don't be afraid to ask. ;)

-Ben

ashbomb
March 15th, 2008, 01:32 PM
Thanks so much! Maybe one day I see you up in New York.

I'll just continue to start saving up money and checking out schools.

Schadenfrau
March 15th, 2008, 01:48 PM
You're very pragmatic and articulate for a 14 year-old, Ashbomb.

You might want to consider looking into undergraduate schools in the NYC area- I found that was an ideal way to transition myself into life here. There are many schools outside of the city with good access to public transportation into the area, as well.

I moved here for school, and I think I was a bit better prepared for adult city life because of that. You've got the cushion of dorm life and a meal plan, but you're also able to access city internships to get a foot in the door before you need to be paid for it. You can also gain first-hand knowledge of different neighborhoods, what sort of commutes you'll have, costs, cultures, and simply whether or not NYC is right for you.

Fortunately, you have plenty of time to plan and you've already started early. Keep up the good work.

ashbomb
March 15th, 2008, 02:55 PM
Thank you, I s'pose. I hope that was meant in a good way!

Yeah, I've thought about that. Moving there while I was still in school would at least insure a place for me to stay, which would be really nice. And I could continue to save up money and be able to look around for places in preparation of graduation.
One question though, as I'm not too college-savvy, is an undergraduate school the same/similar to a community college? Like, community college for 2 years, then a university for a second 2?

Schadenfrau
March 15th, 2008, 06:06 PM
I totally meant it in a good way.

Undergraduate school is just a regular college- a four-year school to get your bachelor's degree. As schools in the area are mostly pretty competitive, I'd advise moving here for all four years, not counting on transfer credits. I know that others will disagree, but it's not as common in New York for people to attend community college and transfer for the last two years as it is in other places.

And it's good that you're thinking about saving money, but you should remember that there are plenty of grants and loans out there. Don't judge a college based solely on price- think about where you really want to go.

ashbomb
March 15th, 2008, 09:55 PM
Hahaha, okay, thanks.

Oh, I guess community colleges are a pretty big thing here. I actually have a prepaid college fund, I'm not sure all what schools it applies to, but I know there's a lot of them, all over the country. And it is either 4 years, or 2 and 2. I meant saving money for getting a place and stuff, and since I know it's pretty expensive up there.
Thanks for you help though. (: It's all pretty much undecided right around now- I'm not even positive on what high school I'm going to, let alone college, so I still have plenty of time. Thank you guys so much!

Hawkeye
March 16th, 2008, 09:06 PM
This is truly a fantastic resource for anyone moving or considering moving to New York so thank you to everyone who has taken the time to contribute to this thread. I have spent several hours reading the majority of the posts which have given a great insight into many aspects of living in 'the greatest city in the world'.

My wife and I spent part of our honeymoon in New York last summer and I can honestly say that no city anywhere has had the same effect on me. The pull to return and experience living in the city on a full time basis has been incredible and the intense feeling of wanting to make that life changing decision just won't go away. We are planning a visit from Edinburgh, Scotland again in July of this year and would like to get a real feel for everyday life as well as further enjoy some of the more 'touristy' things. In essence we are looking to make it a bit of a fact finding trip as well as a holiday. What things would New Yorker's advise ?

At the moment our timeframe for a possible move is Summer 09 so is at an early stage ! We are in a fortunate position job wise as my wife works for Citibank and will get a transfer and I work from home (as well as looking after our young child). Am I right in thinking we will be fine for visa's given she will be employed by a US company ? Our research into neighborhoods has really only just begun but our preferred option is certainly to live in Manhattan though I fully appreciate this is hardly narrowing things down very much, nevermind the practicalities of cost etc !

One quick question my wife is shouting ! - could any parents out there tell us if it is easy to get reliable, safe sitters to look after kids ?

Thanks again for all the great info on here, any further pointers of things to do (more day to day) when we next visit would be greatly appreciated.

Andy

The Benniest
March 18th, 2008, 10:42 PM
I apologize if this has already been addressed, but I am moving from virginia (right outside DC) to park slope in brooklyn. Does anyone have moving company recommendations? What kind of price estimate should I be expecting? Thanks in advance for any info!
I know this was an old post (^^^), but who knows, they might still be active. :)

While googling a bit tonight, I came across THIS. (http://www.manhattanapts.com/movers.php) Should help a great deal :)

Bill2008
March 20th, 2008, 03:41 PM
Yes, you read it correctly. :o

My income for 2007 was near zero, and for 2008 might be the same, so obviously i fall far short of the 50x income requirement for most apts in Manhattan. However, between my S-corp's 401k and savings, i do have about $300k, and no debt. Will that be enough to sway a Landlord? (i also have a 780 FICO score, if that matters). I don't have a guarantor.

I'm looking for a 200 to 300 s.f. studio anywhere in Manhattan (preferably near a Whole Foods :)), and am looking to spend $2k per month. I'd prefer one of the high-rise type buildings, not one of those old brownstones. I can write a check for any amount to pre-pay X months' worth of rent. Will this work? (i assume i will need to pre-pay a few months rent, since i dont show income, and wont have a job when i move there)

This is my first post here, and i am very excited at the possibility of moving to NYC! (live in Boston now)

ps - one LL i called said "you write a check for 9 months rent up front, and you're in". Is that typical policy?

Front_Porch
March 20th, 2008, 05:25 PM
Hi Bill--
Your lack of income and lack of a guarantor make you an extremely poor risk for a New York City landlord. Retirement assets and a credit score don't make monthly rent payments.

I am sure you can find someone who will rent to you if you pay a year's rent up front, but most landlords won't even do that. I certainly wouldn't rent you my condo. What if you move in for a year with the rent pre-paid, and then refuse to vacate in year two? There's not a judge in the world who will attach your retirement assets, so what recourse does the landlord have? To sue you and get a judgment against your non-existent income?

Your best luck will be to look in Brooklyn or Queens, so you can deal with a smaller landlord. I hate to sound like a downer, but in Manhattan, you'll probably have to pay over the market rate to get someone to take this deal.

My guess is that means it will cost you $2,500 a month for a studio in a high-rise.

ali r.
{downtown broker}

Bill2008
March 20th, 2008, 05:57 PM
Hi Ali - thank you for the reply. I have 100k in cash (the other 200k is in the 401k). It sounds like that doesnt matter though.

Would this scenario work?: I pay 1 year up front *and* give them a 6 month deposit that they permanently hold?

Also, do they look at 1 yr's income or two? The reason i ask is that if (being optimistic here) my business has a good 2008, i might have income in the 50k to 70k range. Would that put me over the top for a Jan 2009 move-in date (when combined with my 100k cash on hand)? Or is that 40x income/rent criterion a hard #?

I guess i'm trying to figure out what (if any) shades of grey there are in these criteria? (I'm 40 yrs old, so i want to avoid asking Dad to be a guarantor).

Thank you for your help!

ps - maybe the Manhattan LL i talked to today was a rare exception when he said: "you write a check for 9 months rent up front, and you're in".

Front_Porch
March 20th, 2008, 07:35 PM
Bill, I totally get where you're coming from, I published a book last year and my schedule Cs were not pretty.

But 40x rent is going to be a hard number with an institution, say a no-fee rental building.

With a small landlord, it's really just a matter of how charming you are. Maybe this Manhattan landlord who will take nine months is the one for you.

But if something breaks, what leverage do you have? Your landlord might be a great guy who fixes things tout suite, but if he's not and doesn't, you've given away the card of withholding rent.

If a tri-state guarantor is at all an option, DO IT. Look at it this way -- it's an uncomfortable parental conversation, but then you're done. You could give your year's worth of rent up front to dear Dad, and then he can dole out your rent month-by-month, and in return for that little bit of embarrassment for everybody, you keep from having six months' worth of assets tied up in an escrow that maybe you can't get back.

ali r.
{downtown broker}

Bill2008
March 20th, 2008, 07:54 PM
Thanks, you've definitely helped me narrow the issues:

- Tri-state guarantor: not an option for me - my parents live in MA

- Huge deposit with small LL: risky, since they can ignore repairs more easily (not to mention the risk of loss of said deposit).

- Large managed "corporate" type building: a 'hard' 40x requirement means that my corp's W2 to myself for 2008 needs to be at least $80k for a $2k place

One final question: will they care that i am self employed, and will they want to see 2007's tax return as well?

Thank you for your help! :)

mrstratton
March 20th, 2008, 10:06 PM
so...i'm planning on moving to New York BY Summer 2009. That gives me 14 months. so...i know i want to save enough for First month's rent, last month's rent, security deposit, broker's fee, and enough to live off of in case i don't get a job as soon as i'd like.

so...anybody have any suggestions as to how much that might be? and a good neighborhood near enough to take the subway but not too close to be too expensive.

keep in mind, i'm from texas, and am used to paying between $450-$550/month for rent, so i also need to know a good estimate on what that kind of rent (see above) might actually be.

THANKS TO EVERYONE!!

NYLivin
March 20th, 2008, 11:14 PM
Okay so at least I don't think they were asked in this forum (it took three evenings, but I finally got through this whole thread. Great information!).

Quick scenario. I am not new to NY but still think of myself as new since I have only been here 7 months. I have two options for moving dates, the third week of May or the second week of August. My husband starts his job in September and we do have the letter stating his employment offer etc. I am currently working in Hells Kitchen area while Husband will be working near Times Square.

If anyone has some time I would appreciate any input on these three questions.

1) Would it make a difference if we moved in May or in August? I have one broker telling me that May is the heavy month for moving, so I may want to wait till August and I have another broker stating August is a worst time to find housing. I don't know who to believe (though my gut says August may be harder with the influx of students).

2) If we move in May, are we going to have a hard time qualifying for a place since my husband's job does not start till September? While I make a decent salary, I certainly don't make enough to equal the 40x rent. This concern is making me think moving in August may be a safer bet.

3) We have pretty much decided that we want to stay near the Hells Kitchen area since my husband will be working awful hours and I would rather him spend an extra hour with me than on the subway commuting. That being said, I must admit I am drawn to these "luxury" apartments I keep reading about in LIC. The idea of getting a really nice one bedroom apartment is a little alluring. This weekend we are going to go check it out, but anything I should be thinking about in regards to LIC? Any good or bad thoughts?

Thank you all again!

Schadenfrau
March 21st, 2008, 12:06 AM
"The reason i ask is that if (being optimistic here) my business has a good 2008, i might have income in the 50k to 70k range."

If you're being truly realistic, you'll start looking beyond the 96th Street line in Manhattan with that sort of income. Well beyond.

Front_Porch
March 21st, 2008, 02:47 PM
schade: Remember this is a freelancer who asked the question.

A business income of $50 to $70K on the tax returns might well actually be twice that, depending on what deductions and expenses look like, and that's a story you can talk a landlord through.

Bill 2008: it's possible that they might want to see some old tax returns.

mrstratton: Manhattan one-bedrooms are running around $3K right now, you can certainly find things for $2,500 that are decent.

NYLiv: the vacancy rates probably differ by neighborhood from Hell's Kitchen to LIC, so pick your target neighborhood and then re-ask the question.

Get your husband's employer to generate a letter on company letterhead stating that he is starting a position {TITLE} at a salary of {$XXK} on {STARTING DATE}.

ali r.
{downtown broker}

ta3formforged
March 22nd, 2008, 07:15 PM
I am wondering how much of a rent increase to expect when my lease expires 8/31. I am in the first year of my lease in a pre-war, 6 story building with laundry and elevator but no doorman. The 1 bedroom apartment was renovated right before I moved in so it's in great shape. I am currently paying $2,875, and it's in the UES. I always pay my rent in full on time.

