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TWIJOE
September 6th, 2008, 06:14 PM
Hi,

I'll be moving to New York from Paris on November 1st. I have a job lined up with annual salary of $55000.

Can i realistically imagine finding a place in Manhattan? I don't mind a small place and am aware of real estate prices (Paris is expensive too). A roomate would be fine although not ideal.

I'm willing to pay a broker's fee to get a nice place.

Any suggestions on places to look for apartments?
Any neighborhoods to suggest?

Any advice would be welcome.

Ivan
i wouldnt recomend manhattan for 55k. youre more suited for jersey city

TWIJOE
September 6th, 2008, 06:31 PM
Thanks a lot!! I have found some neighborhoods within the range to rent or buy a place but I am NOT sure about them. Could anyone give me a thumbs up or down on the following neighborhoods:

Elmhurst
Rego Park
Kew Garden Hills
Flushing
Howard Beach
Bayside
Briarwood
Forest Hills

Thanks again!i'll have to give you a thumbs down for howard beach, briarwood, and bayside. they are all very bad for public transport. there is a subway that reaches howard beach but its way too far. as for forest hills and rego park, they are quite expensive. flushing and elmhurst are also expensive. if you are going to look at ridiculous places like briarwood, you might as well look at corona, and jamaica. both are accessible by subway.

TWIJOE
September 6th, 2008, 06:54 PM
Hello all-

I am moving to NYC for a job. The job is in the Bronx... From what I can tell from previous visits, commuting from Astoria, Lower Manhattan, or Brooklyn can be upwards of an 1 hour to an hour and half.
Should I just live in the Bronx?
Is my perception of the length of travel incorrect?
Where should I live in the Bronx?
I really like Astoria and parts of Brooklyn, but I haven't spent anytime in the Bronx.
Which neighborhoods are "recommended" there?

I think that's all.

Thanks!
they have redone many parts of the south bronx. it is the closest part to manhattan. many people who cant afford manhattan have moved to the south bronx.

TWIJOE
September 6th, 2008, 07:01 PM
Obtaining a U.S. greencard is EXTREMELY difficult. There are only 3 ways to get a greencard (4 if you count asylum, but it doesn't apply to any countries in western Europe).

The first way to obtain a greencard is for a spouse, sibling, or parent who has American citizenship to petition on your behalf. No uncles, cousins, etc. can petition for you--neither can mere greencard holders. Also, I don't know what they're teaching in British schools, but Canada is not part of the United States.

The second way is to get sponsorship from an employer. However, finding an employer to sponsor you is difficult, the process itself is long and arduous, and the only jobs that an employer can sponsor a foreign national for are jobs that American citizens are unwilling, unable, or unready to take (i.e., chicken sexing).

The government differentiates between skilled (doctors, PhD's, nurses) and unskilled workers, and skilled workers get greencard application priority dates much faster. Right now, the greencard waiting period for UNSKILLED workers is about 6-7 years. That's 6-7 years before you're even eligible to apply for a greencard even with a sponsor. For skilled workers, it's about 4 years.

The third way is to win the greencard lottery. I have no idea how many lottery slots are allotted to the UK (all of Europe is allotted 3000 slots), but as there are many people who enter the lottery, the chances of getting picked is awfully slim. Still, if your name gets chosen, it's the easiest way to get a greencard.

If you are truly interested in living and working in the US, you need to seek the advice of an immigration attorney and not make plans based on what strangers on the web tell you.

For example, I realize Alonzo-ny means well, but the idea of coming for 90 days on a visa waiver program to try to find a sponsor is not a good one. Let's put aside the fact, for a moment, that finding a sponsor is very difficult (and virtually impossible for unskilled workers).

On the off chance that you somehow manage to find a sponsor who meets all the criteria, there's still more bad news--until the sponsorship kicks in, you cannot legally work in the USA unless you've obtained a temporary working visa (virtually impossible to get if you don't have a university degree). Right now, it's about a 4 year wait for the sponsorship to kick in. Because one cannot work legally until the sponsorship kicks in (unless you have the temp work visa), most sponsored workers go back to their home country--to advance their careers, obtain more education, etc--until the sponsorship starts (about 4 years).

If you decide to stay in the US until your sponsorship kicks in, you still cannot legally work in the meantime and you MUST leave the country every time your visa waiver expires (every 90 days). Overstaying your visa has serious consequences. If you overstay for 6 months, you cannot return to the US for 3 years. If you overstay for 1 year or longer, you will not be able to return to the US for 10 years.

If you take a job without the proper visa and the INS finds out, you will automatically lose your eligibility to apply for a greencard. Most likely, you will also be permanently banned from stepping foot on US soil again (unless you have a waiver from the Secretary of Homeland Security, which might as well be impossible). Working in the US without proper authorization is a HUGE deal.

In other words, there is no easy way and no short cuts to getting a greencard (unless you marry a citizen, that is). Seriously, the laws and regulations are so complex that your best bet is to find a good lawyer who specialized in immigration law and see what your options are.

I hope I didn't discourage the rest of you. It can be done, it's just incredibly complicated, tedious, and difficult.

Good luck-let me just also just say that getting a work permit in the u.s. is extremely difficult. even microsoft was complaining about that, and we know that corporations own america, so if the corporation of all corporations is struggling, you can imagine getting a work permit to work for pizza hut

TWIJOE
September 6th, 2008, 07:10 PM
Next fall I'll be moving to NYC in order to graduate from high school in a country other than mine (Portugal), but I don't know much about Manhattan public schools so I was wondering if anybody could help me out with my choice!

I was advised to go to Stuyvesant, because I'm studying Sciences, but I don't know if I can be admited there because of the examination they require (SSHSAT). Since I'm foreign would they have a special Admission Test?

Any answer would be nice! Thanks ***

:)it is one test for all. foreigners and locals.

TWIJOE
September 6th, 2008, 07:15 PM
Thanks for the reply. You certainly made me evaluate myself for a moment. First off, I am a born-again Pentecostal/non-denominational, and secondly, I am Republican. If this alone makes classifies me as being close-minded, then I guess I am. But I don't think it does. I keep my opinions to myself, unless anyone joins a friendly debate with me. In all truth, I much more likely to argue about religion than politics, as I do know my Bible, but am just beginning to understand the government (just started voting).

I embrace people of other cultures and value systems, but like people from other groups, I would just like to have some friends around me that share my own values (who doesn't?). Sorry if I didn't make it clear. I do not want to start a rally, and am not endowing myself with the responsibility of bringing Christianity to NYC.

Although there are things I love about the South (i.e. South Beach, fried foods, the way my accent fits in with everyone elses), the thing I am most looking forward to getting away from for a while is the segregation. The city where I live is greatly segregated and while I think this is somewhat unintentional, nevertheless there are entire sides of town encompassed by just blacks, and others by just whites. This has created a HUGE social gap here, and I believe it is definately one of the reasons why we have such a large murder rate. I definately want to get away from this for a while (if not forever. lol. ) I want to live in a city that is full of diversity. I just think I am getting cold feet, and am probably just over worried.

I googled some churches in the NYC area and came up with quite a few non-denominational ones.there are actually a lot of right wing types in nyc, especially manhattan. look at bloomberg, and giuliani. thats over 10 yrs of republican legacy. you also have to remember that ny has a huge finance industry, and most rich people are right wing. they are rich and they dont want anyone to touch it. they might be different from the ted hagard type of right wing but you will find a lot of people that share your beliefs.

TWIJOE
September 6th, 2008, 07:28 PM
one thing people should remember when deciding whether they want to live in brooklyn, queens, or jersey is where they will be spending their time in manhattan. if you live in queens, your first entry point into manhattan will be midtown. same goes for jersey. for people coming from brooklyn, your entry point will be downtown. so if you work/play in midtown, queens would be your best bet. if you work downtown, then brooklyn would be your best bet. and finally, if you are for example a student at columbia which is uptown, or just work uptown, then you should look into the bronx because its first entry point is uptown.

TWIJOE
September 6th, 2008, 07:34 PM
id love to work in NYC.... i've got an MCP, and been working in IT, anyone suggest any ways to get my CV around?:cool:
if you want to get your cv around look at websites like monster and hotjobs

antipodee
September 9th, 2008, 08:38 AM
i found this through google, have made my way through a chunk of the thread but will just dive in anyway since i haven't seen many questions in my vein.

i am eligible for a one year USA working holiday visa for 2009, (uni grad 2008). i am hoping for a similar experience to the UK working holiday visa that every man and his dog from Oz does - live/work in a big international city, but travel to other parts of the country at times. i would love to live in new york for all the stereotypical reasons, but i am trying to figure out if it is feasible for the limited stay of one year.

i have temped throughout my degree, so i have a few years call centre & office experience. humanities major, but not neccesarily looking for anything degree related, just life experience. i save pretty well, i will have approx $7000US so hopefully enough to enjoy the city not just exist. i commute an hour+ to my job at the moment and it doesn't bother me if i live in hole in the wall out of town. my questions:

given that i would have a one year visa, would this have any effect on finding an apartment/job - are people generally looking for people who can/will stay for longer?

how common is temp work, especially for travellers with foreign experience/ education/references etc? e.g in Sydney there are hundreds of temping agenceies with books filled with british travellers on gap years who get heaps of work. is the short term office work market taken up by internships in the US or is there still a fair amount of temping?

is there a quiet time of year in the job (especially temp) market - e.g winter/christmas or summer? (i am considering maybe 9 months in a city, 3 months in a seasonal job elsewhere)

is that article right to suggest people really going a year without making friends? generally if you didn't mind going to concerts alone and being generally proactive socially, is the social world that cutthroat?

would i be right to think, with amtrak, chinatown buses, greyhound etc, travel to see a bit more of the east coast would be fairly easy/within a modest budget?

or should i set my sights on a different city to get the most out of a year?

adchick82
September 9th, 2008, 02:01 PM
Why does TWIJOE keep quoting posts that are more than a year old?

718Bound
September 11th, 2008, 02:01 AM
Why does TWIJOE keep quoting posts that are more than a year old?


...and 20 in a row! :eek:

KenNYC
September 11th, 2008, 04:11 PM
Uhm, moderation needed :p

RS085
September 13th, 2008, 04:35 PM
I'm a recent college grad (May) who currently now lives upstate in Utica. (the worst ****ing city upstate).

Many friends and family in the city, and I went to school across the river in Jersey for the last two years of my undergrad. I spent alot of time in the city so I definitely know a thing or two. I'm currently just working at the city school district here and saving up money. So far I don't have much saved up at all because I just started but I plan on saving a few thousand to prepare for the move down.

I don't wanna live in Manhattan, because its more or less a destination for me, although Queens and Brooklyn (especially) have alot to offer in their own right. I'm looking in Queens or Brooklyn on craigslist. I'm 23, got a BA in History, and just wonder how much i'd need to make a month. I figure 30-40k a month will be feasible with a roommate(s). I don't have a car, don't want one. Id rather spend the $80 a month on the subway than a few hundred on gas/insurance/car payments, etc. I'm someone who can really sacrifice things if needed to get by, or what I want.

I thought about doing the teaching fellowship but im still on the fence with it. So how much $$$$$ should I leave aside? I'm looking for apartments that float around a grand.

I know alot of people that are in Brooklyn (Wburg/Fort Greene/etc.) and these areas I find ideal because they're semi-affordable and close to Manhattan. I know where to look and where not to, generally speaking.

I'm also trying to get my friend in Jersey to move back to the city with me. Hes from Queens but moved to Utica when he was little, known him ever since then, graduated HS together, etc. Its ideal to live w/ someone like that.