Obviously it's not rent controlled since I haven't lived here since 1970 and it's not rent stabilized because the rent is too high, right? I can't find any information out on the web on rent increases for those apartments not subject to rent control or stabilization...any ideas on the rent increase I can expect?

Thanks!

Bill2008
March 24th, 2008, 01:01 PM
"The reason i ask is that if (being optimistic here) my business has a good 2008, i might have income in the 50k to 70k range." If you're being truly realistic, you'll start looking beyond the 96th Street line in Manhattan with that sort of income. Well beyond.

Nah...not necessary. I can live anywhere (geographically) in Manhattan that i want, because many places will take a 12 month up-front payment. But it will be much harder for the managed/"corporate" type buildings, who it sounds like want to see those tax returns.

The real issue, per Ali's advice, is whether i want to take the risk of putting down such a large deposit e.g. $24k for a $2k/mo place (i can live in as small as 250 sq ft). Also as she mentioned, as a self-employed person, incomes are really higher than what a tax return shows, so i can walk a LL through that.

meakin88
March 28th, 2008, 09:24 AM
hi everyone, im moving to New York at some point this year ( when ive saved the money)

im moving from London, England and im 19 years old, im an american citizen so thats all sorted.


i was just wondering about the night life, being a brit i love to drink and go clubbing, but i will i have to give all this up when i move to NYC?

and would a english fake id work?

flyingwaitress
March 29th, 2008, 10:46 AM
Hello,

I am a twenty-something flight attendant living in Atlanta, but I have recently been relocated to New York. Instead of commuting to work 3-4 times a month from ATL, I have chosen to make it easier on myself and move to NY.

I have been doing some research but I am still unclear on the best neighborhoods that are closest to either JFK or LaGuardia. I have heard that most flight attendants live in Kew Gardens, but I feel that I am severely limiting myself if I only consider one neighborhood. Kew Gardens is okay-- relatively safe and there is easy access to both airports--but is it a bit on the expensive side for my salary. I do intend to have "roommates"; I would like to use a second bedroom as a crash pad for other commuting flight attendants; however, I would like to find something that I can afford on my own if that plan should ever fall through.

Can anyone recommend any other neighborhoods that might be convenient and affordable for a flight attendant? I am also looking at Flushing, Richmond Hill, and Jamaica...can someone please tell me a little about those as well?

And, if I wanted to rent out my second bedroom but remain the sole renter on the lease, how should I explain that to my landlord? Should I even mention it?

Thanks so much!!

Jonnie

ta3formforged
March 31st, 2008, 07:43 PM
I am wondering how much of a rent increase to expect when my lease expires 8/31. I am in the first year of my lease in a pre-war, 6 story building with laundry and elevator but no doorman. The 1 bedroom apartment was renovated right before I moved in so it's in great shape. I am currently paying $2,875, and it's in the UES. I always pay my rent in full on time.

Obviously it's not rent controlled since I haven't lived here since 1970 and it's not rent stabilized because the rent is too high, right? I can't find any information out on the web on rent increases for those apartments not subject to rent control or stabilization...any ideas on the rent increase I can expect?

Thanks!


Anyone? This question (unlike others near this one) has NOT been asked in this forum before, and I cannot find any answers for apartments NOT stabilized or controlled.

lofter1
March 31st, 2008, 09:27 PM
The simple fact that your rent is over $2,000 / month does NOT mean that the apartment is NOT Rent Stabilized. If it is then the annual increase is regulated. Do not depend upon the word of either your landlord or RE agent regarding the status of the apartment. Would you believe that Landlords in NYC have actually been known to lie about the allowable rent for an apartment? Amazing but true.

Call DHCR and talk to someone there. You have nothing to lose by inquiring about the status of the apartment. Note that individual apartments are Stabilized, not entire buildings.

DHCR - Rent Administration (http://www.dhcr.state.ny.us/ora/ora.htm)

Contact Info (http://www.dhcr.state.ny.us/general/contact.htm#ora)

ta3formforged
April 1st, 2008, 07:19 AM
Thank you for the reply--what if it is not stabilized? What can I expect to see for a rent increase?

Optimus Prime
April 1st, 2008, 11:11 AM
Thank you for the reply--what if it is not stabilized? What can I expect to see for a rent increase?

If it isn't stabilized you can probably expect they will charge you a market rate. Whatever the market rent is for a 1BR in a small, prewar, non-doorman, laundry, elevator building in your particular neighborhood (more specific than UES, because there's a big difference between, say, 90th and York and 77th and Madison). Check a few sites and see what it would take to rent something similar to your apartment, and that is a good estimate.

Another way to estimate would be a 3-5% increase. So for example at 4% you're looking at 2990.

Both of these methods are just estimates, ultimately your landlord is the only one who knows what the increase will be (and they probably don't even know yet themselves).

Optimus Prime
April 1st, 2008, 11:15 AM
and would a english fake id work?

Probably not. NY bars are pretty good about checking IDs. There's simply too much at stake for them not to be.

Also, going out in this city is obviously ridiculously expensive, so if money is an issue for you, you will want to be careful about that.

lofter1
April 1st, 2008, 12:10 PM
Pack a flask and order a Coke :cool:

ionutz
April 1st, 2008, 01:56 PM
This may sound stupid but what can i doo with 780.000 $?I'm planning to move there and this is all the money i have.This amount of money i have to start from scrach.(i'm interested in what kind of appartment can i buy or how long can i live without having a job with this amount of money-this is in case i'm having trouble finding one )

Optimus Prime
April 1st, 2008, 03:11 PM
You have 780 dollars? Or 780,000 dollars?

ionutz
April 1st, 2008, 03:19 PM
780 000 $. I don't have them in my hand but if i can sell everything i have (i mean my car and my house) this is the minimum amount of money i can get.

philvia
April 1st, 2008, 03:25 PM
This may sound stupid but what can i doo with 780.000 $?I'm planning to move there and this is all the money i have.This amount of money i have to start from scrach.(i'm interested in what kind of appartment can i buy or how long can i live without having a job with this amount of money-this is in case i'm having trouble finding one )


i have a similar question... if my bf and I make ~200k/year combined, how would our standard of living be? is this considered to be on the low end of the high income scale? or what?

i really have no idea how much people in nyc make so the answer will hopefully help me out a lot

Front_Porch
April 1st, 2008, 03:30 PM
flyingwaitress: Kew Gardens does have some unique location advantages to the airports: that's one reason they call it "Crew Gardens."

You might also want to check out Rego Park as well as the other neighborhoods you named.


Taformforged:

I don't work the UES so I don't have market data for you.

My best guess would be for you to take a look at the Citi Habitats Black and White Report (I don't even know if they still call it that) -- it's their quarterly apartment pricing update, and it should give you some trend numbers.

ali r.
{downtown broker}

Optimus Prime
April 1st, 2008, 03:54 PM
780 000 $. I don't have them in my hand but if i can sell everything i have (i mean my car and my house) this is the minimum amount of money i can get.

Do you own your house and car free and clear or do you have a mortgage or car loan to satisfy? If you have $780,000 cash in hand (or you will when you sell your assets), there is a whole lot you can do as that is a pretty substantial down payment. Even if you only spend half of that (390,000) you could buy something at $1.95 million (assuming 20% down). Though assuming you don't have a job right away you may need to increase the amount down to satisfy your mortgage broker.


i have a similar question... if my bf and I make ~200k/year combined, how would our standard of living be? is this considered to be on the low end of the high income scale? or what?

i really have no idea how much people in nyc make so the answer will hopefully help me out a lot

My fiancee and I are roughly in this boat, so I can tell you that your standard of living would be very comfortable but not luxurious. Low end of the high income scale is probably pretty accurate. A more detailed answer would depend on what you want to do (rent vs. buy, try to save money, pay debts, etc), but that's a basic answer.

ionutz
April 1st, 2008, 04:11 PM
I have my car and my house free and clear of any mortgage.I don't have any loans or bank loans.I had some actions and i selled them.With the money i earned i managed to invest and to make a house and buy a car.I always dream moving to New York but i was afraid.I was afraid that i might get there, having trouble finding a job,then lose all my money and getting into all sorts of problems.My life here is pretty good(from a scale of 1 to 10 i say 6 or 7) i was afraid not getting any worse becuse i moved there...so i was wondering now if i sell my house and my car...how far can i get with that money.I mean do i have a chance there ?

ionutz
April 1st, 2008, 04:13 PM
I forgot to tell you that i live in Romania and The United States is a new world for me.

lofter1
April 1st, 2008, 05:39 PM
Why not use a few thousands from your fund ^ and take a trip to NYC to see if it matches up to your fantasy of what it seems to be?

ionutz
April 2nd, 2008, 02:14 AM
cause i don't have that money yet.That is all the money i can get if i sell all i have.And if i start selling there will be no chance of turning back :p.I tryed to take a trip there but i need to save some money in order to do that and meanwhile i have to live too.
I found this forum and i was courious what can i do with that amount of money.I needed an advice and who else can i ask here? And since i don't know enyone in the USA this was the optimum solution for now. (by the way please excuse my english.i don't know for sure if i do mistakes or not :D)

Optimus Prime
April 2nd, 2008, 08:35 AM
What sort of job would you be qualified for?

ionutz
April 2nd, 2008, 02:07 PM
computers and telecomunications

baby_princess01
April 3rd, 2008, 09:13 PM
Hi Everyone,

I'm Looking To Move To Nyc Soon And I Wanted To Know Which Neighbourhoods Close To Manhattan Are Affordable And Safe. Here Is What I'm Looking For :

-safe Neighbourhood
-10-30 Min From Manhattan Via Bus Or Subway
-affordable (i.e. Max $500)

I've Already Seen That Astoria, Queens Is A Good Spot, So What Other Locations Do You Think Fit This Criteria??thank You....all Answers Are Greatly Appreciated!!

The Benniest
April 3rd, 2008, 09:15 PM
Your maximum amount per month is $500 ?!

ta3formforged
April 4th, 2008, 12:18 AM
Seriously?! You could maybe find a place in the shadiest part of the Bronx or Harlem with 3 roommates for $500...I would advise you to wait to move to New York until you can afford more rent. New York isn't a place for the faint of heart OR wallet...



Hi Everyone,

I'm Looking To Move To Nyc Soon And I Wanted To Know Which Neighbourhoods Close To Manhattan Are Affordable And Safe. Here Is What I'm Looking For :

-safe Neighbourhood
-10-30 Min From Manhattan Via Bus Or Subway
-affordable (i.e. Max $500)

I've Already Seen That Astoria, Queens Is A Good Spot, So What Other Locations Do You Think Fit This Criteria??thank You....all Answers Are Greatly Appreciated!!

baby_princess01
April 6th, 2008, 02:34 PM
Sorry maybe I didn't clarify,

I'm looking to rent a room or a share!! Sorry I didn't put that before!!

adchick82
April 7th, 2008, 06:34 PM
Honestly? With the criteria you're mentioning, $500 wouldn't get you squat. Sharing a studio with 2-3 other people might make it possible, but you could run into a lot of legal issues re: occupancy. Up your budget, or wait until you can to move. I have a friend living at 110th and Central Park North and paying $900 for his share of a 3-bedroom. $500 is not remotely realistic.

helification
April 9th, 2008, 03:49 PM
Hello,

I am an Irish girl hoping to live in New York for three months this Summer. I was just wondering if anyone has any advice on where I can find an apartment in Manhattan to rent for just three months and how much I should expect to pay. Any help would be very much appreciated. Thanks very much

The Benniest
April 9th, 2008, 06:12 PM
Craig's List (http://newyork.craigslist.org/) is the god of temporary and rent apartments for Manhattan. (in my opinion).

Take a look there for apartments to rent.

(By the way .. there was no sense posting what you posted above twice..)

The Benniest
April 19th, 2008, 11:59 PM
Simple question...

http://newyork.craigslist.org/mnh/nfb/626672274.html

Does that look fake to anyone? :p I'm getting a feeling that it is, but I continue to tell myself it isn't. Haha! The location, the looks and the price are perfect. I read somewhere on here that said: "If it looks to good to be true ... it probably is."

Is that what this is? Thanks,
Ben

Front_Porch
April 21st, 2008, 10:42 AM
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=3281&page=6

The thread mentions that the going rental rate is 3x what you've mentioned for a studio. Tread carefully.

ali r.
{downtown broker}

The Benniest
April 21st, 2008, 10:56 AM
Ok. Thank you Ali. I can see now, after reading the WNY thread a bit and looking at the main site for the Archstone Clinton (http://www.archstoneapartments.com/Apartments/New_York/New_York_City/Archstone_Clinton/default.htm), the the starting amount for a studio apartment is going to be well into the $2,000's.

That makes me sad. :( :p

Biff McCool
April 22nd, 2008, 09:17 AM
Hello, I'm interested in moving into Manhattan and have heard it is almost impossible to get a decent place there? Hopefully this isn't true. Also, as a budding Computer Games Designer, are there any companies in the big city? thanks...:D

The Benniest
April 22nd, 2008, 09:28 AM
Not sure who told you it's nearly impossible to get an apartment in Manhattan/NYC, but that's not true at all. It just takes a little bit of searching and time to find a nice, cheap, place.

I would highly advise you looking at Craig's List for New York and look at the Room & Shares page, and the No-Fee apartments. There are usually nice apartments for a reasonable price there and all of the pages (apartments, job, etc.) are updated daily. However, you have to be careful when looking at Craig's List for apartments because some of the places listed are not legit like the studio apartment from Archstone that Front_Porch and I discussed above.

Hope this helps,
Ben

Biff McCool
April 22nd, 2008, 01:32 PM
Thanks mate,
So, approximately (you've probably heard this many times) but how much do you need to earn a year to live comfortably a.k.a go out whenever i want, things like that?
does anybody have any information on how long it takes to recieve a green card? where is a nice affordable neighbourhood to live?
Also, anybody know of any big Games Developing companies with offices in the big apple?
thanks....:)

adchick82
April 22nd, 2008, 03:17 PM
To be able to go out whenever you want and live in a good neighborhood, you'd be better off trying to marry rich.

I make what I think of as a great salary ($65K/year) for my age (25) and industry (advertising), and I'm still on a strict budget. I don't sit home every night eating ramen noodles, and I live in a great neighborhood (albeit in a very tiny bedroom with two roommates), but I definitely can't decide on a whim to go out to dinner or out drinking any old night of the week.

Biff McCool
April 23rd, 2008, 06:36 AM
Hello again,

Where is a nice neighbourhood to live in? I mean a nice vibrant place with different cultures..? Also, approximately how much would a one bedroom, medium size apartment cost? Are jobs easy to get in the city?

The Benniest
April 23rd, 2008, 08:06 AM
I think just about every neighborhood in Manhattan is going to be a nice, cultural place, but it's also going to be expensive. I'm sure that even for a studio apartment, your going to be well into the $1,000's (at least from what I've seen). One bedrooms are, like studios, going to be well into the $1,000's.

As I said before, take a look at Craig's List (http://www.nycvisit.com/content/index.cfm?pagePkey=281#JFK) for jobs in NYC. They update the lists daily.

Also, don't forget about boroughs like Brooklyn or Queens. They're certainly not Manhattan, but they are still really nice boroughs. I stayed in downtown Brooklyn when I visited and loved it. The subway goes everywhere!

Schadenfrau
April 23rd, 2008, 11:15 AM
I'd actually say that 1-bedrooms in most areas of Manhattan are 2K or over.

Biff McCool
April 23rd, 2008, 01:00 PM
Hello All,
Woah, $2,000 a month? That's crazy, I'm 16 at the moment and want to continue my education here until my early 20's then move to NYC...How long does it take to get a Green Card/Visa? :confused::D

Biff McCool
April 23rd, 2008, 02:00 PM
Hello,
Is buying a 1 bedroomed studio expensive in Harlem? Also, is it expensive to buy a place in the Bronx? :)

Schadenfrau
April 23rd, 2008, 02:16 PM
That depends on what you consider to be expensive.

Seriously, stop worrying about this at the age of 16. Get an education first and then think about it.

Biff McCool
April 23rd, 2008, 02:34 PM
Yeah, I suppose your right, it's just the idea of living in NYC seems so refreshing and exciting compared to the dull North West of England.
By the way, what's the situation in acquiring a Green Card/Visa? How Long does it take and is it easy to get one?
Thanks...:D

brianac
April 23rd, 2008, 03:46 PM
Hello All,
Woah, $2,000 a month? That's crazy, I'm 16 at the moment and want to continue my education here until my early 20's then move to NYC...How long does it take to get a Green Card/Visa? :confused::D

This statement makes the majority of your questions pointless at the moment.

In 3 or 4 years time the answers would be completely different.

Green Card read HERE (http://www.usafis.org/)

The Benniest
April 23rd, 2008, 04:31 PM
That depends on what you consider to be expensive.

Seriously, stop worrying about this at the age of 16. Get an education first and then think about it.
I agree about what Schadenfrau is saying about you being 16. I'm 18 right now and just about to finish up high school, and started coming here at 16-17 years old. I was told the exact same thing.

Get an education. Then think about. You must be a sophomore in high school, right?

brianac
April 23rd, 2008, 04:37 PM
Get an education. Then think about. You must be a sophomore in high school, right?

They don't have sophomore's in the North West of England.

The Benniest
April 23rd, 2008, 04:46 PM
OH! I forgot Biff McCool was from England.

Sorry... :o

brianac
April 24th, 2008, 05:09 AM
How to Prepare for an Apartment Search

Published: April 20, 2008

FINDING the right apartment in New York City (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/classifieds/realestate/locations/newyork/newyorkcity/manhattan/?inline=nyt-geo) is a challenge for anyone, but for recent graduates who are first-time renters, meeting the landlord’s financial requirements and coming up with enough cash to get in the door can be even more daunting.

This is documentation that many landlords want to see from prospective tenants and their guarantors:

A letter from an employer stating position, salary, length of employment or anticipated start date.

Pay stubs if already working.

Tax returns for at least two years.

Recent bank statements.

Proof of other income, like revenue from stocks, securities, real estate or trust funds.

Contact information for previous landlords.

Personal reference letters.

Business reference letters.

An estimate of the money that renters might need to have on hand to get a $2,000 apartment (* = not always required):

Nonrefundable application fee — $25 to $150

First month’s rent — $2,000

Last month’s rent* — $2,000

Security deposit — $2,000

Broker’s fee (15 percent of the annual rent)* — $3,600

TOTAL — $4,025 to $9,750

RELATED ARTICLE

FINDING (http://www.nytimes.com/2008/04/20/realestate/20COV.html?ref=realestate) YOUR FIRST APARTMENT



Copyright 2008 (http://www.nytimes.com/ref/membercenter/help/copyright.html) The New York Times Company (http://www.nytco.com/)

The Benniest
April 24th, 2008, 06:30 AM
Thank you Brian! Wonderful information here!

:D

(and congrats on becoming a forum vet ;))

The Benniest
April 24th, 2008, 10:09 AM
As I was reading through Brian's post, I saw that the Broker's fee is quite high ($3,000+), and was wondering if it is common to find no-fee apartments.

I've seen them on Craig's List but would like some other opinions. thanks,
ben

wereleopard
April 24th, 2008, 12:18 PM
I will be moving to NYC to start graduate school in August. Everything I have seen on Craigslist (even in shares) and on broker sites wants me to have a job and income verification, but I do not plan to have a job, and will be paying for my apartment with my student loans. I also won't have a guarantor, as my family is all in Ohio. I'll have somewhere between $3k and $8k saved up by the time I move, but I know that's really only going to be first, last and deposit, not any extra months or anything.

Has anyone had any luck getting landlords to rent to students? I don't need much space, I don't mind having a roommate, and I don't mind living in Brooklyn or Queens or Jersey, just as long as I'm within 45 minutes or so of Penn Station. The other interesting twist here is that I have 2 cats who have to move with me, making it even harder to find a place. I would prefer to keep my spending around 1000-1500 a month.

Any recommendations?

adchick82
April 24th, 2008, 06:06 PM
Do the cats absolutely have to come with you? If not, look into university housing for grad students through your school - might be your best bet, to be honest.

As far as the income verification even for a roommate/shared situation - proof of your loan amounts ought to suffice as income. However, if you're going into a roommate/shared situation, you are looking waaaaaaaaaaaaaaay too early for August - and you should keep in mind that those apartments will go FAST. Whomever is posting the ad will most likely want to meet you in person within a day or two of making the post, and want a commitment to move in just as quickly.

The Benniest
April 24th, 2008, 06:54 PM
If you are absolutely set on moving to NYC with a pet, try reading this thread (http://wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=10745) here at WNY. It has some really interesting and REALLY good advice.

Hope it helps!
Ben

wereleopard
April 25th, 2008, 01:09 PM
Do the cats absolutely have to come with you? If not, look into university housing for grad students through your school - might be your best bet, to be honest.

As far as the income verification even for a roommate/shared situation - proof of your loan amounts ought to suffice as income. However, if you're going into a roommate/shared situation, you are looking waaaaaaaaaaaaaaay too early for August - and you should keep in mind that those apartments will go FAST. Whomever is posting the ad will most likely want to meet you in person within a day or two of making the post, and want a commitment to move in just as quickly.

Unfortunately, yeah, the cats have to come. And even if they didn't, FIT doesn't have nearly enough housing for even all their undergrads, I would have had to apply last fall with the continuing students to have a shot at anything owned by the university.

I do have a friend I can stay with outside Trenton, NJ, and the first 2 weeks of class are only 6-9 PM, so I should be able to commute in and apartment hunt during the day and jump on anything that looks good right away. I was just hoping to find something before I moved, so I didn't have to move twice! I don't plan to bring much stuff, so moving in quickly isn't a huge deal. And yeah, I know I'm looking early, but, if I start now I'll have a better idea of what's out there and what places are going for when that perfect one comes open August 1st :)

Thanks for the advice, I didn't think of using my loan letter as "income" but I guess it technically is!

adchick82
April 25th, 2008, 10:10 PM
You'll be fine in that case :) Actually, I might be able to point you toward a vacant room in the place I'm in by then - if your cats kill mice, you'll totally be in (welcome to New York and living in a building next to one that was just gut renovated).

brianac
April 26th, 2008, 05:46 AM
Time Out New York / Issue 656 : Apr 23–29, 2008

Apartments ’08

The place to be

Where to move next? We crunch the numbers—considering culture, character and commute—and spotlight the four hottest ’hoods.

By Scot Meyer

We all know the bubble doesn’t apply to NYC—we are in our own wacked-out world here. It’s still expensive to buy, and rents in central neighborhoods remain higher than should be legal. And yet, because this is New York, there are still pockets where you can find attractive places to plunk down your hard-earned dough, whether because the rents are reasonable (relatively), the vibe is energetic or the future is bright. Here, we laud four of our favorite neighborhoods, each with its own attraction.