So if anyone can help id appreciate it.

and THANKS YOOOOOOOOOO

antinimby
September 13th, 2008, 09:49 PM
I figure 30-40k a month will be feasible with a roommate(s). You'd have no problem living anywhere on earth with a 30-40k a month budget. :D


Why does TWIJOE keep quoting posts that are more than a year old?Doesn't matter if it's a year old or not. Others later may find the information he/she gave useful.

RS085
September 13th, 2008, 11:35 PM
You'd have no problem living anywhere on earth with a 30-40k a month budget. :D



HAHAHAHAHAHAHA my bad antinimby.

I meant a year.

I'd say at LEAST 40k and depending on the rent and roommates, I could make it.

withjoy
September 14th, 2008, 07:44 PM
Hello everyone! This forum has been a treasure of great information, but I still have a few questions.

First, my situation - I am 34 with a Master's degree and have been at my current teaching job (in Manhattan, Kansas. Yes, really.) for seven years. I make $38,000 and own my own home. My credit score is excellent. My salary is plenty for living in the heart of fly-over country, but I don't really have an idea of cost of living in the NYC area.

I am applying to PhD programs at both Columbia's Teachers' College and NYU. From the research I have done, I think my chances of being accepted are at least better than average. Here is my problem -- how do students live in NYC?? I would rather not live in a dorm room -- a small studio would be fine. (If I have a bed, a bathroom and a small kitchen area - I'll be good.) I don't need to live in Manhattan and don't mind commuting to school, although if it could 45 minutes or under -- that'd be nice. Is that even reasonable? What range of monthly rent am I looking at?

It seems like Brooklyn might be an option if I end up at NYC, but I can't figure out the neighborhoods. I'm not looking for nightlife or a fashionable spot. :-) What about reasonable places for the Teacher's College? Are there areas I should be focusing on? I'm just trying to get a sense of what I need to be saving for.

Also - I won't have a guarantor since my parents make about the same salary that I do (and it seems really weird to have my parents signing something for me at 34! Not that they wouldn't be willing.) I hope to be funded in my PhD work. (That will be part of my decision on where to go.) I have previous experience teaching writing at the university level, and I hope to have a GTA position. (Please ignore the grammar in this post!) :-) Is it possible to rent an appartment as a student with a job that hasn't started yet? I hope to move in at least a week before classes start. This housing issue will help me figure out if I can keep my house as a rental property or if I need to sell it to finance this adventure.

Any help and advice you can give will be much appreciated. Thank you!!

BrooklynRider
September 14th, 2008, 11:10 PM
There willbe differences in salary coming to NY. $30-35 is more of a typical salary of entry level positions for someone with a 4-year college degree.

If you land at NYU, they have extensive student housing throughout Manhattan. While I believe you will be able to find housing for your level of income within the five boroughs of NYC, I'm guessing that a roommate situation would probably serve you best.

I know a guy at Columbia that rents a large three bedroom townhouse with two bathrooms in a great part of Harlem, with two other friends, for $2700/month.

withjoy
September 14th, 2008, 11:26 PM
I'm sorry, I just knew my post would be unclear in some area! The $38K is what I make here in Manhattan, Kansas. As a PhD student (hopefully with funding), I'm not quite sure what I'll make in New York. I have no idea what my salary will be or what kind of time I'll have with a full class load. I hope to work at the university teaching undergrad Expository Writing, perhaps as part of a fellowship. (I have two years experience teaching that class.) During my master's work, I was able to rent a room and live somewhat comfortably on the living stipend from my TA position.

What I'm looking for is advice on what neighborhoods I need to be focusing my research on if I'm going to study at the Teacher's College (I think it might be near Morningside?) or NYU. That way I can do some aggressive saving and hopefully be ready for what awaits me.

Thanks for your help!

Schadenfrau
September 15th, 2008, 10:45 AM
If you're studying at Columbia, look for a roommate situation in Harlem or Washington Heights.

withjoy
September 15th, 2008, 12:08 PM
Thanks! I'll focus on those areas. What about NYU? It seems that Brooklyn might be an option if I am willing to have a commute (which I am.) is that true? Is there a neighborhood outside of Manhattan that would be a good option for Columbia? (I don't have a desperate need to live in Manhattan. It would be nice, of course, but I want to be realistic about my finances!)

Thank you for all your advice. You all are so gracious to help out on this board.

Schadenfrau
September 15th, 2008, 03:32 PM
I don't know much about NYU's teaching school, so I'll leave that to someone else.

Frankly, I think the commute between most parts of Brooklyn and Columbia (at least an hour) would be so long as to cut into your academic work. You might want to accustom yourself to thinking in terms of distance and travel by subway, not miles:

http://www.mta.info/nyct/maps/submap.htm

Outside of Manhattan, you would do best to look into the Bronx. The area around Yankee Stadium is home to many Columbia grad students, and is a short distance away. Riverdale in the Bronx would work, as well.

alexdf
September 21st, 2008, 08:41 PM
I've been lurking on this forum for a while, but I am still puzzled. Moving to NYC in January and will (hopefully) make decent income there.

I can comfortably spend about $2,500/month on rent, and all I need is a decent 1br apartment.

The question is: which area in Manhattan to look in?

I don't have kids, I work from home and, therefore, I will be spending a lot of time in the area I choose. Basically I'm looking for a neighborhood with *tons* of stuff accessible by foot from my apartment: restaurants, bars, cafes, book stores, groceries, etc. That's the main criteria. I hate driving.

I've been to NYC before, and I must say I am not sure I like Brooklyn and Queens (although I haven't been to downtown Brooklyn). I've been reading Wikipedia on various Manhattan parts and they're all sound the same form "good" to "great": UES, UWS, Chelsea...

Would be great to hear what NYC residents have to say about various parts of Manhattan.

Thank you very much!
--
P.S. I did trying to search for answers, but the search feature here is very rudimentary... Not helpful at all.

stache
September 21st, 2008, 09:19 PM
Maybe Yorkville or Washington Heights.

KenNYC
September 24th, 2008, 08:24 PM
If you're alone, might want to consider a studio as well. If you can get one with a clearly separated sleeping alcove or maybe a loft, that'll save you a little money.

Phill
November 13th, 2008, 09:11 AM
Hello,

My name is Phill I'm an Australian living in Europe, I have a great opportunity to move to New York but my education would be useless in the US, so I need a new proffesion, does anybody have an Idea what would be best in two categoriess good salary and accesibility for foreigners, I have in mind simple proffessions ex. welder, plumber, electrician, waiter etc..
sorry for my english, and thx for all the tips:)

ablarc
November 14th, 2008, 05:42 PM
^ Nurse.

Alonzo-ny
November 14th, 2008, 05:59 PM
Why are you apologising for your English?

Phill
November 14th, 2008, 07:16 PM
Why are you apologising for your English?

Because it is very possible that i've made some mistakes since I didn't use It for years:(

rmassengale
November 17th, 2008, 05:21 AM
All of the Q&A on here is extremely helpful yet I would like to get some more specific details and feedback from all of you. I also plan to move to NY very soon and I am questioning the amount of money I have to take with me to play it safe.

1. Rent (Harlem Studio 5 Mths advance & Sec. @ $900 mth) - $5,400
** I am moving w/ no job and bad credit. To better the odds of not being turned down for an apartment, I will provide 6 mths in total.

2. Living Expenses (Up to 3 mths while I jobhunt) - $3,000

3. Pots/Pans/Bed - $500

4. Extra Money should I not find work - $1000

5. Hotel (14 nights YMCA @ $50 per night to search for apts) - $700
** I'm hoping it doens't take 2 wks to find an apt
________________________________
Total = $10,699

I would like advice from others who plan to move/has already moved to NY if they feel this amount would be a good amount to have when moving. I feel I have planned for the unexpected job market, apartment situation (should I not find work asap) and whatever may come along. Or, perhaps I'm being naive??? I'm tryint to do this with logic. Please, let me know what all of you think. I want to make sure this move goes smooth as I do not know anyone in NYC.

THANK YOU ALL SO VERY MUCH FOR YOUR FEEDBACK!!! And by all means, don't hold back on your answers. If you feel I'm setting myself up for failure, please detail.

Do you know anyone that lives in the area? It's difficult to open a simple checking account here for the first time. I wound up living in a hotel for a month when I started out here, with good credit. Banks will not start an account for you with a hotel address. Fortunately I discovered a college chum that had moved here years before. I was able to use his address to open my checking account.

Phill
November 17th, 2008, 06:42 PM
^ Nurse.


heh, It takes years to become a nurse I need something quicker ;), arent there any need's for some decent jobs, like for a fork lift truck driver or somethig??

stache
December 6th, 2008, 07:56 AM
I had good results with Bekins.

Apion
December 12th, 2008, 04:05 PM
Welcome everyone

I currently live and work in Dublin, but always wanted to move to NYC.
I am a QFA (qualified financial adviser) and have BA in financial services plus some cert in accounting.
Whats the chance to get a decent job in my profession, and how much would I get?
Thanks a lot.

DawgDdogg
December 12th, 2008, 10:40 PM
I work in the oilfield now and am recently divorced. I am a truck driver with no kids. I want to move to NY in June of 09. I'll probably only have about 10,000.00 saved up. I don't have good credit because I stopped using it years ago. I will only have my clothes....NO car. Basically I want to know is this possible. I can work as a truck driver in NY somewhere..and will more than likely have a job doing so before I move there....hopefully. I want to do other things with my life career wise. And I still love the night-life. Is june too soon or can I make it work. I don't mind living with people...it will at least put me in a position to meet some "possible" friends. Any and all help is greatly appreciated.

Brianna827
December 18th, 2008, 02:30 PM
i def recommend subleting an apartment maybe for a few months before permantley moveing to nyc ...stay with a friend...really make sure it's what you want to do and you like it. Because it is not for everyone

DawgDdogg
December 20th, 2008, 09:39 PM
thanks girl....what exactly is sub-letting...is that just renting a room from somebody?

Miles23
February 2nd, 2009, 11:09 PM
thanks girl....what exactly is sub-letting...is that just renting a room from somebody?

Yes, it usually is.

KenNYC
February 7th, 2009, 11:21 AM
Subletting is renting from someone else that is also renting their apartment. (i.e. not directly from the owner). It is usually unproblematic and simple. Just make sure they are actually subletting and not assigning you their lease.

dan@buzzedNYC
February 8th, 2009, 01:19 AM
(hey... cool dashboard...!)

hi guys -dan here... this is my first time posting & just wanted to introduce myself real quick...

i'm a film student over at NYU & have been moonlighting as a real estate agent since November 2008... i started a no fee apartment rental blog last month that currently has some no fee listings for the East Village (http://buzzednyc.com/2009/01/east-village-apartments.html), Midtown West (http://buzzednyc.com/2009/01/midtown-west.html), Nolita (http://buzzednyc.com/2009/01/nolita.html), & the West Village. (http://buzzednyc.com/2009/01/west-village.html)..

it's strictly a one man operation so not as extensive as the big boys but i do work only no fee apartments & you can rest assured i won't ever -Ever!- charge a broker fee...

in fact, it wasn't until i got my license that i learned the vast majority of apartment buidlings in Manhattan are no fee! if you deal directly with the landlord, 9 out of 10 times you can bypass a broker fee...

anyhow, you all seem like a good bunch to get down with & i look forward to checking in from time to time...

in the meantime, feel free to visit me anytime at buzzed-nyc (http://buzzednyc.com/2009/01/key-things-to-know.html) to say hello, ask a question, or just give me some feeback about how helpful my blog is or is not... in the least, i hope you find it slightly entertaining...

Cheers,

dan

buzzed-nyc (http://buzzednyc.com/2009/01/key-things-to-know.html)
--
New York City Apartments -No Broker Fee... No Sign Up Fee... No BS.