HUDSON SQUARE | SUNSET PARK (http://www.timeout.com/newyork/articles/features/28891/2.html) | SOUTH BRONX (http://www.timeout.com/newyork/articles/features/28891/3.html) | BAYSIDE (http://www.timeout.com/newyork/articles/features/28891/4.html)

Hudson Square, Manhattan
http://www.timeout.com/newyork/resizeImage/htdocs/export_images/656/656.x600.ft.hudsonsquare.jpg?width=480
Photographs: Shane Bar-On and Jackie Johnston

No ad for the new developments in Hudson Square is going to brag “Holland Tunnel–adjacent,” but that’s exactly where they are—and that’s okay. Away from the tourist-flocked streets of Soho and the high prices of Tribeca, this former no-man’s-land bounded by Varick, Canal and West Houston Streets is coming into its own as a place to buy. “It’s like Tribeca in the early 2000s,” says Corcoran Group vice president John Gasdaska, who notes that at least five condos have been built in this formerly industrial neighborhood in the past four years, with more coming. In fact, two particular buildings (one of which is the love-it-or-hate-it Philip Johnson–Alan Ritchie project) are going up now on a single block of Renwick Street.

Affordability is relative, but for now the numbers are lower than they are a few blocks south. Condos are selling for about $1,350 per square foot, Gasdaska says—compared with a range of $1,500 to $2,000 for Tribeca or the rest of Soho. What’s more, you’re not as cut off from the world as you think: Don Hill’s (http://www.timeout.com/newyork/bars-clubs/soho/132/don-hills) (a locus of NYC’s rock scene since the music died at CBGB and the Continental) and the Ear Inn (http://www.timeout.com/newyork/bars-clubs/soho/2233/the-ear-inn) (one of the oldest bars in the city) are not the only nightlife in the area anymore. The Jazz Gallery (http://www.timeout.com/newyork/bars-clubs/soho/4456/jazz-gallery) features both established and young musicians, the new restaurant Lomito (http://www.timeout.com/newyork/restaurants/soho/13908/lomito) brings an Italian-Argentine flavor to Spring Street, and French wonder La Sirène (http://www.timeout.com/newyork/restaurants/soho/5733/la-sirene) just won a TONY Eat Out Award (http://www.timeout.com/newyork/articles/features/28630/eat-out-awards-2008). Weekends do still find streets on the empty side, with joggers and dog-walkers merely passing through on their way to the park space along the Hudson River. But Christine Messineo, an art dealer who works in the nearly one-year-old Renwick Gallery (http://www.timeout.com/newyork/venues/soho/10970/renwick-gallery), says she has gotten to know some of the locals. “They’ve been great about supporting us and some of the other new businesses in the area, and welcoming us to the neighborhood,” she says. We’re sure they’ll do the same for you.

http://www.timeout.com/newyork/articles/features/28891/the-place-to-be

Copyright © 2000–2008 Time Out New York

daveputney
April 27th, 2008, 05:53 PM
I'm relocating to New York this week, from London.

Work are providing me with an apartment in the Flatiron district whilst I find my feet but am looking for a few pointers on which neighbourhoods I should be looking for at renting in.

In case anyone is familiar with London, I've been living in the Clapham/Fulham/Putney areas and would be looking for a similar type of neighbourhood (busy, plenty of bars and restaurants etc).

Also, any other tips for a newcomer to the Big Apple would be greatly appreciated!

By the way, I'm a 30 year old male.

cheers

Dave

Front_Porch
April 28th, 2008, 10:17 AM
One-bedrooms in downtown Manhattan (where I work) are running $3,000 to $3,500. There is usually a broker's fee of 12- 15% of a year's rent, but if the company is relocating you they will probably pick that up.

If you need to go cheaper, you will probably be fine in a studio.

As far as neighborhoods, maybe it's just me, but I think of Clapham as very similar to Park Slope, Brooklyn.

You might also want to PM LondonLawyer to ask him about this.

ali r.
[downtown broker}

wereleopard
April 28th, 2008, 12:15 PM
You'll be fine in that case :) Actually, I might be able to point you toward a vacant room in the place I'm in by then - if your cats kill mice, you'll totally be in (welcome to New York and living in a building next to one that was just gut renovated).

Haha, that would be great! Yes, definitely let me know.

Yeah, my guys think they're mighty hunters. They've brought me mice, birds, and every bug they can get their little paws on. Nothing like finding a dead wolf spider on your pillow next to a very proud cat! :D

The Benniest
May 1st, 2008, 08:57 AM
Study: Brooklynites spend half their paycheck just on rent
BY AMANDA COLEMAN and JOTHAM SEDERSTROM
DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITERS

Thursday, May 1st 2008, 4:00 AM

In Brooklyn (http://www.nydailynews.com/topics/Brooklyn), half the paycheck is going to the landlord.From Bensonhurst (http://www.nydailynews.com/topics/Bensonhurst) to Williamsburg (http://www.nydailynews.com/topics/Williamsburg+%28Brooklyn%29), 30% of Brooklynites are spending more than half of their income on the almighty rent check, a new study shows.

More than 167,000 Brooklyn renters paid much more in 2006 than what financial experts typically recommend spending on rent: 30% of annual income.

"If New York City (http://www.nydailynews.com/topics/New+York+City) is going to continue as the middle-class capital of the world, then we need to have places where middle-class families can afford to live," said Rep. Anthony Weiner (D-Brooklyn (http://www.nydailynews.com/topics/Anthony+Weiner), Queens (http://www.nydailynews.com/topics/Queens+County)), who spearheaded the housing study.

The study, which shows sharp increases in all five boroughs, revealed that more than 500,000 New Yorkers were handing over half their paycheck to the landlord, with Bronx (http://www.nydailynews.com/topics/The+Bronx) residents most likely to shell out too much for rent.

In Brooklyn, where the number of overspending renters shot from 140,239 in 1999 to 167,835 in 2006, residents said the high cost stung more because of spikes in the prices of gas and milk.

East New York (http://www.nydailynews.com/topics/East+New+York) resident Emilio Ramos (http://www.nydailynews.com/topics/Emilio+Ramos) said he spends a whopping $940 of his $1,300 monthly pay on rent at his walkup apartment, an expense that rises by 3% every two years.

"The rent keeps going up, so it's hard," said Ramos, 50.

Weiner, who is co-signing new legislation that would spur private investment in 80-20 subsidized housing, recommended a five-point plan to lower rental costs that includes increased funding on affordable and senior housing.

East New York resident Joseph Rodriguez (http://www.nydailynews.com/topics/Joseph+Rodriguez), 32, said he was struggling to hold on in his $1,200-a-month apartment with the $1,000 a month he receives in unemployment.

"It's difficult to meet," said Rodriguez, who said he splits the rent with his wife, who earns $1,200 a month.

Bedford-Stuyvesant (http://www.nydailynews.com/topics/Bedford-Stuyvesant) resident Derek Jones (http://www.nydailynews.com/topics/Derek+Jones) isn't yet handing over 50% of his paycheck to the landlord, but he's close.

The chemical plant assistant said that since he moved into his apartment 10 years ago, the rent has increased by $300, an amount that far outpaced his salary hikes.

"I was paying $600 10 years ago, and now it's up to $900," said Jones, 48, who earns $1,980 a month. "I'm spending too much. It's hard."

Copyright 2008 New York Daily News

Hawkeye
June 4th, 2008, 12:16 PM
This is truly a fantastic resource for anyone moving or considering moving to New York so thank you to everyone who has taken the time to contribute to this thread. I have spent several hours reading the majority of the posts which have given a great insight into many aspects of living in 'the greatest city in the world'.

My wife and I spent part of our honeymoon in New York last summer and I can honestly say that no city anywhere has had the same effect on me. The pull to return and experience living in the city on a full time basis has been incredible and the intense feeling of wanting to make that life changing decision just won't go away. We are visiting NY for a week next month from Edinburgh, Scotland and would like to get a real feel for everyday life as well as further enjoy some of the more 'touristy' things. In essence we are looking to make it a bit of a fact finding trip as well as a holiday. What things would New Yorker's advise ?

At the moment our timeframe for a possible move is Summer 09 so is at an early stage ! We are in a fortunate position job wise as my wife works for Citibank and will get a transfer and I work from home (as well as looking after our young child). Am I right in thinking we will be fine for visa's given she will be employed by a US company ? Our research into neighborhoods has really only just begun but our preferred option is certainly to live in Manhattan though I fully appreciate this is hardly narrowing things down very much, nevermind the practicalities of cost etc !

One quick question my wife is shouting ! - could any parents out there tell us if it is easy to get reliable, safe sitters to look after kids ?

Thanks again for all the great info on here, any further pointers of things to do (more day to day) when we next visit would be greatly appreciated.

Andy

Front_Porch
June 4th, 2008, 03:30 PM
Andy--
Babysitting runs about $15 an hour.

ali r.
{downtown broker}

Biff McCool
June 9th, 2008, 08:49 PM
Why Hello!
Is it a lot easier to pay for an apartment in Manhattan with a roomate? Are there a lot of advertisements for roomates in the paper?
Thanks...

Soup
June 10th, 2008, 12:11 AM
Yes and yes, Biff. You might want to read through some forum posts. Those questions have been answered a lot of times already. :)

Try Craigslist.

nyc_obsessed
June 15th, 2008, 02:50 PM
So I am trying to find a sublet for over the summer to look for a job easier, I found one that seems too reasonable, I was wondering what you thought? The location would be perfect, just want to know if it is a scam or not...I will be sending the Craigslist posting and the email he wrote back when I asked him why it was so cheap and asking him the location :)

http://newyork.craigslist.org/mnh/sub/718417813.html


The Email:

Hello,

Thanks for your interest in my room. I am Johan Svanholm am single,very hard working man,religious and business man. The apt is currently available for rent.

The Apartment is located at the below address:

Address: Upper West Side 33 West End
33 West End Avenue (Apt # 23F)
Manhattan Manhattan NY
West 60s
Located between: W. 60th Street and W. 61st Street

• Pets OK
• Elevator
• Doorman
• Live-in Super
• Elegant Lobby
• Floor-to-Ceiling Windows
• Hi-Speed Internet

• Resident Lounge
• Laundry in the Building
• Dishwasher
• Microwave
• Granite Kitchen
• Marble Bath
• Concierge
• Valet
• 20,000 Sq. Ft. Park with Hudson River Views
• Free Shuttle to Columbus Circle (1, A, B, C, D Trains, Entrance to Central Park , and the

Time Warner Center with Whole Foods, Jazz at Lincoln Center , and Upscale Shopping)
• Hardwood Floors with Carpeted Bedrooms
• All 2 Bedroom Apartments have their own Washer & Dryer in the Unit
• About a 15 Minute Walk to Central Park
• 2.5 Blocks to Food Emporium
• About 2 Blocks to Duane Reade Pharmacy
• About a 10-15 Minute Walk to Lincoln Center and Damrosch Park
• Private Entry Road
• Access to Henry Hudson Parkway

Actually I lived in the Apartment before i was transfered to Hyattsville, MD in our new office as the new manager of our sales department and i will be staying for 1 year before coming back so that is why am looking for a responsible roommate someone i can trust who would be able to look after the apt while am in Hyattsville, MD. Like i said the room is available for rent immediately. The apt is well furnished and its a spacious and lovely 2-bedroom 2 bathroom furnished Apartment, Utilities are included and Pets are allowed. Kitchen completely equipped, Kettle - Toaster - Dishwasher - Freezer - Microwave - Oven - Dryer - Heat - Water - Washing Machine. Please I want you to know that I am a kind and honest man and also I spent a lot on my property that I want to give you for rent, so I will solicit for your absolute maintenance of the Apartment and I would want you to treat it as your own, I would like you to keep it tidy all the time I also want you to let me have trust in you as I always stand on my word.the rental fees is $700 per month including utilities for the whole of the Apartment and the Security deposit is $400.00. Also i will like to know when you want to take possession of the apartment .Please note that due to my present transfer to Hyattsville, MD, you may not be able to actually see the inside of the apt until you are able to move in or pay for a security deposit because the key's are presently here with me in Hyattsville, MD and i will have to ship down the key's to you when we conclude on the rent, so if you have the time you can walk down the location of the area and view the exterior of the apartment to know the place the the apt is situated.