KenNYC
February 8th, 2009, 11:49 AM
heh, It takes years to become a nurse I need something quicker ;), arent there any need's for some decent jobs, like for a fork lift truck driver or somethig??

I really hate to end up as Mr Negative here, although I guess I sometimes do. But if you have looked at the news lately it should be obvious that this isn't a good time to be moving around at all, least of all to an expensive place like NY. If you somehow manage to secure a job before moving, then go ahead, but just packing up and leaving right now is a thoroughly bad idea.

AJTraveler
February 9th, 2009, 07:12 PM
Hey everyone. My friend and I are planning on moving to New York around August and I've been reading this forum and have found it really helpful. I have a few questions that hopefully you guys can help me with.

For the last 7 years I've been working for a touring theatre production. I'm on the road full time, and I've lost track of the landlord that I had previous to joining tour. Will it be a big issue that I dont' really have a rental history when trying to get an apartment?

Also, I've noticed that they usually want to see that your annual income is at a certain level. I won't have a paycheck from my new job in NY yet, so would they look at what I made at my previous job? Sorry, I'm just not really sure how that works.

I'm still in the process of figuring out what areas of New York I'm interested in moving to, so I will be asking a few more questions once I know a bit more about that. I am going to be trying to work in the theatre district, so if anyone has any advice on what areas would be easily accessible with a decent commute, that would be appreciated.

thanks so much!

dan@buzzedNYC
February 19th, 2009, 01:57 AM
(1) Will it be a big issue that I dont' really have a rental history when trying to get an apartment?

(2) ... I won't have a paycheck from my new job in NY yet, so would they look at what I made at my previous job?

(3) ... any advice on what areas would be easily accessible with a decent commute, that would be appreciated.


hi AJ,

(1) not having a rental history is not necessarily a big deal... indeed, what matters for most landlords is money... in which case you can be asked to make a larger security deposit, or be required to apply with a guarantor to make up for any deficiency in history or even money...

(2) yes -expect to be asked for a copy of your previous year's taxes & your most current bank statement... (feel free to read my blog post about application requirements Application Process: Know Your Docs Before You Apply! (http://buzzednyc.com/2009/01/apartment-rentals-know-your-docs-before.html) )

(3) there's theater all over this town & it almost doesn't matter where you live if you're near a main subway express line! the meat of theater, of course, is Bdwy & the closest neighborhoods are Midtown West & Midtown East, which can easily mean living within walking distance of the big theater houses...

i personally prefer & live in Midtown West -Hell's Kitchen to be exact- & can tell you that it's full of theater professionals who love it here... as for rent, prices are currently deflating & will hopefully be in a good place by the time you arrive...

you can browse my Midtown West No Fee Apartment (http://buzzednyc.com/2009/01/midtown-west.html) listings to get a sense of current rents w/ respect to size...

if any of this helps, please drop me a comment at buzzedNYC (http://buzzednyc.com/2009/01/key-things-to-know.html) to let me know...

cheers,

dan
--
New York City Apartments -No Broker Fee... No Sign Up Fee... No BS.

MumElise
February 23rd, 2009, 06:16 AM
A friend of mine wants to move to New York but he is not really sure in where. I recommended Brookly because it is very central but though a nice part of New York.
Where would you move to?

OldStudent
February 28th, 2009, 09:43 PM
I posted a while back thinking about moving to NYC and shortly thereafter my pragmatic side kicked in(when the economy started slowing) and so now I'm looking at applying for a Master's program where I live. I'm bummed because I have a lot of emotional attachments to the Mid-Atlantic and I wanted to do a stint in NYC while my beloved parents are still around. I'll be switching gears to start studying the visiting New York thread to plan a great trip. I want to thank all of the regular posters on this thread for such valuable insights and information.

RAM1424
March 18th, 2009, 12:57 PM
Hi to all. My name is Roman I plan on moving to NY in near future and I would like to get some advice from people who live in NY. I have few questions.
What's a good valid way to find a job in NYC?
I'm in a criminal justice field, so I'm looking for something relevant to that field.
Is it relistic to own a ca in NYC and surrounding cities or I would be beter riding a cab or something in that nature.
I have million questions but this is enough for beggining. Any and all help is greatly appreciated.

KenNYC
March 29th, 2009, 02:28 PM
Hi to all. My name is Roman I plan on moving to NY in near future and I would like to get some advice from people who live in NY. I have few questions.
What's a good valid way to find a job in NYC?
I'm in a criminal justice field, so I'm looking for something relevant to that field.
Is it relistic to own a ca in NYC and surrounding cities or I would be beter riding a cab or something in that nature.
I have million questions but this is enough for beggining. Any and all help is greatly appreciated.

No ideas on the job front, I'm assuming government is not recruiting any more than private enterprise is right now, so probably tough. Still, sending applications never killed anyone, and I'm guessing you'd be looking for those jobs at NYPD's website.

It's absolutely realistic to own a car in NYC, whether it is worth it is another matter. First of all is parking, if you want indoor parking expect to pay a lot. My building currently charges $680 / month for a single parking space. I've seen other places further uptown, often towards west side that are as "low" as $250-300 a month. In many places you can also park on the street, but that's obviously going to be first come, first served, so prepare to battle for them. I have rarely, if ever, missed having a car, cabs and subway work just fine. Subway is $2 going anywhere, and $10-15 gets you a long way in a cab. If you plan to go out of the city fairly regularly it might be worth it, since rental cars could quickly get expensive as well.

Countesss
April 15th, 2009, 11:11 AM
No ideas on the job front, I'm assuming government is not recruiting any more than private enterprise is right now, so probably tough. Still, sending applications never killed anyone, and I'm guessing you'd be looking for those jobs at NYPD's website.

It's absolutely realistic to own a car in NYC, whether it is worth it is another matter. First of all is parking, if you want indoor parking expect to pay a lot. My building currently charges $680 / month for a single parking space. I've seen other places further uptown, often towards west side that are as "low" as $250-300 a month. In many places you can also park on the street, but that's obviously going to be first come, first served, so prepare to battle for them. I have rarely, if ever, missed having a car, cabs and subway work just fine. Subway is $2 going anywhere, and $10-15 gets you a long way in a cab. If you plan to go out of the city fairly regularly it might be worth it, since rental cars could quickly get expensive as well.

- Federal agencies are still actually hiring; albeit to a lesser extent. The best clearing house of all major government jobs is located at USAJOBS (http://www.usajobs.gov/). The process is lengthy and involved; be prepared for a long wait and application process.

- If I had not found a house on Staten Island, I doubt I would have kept any vehicle save my motorcycle. Off-street and/or free parking is rare in the city. Vehicle insurance is outrageous here (NJ is 1/2 the annual premium) and you are likely to get some kind of damage whether in an accident, from a parking lot or due to the poor maintenance of NYC streets. I have not found taxi's to be economical at all and the price of public transportation will be going WAY up in the near future.

Countesss
April 15th, 2009, 11:15 AM
A friend of mine wants to move to New York but he is not really sure in where. I recommended Brookly because it is very central but though a nice part of New York.
Where would you move to?

Any of the five boroughs will have good and bad areas to them. Brooklyn is an up-and-coming area for improvements, but it's not all there yet. Queens is still too remote and the Bronx just has too many bad elements, in my opinion. Kudos if you can afford Manhattan, but I prefer Staten Island; far enough away and enough affluent areas to feel comfortable walking around. The only drawback I can see is access to trains; there are none going into the city, but express buses are plentiful and the Staten Island Ferry is free!

bigapple
April 30th, 2009, 01:08 PM
Hi, I'm going to move to New York very soon. I've been offered a job in a hotel in Manhattan (manager of the restaurant, with a pretty okay salary). Do you think it's possible for me to rent an appartment in Manhattan (close to central park, and sharing it with a roommate is no problem).

scumonkey
April 30th, 2009, 01:24 PM
you'll have to give us more info than that....like what you expect to pay for rent- (if you can afford it, you most likely can rent it)

Schadenfrau
April 30th, 2009, 07:46 PM
Any of the five boroughs will have good and bad areas to them. Brooklyn is an up-and-coming area for improvements, but it's not all there yet. Queens is still too remote and the Bronx just has too many bad elements, in my opinion. Kudos if you can afford Manhattan, but I prefer Staten Island; far enough away and enough affluent areas to feel comfortable walking around. The only drawback I can see is access to trains; there are none going into the city, but express buses are plentiful and the Staten Island Ferry is free!

I'm confused here: Queens is too remote, but Staten Island is A-OK? Long Island City is one subway stop from midtown. Also, if you're claiming that Brooklyn is "up and coming" and the Bronx has too many bad elements, you might want to set the dial on your time machine for something later than 1977.

MidtownGuy
April 30th, 2009, 09:49 PM
Lmao

Countesss
May 1st, 2009, 12:12 PM
I'm confused here: Queens is too remote, but Staten Island is A-OK? Long Island City is one subway stop from midtown. Also, if you're claiming that Brooklyn is "up and coming" and the Bronx has too many bad elements, you might want to set the dial on your time machine for something later than 1977.

Don't mess with my time machine, now! :p As is always assumed, this is my own opinion and simply based upon those I have talked to, my own experiences and what I've researched. I have friends in Queens who are up by LGA and literally in the 'boonies' - who absolutely hate the fact they're so far out from Manhattan. I realize Queens is a large area and should have clarified.

There are certainly parts of Brooklyn I've seen that are being revitalized and money is being poured into them. The folks I've spoken with who were born and grew up there (and left due to the crime and filth) are now returning to those same areas and are amazed at what they see.

As far as SI being 'remote' - I have not found that to be the case at all and it seems it is truly the "forgotten borough". I love it there and try to educate folks like you who seem to be absolutely adamant in their opinion. Brooklyn (Verazzano-side) is 1 bus-stop from my home and express buses are everywhere. Of course it's a big island and it all depends on where one is located. I've not seen any part of the Bronx that I would feel comfortable living in or even walking the streets of and it seems to take forever to get to.

No need to feel 'confused'... but if you have additional and/or specific information to share, please do so!

ZippyTheChimp
May 1st, 2009, 01:23 PM
I have friends in Queens who are up by LGA and literally in the 'boonies' - who absolutely hate the fact they're so far out from Manhattan.The area around LGA has relatively poor mass transit into Manhattan. The same can be said for parts pf Brooklyn such as Canarsie, but they are urban areas and not "literally out in the boonies."

Staten Island has a tenuous connection to the rest of the city. In a metro consideration, it would make more sense if JC and Hoboken were part of NY and Staten Island were part of NJ.


There are certainly parts of Brooklyn I've seen that are being revitalized and money is being poured into them. The folks I've spoken with who were born and grew up there (and left due to the crime and filth) are now returning to those same areas and are amazed at what they see.Yes, you are in a time warp. This is not exactly the latest news.


As far as SI being 'remote' - I have not found that to be the case at all and it seems it is truly the "forgotten borough". I love it there and try to educate folks like you who seem to be absolutely adamant in their opinion.The "forgotten borough" is what you become when you are in fact isolated from the rest of the city.


I've not seen any part of the Bronx that I would feel comfortable living in or even walking the streets of and it seems to take forever to get to.Where in the Bronx have you visited, and when?

Schadenfrau
May 1st, 2009, 06:47 PM
I've not seen any part of the Bronx that I would feel comfortable living in or even walking the streets of and it seems to take forever to get to.

No need to feel 'confused'... but if you have additional and/or specific information to share, please do so!

I live in the Bronx and can be in midtown Manhattan within 20 minutes. How long is the trip from Staten Island?

I'm also curious as to where and when you've been to the Bronx, and what exactly it is that makes the idea of walking the streets so unbearably frightening to you.