I await your urgent reply and if positive and decides to proceed, i will then email you the rental application form and also discuss on how to get the document and the keys of the Apartment to you,please i am giving you all this base on trust ,you know that we do not see yet and only putting everything into God hand so you to drive by and view the exterior of the building to know the area where the building is located,so please do not let us down in this our property. Let me know if you are interested in the apartment so that i can email you the application form today.

Regards,

Johan.

Front_Porch
June 16th, 2008, 11:51 AM
It's a $6,500 apartment that someone is offering you for $700, but you can't get in. What do you think?

I swear I am losing my faith in humanity.

ali r.
<downtown broker>

wereleopard
June 18th, 2008, 12:48 PM
So the apartment hunt is kicking into high gear. I'll be in the city in early July apartment hunting for an August 1st move-in. I've got an appointment made with a CitiHabitats broker, but I'm also looking for a second broker to potentially meet with as I've heard very mixed things about CitiHabitats as far as being pushy and not caring about more than their (very high) commission.

Can anyone make some recommendations for a broker who might be more in-touch with lower-end properties (up to $1200/month) within half an hour or so of FIT? Also, this is my obligatory "if anyone knows of an opening coming up TELL ME" begging post.

I've ultimately decided to do this on my own and not have a roommate unless I can find someone willing to sign a joint lease, since I'd like to establish NY state residency before next fall for the tuition break - I do plan to stay in the city after graduation, so I might as well take advantage of the benefits as soon as possible!

So, who else besides the Godzilla of Brokers has everyone worked with and liked?

joe25
June 18th, 2008, 04:23 PM
Hey I'm 17 and turn 18 in December. Ive asked myself many times where I would like to move, and a big city with mass transport and things to see and people to meet keeps popping up, yeah NYC :)

The thing is, Ive looked online, and read this forum, but all I see is people with jobs lined up here and 6 digit salaries buying big. Is the city for me? I don't care about moving to a crummy neighborhood and riding the bus to work everyday, that's me, I want that challenge. Should I consider a move here, or is it a waste of time. Ill have my high school diploma by December for sure, and attending colleges has been nice thought. Where did you guys go when you where 18? Is it too big of a leap to go at 18 with diploma?

I speak 3 languages, don't know if that helps any. 2 fluent and 1 kinda half-Assed. I have no idea about the outside world, only what the internet has tought me. Also when I move out of my uncles, there is no going back, since hes going back to his home country, only here since I'm under 18.

.pulchritudinous.
June 18th, 2008, 09:49 PM
I'm not sure in what field of employment you'd want to work, but knowing two languages fluently (assuming English is one?) could open a job of translation for you. It's a skill that few people are lucky to have.

I'm not currently residing in New York, but hope to in the future, so I'm not sure the demand on translators, but I was just voicing my opinion on that idea. (I always found that to be a fascinating job, just haven't been able to master a second language. I haven't even been able to come close to holding a slight conversation in a second language.)

adchick82
June 18th, 2008, 10:50 PM
Go to college in New York, or go to college somewhere else, then move here.

philvia
June 19th, 2008, 01:42 PM
Hey I'm 17 and turn 18 in December. Ive asked myself many times where I would like to move, and a big city with mass transport and things to see and people to meet keeps popping up, yeah NYC :)

The thing is, Ive looked online, and read this forum, but all I see is people with jobs lined up here and 6 digit salaries buying big. Is the city for me? I don't care about moving to a crummy neighborhood and riding the bus to work everyday, that's me, I want that challenge. Should I consider a move here, or is it a waste of time. Ill have my high school diploma by December for sure, and attending colleges has been nice thought. Where did you guys go when you where 18? Is it too big of a leap to go at 18 with diploma?

I speak 3 languages, don't know if that helps any. 2 fluent and 1 kinda half-Assed. I have no idea about the outside world, only what the internet has tought me. Also when I move out of my uncles, there is no going back, since hes going back to his home country, only here since I'm under 18.


i'm 18 and will be 19 by the time i move late august.. but i'm going to be living in dorms and attending college. personally, i wouldn't move to nyc if i was just out of high school and not attending college. i would imagine it being hard to live a comfortable lifestyle in nyc with just high school diploma(though i know people do) ... thats just my opionion

The Benniest
June 23rd, 2008, 01:14 PM
Occasionally, I will get on Craig's List and just look at what's on there from time to time, and last night I came across this:

http://newyork.craigslist.org/mnh/fee/724096501.html

Is it realistic to live in a loft apartment without a bathroom or kitchen? It's not that expensive and seems to be in a very good location in the E Village from the description. Is it harder? Is it doable for 1 - 2 years? What do people who live in these kinds of apartments (no kitchens) do for food?

Thanks all .. :)

Ben

Alonzo-ny
June 23rd, 2008, 02:41 PM
Sounds like a dorm without a kitchen. Life will depend alot on the people you are sharing the bathrooms with. Food you can eat out its cheap.

The Benniest
June 24th, 2008, 01:10 AM
Thanks.

But...won't eating out many times a week add up? :confused:

kliq6
June 24th, 2008, 01:39 PM
With the prices in the stores, it is sometimes cheaper to eat out most nights. In my early 20's I did atleast 5 nights a week.

adchick82
June 24th, 2008, 10:00 PM
Eating out doesn't have to mean sit down, full service restaurants - it can be $3.50 of fried rice from a Chinese place around the corner.

Also, if you can put a microwave and a mini-fridge and a toaster oven in the room, you'd be surprised how much you can manage to cook on your own... Cold sandwiches, ramen, bagel / english muffin pizzas, etc.

The Benniest
June 24th, 2008, 11:19 PM
That's true. I'm an 'executive chef' with a microwave and toaster oven, so that would not be a problem. :p

Are there 24 hour delis around the east village area?

MidtownGuy
June 25th, 2008, 10:51 AM
Sure, lots of them (at least for now). Didn't you get a chance to visit the E. Village at night when you were here?

The Benniest
June 25th, 2008, 04:58 PM
Unfortunately, no, which made me quite angry and disappointed. I was looking forward to seeing SoHo, and the areas around Greenwich Village, but we only 1-2 buildings of SoHo and extremely little of the Village.:(

I'm planning on spending a full day in the village areas when I return in July (including going there at night), so I'll get a full load then.

adchick82
June 26th, 2008, 10:46 AM
Definitely look around the East Village at night - it's one of my favorite neighborhoods... if I didn't work on the west side and enjoy being able to walk to and from the office, I'd be looking for a place there in a heartbeat.

When will you be visiting?

The Benniest
June 26th, 2008, 01:31 PM
I'll be in the city from July 16 until the 24th.

KenNYC
June 28th, 2008, 05:59 PM
Yeah, I suppose your right, it's just the idea of living in NYC seems so refreshing and exciting compared to the dull North West of England.
By the way, what's the situation in acquiring a Green Card/Visa? How Long does it take and is it easy to get one?
Thanks...:D


Let me put it like this; getting a green card is hell of a lot harder than paying the Manhattan rents. You can probably get a student visa without too much trouble, but whether you will be allowed to stay after graduation depends a lot on the education you take. If it's an education that is in high demand in the US you have a chance, if it's a run-of-the-mill college degree, it's pretty much a no-go.

KenNYC
June 28th, 2008, 06:06 PM
Hey so will anyone tell me about the rent on new york? Anybody knows if it is easy to be hired in a job like a waiter or something like that? And please can anyne tell me how can I come to New York and get a green card, without having a relative in America? Thanks everyone!!!


Your chances of getting a green card for a job like a waiter or similar is exactly 0. I don't intend to be mean or anything, people just need to be realistic. Getting a green card from employment is pretty much only going to happen if you have a Masters or Doctoral degree, or if you're highly qualified in certain computer sciences.

nikica123
July 3rd, 2008, 06:34 AM
My boyfriend and I are thinking about moving to New York in the next year or so... We live in Australia at the moment, in the Gold Coast.

He has a Bachelor in Business Marketing and has been working in a marketing firm for the past 2 years. I will be finishing my Masters in Architecture this December.

... This is enough to get green cards to live in New York for a couple of years, isn't it?

KenNYC
July 3rd, 2008, 12:28 PM
To get an employment based green card you need 1) a US employer willing to hire you and 2) that employer has to "convince" the immigration authorities that you have qualifications they cannot (easily) find among US candidates.

What perhaps would make this a bit easier would be to find an Australian company that has department(s) in the US and they might be willing to hire you a bit easier than a plain US firm would.

You both have good educations so it is certainly possible yes, but do expect to do a good bit of work.

Also, if you really just want to work in the US for a few years you do not really need a green card, it is also possible to get a temporary work permit. The procedure is about the same as for a green card, but they're a lot easier to get (meaning, there are tons more available of them).

Best of luck.

Ginge
July 25th, 2008, 06:53 PM
I am looking at moving my family from the UK to NY in the near future for a job with NYPD, where is the most reasonably priced place to rent???? I am also looking for snow in the winter and lots of it, snow in the south of the UK is pretty pants, but when it does fall for about 1 hour it is great to see my little boy's face light up....any ideas.alos has to be a safe friendly and good enviroment to raise the family

Schadenfrau
July 25th, 2008, 11:27 PM
How much are you looking to pay, and for how many bedrooms?

It doesn't snow that much in NYC, and when it does, it doesn't last very long here either. You're not apt to find much difference in the surrounding areas.

Ginge
July 26th, 2008, 07:57 AM
Cheers for the quick response mate.....minimum would be a 3 bed, either single storey or double I am not that bothered, area has to be good though, here we can pay anything from £500 a month upwards, what areas would you recommend? I am not sure yet where I would be working out of either as I am applying for a 911/dispatcher so i dont know at the moment whether they work from one main place

KenNYC
July 26th, 2008, 08:13 AM
Kinda hard to answer without knowing where you're gonna be working, but is it for New York City, or just New York State? If you're looking to work and live a bit further upstate it gets a lot cheaper and also more snowy.

A 3 bedroom for $1000 a month I cannot see happening anywhere within the city borders.

Ginge
July 26th, 2008, 08:32 AM
Where are you talking upstate??? I can look on the map then and start looking at areas

KenNYC
July 26th, 2008, 08:41 AM
I'm not really familiar with the areas outside NYC myself, being a completely fresh New Yorker myself. But prices within the city limits are quite steep, to say the least. Not quite London-bad, but not far from it.

lighthouse67
July 26th, 2008, 08:54 AM
NYC is very expensive and going to get more expensive. I live in LI and its getting expensive their to.

Ginge
July 26th, 2008, 01:16 PM
where are the cheaper places to live.......even upstate....wherever that is

Schadenfrau
July 26th, 2008, 02:46 PM
I think you need to re-think your plan, Ginge. The NYPD requires all new recruits to live within city limits- I'm not sure about 911 operators, but I do think that it's highly unlikely you could work for the NYPD in any capacity as a non-citizen.

Additionally, $1,000 a month for a 3-bedroom would be considered cheap pretty much anywhere in the country, much less in the tri-state area. You would pay probably triple that here.

Also, you are aware of how much the NYPD pays, right?

nykid17
July 26th, 2008, 05:50 PM
Hey I'm a student who will be moving to the city for school for the foreseeable future and will probably living somewhere between West 125- West 140th streets. I've been to the area during the day for short and simple trips though am not sure what to expect actually living there. How is the neighborhood in that area around night and just in general. Are the subway stations in that area safe?
Please get back to me as soon as possible.Thanks

KenNYC
July 26th, 2008, 08:05 PM
So Columbia U. ? I spent 3 days there visiting the school this spring, and I didn't see anything that made me worried at least - but I'm sure there's people here living closer that could give you a real answer :)

antinimby
July 26th, 2008, 08:18 PM
Ginge, if the NYPD doesn't work out, you can always try the many suburban police departments found throughout the metro area.

They tend to pay even more than the city.

Look at the various towns in New Jersey, Connecticut, Long Island and Westchester/Rockland/Orange/Putnam counties in upstate NY. There are many options.

These departments may not have requirements as strict as those of the NYPD.

Ginge
July 27th, 2008, 06:11 AM
I think you need to re-think your plan, Ginge. The NYPD requires all new recruits to live within city limits- I'm not sure about 911 operators, but I do think that it's highly unlikely you could work for the NYPD in any capacity as a non-citizen.

Additionally, $1,000 a month for a 3-bedroom would be considered cheap pretty much anywhere in the country, much less in the tri-state area. You would pay probably triple that here.

Also, you are aware of how much the NYPD pays, right?

Cheers mate for the reply, the non citizenship thing with NYPD is because a 911 dispatcher is classed as a non sworn post, therefore so long as you gain residency in about 90 days i think. my intention is to do this, grab my citiezship at the first oppertunity and the then apply for the police.....i think renting would be my best option if my plan comes off...

Ginge
July 27th, 2008, 06:53 AM
Ginge, if the NYPD doesn't work out, you can always try the many suburban police departments found throughout the metro area.

They tend to pay even more than the city.

Look at the various towns in New Jersey, Connecticut, Long Island and Westchester/Rockland/Orange/Putnam counties in upstate NY. There are many options.

These departments may not have requirements as strict as those of the NYPD.

Cheers mate...that is diamond...it is just so difficult to get anywhere...i have heard back from places like Alabama,Arizona, but i think they will be way to hot, i am looking for somewhere it chucks down with rain and when you wake up in the morning snow has fallen......my hope is to continue being a police officer as soon as i can over there....once again cheers mate

meakin88
August 1st, 2008, 03:20 PM
i here! ! ! finally, living downtown, wall street :)

NYatKNIGHT
August 1st, 2008, 03:41 PM
Congrats! Have fun, stay safe.

RicanPrincipessa
August 6th, 2008, 11:20 PM
We are three girls looking for a basement, house or studio to rent at the start of April.

Looking for any space in Brooklyn, Queens, Bronx, or Manhattan.

We are starting this search early in hopes that someone out there may know or a have a place available by then.

Is it possible to find any of the below?

Looking for a safe area, with laundromat and subway's close by.
Anything with utilities included is a big plus.
Brick walls a plus =)
Nothing that will break the bank, we each make under 30,000 a year.
Moving to the city to improve our lives and careers.

Any thoughts?
Ideas?
Advice?

Thanks in advance!

adchick82
August 7th, 2008, 03:36 PM
I am sure you can find a place that fits those requirements, but it is waaaaaaaaaaaay too early to start looking for April occupancy.

Txoov
August 14th, 2008, 02:22 PM
Hi everyone, I've been looking and reading through this forum but couldn't find anything similar to this so I thought I'd go ahead and see what you guys think about my idea.

I'm currently in the military but will be getting out in the spring of 2009. When I get out I'm planning on going to school and was thinking about possibly going to one of the CUNY schools, preferably Hunter College.

With the New GI Bill going into effect in August 2009, If I go to one of the CUNY schools I'll be getting about $2500 for housing expenses. So basically my plan is to get into one of the CUNY schools, move to NY, and live off of the GI Bill while I'm going to school. Of course I'm still planning to work while going to school.

So yeah... I know this is kinda vague, but I just wanted to see what everyones thoughts were. Thanks for taking the time to read. And if y'all have any other advice I'd greatly appreciate it.

BroadwayActor
August 15th, 2008, 11:47 AM
Hey guys, i'm not sure if you remember me, but i posted a while ago, asking for advice about moving to NYC to study acting, and gues what? I have been accepted into AMDA, and am moving there soon from the UK. I just wondered about any advice in terms of if i want to work in acting, do i need a green card after college ends?
XXXXXXX
THANKS!!!!

John P Robinson
August 15th, 2008, 02:44 PM
Congrats and well done Broadway Actor hope to see your name in lights in the future. Sorry but I can't help with the advice :(

jersey_guy
August 15th, 2008, 02:59 PM
I just wondered about any advice in terms of if i want to work in acting, do i need a green card after college ends?
XXXXXXX
THANKS!!!!

You will not "need" a green card, but you will need employment authorization, which you will not get without having at least a temporary work visa, such as H1-B. You should look into this as early as you can once you get on this side of the pond and plan well in advance.

kandinsky
August 16th, 2008, 04:35 PM
Hi,

I am planning to move to New York in mid January. As soon as i finish my Master in Architecture (Lisbon, Portugal) i will start to make some contacts and scheduling some interviews as an intern. I also work as architectural photographer in free time...

I was just wondering would anyone have any ideas if i will be able to find a 1 bedroom apartment /studio easily enough. I am 24, single and i am looking for a safe and calm place to live.

Looking for a safe area, with laundromat and subway's close by.
Anything with utilities included is a big plus.

Any ideas, ?
advices or thoughts?

Thanks a lot!!

j123
August 23rd, 2008, 03:57 PM
Hi all,
I am a Brit who has been looking into moving to NYC for a while now.

I have read the majority of this forum and have found it very interesting.

I do have one unanswered question though. Does anyone know about the possibilities of employment within the radio industry in the city? By this i mean producing radio shows etc.

Thanks in advance

KenNYC
August 24th, 2008, 01:17 PM
kandinksy; unless you have some solid employment offers on the table etc, January is getting very close for a foreigner. I'm not sure if there's much chance for a foreigner to be accepted as an intern at all, but contact the US embassy about that since I haven't been in that situation myself.

j123, while there certainly are those jobs in the city, they're probably not going to be an option for a foreigner, it's just too easy for them to find qualified personnel among Americans to offer a work permit / visa for a foreigner.

By all means guys, do some research, talk to your local US embassies etc, I really don't mean to talk people out of moving here, but it needs to be understood that getting work based residency in the US is very difficult these days. It's not like moving around in Europe where you're pretty much free to cross the borders at your own discretion.

j123
August 24th, 2008, 01:59 PM
Thanks kenNYC,

i will continue to do futher research as getting into the radio industry and one day living in NY is a dream of mine.

If anyone else has any futher advice i would love to hear it thanks.

Amberlicious7583
August 25th, 2008, 02:16 PM
Does anyone know how long does it take to become a resident of NY? I am moving up from Florida next month. Will I need to get a ID or drivers license?

Thanks! ;)

scumonkey
August 25th, 2008, 02:29 PM
Department of Motor Vehicles
Definition of a Resident of NYS


(http://www.nysdmv.com/index.htm)
Definition of a Resident. If you become a resident of NYS, you must exchange your driver license and vehicle registration from another state for a NYS driver license and vehicle registration within 30 days. If you have a driver license from another state, you must get a driver license from NYS within 30 days after you become a resident of NYS. If you have a vehicle registration from another state, you must get a vehicle registration from NYS within 30 days after you become a resident of NYS.
Section 250 (5) (http://www.nysdmv.com/vtl.htm) of the Vehicle and Traffic Law defines the term "resident." The law defines a resident as a person who lives in NYS with the intent to make NYS a "fixed and permanent" place to live. To live in a house, a home, an apartment, a room or other similar place in NYS for 90 days is considered "presumptive evidence" that you are a resident of NYS. A police officer can use this evidence as the reason to issue a traffic ticket if you drive in NYS without a driver license or vehicle registration issued by NYS.
A judge considers the law and the evidence of your intent and decides if you are a resident of NYS. For example, if you pay taxes or your children attend school in another state, a judge considers these facts to decide if your intent is to make NYS a "fixed and permanent" residence. The DMV will not decide if you are a resident of NYS, if you must get a NYS driver license, or if you must register your vehicle in NYS.
According to this law, students from other states or from other nations who attend school in NYS are normally not considered residents of NYS.

Amberlicious7583
August 25th, 2008, 02:46 PM
Thanks Scumonkey that was very helpful!

antinimby
August 26th, 2008, 10:29 PM
Newcomers Adjust, Eventually, to New York

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/08/26/nyregion/arrive_span.jpg
Ian Ingersoll, right, grew up in Alaska but moved from Seattle to New York City eight months ago.


By CARA BUCKLEY
Published: August 26, 2008 (http://www.nytimes.com/2008/08/27/nyregion/27arrival.html)

Sometime over the course of a person’s first year in New York, there usually comes that moment. It can happen in the first days or weeks, or after 10 months. It can happen repeatedly, or without people noticing, at least not at first.

Newcomers suddenly realize either that the city is not working for them or that they are inexorably becoming part of it, or both. They find themselves walking and talking faster. The subway begins to make sense. Patience is whittled away; sarcasm often ensues. New friends are made, routines established, and city life begins to feel like second nature. In other words, newcomers find themselves becoming New Yorkers.

“It can be lonely, very lonely, and I knew I would find it hard,” said Lisa Phin, 25, who moved to New York from Dallas in late May, and is building a network of friends through events listed on Web sites like Meetup.com. “But if you can stick it out for one year, you’re home free.”

Rebecca Thompson’s moment happened shortly after she moved to the city in January. On a visit home to Oklahoma, Ms. Thompson, 24, found herself flummoxed when a hostess at a party and everyone else there were inexplicably acting so nice.

Gabrielle Sirkin’s moment came on the heels of Thanksgiving Day last year, five months after she moved to New York. Every day until then, she felt as if she was doing battle daily with the city. But suddenly, on a night flight to Kennedy International Airport from California, Ms. Sirkin, 26, caught sight of glittering skyline, and, to her great surprise, felt a surge of joy.

“I was really caught off guard by my reaction,” she said. “But I could see Central Park, and the lights on the Chrysler Building, and I wasn’t looking at it as a tourist. I was looking at it as though I was home.”

Ian Ingersoll’s moment happened within weeks of his move from Seattle to New York last fall. He suddenly found himself exasperated by slow moving pedestrians, and, like a true New Yorker, began darting around them instead.

“That was when I realized I was getting in sync with the city,” Mr. Ingersoll, 25, said.

For newcomers, there is often great comfort in these flashes of recognition, which can serve as signposts along the often arduous path to integration with New York.

For Mr. Ingersoll, the sense of getting aligned with New York felt like balm, because the city, for all of its exquisite appeal, ended up nearly breaking his spirit.

Mr. Ingersoll painstakingly saved $8,000 over a year and a half in Seattle, working three jobs to prepare for life in the city of his dreams. He burned through it in no time when he could not find full-time work. While he had admired New Yorkers’ famed acerbic attitude from afar, he found the brusqueness wounding once here. Making friends also proved hard; Mr. Ingersoll spent last Christmas wandering alone through Central Park.