OmegaNYC
May 1st, 2009, 09:08 PM
Not to jump in, but some parts of the Bronx is nice and is only a short ride from Manhattan. I'm thinking of an area such as Riverdale that is only a few stops from Manhattan along the 1, and a ride to Midtown is only a transfer away on 96 st to an express 2 or 3 train.

BrooklynRider
May 5th, 2009, 09:58 AM
Go to this (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=39) forum and check out Bronx Development. The Bronx has some great stuff going on and is home to many beautiful stable neighborhoods as well as many newly rediscovered neighborhoods.

conorsul
May 16th, 2009, 05:15 PM
Hey, Im going to be in New York for the summer on a J1 visa, I have two questions:

1) What is the best way to find cheap tempoary accomodation for the summer (2-3 months)? What neighbourhoods would you recommend? Is craigslist the best or are there better ways? I would be thinking 400-650 a month tops.

2) Wheres good to look for a job? Again, is craigslist the best? Is the job market good or is it going to be hard with recession all about etc.

grindin65
May 19th, 2009, 01:08 PM
I am moving back to NYC after a two year absence. I am considering using one of these agencies, such as: Delta Room Rentals, NYC Rooms For Rent Inc, for a short term living until I find employment. Has anyone ever used one of these agencies or knows someone who did? What was the experience like? Would you or they recommend it for a short term situation?:confused:

http://wirednewyork.com/forum/images/misc/progress.gif

Alonzo-ny
May 20th, 2009, 01:49 PM
Hey, Im going to be in New York for the summer on a J1 visa, I have two questions:

1) What is the best way to find cheap tempoary accomodation for the summer (2-3 months)? What neighbourhoods would you recommend? Is craigslist the best or are there better ways? I would be thinking 400-650 a month tops.

2) Wheres good to look for a job? Again, is craigslist the best? Is the job market good or is it going to be hard with recession all about etc.

Craiglist for accomodation, you will be limited in location.

The job market from what Im hearing is extremely bad.

Bill2008
May 21st, 2009, 12:37 PM
Lots of bait switch in these Craigslist rental ads with brokers. Been looking on the UWS near 97th St and Columbus (new Whole Foods opens there soon).

What "should" i be paying in rent for a 250 sq ft studio? Hopefully i can find for rent by owner.

ps - no job, no debt, 50k cash, 720 FICO score, good LL reference (5 yrs in current place), willing to put down a few month deposit

smarty jones
May 21st, 2009, 03:14 PM
The difference between a condo and co-op is control. co-op boards control buying and selling. owners control buying and selling in condo's. More value in co-ops for lack of control with space for the money. condo's have larer retained value for ease of selling.

new2city
May 26th, 2009, 10:49 PM
Hi everyone,

I'm about to move to NYC from Arizona and can't find any info about bringing my handguns with me. Does anyone know the proper procedure for a non-resident to bring a handgun when relocating to the city?

I've checked the NRA site and NYC.gov with little luck.

any help is appreciated.

ZippyTheChimp
May 26th, 2009, 11:27 PM
New York doesn't recognize an out-of-state handgun license, and doesn't issue a license to a non-resident.

So you'll have to apply for a license as a resident. I'm not sure how this works out, but the NYPD License Division (http://www.nyc.gov/html/nypd/html/permits/handgun_licensing_information.shtml#license_divisi on) has a contact tel # 646-610-5560.

Call and find out exactly what you need to do.

Gekko
May 27th, 2009, 01:16 PM
I would suggest you learn how to read the subway map before you move to NYC.


NYC subway is one of the best transit systems in the world,you can learn how to read the map online or ''Hopstop'' would be handy-just enter your starting point and your destination and it will give you door-to-door directions.

conorsul
June 2nd, 2009, 10:29 AM
Can anyone offer any advice?.


Hey, Im going to be in New York for the summer on a J1 visa, I have two questions:

1) What is the best way to find cheap tempoary accomodation for the summer (2-3 months)? What neighbourhoods would you recommend? Is craigslist the best or are there better ways? I would be thinking 400-650 a month tops.

2) Wheres good to look for a job? Again, is craigslist the best? Is the job market good or is it going to be hard with recession all about etc.

Turns out with exchange rate can afford to spend 800/month on accomodation

adchick82
June 2nd, 2009, 06:58 PM
I'd look on Craigslist for a temporary sublet - that's how I found the first apartment/roommates that I lived in/with, and it worked out very well.

Enigm_Axxxx
July 12th, 2009, 03:26 PM
EDIT: After further lurking on these forums I feel that it would be better if I started my own thread, since my post was so long. Sorry for the mistake.

jendenkem
July 12th, 2009, 10:41 PM
I am a female from NC and have always wanted to to NYC. I have been visiting for many years now and each time have been falling in love with the atmosphere. I have a Communication degree from a credited college and have to of course first find a job. Right now I work at a great company with good benefits and good pay. My co-workers encourage me to live out my dreams before I get too old or regret it. I am very educated and very knowledgeable when it comes to work and am definitely a hardworker. I do not like to share aparatments with others but I think in this case, I will have to. Everyday this eats at me and I am constantly doing research to find the best option for me. Any advice?:confused:

jendenkem
July 12th, 2009, 10:45 PM
I am a female from NC and have always wanted to to NYC. I have been visiting for many years now and each time have been falling in love with the atmosphere. I have always loved huge cities and Raleigh is just not doing it for me. I have a Communication degree from a credited college and have to of course first find a job. Right now I work at a great company with good benefits and good pay. My co-workers encourage me to live out my dreams before I get too old or regret it. I am very educated and very knowledgeable when it comes to work and am definitely a hardworker. I do not like to share aparatments with others but I think in this case, I will have to. Everyday this eats at me and I am constantly doing research to find the best option for me. I am planning on moving hopefully next year by June. Any advice?:confused:

danielhl
July 17th, 2009, 02:56 AM
Hey.

I'm from Norway and I am considering a move to New York in the near future. Prices in Oslo are similar to those in New York, perhaps more expensive.

Few questions.

I have a degree in interactive design(IT), how is the job market for that industry at the moment in the US? Shitty? Like everything else or possible to find a job?

Here in Oslo I tax 36% of my paycheck which is a lot i know(but worth it, considering what we get in return). How much is normal to pay in taxes in NYC?.

Is there a "norwegian" neighbourhood in NYC? Read somewhere that Brooklyn had an area where a lot of 2nd and 3rd generation norwegians settled. Might be bogus though.

This may sound weird, but I lived in DC during middle school and freshman year and I got busted for weed. Was never charged or anything, but is that something that can come back and haunt me now with the visa applications etc? Was over 10 years ago(We all do dumb shit from time to time :P).

Going to NYC in the middle of august for a vacation where I am gonna stay in Spanish Harlem :)

twhite1221
July 29th, 2009, 02:37 PM
as someone who is looking to move to the city from the south with no connections in the city or a job lined up prior to arriving...would landlords work with you if you had a year's rent saved up prior to arriving in lieu of rental history or guarantor in the area?? btw i have excellent credit and currently own a home where i currently reside.

KenNYC
August 1st, 2009, 05:51 AM
I'm from Norway and I am considering a move to New York in the near future. Prices in Oslo are similar to those in New York, perhaps more expensive.

Kinda depends... it's possible to live pretty frugally in NY (except rent) if you want, but for a "normal NY lifestyle", it's quite a lot more expensive than Oslo.


I have a degree in interactive design(IT), how is the job market for that industry at the moment in the US? Shitty? Like everything else or possible to find a job?

Pretty slow right now yes, but by all means, do look. IT professionals are given beneficial treatment when it comes to visa applications, so you might be a bit more lucky than most others there.


Here in Oslo I tax 36% of my paycheck which is a lot i know(but worth it, considering what we get in return). How much is normal to pay in taxes in NYC?.

More or less the same. NYC is very tax-heavy compared to the rest of the US.


Is there a "norwegian" neighbourhood in NYC? Read somewhere that Brooklyn had an area where a lot of 2nd and 3rd generation norwegians settled. Might be bogus though.

Not really. There are a lot of Norwegian ancestry in that area, but none of them are what you'd call Norwegians. They will love meeting you and talking to you about the country, but they generally don't speak Norwegian, most of them haven't visited or anything.

The Norwegian Seamen's Church (2nd Ave and 52nd St.) has a lot of events for Norwegians. In particular they have at least once a month an event called "Ung i New York" which is a get-together of people from ages 16-35 or so (no fixed limits, mind you, just the crowd that usually shows up). No idea how old you are, so just saying. Au pairs, students, young professionals. It's a good way to get to know people if you're feeling a bit alone in the city.

There are also a few groups of Scandinavians that throw private parties around the city, usually pretty dominated by Swedes however.


This may sound weird, but I lived in DC during middle school and freshman year and I got busted for weed. Was never charged or anything, but is that something that can come back and haunt me now with the visa applications etc? Was over 10 years ago(We all do dumb shit from time to time :P).

Probably not, but full disclosure in your interview is the way to go. Nothing will piss off people more than trying to deceive them. Possession of small amounts of weed in New York isn't even a misdemeanor anymore :p Just sayin. (Federal laws aside).


Going to NYC in the middle of august for a vacation where I am gonna stay in Spanish Harlem :)

Enjoy :)

KenNYC
August 1st, 2009, 05:52 AM
as someone who is looking to move to the city from the south with no connections in the city or a job lined up prior to arriving...would landlords work with you if you had a year's rent saved up prior to arriving in lieu of rental history or guarantor in the area?? btw i have excellent credit and currently own a home where i currently reside.

Hard to say these days, landlords might be more flexible now than they were a year ago, for obvious reasons. If you are willing to pay a full year in advance, your chances increase dramatically, but you also lose leverage over the landlord in case something breaks etc. Can't withhold rent you already paid.

Lindsay
September 20th, 2009, 06:38 PM
Hi everyone,

I'm looking to move to New York in August or September of next year with my boyfriend. I have a lot of questions about this. Although I have family and friends who are from New York, most of them have not lived there for a number of years.

What are some of the more inexpensive and nicer neighborhoods, specifically for grad students? When should we start looking for/at apartments? Should we opt for a broker, or no broker? Are there any alternative housing options that would be good for us, with people are us?

Thanks so much for your help :)

BrooklynRider
September 21st, 2009, 06:43 AM
What university will you attend? That would narrow down the neighborhoods.

NY is comprised of five "boroughs", which are the equivalent of "counties."

Lindsay
September 21st, 2009, 11:32 AM
Thanks so much for the quick response.

Neither of us have been accepted yet, but we are planning on moving to the city regardless of whether or not we are accepted into our choice schools.

I'm applying to Hunter College and The New School. My boyfriend is applying to NYU.

Obviously, neighborhoods that are easy to commute from would be our best bets. We were thinking Brooklyn or Queens, if we can't afford Manhattan.

[312]nick
September 22nd, 2009, 04:39 PM
My sister and I are planning on moving to NYC the fall of 2010 for school. I am just starting to do research on apartments and such. Is it completely unreasonable to think that we can afford a 2 br place in Manhattan solely on student loans and part time jobs? If so would Brooklyn or Queens be a more viable option? I just need to get out of Chicago. Thanks

hbcat
October 24th, 2009, 03:11 AM
Hi there. I am originally from NJ :rolleyes: , born just across the water there, but haven't lived in the NYC area since the 70s. Visited loads of times -- ranging from a day to a few days to weeks per time. I've not lived in the US since 1983 (except for some graduate work), but I am hoping to spend a research leave in NY in a couple of years, possible 2011-2012.

My funds are not as tight as they used to be (I'll dip into savings if I don't get enough research support, etc.), and I want to live in Manhattan -- I can handle perhaps $2000+ / month plus utilities, etc. I am not asking for neighborhood advice per se, but my question comes down to this -- is a one year sublet more reasonable to go after rather than a lease? Is a direct lease even possible for a single year considering I have no meaningful rental history in the U.S.? (My credit is perfect, and I can prove I have the money for a year's rent & expenses.) I am on an academic schedule so I can be slightly flexible with time parameters such as these -- July 1, 2011-August 31, 2012, or a variation, e.g. September 1-August 31.

I REALLY want to live in the city. Yes, I know the other Burroughs have a lot going for them, and I might consider them if I decide to stay on (as I might, fingers crossed), but I want to live in Manhattan if possible. One concern will be negotiating a sublet or rental from overseas. I don't want spend precious weeks apartment hunting. On the other hand, I want to see a place before I commit, of course.

Am I planning too far ahead? Maybe, but that's just me.

What would *you* do? Any and all advice would be welcome.

Cheers,
hbcat

p.s. My partner will be living with me some of the year, but not the whole of it, unless we get doubly lucky. Wish us luck, will ya? :)

ldsim1986
October 25th, 2009, 07:38 PM
Hey everyone,

Just wanted some advice on a little bit of everything, im moving to NYC for an intern.. which is unpaid. But, the opportunity is too great to pass up. Hopefully, I can stay with a relative that is close to the area. However, I am preparing for the worst case scenario. The intern starts in a few months, so im just saving what i can and preparing mentally for the move. Any advice? Cost of living? Metrocards? Subways? Im preparing from scratch so the advice is greatly appreciated

Taz
October 27th, 2009, 01:06 AM
Cost of living depends entirely on where you live, and this is not a cheap city to live in. Metrocards range from 2.25 for a single ride to $89 for a monthly, which would probably be your best bet if you plan on commuting a lot.

You can find all the information you need on the subways here:
www.mta.info


Hey everyone,

Just wanted some advice on a little bit of everything, im moving to NYC for an intern.. which is unpaid. But, the opportunity is too great to pass up. Hopefully, I can stay with a relative that is close to the area. However, I am preparing for the worst case scenario. The intern starts in a few months, so im just saving what i can and preparing mentally for the move. Any advice? Cost of living? Metrocards? Subways? Im preparing from scratch so the advice is greatly appreciated

jazzguy
October 29th, 2009, 06:52 PM
Hello all.
Okay, so my wife and I want to move to NY. I'm a jazz musician, and I played a show in NY last August. She's from London and has never seen NY so I made my gig into a vacation and she was knocked out, way beyond what I would have expected.
She's a nurse, an ICU nurse at Emory hospital in Atlanta. I'm a jazz composer and drummer, semi-retired. She's already applied for her New York nursing license which she will get with no problem. She's been moving up the ladder at Emory but she really wants to live and work in New York.
I've always wanted to live there. New York isn't new to me. I did my first recording session there when I was sixteen and I went to music school there. I know and have worked with a good number of New York musicians, all of whom encourage me to move up. They're a great bunch of guys. One of my best friends is a trumpet player who lives in Astoria.
So there's all that.
She wants to buy a place. I've been looking around all the neighborhoods on the internet and the prices are about what I would have expected for what we want, which is a three-bedroom condo or coop. Now we don't have shit for money, really. The most we could afford is, say, $290,000, tops.
So what I'm asking is this: is it possible to do this without living in a gross dangerous neighborhood? Some place close to the subway? I know that we'll be looking at Queens or Brooklyn. About the Bronx I know absolutely nothing.
Any input you're willing to provide would be greatly appreciated.

skaterfanmike
November 2nd, 2009, 02:41 PM
My Father-IN-Law lives in NY and he likes it He is a nurse.

BrooklynRider
November 3rd, 2009, 02:01 AM
Thanks so much for the quick response.

Neither of us have been accepted yet, but we are planning on moving to the city regardless of whether or not we are accepted into our choice schools.

I'm applying to Hunter College and The New School. My boyfriend is applying to NYU.

Obviously, neighborhoods that are easy to commute from would be our best bets. We were thinking Brooklyn or Queens, if we can't afford Manhattan.

Brooklyn & Queens would probably be best. You might want to look at a subway map. The 7, N, R, W, E, V, F subway lines go to Queens and will offer each of you transfer points to get to those respective schools. For Brooklyn, you can look at the B,D,N,Q,R,2,3,4,5.

I have a personal preference for Brooklyn, but you'll find all kinds of opinions on here.

Queens you might want to check Astoria, Long Island City, Jackson Heights, Forest Hills, Kew Gardens.

Brooklyn you might want to check out Prospect Heights, Fort Green, Park Slope, Sunset Park, Boerum Hill, Cobble Hill, Carroll Gardens.

Those are good places to start. Rents are coming down due to high vacancy rates in market rate buildings. It's actually a good time to be looking for an apartment - but a horrendous time to be looking for work - in NYC.

hbcat
November 3rd, 2009, 02:42 AM
^^^ Yo! BrooklynRider, what's with the new look? I was getting into that beehive thing you had working, and now you go all Jetsons on us. Sheesh.

1) Real question: Can one live really much more cheaply in Brooklyn -- with easy access to Manhattan -- than in Manhattan, anywhere below, say, the 100s? I am not too picky about a neighborhood and don't need to, and don't really want to, live in a trendy place. It's just that I might have only one year in NYC and 90% of my research will be in Manhattan proper. I could compromise on the borrough, but if I don't need to, I'd prefer not to. Space is not an issue, but if I don't land any research money, I will be paying my own way out of retirement savings, etc. I am not a wealthy person.

I hope to never again live in Jersey. I am happy for those of you who are happy on that side, but I have seen enough of NJ for two lifetimes. Brooklyn ok, Jersey City, probably not.

2) Another question: If I come to the U.S. (on a US passport, if that matters), how much will private health insurance cost. I hope to get part-time employment or a one-year teaching gig, but if I don't, I will need to pay my own way for health insurance as well. America is a scary place for the unemployed & uninsured. Yeah, ok, that's probably true in a lot of places, but somehow the US looks rather fierce from the outside looking in. It gives one pause.

Opinions, anyone?

Cheers,
hbcat

KenNYC
November 9th, 2009, 01:47 PM
1) Real question: Can one live really much more cheaply in Brooklyn -- with easy access to Manhattan -- than in Manhattan, anywhere below, say, the 100s? I am not too picky about a neighborhood and don't need to, and don't really want to, live in a trendy place. It's just that I might have only one year in NYC and 90% of my research will be in Manhattan proper. I could compromise on the borrough, but if I don't need to, I'd prefer not to. Space is not an issue, but if I don't land any research money, I will be paying my own way out of retirement savings, etc. I am not a wealthy person.

Yeah, just moving across the East River is going to cut a good bit off your rental budget. That doesn't mean that Brooklyn is going to be cheap at all, but you'll be better off there than in Manhattan yes.


I hope to never again live in Jersey. I am happy for those of you who are happy on that side, but I have seen enough of NJ for two lifetimes. Brooklyn ok, Jersey City, probably not.

No disagreement there. You'll be paying about the same, and me personally would pick Bk or Queens over Jersey any day.


2) Another question: If I come to the U.S. (on a US passport, if that matters), how much will private health insurance cost. I hope to get part-time employment or a one-year teaching gig, but if I don't, I will need to pay my own way for health insurance as well. America is a scary place for the unemployed & uninsured. Yeah, ok, that's probably true in a lot of places, but somehow the US looks rather fierce from the outside looking in. It gives one pause.

Emblem Health seems to be big in NYC, check out their policies. As a foreigner I'm completely insured by my government (go socialism!), so I don't actually know the answer to this question. If you're moving to do any form of graduate studies/work though, your university is likely to have discounted health insurance programs.

hbcat
November 10th, 2009, 12:00 AM
As a foreigner I'm completely insured by my government (go socialism!)

Thanks, Ken. My Grandma was Norwegian. Can I get 25% of my genes insured? :D Can I tell them you sent me?

That's about what I thought about Brooklyn (your response above). I guess I need to be more specific about neighborhood, etc., before I get any real advice, but I am only really familiar with Manhattan.

MidtownGuy
November 10th, 2009, 01:11 PM
Yeah, ok, that's probably true in a lot of places, but somehow the US looks rather fierce from the outside looking in. It gives one pause.

Yes, fierce...it's the jungle. No health insurance...too bad. Die.
It's horrible.
It's not civilized compared to a place like Norway. Or even Costa Rica.

hbcat
November 10th, 2009, 06:46 PM
It's not civilized compared to a place like Norway. Or even Costa Rica.

Or even Taiwan. I checked this week, and as a alien resident of Taiwan, my insurance would cover me in my home country for up to three months.

But how ridiculous is this?: I was born in NJ, went to college in Ohio, did graduate work in NJ and Illinois, and have to rely on little ol' Taiwan for health insurance if I want to do a research year in NYC.

Taiwan spends 6% of GDP on health care vs 16% in the US.

Taiwan has one of the best health care systems in the world:

http://www.citizen.org/publications/release.cfm?ID=7685

It is not ranked by the World Health Organization (WHO), which doesn't consider Taiwan a "country," but the National Health agency of Taiwan is consistently ranked as one of the top 10 in the world by other organizations, and I heard of one ranking which placed it at number 2 (behind Switzerland).

The WHO ranks the US system at 37 worldwide.
Question: Does the US have a health care "system"?

I am thinking of flying back to Taiwan once every three months while I am "in" NY to maintain my health insurance. It would probably be cheaper than purchasing private health insurance (which I assume would take months to obtain anyway) after I arrive in NYC. Absurd? Yes, absurd, but we doing what we gotta do...

noktulo
November 15th, 2009, 06:11 PM
So I just sort of moved to New York in September. I'm currently renting an apartment until Christmas with some friends from school who will be going back to Cincinnati then. The plan is that my sister, a friend of mine who goes to Parsons, and I will sign a 1-year lease and move into an apartment in the East Village or Williamsburg sometime between Christmas and January 5.

Since I've only ever sublet apartments for 3 month periods before, I'm not sure how to go about this. I've discussed a little in one of the NYC threads about this, but I figured it deserved its own thread. Almost all of the apartments on Craigslist seem like they're available immediately, so I'm not sure how far out I can put a deposit down. It would seem that they'd want to minimize the time between my signing a lease and my moving in and starting to pay rent. When would be a reasonable time to start contacting people whose apartments are available immediately if I want to move in Jan 1?

Then there's also the issue of subletting. My friend will probably be going home for the summer, and I might be going to Copenhagen for an extended period. Is a subletting provision in the lease a common thing, or will that be a potential dealbreaker for some apartments?

My goal is basically to know where I'm going to be living as soon as I can so I can stop worrying about it.

ldsim1986
November 23rd, 2009, 12:07 AM
I have read over most of the thread questions and responses however I just wanted to know the best places to eat for your money. Mind you as most newbies to the city my pockets arent so deep. Also, how long did it take you on average to figure out the subway systems? Any sites or other forums with comprehensive info on the city (not so much tourist info) would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

P.S. My intern is in Manhattan, avenue of the americas and i could be staying in Staten Island. How long of a commute is that?

hbcat
November 23rd, 2009, 03:48 AM
It is housing/rental costs which are the real killer in NYC, or so they tell me, and not food. You should be able to find plenty of meals to fit your modest, internship budget, and if money is really tight, you can always brown-bag it.

As for your commute: the problem is you have not provided approximate locales for your departure and destination points. Staten island is large and 6th Avenue (few people call it Avenue of the Americas) is many miles long. The Staten island ferry runs frequently and a one-way trip takes about 25 minutes or so. Here's a site with an official schedule and other info:

http://www.nyc.gov/html/dot/html/ferrybus/statfery.shtml

If you can give us your approximate residence area (a neighborhood or a local landmark, for example; you probably do not want to list your exact address on a public internet forum) and the cross-street on 6th Ave where you'll be interning someone here will be able to give you a better approximation.