But slowly, more than halfway through that crucial first year, life is brightening for Mr. Ingersoll, who is an actor. A close friend moved here, too, and now shares Mr. Ingersoll’s basement apartment in Union City, N.J. Mr. Ingersoll found a full-time job and has an audition or two lined up.

“I knew it wasn’t going to be easy — it was something I had to do,” said Mr. Ingersoll, who grew up in Alaska. “I am in love with the city. And what relationship is good if you don’t work for it?”

Young people have flocked to New York City by the tens of thousands for generations, to chase their dreams and test their mettle. And they continue to come in strong numbers. In 2006, nearly 77,000 people in their 20s had been in the city for a year or less, according to the annual study by the United States Census Bureau for that year.

But for many, the thrill of arrival is often tempered by the sinking realization of what an alienating place the city can be, especially for those who are not wealthy or who do not have a pre-existing network of friends. Nothing comes easily, even if one can get past the dauntingly high cost of living. The subway maze seems indecipherable. People are everywhere, but ignore each other on the street. Friends and acquaintances might live in distant neighborhoods, and seeing them often requires booking time, like an appointment, weeks in advance.

“Any time I want to see someone and catch up with someone, everyone takes out their BlackBerrys and says, ‘This weekend isn’t good; how about three weeks from now?’ “ said Ms. Sirkin, who moved to New York from Milan in June 2007. “How can you form really good and solid relationships with people if you see them once a month?”

Not every newcomer has trouble adjusting. Alexis Vuatrin, 27, from France, said that New York fit him perfectly from the start. The skyline, the bustle and the taxis seemed familiar, thanks to movies and TV shows, and he quickly fell into a sprawling group of French friends. Then again, Mr. Vuatrin had already lived in Geneva, Paris and Hildesheim, near Hanover, in Germany.

And by comparison, he said, “The people in the street here are so nice, and smiling.”

But nice is a relative thing. Boris Chen, 22, moved to New York from California early in July for a job with a finance company in Midtown. He is still trying to stomach what feels to him like a whole new brand of rude.

Mr. Chen also had to get over his lingering childhood fear of taxi drivers, which he believed came from movies. “I always thought any time I got into taxis they were going to kidnap me, and I was going to die,” he said.
He is cultivating friendships with people he met while apartment hunting on Craigslist. Through them, he has learned valuable insider city tips, like what kind of subway pass to buy (30-day unlimited), and whether he should tip deliverymen (yes) or doormen (it depends).

Ms. Phin already finds herself getting annoyed more easily, even though she arrived from Texas only two months ago. The culture at her job, as a marketer for an engineering company, was a lot more abrasive than she had expected. “Nothing is sugarcoated,” she said. And so, she is finding herself growing a tougher skin. “I thought I’d bring my niceness with me,” she said, “but already I feel an edge developing. Because you need to, to deal.”

Ms. Thompson, a native of Oklahoma who moved from Chicago six months ago, has adjusted to New York life relatively easily, she said, largely because she interned here a few summers ago. She also has friends from college in the city, and has made new ones through her church, St. Paul the Apostle.

But the city has changed Ms. Thompson, who lives in Hell’s Kitchen near the tourist-clogged streets of Times Square. “I’ve definitely become the pushy New Yorker who has to get around everyone on the sidewalk,” she said.

During a recent week back home in Oklahoma, Ms. Thompson said she found herself holding doors for others, but she was transformed again immediately upon her return.

“I had a horrible flight,” she said, “and I snapped back.”

There also usually comes a time, early on, when newcomers must accept that the city is a power greater than they are.

“My friend said, ‘The city abuses you, and you just have to abuse it back,’ ” said Ms. Sirkin, who grew up in California and moved to New York reluctantly, after having visa problems in Italy last year. “The subway doesn’t work in the morning, and you’re a half-hour late for work, and that’s not in your control. You have to find ways of surviving.”

Ms. Sirkin’s friend Sarah Kasbeer also recalled being consumed by a common strain of existential New York City angst: the sense that no matter where one is, something better is happening — the real New York is in full swing — somewhere else.

“When I first got here, I’d go out in the city with people I worked with, and I felt I was missing something,” said Ms. Kasbeer, who moved to New York from Milan in 2006. I was going to clubs in Chelsea, the Lower East Side, things I wouldn’t do now.”

But sometime during her first year, she stopped trying so hard. “I just realized that I didn’t need to find ‘it,’ that my place in the city would fall into place,” she said. “Now I don’t make an effort; I roll with things. It’s not just the city, it’s yourself that you have to deal with as well.”

Ms. Sirkin continued to resist feeling part of New York long after her revelatory experience last Thanksgiving.

And, yet she has begun to come around, taking acting and photography classes, and forging new friendships. It took a year, she said, but now, at last, she is starting to feel connected with what she describes as “this terrifying city.”

“Every day you encounter situations where you have to step out of your safety zone, and it’s really kind of a self-discovery experience,” she said. “I see myself fighting it, but I also I see myself, every day, becoming a New Yorker.”


Multimedia

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/08/26/nyregion/arrival-190126.jpg (http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2008/08/26/nyregion/20080826_ARRIVE_FEATURE.html#)


Copyright 2008 The New York Times Company

Amberlicious7583
August 26th, 2008, 10:45 PM
Great article, thank you!

I am ready to take on New York!

KenNYC
August 26th, 2008, 11:05 PM
Getting used to New York is very easy, I can assure you :)

antinimby
August 26th, 2008, 11:25 PM
^ Europeans seem to have an easier time. In that article, that guy from France said it was easy for him, too.


Not every newcomer has trouble adjusting. Alexis Vuatrin, 27, from France, said that New York fit him perfectly from the start. The skyline, the bustle and the taxis seemed familiar, thanks to movies and TV shows, and he quickly fell into a sprawling group of French friends. Then again, Mr. Vuatrin had already lived in Geneva, Paris and Hildesheim, near Hanover, in Germany.

And by comparison, he said, “The people in the street here are so nice, and smiling.”

KenNYC
August 26th, 2008, 11:36 PM
Aye, I'm sure... we don't really have a problem getting the "social acceptance" I see some other immigrants having, maybe not quite racism but it's rather obvious a lot of people are a bit wary to newcomers from Middle East etc... Anyway, I recon the New Yorkers have been very welcoming to me, and I appreciate that :)

It's still a bit weird to me to walk the streets of a city with around 10million people, and semi-random strangers you've barely met still greet you. It's nice, but weird :)

antinimby
August 27th, 2008, 12:08 AM
That wasn't always the case. In that respect, New York has changed a lot due in part because of recent newcomers.

I grew up in the New York of the 1980's and 90's and trust me, no stranger will greet you under any circumstances at anytime then.

People were a lot ruder, colder and not friendly at all. It's like a 180° turnaround in people's atittude from even just 15 years ago.

peyt4
August 27th, 2008, 12:27 AM
Hi there,
I'll be in NYC for a few months over the Christmas NY period (from early Nov to Feb). I have a couple of questions..first I'll be arriving with not a lot of money (say $5-6000)...but I'm hoping to find work - cash work - asap. Not to completely support myself, but just to pay for food and play. I'm happy to waitress etc...will I find something not too bad for a few months?

Also, will the weather be... miserable? I have the option to leave a little later in the year...perhaps I should arrive bit closer to Spring...
Any thoughts?

antinimby
August 27th, 2008, 12:33 AM
If you have good experience you should be able to find something.

As far as the weather goes, it will be your typical Northeast type weather.

It can be cold and snowy but it will also have its share of sunny and mild days because unlike places in the interior or Midwest, the city's proximity to the warmer Atlantic Ocean waters offers it a bit of respite from the harshest temperatures.

Where are you coming from?

Amberlicious7583
August 27th, 2008, 09:27 AM
What brings you to NY for only 3 months?

Amberlicious7583
August 27th, 2008, 09:36 AM
That wasn't always the case. In that respect, New York has changed a lot due in part because of recent newcomers.

I grew up in the New York of the 1980's and 90's and trust me, no stranger will greet you under any circumstances at anytime then.

People were a lot ruder, colder and not friendly at all. It's like a 180° turnaround in people's atittude from even just 15 years ago.

I have only had one rude New Yorker experience the past three times I have been up there to visit thank goodness. A guy yelled at me for not wanting to try hand cream in the mall...go figure ;)

KenNYC
August 27th, 2008, 08:52 PM
Well, antimby wouldn't that be because everyone was mugging everyone back then? :)

antinimby
August 27th, 2008, 10:18 PM
That had a part in it I guess. Don't forget the high number of murders, too. It was very dangerous, not to mention dirty back then.

What's funny is that it used to be that people from other parts of the country and even international visitors leave the city after their visit, saying how rude and pushy New Yorkers were.

Now everything is reversed. People are saying that New Yorkers are nicer than what they were used to at home.

lorcar
August 28th, 2008, 12:07 AM
also the comments to the articles are great!

http://community.nytimes.com/article/comments/2008/08/27/nyregion/27arrival.html?permid=39#comment39

KenNYC
August 28th, 2008, 07:57 AM
Fully knowing I've only been here for a short time, I don't recognize any of the hostility that are in the comments, I'm almost guessing these are people who haven't lived in the city and just re-print the stereotype they've heard. I find people being pleasant, I find drivers (even taxis) stopping to let people across the road, I don't think I've met anyone with a "getouttahere" attitude at all. I've never seen anyone be harassed for walking slowly or standing on the sidewalk looking at the big buildings - heck, I do it all the time. In most other big cities I've spent time at people step away if you even just ask them for the time, or pace up so they can walk away from you.

nicksinif
September 6th, 2008, 04:56 PM
So actually the co-op isn`t your property?co-ops are more difficult to get because the existing members can vote you out, like big brother, or survivor.

nicksinif
September 6th, 2008, 05:02 PM
Getting used to New York is very easy, I can assure you :)
getting used to ny is very hard, especially for americans from other states. for starters, ny is very multicultural, so in some neighbourhoods, its mostly immigrants, or people who don't speak english. in some neighbourhoods, you would fit in better if you were from mexico, rather than idaho. ny is also very restricting for those who are used to driving. its a place where you rely mostly on public transportation. also anyone that has ever gone into any kind of government office will know that basically nothing gets done in ny because the employees dont take their jobs seriously, yet they never get fired. another thing about ny for americans moving from other states is the crowdedness. someone from idaho might have been renting a 2 bedroom apartment for $500 with a swimming pool, his own parking space, washing machines, tennis court, gym, but when you move to ny, you dont get any of that and youre paying $3000.

nicksinif
September 6th, 2008, 05:17 PM
Hey Everybody!

I've just landed my dream job in NY. It pays 40k. I just bought a new truck so I'm wondering if I'd be better off looking for a new place in NJ vs. Brooklyn due to parking? Also, I'm more concerned about how I'll be getting back n forth to work. If I was to live in Jersey would the train be the best way to go? I know once I'm in the city I can just hop on the subway to get where I'm going. I'm a bit overwhelmed by mass transit in NY & NJ. Any advice is mucho appreciated!
train is the best way to get to and from nj. the tunnels have a lot of traffic.

TWIJOE
September 6th, 2008, 05:22 PM
I'm considering Sunnyside as an alternative to Astoria and Long Island City. Can anyone give me any information on whether or not it's a good area?

As to Ben:
I hear ya! I've been looking and I'm getting more and more nervous about the cost of finding a decent place:(

Best of luck!
i know these neighbourhoods pretty well and cant see a big difference between them. i know that astoria and long island city are probably better because its closer to manhattan and thus you will have a different crowd of residents. personally i dont think these places are very safe, but i have heard that crime is decreasing.