In fact, I think Ken (see above in this thread?), provides a city government link to a site which aids in calculating commute times.

Ken, if you see this, can you post it again? I'll have a look and see if I can locate it with a forum search.

hbcat
November 23rd, 2009, 03:53 AM
^^^ Try this: http://tripplanner.mta.info/

195Broadway
November 23rd, 2009, 10:27 PM
^^^ Yo! BrooklynRider, what's with the new look? I was getting into that beehive thing you had working, and now you go all Jetsons on us. Sheesh.



For the record...
http://idothings.info/wp-content/uploads/2009/07/old-quisp.jpg

hbcat
November 26th, 2009, 07:05 AM
Indeed. I stand corrected.

noktulo
November 27th, 2009, 11:25 AM
Another question: my sister and I are going to be moving into an apartment in the East Village. Will it be hard to find parking for a big U-Haul?

JacksonE
November 28th, 2009, 09:57 AM
Pretty slow right now yes, but by all means, do look. IT professionals are given beneficial treatment when it comes to visa applications, so you might be a bit more lucky than most others there.





just a quick question on this, what is an 'it' professional, does somebody who works with online marketing fall into this category or is it more specific i.t work than that.

thanks

hbcat
November 28th, 2009, 10:42 AM
Information Technology (IT) -- Broadly, this refers to all aspects of information creation, storage and retrieval, including (but not limited to) computer software & hardware, internet services, information data storage, and data security. Think of computers & computer technology and their many manifestations in our culture.

JacksonE
November 29th, 2009, 12:58 PM
thankyou

DKfreddy
November 29th, 2009, 09:16 PM
I'm moving to either Queens or Brooklyn soon and I'm trying to create a budget. Does anyone have an idea of how much basic cable, internet and electricity for a studio apartment would be per month? Thank you!

hbcat
November 30th, 2009, 10:08 PM
^ This thread might provide some leads:

http://wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=305070

HoveringCheesecake
December 7th, 2009, 04:12 PM
How hard would it be to rent a studio apartment in Lower Manhattan for 3 months? This wouldn't be until the spring/early summer of 2011 but I'm just curious.

hbcat
December 7th, 2009, 08:33 PM
HoveringCheesecake (love the name, btw) -- Having recently checked into this, it is my understanding subletting is a good deal easier than renting directly from a landlord and for a short-term rental it is probably your only realistic option. Try this site for starters: www.sublet.com (http://www.sublet.com) (you do not need to register to search). It will give you a rough idea of what the possibilities will be when you're ready to actually take the dive. I am weighing similar options, so post here with updates as you get closer to an actual rental.

HoveringCheesecake
December 8th, 2009, 01:09 PM
HoveringCheesecake (love the name, btw) -- Having recently checked into this, it is my understanding subletting is a good deal easier than renting directly from a landlord and for a short-term rental it is probably your only realistic option. Try this site for starters: www.sublet.com (http://www.sublet.com) (you do not need to register to search). It will give you a rough idea of what the possibilities will be when you're ready to actually take the dive. I am weighing similar options, so post here with updates as you get closer to an actual rental.

Will do! I'll have a better idea of whether or not things will work out in a few months.

travelbug
December 9th, 2009, 05:34 PM
I don't know whether this is the right place to post this. I am looking to move to NYC but it is also about real estate!

I am looking at condos in Tribeca, but I want a view. What is the general feeling in the community about Artisan Lofts? Any other suggestions?

ZippyTheChimp
December 9th, 2009, 07:30 PM
The website lists the address as 143 Reade St, but the main building fronts Chambers St. I surmise that one of the buildings being renovated on Reade St is part of the project, and that's the address they want to use.

I mention this because the two streets have a different character. Reade St is quiet, tree lined, with very little traffic. There's a bar/restaurant a few door down, but the owner is a good neighbor. Chambers St is commercial, and has lots of traffic and pedestrian movement. It's a route to several schools in the area.

This would make no difference to me, but just thought you should know.

The Reade St building apartments would be too low for a view. For the main building, the nearby buildings are about 6 floors max, except for corner buildings on West Broadway. The views depicted on the website seem to be correct, but I'm sure they were taken from the roof. So as long as you're on a high enough floor, the view to the south would be excellent.

I don't know anything about the apartments; the building is plain, but attractive, with some deco flourishes. At one time, the ground floor housed Hamburger Harry's, before people thought the speed of Mcdonald's (they're down the street) was a better idea.

travelbug
December 10th, 2009, 03:31 AM
The website lists the address as 143 Reade St, but the main building fronts Chambers St. I surmise that one of the buildings being renovated on Reade St is part of the project, and that's the address they want to use.

I mention this because the two streets have a different character. Reade St is quiet, tree lined, with very little traffic. There's a bar/restaurant a few door down, but the owner is a good neighbor. Chambers St is commercial, and has lots of traffic and pedestrian movement. It's a route to several schools in the area.

This would make no difference to me, but just thought you should know.

The Reade St building apartments would be too low for a view. For the main building, the nearby buildings are about 6 floors max, except for corner buildings on West Broadway. The views depicted on the website seem to be correct, but I'm sure they were taken from the roof. So as long as you're on a high enough floor, the view to the south would be excellent.

I don't know anything about the apartments; the building is plain, but attractive, with some deco flourishes. At one time, the ground floor housed Hamburger Harry's, before people thought the speed of Mcdonald's (they're down the street) was a better idea.

Thank you very much indeed. I did look on Google Earth and the building on Chambers street seems to be higher than the surrounding buildings.

Another query: I am condo hunting from the UK online mostly at the moment and it troubles me that even in completed buildings like the Chelsea stratus and 101 Warren Street most of the listings still use renders on their image selection. surely if the apartment was finished and any good they would get a photographer round there? It seems to be a common thing, should I be worried if they do not have actual photos rather than renders?

ZippyTheChimp
December 10th, 2009, 09:25 AM
Another query: I am condo hunting from the UK online mostly at the moment and it troubles me that even in completed buildings like the Chelsea stratus and 101 Warren Street most of the listings still use renders on their image selection.I guess the most common reasons for this are laziness or hiding nearby buildings that would block views.

We have many threads here on individual developments and their neighborhoods, with lots of photos. You can use the SEARCH menu on the top blue bar, either by tag or thread title. A tag search for TRIBECA gave these results (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/tags.php?tag=tribeca). Threads for 101 Warren and 200 Chambers are listed. There's a thread for Chelsea Stratus (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=7995). We trash developments at least as often as we praise them.

Good luck.

Jeremy Pritchard
January 5th, 2010, 09:53 PM
Oh nice, new place to gradually get familiar and to know how it will work with a new environment. It's exciting and depressing to think that you're moving at the first place. :D

Grand Fromage
January 6th, 2010, 01:07 AM
I may finally be moving out soon and I got a question about roaches. My dad used to live in the city, maybe 25-30 years ago, and he's told me that roaches are just everywhere and I'll have to learn to ignore them. I've also read, from more recent sources, that the roach problem's been mostly taken care of and they're only still in the terrible dilapidated buildings. Then there are others who claim they're around, but as long as you keep your food sealed and the apartment clean, you'll probably never have to deal with them. I've spent a fair amount of time there and never saw a roach, but I didn't live there so I'm not relying on that.

Obviously this isn't going to stop me, but I'm curious what the truth is. I've never had to deal with them personally and there are so many stories. Is it true you should throw out everything you own when you move if your apartment has roaches? That sounds insane. Do they destroy things or are they just an annoyance? Can I use them as currency in the Bronx?

HoveringCheesecake
January 6th, 2010, 01:25 PM
Are you getting roaches confused with bed bugs?

Grand Fromage
January 6th, 2010, 04:05 PM
No. I know about the bedbug problem, I mean roaches.

NYCSublets
January 11th, 2010, 12:24 PM
CO-OPS
Co-ops are owned by an apartment corporation. When you purchase within a co-op building, you're purchasing shares of the corporation that entitle you, as a shareholder, to a "proprietary lease." Generally, the larger your apartment, the more shares of the corporation you own. Co-op shareholders contribute a monthly maintenance fee to cover the building expenses. The fee covers such items as heat, hot water, insurance, staff salaries, real estate taxes and the mortgage indebtedness of the building. Portions of the monthly maintenance fees are tax deductible due to the building's underlying mortgage interest. Also, shareholders can deduct their portion of the building's real estate taxes.

Condominiums
As more and more new buildings are constructed in New York, condominiums are fast gaining in number and popularity. It's not surprising. As opposed to a co-op, a condominium apartment is "real" property. A buyer receives a deed just as though he or she were buying a house. Each individual apartment in a condominium receives its own tax bill. There is still a monthly common charge similar to the maintenance charges in a co-operative. These charges don't include your real estate taxes and are not tax-deductible. They also tend to be lower than in co-ops because there is no underlying mortgage for a condominium building. The straightforward nature of buying a condo coupled with the fact, that in some cases, you can finance up to 90% of the purchase price and sublet them at will, makes condominiums the number one choice for flexibility.

NOTE: Financing with low money down is reserved for those with excellent credit, given the current market atmosphere.

.pulchritudinous.
January 15th, 2010, 07:26 PM
Well, I submitted a post in another section of this forum, but I'm guessing there is no one in the teaching career that could give me any information. That's okay, I do, however, have a few more questions...

A little bit about myself (for those of you who don't remember me):

I am planning on moving to New York still, preferably in the Brooklyn area, as I had mentioned last year (on my last deployment). It will be in approximately 3 years, after I finish up school. I'm going to be going to school for Early Childhood Education. I will be moving to New York City with my boyfriend...we are both young, we'll be 25 by the time we move there, and hopefully I'll get a job, or the likelihood of the move is slim to none. To be honest, I don't care if I live in any of the boroughs, but my boyfriend, coming from Queens, prefers to not go back there...so I thought Brooklyn would be a good idea. I understand that it's quite a short commute to go anywhere in the city, but I may not always want to get on the subway and go into Manhattan. Is there anyone from Brooklyn that could recommend a decent area of living, with relatively short walking distance to restaurants/markets/parks/stores/etc? I guess the price range would be preferable if staying under $2000.00, if I do happen to get a job in teaching, and my boyfriend will have a GI Bill with about $1,500.00 a month while going to school. I figured keep it in that bracket so that I can still afford utilities and what not...

Any help on this would be greatly appreciated. I understand it's three years away, but I want to be prepared in making this happen.

mandywilliams
January 25th, 2010, 04:47 AM
I would like to live in an ethnically diverse neighborhood just for sake of an interesting place to live and probably that is new york.

jingleligtas
January 26th, 2010, 03:07 AM
NEW YORK -- Deloitte today announced that it has been ranked No. 1 on Bloomberg BusinessWeek's third annual "Best Places to Intern" list, which identifies the top 40 undergraduate internship programs (http://www.internshipabroadoffers.com/) in the country. The ranking considered data from employer surveys, such as compensation and the percentage of interns who receive and accept offers for full-time positions, along with feedback from career services directors across the United States.

By: newyork.dbusinessnews.com (http://newyork.dbusinessnews.com/shownews.php?newsid=199528&type_news=latest)

Free Moving Quote
March 4th, 2010, 06:11 PM
It wouldn't be that hard to rent a studio for 3 months. I have a friend there living by where her college is, paying like $500 a month in crown heights. If you find places near colleges or universities you can probably find a short term lease.

psustud4331
March 14th, 2010, 02:26 PM
This is probably too general a question, but I figure someone might have fun with it:

If I wanted to live in a decent Manhattan neighborhood, split a nice apartment with one roommate, and live comfortably as far as other expenses go, how much would I need to make in yearly salary? By living comfortably I'm talking about things such as going to the movies when ever I wish, not driving a 'Benz to TWC for sushi.

I figure about $1000 a month rent (per person) would get a place. $12,000 a year rent, at the 30% or what ever figure they say to pay in housing, leaves me with a $40,000 salary to make due. That seems awfully low given my expectations above. What do you think?


I think $55-$60 will barely make you comfortable since, realistically, you will not find a two bedroom apartment in Manhattan (I assume you were talking about Manhattan) for $2000. You won't even find a nice 1 bedroom capable of being converted to 2 (very common here) for that much.

Expect to spend $2600 for a one bedroom that would be converted to two.

I think the most optimal situation, if you're going to have roommates at all, is 3 people in one apartment. There is much less pressure to get a long with just one other person and you can spend less money on your share.

You can likely find a 2 bedroom (to be converted to 3) somewhere for $3500-$4000 reducing your minimum share to $1166 from $1300.

joe1
April 9th, 2010, 03:02 AM
How far from Manhatten must you live, to rent a 1 bd. suite for $1000 a month?

KenNYC
April 9th, 2010, 09:43 PM
How far from Manhatten must you live, to rent a 1 bd. suite for $1000 a month?

You can find 1br apartments on Manhattan for $1,000 (and less) per month. Look around Harlem.

cbhiatt
May 11th, 2010, 09:23 AM
I've been writing about my move here. Came here unemployed, recently engaged with my fiancee in Florida. Now I'm working here as a newlywed.

http://chrishiatt.blogspot.com

andre000
June 8th, 2010, 03:32 PM
I just grduated from university in New Zealand. im going to be moving to manhattan to work at the museum of natural history. Im having some trouble finding basic information about it. all ive learned is that its an island. I spent most of my youth on the cook islands. I went to university in new zealand for three years. I would like to know what kinds of housing do people in manhattan live in and what activites are avalible when people are not at work. :confused:

mjfoxy
June 11th, 2010, 02:08 AM
Hi. I'm Mike. I just finished taking classes at the Art Institute of Washington and now want to move to where the arts are alive and taken seriously. Where is that? Duh. It's not in Washington DC or Northern Virginia where I live. It's in New York or LA. I see myself fitting in more so in New York. I'm not knocking DC but I don't belong there. For one thing, I'm not looking to work up on the hill because just walking up that hill to work would give me a wedgie. :confused: I need your help. I'm 30 years old and want to move to New York NOW! If you could point me towards some resources or reliable and trustworthy people, I would appreciate it. I need housing, job, or whatever order they can come in and then bam :D I'll be on my way.

tasha212
June 20th, 2010, 09:13 PM
Hi! I'm new to the board. I am moving to NY in August. I live in Louisiana now and just graduated with my Master's Degree. I have a job lined up with an agency to work as a speech therapist in an nyc school. I have visited NY 4 times already and I just can't get enough.

Here's my question: Is anyone on here familiar with the neighborhood of Crown Heights or Bed Stuy? I am thinking of these two areas as potential neighborhoods to live in. I also love Harlem and am also thinking about living or at least working there. What about the Bronx? I've never been there but here it is a good place to go if you're on a budget. My salary will be between $47-48,000 the first year. Do you think it is possible to live comfortably in NYC with this kind of income? Any help or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

lofter1
June 20th, 2010, 10:40 PM
Comfortably with roommates. Parts of Bed Stuy could be good, but no matter which neighborhood try to find something within 5 or so blocks of a good subway station, particularly if your work place is in Manhattan or far away from home.

lofter1
August 16th, 2010, 09:33 AM
Hard to give you numbers for the whole cost (rents being the widest variant), but when doing your budget consider that in NYC movies now cost $12.50 - $13 per ticket :eek: -- add another ~$5 for Imax and $7 for 3-D :mad: . Plus: Generally there are no bargain matinees (at least not in Manhattan). Depending on seeing a film "whenever" you want that can add up (and don't even get me going on the additional movie cost of popcorn & candy).

eddhead
August 16th, 2010, 10:18 AM
@mornk

I have seen 2 bedroom apts in Murray Hill listed as low as $2500/mo, but I tend to think those are rather smaller units that have been converted to a second bedroom in order to attract shares. Still, it might be worth checking out. You can find them on Craigslist, but be careful. Sometimes the ad tittles read 2 Bars but when you click on the ad you find it is a 1 Br. They are sneaky that way

More likely I would figure start at $4200 in Manhattan (outside of Harlem) for a comfortable 2 bedroom place, maybe more if you are looking for amenities, maybe a bit less ($3800?) if you are willing to make some sacrifices on space and location. So figure $2100 or so each for rent, $250 - $350 for assorted utilities, phone, cable, groceries etc.. and depending upon your appetite for entertainment (dating can be expensive) maybe $100 or so per week, or $425 per month (not going to get you many dinners out). All in, maybe $2800 or so with limited nights out with a lady friend. That translates to maybe $35000 or so after taxes, savings etc.., so call it $55K- $65k or so. That might be a little high, but I think it is close.

ZippyTheChimp
August 16th, 2010, 04:14 PM
^
Mornk is in India. THis is the third time he/she has been here with a different ID. Not coming to NY. Didn't you guys see the big spam-link at the bottom of the post?

eddhead
August 17th, 2010, 10:01 AM
^^ Sorry, I did not. Sometimes graphics do not display on this particular PC. mea culpa.

fiona1990
August 25th, 2010, 05:20 PM
I have been looking at apartments in brooklyn and considering living here rather than central manhattan because of value for money and space factors. For a 1 bedroom apartment on flatbush ave it works out at around 663 in GBP which is expectational
because in Aberdeen, the city where I stay in Scotland it is currently around 700 for a decent 1 bedroom in the city centre or surrounds.

Can anyone provide any information on Brooklyn as far as living there is concerned. I am really looking into this as a venture for my boyfriend and I are looking to moving together. Anything such as safety, easy access to the city, highs and lows?

Thanks for any information.

KenNYC
August 26th, 2010, 11:00 PM
Well, Brooklyn is huge; in fact, if Brooklyn was it's own city, it'd be the 4th largest in the US. Thus; you can find everything from "very bad" to "very good" in Brooklyn. The Flatbush area is a minority-heavy, working class area, but you have quite a lot of diversity. Mass transit is very good, and you're close to Prospect Park, which is very nice. The area still have some concerns regarding crime/safety, especially East Flatbush. You should know where not to go, and personally, I wouldn't recommend a young female to wander around too much in the area alone at night time.

Edit: Reading my own post, I think I may have come off as a bit more "scary" than necessary. It's not like you'll get robbed as soon as you step outside the door or anything, just a good idea to stay alert.

fiona1990
August 27th, 2010, 01:06 PM
Thanks very much for help, Iv been looking at apartments which are currently available for rent just to get an idea of what to expect. In comparison to apartments in Manhattan there is more space in Brooklyn which is a plus.

Is there any specific areas you can recommend which are safe and reasonably priced?

KenNYC
August 27th, 2010, 02:16 PM
Well, yeah sure. I like Morningside Heights, it's around Columbia University (and also the area where the TV series Seinfeld was based). It's cheaper than lower Manhattan, but not cheap-cheap (nothing in New York ever is). Since it's a University area, there's lots of young people around as well, which is kinda good. The Yorkville area of the Upper East Side is also slightly more affordable than Manhattan in general, and again, lots of young people around.

I really don't know Queens or Brooklyn as good as I'd like to, but the most popular residential area of Brooklyn still seems to be around Williamsburg. It's pretty much hipster-central, if that's your thing. Queens is generally supposed to be a nice place to live, at least the areas closest to Manhattan, but I haven't spend enough time there to really know myself.

On the Jersey side, look into the areas around Weehawken, Hoboken, Union City and Jersey City. They're all very nice areas, and considerably cheaper than Manhattan. Mass transit is very simple, both via boats across the Hudson, and trains.

Anyhow, you sort of have to pick a budget before you start looking, since it all comes down to the money. www.streeteasy.com has a search function where you can find apartments pretty much anywhere based on price, it's a good tool to get some indication of where, how much and what.

fiona1990
August 28th, 2010, 11:28 AM
Thanks so much for your help. I'v been researching into the embassy in London on how to immigrate to America, at the moment it seems impossible to find a way to get a visa. Which is a big shame as I really have set my heart on America.

KenNYC
August 28th, 2010, 01:03 PM
Just make a post on craigslist saying you're looking for a US Citizen husband. I'm sure you'll get plenty of offers;)

fiona1990
August 28th, 2010, 02:19 PM
That does seem to be a good option, not sure how my current boyfriend would feel about it but never mind if it gets me in!

eddhead
August 31st, 2010, 12:27 PM
RE: Brooklyn neighborhoods, I used to live in Bay Ridge which pretty much covers the area from Senator St to the VZ Bridge, and 5th Ave to Colonial. It is nice, quiet community but still has a decent night life. Probably 30-4- minutes from downtown Manahattan by subway, longer to mid town. Park Slope, Brooklyn Hieghts ,Carroll Gardens Cobble Hill are closer to the city, but more expensive. Still, I would check them out.

If you are interested in Queens, I like Forrest Hills which is approx 6 mile car ride to midtown Manhattan.

KenNYC
September 1st, 2010, 01:37 AM
That does seem to be a good option, not sure how my current boyfriend would feel about it but never mind if it gets me in!

If he really loves you, he'd want you to be happy! ;)

KPO89
September 27th, 2010, 12:21 AM
New to the forum so hello one and all :)

I am moving up to New York late this year. I'm coming from Lynchburg, VA which is a small town. I'm graduating from college in December and have a job offer from an up and coming wireless communications dealer. I have not received the compensation package yet but industry average in NYC seems to be right $50,000 a year for entry level. I've been doing some research and it seems as if Greenpoint and Woodside seem to be viable options for me. I'm concerned about safety because my fiance will be joining me in May of next year due to some events in her past she is very cautious about being alone. Also I'm more worried about housing cost over nightlife/restaurants. I will be working near the Queensboro bridge on the Queens side(this may be completely irregular communication, forgive me if it is so), so proximity is important as well.

Now my question is this...I've never been to New York so where is the best place to look for housing? Any suggestions on neighborhoods? I tried easystreet.com but I have they don't seem to have varied pricepoints; or maybe it really is that expensive. I don't know. Somebody give me some advice please :)

Thank you in advance.

Ninjahedge
September 30th, 2010, 01:08 PM
One thing that would help would be where you will be commuting to.

If you are commuting to lower Manhattan, areas like Brooklyn and NJ are good. If you are going into Midtown East then Queens or even areas of the Bronx would be good (Subway/Grand Central Station trains).

You do not have to be specific about the company, but location helps.

Also, look around the forum. You will get an idea about living expenses here and be able to gage what you can afford.

Places like Forest Hills are REALLY nice, but chances are you will be living on Instant Soup and Pasta if you rent anything more than a closet with a toilet! ;)


(BTW, most neighborhoods in NYC are very safe now. Just keep an eye out by using Google Maps for things like roadside trash, barred windows and "un artistic" grafitti. Even in those areas you can be assured it is pretty safe for anyone not walking around at 2am with wads of cash tied to their chest....)

mNels1010
October 10th, 2010, 08:56 AM
Needless to say, I am planning on moving to NY. My company is located on Avenue of the Americas and I was wondering where would be the closest residential area that would quieter and wouldn't be a nightmare for travel? Any advice would be appreicated. Thanks

littletree
October 10th, 2010, 02:12 PM
Hi everyone,
I have been thinking about moving to NYC for years and I think I am ready to take the plunge after I get my master's next year. My question is: would it be possible to find a place to rent with 5 cats? (yes, insert crazy cat lady joke here) A few of you may be thinking I should just get rid of some cats but I can't have kids and they are all rescues so I am attached to them. Having said that, I don't want any more than this! I will probably be making around 50,000 a year, so I won't be rolling in cash. So is it even possible? Any tips? Thanks, this is a great forum.