TWIJOE
September 6th, 2008, 05:24 PM
"seriously consider finding an easygoing homeowner to work for on a monthly basis until he finds a reasonable apartment"

Can anyone give me info on where I can find homeowners that are looking for help in exchange for room and board?
most buildings in nyc have a guy they call the super. he is basically the guy who sweeps the floors and fixes minor things. these guys usually live in the basement of buildings for free. you should go around to different buildings and talk to the supers. i think they have some kind of network because many of them tend to know each other. if one of them knows a person who is about to quit, then you can move in.

nicksinif
September 6th, 2008, 05:25 PM
Ben, another thought... I don't know where you plan on attending community college, but instead of going to community to prepare for a school later in New York why no just attend a CUNY community college? Think of it this way if you attend community college in your home state of Iowa it might give you something to shoot for (NYC). Or you might be miserable thinking "I cannot wait to get to NY" affecting your mindset and mood in turn affecting your grades. Why not study in a place you want to be... It may make you happier and affect your grades!
i agree about community college. they are wonderful

TWIJOE
September 6th, 2008, 05:29 PM
Yeah, I suppose your right, it's just the idea of living in NYC seems so refreshing and exciting compared to the dull North West of England.
By the way, what's the situation in acquiring a Green Card/Visa? How Long does it take and is it easy to get one?
Thanks...:D
a green card isnt something that you just sign up for and then they give you a number and call you when theyre ready. there are very strict guidelines for getting a green card. family members such as children, parents, and siblings of citizens can get them. you can win a green card through the lottery but there are restrictions on which countries can get them. i dont believe britain is one of the countries that can sign up for green card lottery.

TWIJOE
September 6th, 2008, 05:33 PM
We are moving from Europe to New York this summer, and would like to settle in Brooklyn. We have to young teenagers, aged 13 and 14, and we would like them to attend public schools. Is there some kind of public office we apply to for admissions?
you just show up at the school and register. you will need the childs birth certificate and previous transcripts. most americans have no clue about foreign transcripts and they will look at it like a 3 dollar bill. if you are interested at all in competitive schooling, there are a few schools that do entrance exams for what we would call "nerds". brooklyn tech, bronx science, and stuyvesant.

TWIJOE
September 6th, 2008, 05:43 PM
Hi All!

Like a few others here I have resisted posting for a while for fear of repeating the hundreds of posts already written - but everyone on here seems so implausibly and wonderfully happy to help (by my British standards, at least) that I thought it would be worth asking a few questions in any case.

I am a 23 year old Brit (but with US passport - no problems there) considering a move to NYC in the next three or so months. I currently work as a copywriter and have a reasonable level of experience in a number of fields. At the moment I'm earning in the mid £20,000s. I'm struggling to translate this into a reasonable salary expectation in US$ but I'm thinking somewhere along the lines of $35,000 - $40,000 seeing as I've vastly expanded my skillset and will be looking for something that's a real step up from what I'm doing now.

I could ask questions til I'm blue in the face (fingers?) but I'll keep it as brief as I can for the moment and try to condense my infinite curiosity into a couple of questions.

1) On the type of salary I'm expecting, can I afford to rent a room in Brooklyn/Jersey (at a push)? I've seen a lot of rooms on craigslist for around $600-$800/mo, which seems manageable, but I'm aware of the many monthly costs which will creep in such as health insurance, and so on.

2) On that note - is anyone able to give me the roughest of ideas of how much health insurance might be? My mother's American, but has lived here in the UK for 40 years, and is hopelessly out of touch...

3) I'm a young professional and (I'd like to think) suited to somewhere interesting, diverse and creative. From my research, that spells Brooklyn - does anyone have any suggestions?

4) Other than the small matter of getting a job, a concern for me is having the financial backing to rent a room. It's possible that the bank I have a fund with (in the US) would be able to act as guarantor, which would be great. I was also wondering whether it is standard to put down a deposit or down payment which can be reclaimed whenever one moves on? I'd also be able to get a reference from a previous landlord.

I already feel like I've bombarded everyone, so I will leave it at that... any information would be gratefully received.

Thanks

i think insurance is about $500 a month. renting a room is different from renting an apartment. its usually easier to rent a room and they wont ask for as much stuff. there are also websites like roomates.com, and many more like it. you know you dont have to buy insurance. in the u.s., if you get into a serious accident, they have to treat you. however, if you have other non life threatening conditions then they will probably turn you away. if you are looking to buy insurance, these are the ones i know of. blue cross blue shield, fidelis, hip, ghi. if youre looking for some place creative, i would think that soho is your place, but that is very expensive.

TWIJOE
September 6th, 2008, 05:48 PM
Hello to all...

I'm moving into my new place on Monday (NE corner of the Park) and wanted to ask you Manhattanites... where do you get your essentials (ie. toilet paper, hangers, cleaning supplies, random junk) if there is no Target or Wal-Mart in Manhattan? Is there another store on the island I should hit up instead?

Thanks much.
there is a kmart in nyc. right on a subway station too. there is also rite aid and walgreens. there are also many indian run shops that sell this stuff. thats what i love about nyc.

TWIJOE
September 6th, 2008, 05:49 PM
Hey, I live in England in a reasonably small city and it's always been my dream to move to new york. I'm 16 and i'm now starting to consider this as a possibility.
I was just wondering, what would I need to do to get a visa? And how easy would it be for me to completely uproot from here?

Thanks :)some countries can apply for a holiday work visa in usa. britain happens to be one of those countries. australians also can do it. many people choose bunac when they do it.

TWIJOE
September 6th, 2008, 05:50 PM
I was wondering for some advice on moving to NYC. I've only been twice on vacations, but will be going to look at neighborhoods and such over spring break this year.

When I plan to move (this fall), I will be a recent college grad, female, white, single and 22. (Just giving you an idea of my background!).

I am planning on attending graduate school in a year or two and thought moving to NYC until then would be a great adventure.

I would be looking for a decent apartment to share with one to three roommates, with rent being up to $2000 (per roommate).

I want a safe neighborhood - I've heard several people say most of NYC is safe, but I want the safest recommendations for a single gal to live.

I'd really prefer to live somewhere other 20-somethings live, with lots of energy and things to do. Are there any specific streets or areas mostly young post-grads live in?

Let me know what you guys think! Thanks in advance for any advice! Sorry for the really long post.
safest neighbourhood would probably be the upper east side

TWIJOE
September 6th, 2008, 05:52 PM
Hi everyone, I did a google search in this thread for "noise-friendly neighborhoods" for musicians but couldn't find anything specific. I was wondering if I could have a few questions answered, here is my situation:

-I plan on moving to New York in January even though I have not fully completed college, but I plan on taking the remainder of the courses online which I should finish in a matter of months. I have $4000 saved up so money won't be an issue right away.

-I would like to live in an affordable neighborhood ($1000/month max for studio/1br rent) which is suitable for playing music at low-medium volumes, I heard the landlords can be sticklers about noise level. Ideally I would want a location close to the subway and not too far from the city.

-I am curious about the job situation there for students about to finish college. Are federal (government) desk jobs plentiful? And will they hire entry-level applicants? I figure I should try for something higher than retail/waiter positions if I have most of my college work complete. This will be a temporary money source while I finish the rest of my classes online.

-How much should I expect to pay every month for the most basic living expenses with a $1000 rent? I won't have a car but i'll probably need to ride the trains everyday for work.

-Where are the cheapest motels in the area? I'll need somewhere to stay when i'm going around looking for apartments. Distance is not too much of an issue as long as public transportation is nearby.

Help would be very appreciated! :)
ive never heard of anywhere in the ny suburbs to have $1000 rent, unless youre talking about living in the projects. you might be able to get a basement in the bronx for that price, but look out for the roaches.

TWIJOE
September 6th, 2008, 05:53 PM
I am thinking of moving to NYC in a few years. I am currently located in Australia. When looking at apartments would it be best to stay in a hotel for a week whilst looking? are there any other options because I want to look at an apartment instead of getting it strait of the internet.

Also by the time I relocate to NYC I will have a Economics degree majoring in accounting and I will also be able to speak fluent Chinese. What type of job would I most likely get into in? also i know that the starting wage of lawyers is around 140K, what about accountants?

Thanks in advance, i would appreciate your help.i dont think being able to speak fluent chinese will get you anywhere in ny. the chinese population is very small in ny. this isnt vancouver. the language that will get you somewhere in ny is spanish.

TWIJOE
September 6th, 2008, 05:56 PM
Hi!

First post here - sorry if similar posts have been answered before - did not take the time to browse the 112 pages in this thread before posting...

Now, me and my wife are moving to NYC this spring, and I am having a hard time trying to create a monthly budget for our life there. We currently live in Paris, and this budget is based roughly on what we spend a month here. I have increased some and decreased some things - but I would like a second opinion to understand if this is a realistic budget at all.

We have no kids and are in our early 30's. We won't be commuting. We do eat out a lot, and usually spend (too) much on good food and wine.

I understand that spending is completely individual, but if anyone could just give me an idea if we are way off, or approximately in the ball park of what a nice life in NYC costs. Could we make it? I really appreciate any input! Thanks in advance!

These are our calculated expenses in USD:
Groceries - 800
Utilities - 100
Phone/internet - 100
Cellphones - 200
Insurances - 100
Cable TV - 100
Rent - 4500
Taxi / Public transport - 250
Leisure - 350
Restaurants - 1500
Health (products and activities) - 400
Shopping - 600
Total 9.000 USD / Month
how did you come up with insurance costing $100

TWIJOE
September 6th, 2008, 05:59 PM
Hi all,

My husband and I are considering moving to NYC in the summer. He's american and I am Italian, he got offered a place with the New York teaching fellows, and he'll be making roughly 41,000/usd a year. We have a 2 yr old daughter. I will be out of work and minding the kid full time. The other source of income will be a mere 500-550 usd a month we will be getting from renting our italian apartment.

Although we are very excited for the opportunity, we are concerned about the finances.
Will it be feasible to move and live in New York City on such a low income?

Any word of wisdom will be much appreciated.

Thanks a mil!since you have a kid you will be able to apply for welfare and food stamps. i would tell you to sign up to live in the projects but theres a long waiting list. another idea is, and ive seen this mentioned, is that you can apply to be a super of a building. then you get free rent.

TWIJOE
September 6th, 2008, 06:00 PM
thanks ali
im exploring the idea of getting a 2br in Williamsburg for $3000 and then subletting one of the rooms to another person. I dont mind a 45 min commute

tomscho
williamsburg is not 45 min. its just accross the bridge. probably 2 stops to lower east side if that.

TWIJOE
September 6th, 2008, 06:13 PM
Depending on your income level, marital status, etc. once you add up the Federal, NY State & NY City income taxes then you count on ~ 30 - 40% of a check NOT being available for deposit into your personal account (a chunk of which you might get back via a refund at the end of the year).

Or you can try to dive into the details of the US tax system in order to "Pay Later" via the claim of deductions on your tax form -- but "Pay Later" can involve interest and penalties, so is often NOT recommended.

Total sales in NYC = 8.375%, but is not payable on clothing items under $100 and food in stores (other than "take out" type prepared foods.

Bottom line: NYC is more expensive than you think. So plan accordingly. And be thrifty when you first get here.
ny is actually quite cheap compared to many countries like norway, sweden, but even for countries like canada and australia. in nyc, i can buy a beef patty and pizza for $5. no way you can get that in those countries. then theres also the 99cent store which you can buy a lot of cheap stuff there. there is a kmart in nyc, so if you are cheap then you can find lots of stuff there. i had a key made in britain once and it cost me 4 pounds. this you can still get for $1 in ny. public transportation, also much cheaper in ny than in vancouver for example.