PSan1010
October 18th, 2010, 07:06 PM
OMG, I can't believe someone also has 5 cats. Actually, I had 6 but sadly one died. That is exactly my problem with going to NYC. They are only indoor and getting old, so they don't have any ambition of going out.

_alexander_
October 27th, 2010, 06:52 AM
hello.
i'm planning to move to NY soon. but firstly I would like just to visit and check everything out. Can anyone tell me where is a nice and quiet hotel where I could stay for 3 nights?

fpete1110
November 11th, 2010, 09:05 PM
Hi all, Don't know anything about the city, except for Broadway. I'll be working on Avenue of the Americas, near W 23rd. Is there any areas around there that would be considered more family oriented?

zandria
November 28th, 2010, 06:39 AM
Well I don't know if anyone will see this since the last post on Nov. 11th has yet to get a response, but I'm willing to give it a shot in the hopes that someone will respond. Here goes:

I'm a 29-year-old female who lives in Houston, Texas, and has loved and has wanted to move to NYC since I first visited there a few years ago; actually, I wanted to move there since before I visited, but that's neither here nor there. I'm one of the few who have actually read through each and every page of this thread so I hope I will not ask any repetitive questions, but I guess I just wanted to get some input because most people think I am crazy for wanting to move there.

First, I realize that NYC rents are very expensive, so I am not coming up there with any delusions of finding an apartment in Manhattan only my salary, which will be that of your typical student (poor). I'm doing the online school thing for now but definitely plan on transferring to a university up there once I establish residency. I'm open to doing the roommate thing and I can afford $500-600/month in Brooklyn or Queens. I won't be coming up there with a whole lot saved (probably about $3-4000) but I do have a friend who's willing to let me crash until I find a job, which may actually be a little bit easier for me since I've already sent my resume out and have had a couple of employers contact and tell me to call them/email them when I visit or move up there. One of the companies is located near Grand Central Station in Manhattan, so would Brooklyn or Queens be a better location for me? And most importantly, am I insane? I just really need/want to get the hell out of Texas and since I've been wanting to move to New York since I was in my early 20s then I feel like it can be done with a little drive and determination. Am I crazy? Delusional? :)

mariab
November 28th, 2010, 08:01 PM
Delusional? No. Crazy? Maybe. Nothing wrong with chasing your dreams, but be realistic about living expenses. Think Texas, X10. Although I live in NJ so that's my view of it. Best of luck to you.

zandria
November 29th, 2010, 12:36 AM
Realistic is right, Maria...thank you. :)

JRusso
November 29th, 2010, 01:00 PM
Do your research (it seems like you've already started!) and have a plan, a plan b, plan c and an "if all else fails" plan. You can compare where you live to NYC by looking into city demographic (http://www.areavibes.com/new+york-ny/city-guide/) sites and city data or cost of living sites. Good Luck!

zandria
November 29th, 2010, 03:05 PM
Yes...lordy I've been doing research for the past two years! But you are right about plans ABC...if all else fails I will have to turn tail and come back to Houston...I'm used to "big city" living but our rent is wayyyy cheaper down here than up there...but I'm willing to trade my private one bedroom apartment in a nice area of town for a room (hopefully) in a brownstone or apt building in a decent area of town as long as I can be out of Houston and in NYC!

valennealv
November 29th, 2010, 06:24 PM
Alright, not too sure if anyone still looks here, but here goes..

Currently, I'm living in New Zealand.. A small country east of Australia. I've wanted to move to New York for, Manhatten especially, for as long as I can remember. I can't move there until 2015 as I plan to do a Graphic Design course back here in New Zealand.. at the time of the move, I would be around 21 years old, roughly. So, I guess my biggest question is, with my mind set on living in Manahatten and with my preferred job being in the design area, how well would I be living? Apartment wise, neighbourhood wise, etc.. I've been looking and online, and junior graphic designers earn roughly 40,000-50,000 a year with seniors earning roughly 70,000.. Which I know isn't much. But eh, any answers are helpful. Thanks!

KenNYC
December 2nd, 2010, 09:57 PM
Since few people here are in possession of any magic crystal balls, at least functioning ones, it's pretty hard to tell you what the world is going to be like in 2015. I believe, according to a movie I saw, we'll all be living in huge boats.

Anyway, it's pretty safe to assume Manhattan is going to be 1) crowded 2) expensive in 2015, just like it is now. That's about as far as anyone should try to predict the future.

pickledsnail
February 22nd, 2011, 08:03 PM
so here are my questions. to whomever has moved to new york before, did you just sell everything and move with very little? i am 31 years old and 5 years ago lost most of my belongings in a hurricane. today, as i plan to move to new york next year, i am having a hard time with the thought of losing all my things again and going up there with just what i can carry. i just wanted some opinions on that and if anyone DID move to NY with a truck load, how that went.

also, i just got a new car about 6 months ago. i love it and dont want to give it up. i know moving to NY with a car seems silly, but if insisted on doing so, is it manageable? i plan to try and find a place in brooklyn which i hear would be easier to park. and also, if i rented a monthly space, are they usually safe?

thanks for any advice!

Hegel Fischer
March 11th, 2011, 03:00 AM
If you have many things, you can move with truck. But you can move also by means of getting move slowly like carry what you can until you move all your things in your new home here in New York.

wdb81
June 20th, 2011, 01:50 PM
Hey there

Firstly, great forum here :-)

I just wanted some advice regarding moving to NYC and thought this would probably be the best way to start. I'm from the UK and work in the media industry (media agency-side), specialising in Digital. I'm desperate to move to the States though there's a big barrier in the form of visas. Is it a simple process to get an H1B? Would a company need to sponsor me for this or is it a cost I would personally need to look at? Also, are companies reluctant to employ overseas skilled workers due to a visa issue (ie, if I was to sort it myself, would it give me a better chance in obtaining a job there?).

Any help anyone could give me would be awesome!!

Thanks so much guys!

Jacktonep
June 24th, 2011, 12:24 AM
RE:moving to New York
I'll be moving to New York for my Master's degree in the near future, what I have to keep in mind about New York?

lofter1
June 24th, 2011, 12:29 AM
It will grind you into the ground. And you'll be better for it.

devon NYC
July 22nd, 2011, 12:33 PM
To everyone who wants to learn more about NYC and those looking for apartments in NYC/the surrounding areas, I encourage you to visit Urban Edge (http://www.urbanedgeny.com) - a website that has thousands of no-fee apartment listings. There is also a "neighborhoods" section with abundant information on all of the neighborhoods in NYC, the surrounding areas, and even a lot of NJ towns. Urban Edge provided me with a lot of valuable information and also allowed me to save money when I rented my first apartment since I didn't need to pay broker fees.

gweana
July 26th, 2011, 01:08 PM
Can anyone recommend some good websites other than Craigslist for apartment / room / sublet shopping? If it matters, I am looking specifically at Brooklyn.

32rclint95
August 2nd, 2011, 05:37 PM
Just moved to Manhattan in the past week and it's definitely taken some getting used to. :) Now that everything is moved in and we are adjusted I am getting to the essential services. Does anyone have any recommendations of reputable NYC dentists (http://angieslist.com/companylist/new-york-tristate-area/dentists.htm), doctors, orthodontists, etc.? Any help would be greatly appreciated. I just don't want to go the yellow pages route.

georg1e
August 21st, 2011, 06:26 PM
hi all.
im looking to move to nyc for a couple of months on my way to the uk for a 2 yr working holiday. (im currently in new zealand). im a fashion design assistant and have 2.5 yrs exp under my belt, as well as top grades from a reputable design school. i will arrive in nyc just before xmas, and will be there until beginning of march. my plan is to experience nyc, while interning with (hopefully) a top fashion house. i would prefer to find paid work, as im not a student or recent grad, and dont really fancy the idea of spending all my savings on rent in nyc before even getting to the uk.... however without a visa (im allowed to visit the us for 90days without one) this might be impossible.

does anyone think a fashion house might consider 'reimbursing my accomodation costs' as compensation for an intern? i havent contacted any companies yet, but plan to do so in october/november.

i have a good friend in nyc currently, who i will room mate with. but she is poor enough as it is, so i cant just 'crash' with her.... im also wondering if this idea is madness... i plan to have about $15K (NZD, about $12K USD or $7.5K pounds), but dont want to hemorrhage it away in nyc, as i want to get set up in the uk, and have some left over for summer travels in europe. i know that nyc is expensive, but its a dream of mine.... im wondering if 3 months is going to cripple me financially?

love to hear your thoughts.
x

Ali_F
October 11th, 2011, 04:30 AM
Good Morning All,
Have just joined the forum. I have a question about commuting out of manahttan.
I have accepted a job in Melville, quite a way out of town i know. But my partner has already started a position in the Rockefeller university.
so we will be living close to there.
how is the drive out of manhattan on the weekday? is there overnight parking garages? or can you park on the street over night no worries in the upper east side.
Coming over from the uk so all very exciting and cannot wait.

Lots of info on this website so thanks everyone.

Good day to all!!

allthingsmwny
November 25th, 2011, 10:26 AM
So glad I came across this site!! I want to move to New York in about 9 months so we shall see.

lofter1
December 28th, 2011, 02:33 PM
Spammers love this thread.

infoshare
December 28th, 2011, 04:02 PM
The firm i am going to be working for is up in Tarrytown. I was thinking of living in the Bronx but am concerned about crime, drugs etc as I have a family.



Try the Riverdale section of the Bronx: nice safe place to live. BTW, if you are in need of new window treatments for your new home, I highly recommend Blinds.com (lol)

www.blinds.com (http://www.blinds.com)

http://www.blinds.com/control/infopage?page=nbi_finder.html

CHASELENDAZE
January 17th, 2012, 04:19 PM
So Ive finally made up my mind to go ahead and make the move from Texas to NYC next year after I graduate college, Im gettin my degree in Healthcare Administration but have been working the last few years in the Insurance field and have alot of work experience with that not to mention my Property and Casualty Insurance License as well.

So Im moving at the age of 25..Ive only been to NYC once but fell in love...and do plan to visit a few more times before next year, however im researching now on what areas to move to..I know Brooklyn or Queens is a good alternative to Manhattan but I also have found a lot of prices in my range of 1100-1300 in Washington Heights/Inwood area...is this a good bet??? Also I have been thinking about maybe securing an apt with a roomate to reduce my costs by about half to around 600-700 for room, but I dont where to quite look for this? Any suggestions???

Lastly, does anyone know where to look for jobs in the Insurance field in NYC or is the insurance field there not that great for a living before I secure more lucrative employment in the Healthcare Administration field??

Thanks,

Chase

LMRE_BEN
April 1st, 2012, 06:57 PM
For all the current residents of the New York City, one question eternally knocks are heads and i.e. how many people can New York accomodate? Well I came across this interesting piece of information and thought to share here. For somethings it is worth questionable while for others more moving in New York means more diversity and development. If you might want to read some more on that, you can take a look at
http://lower-manhattan-real-estate.com/2012/03/how-many-people-can-fit-in-manhattan/

15130

Regards,
Ben
http://lower-manhattan-real-estate.com

lofter1
April 1st, 2012, 09:45 PM
The Lo Lo plan would be outrageously expensive and could create a whole new set of problems. The more probable option is that the zoning regulations will continue to be altered, to allow for additional mass for new buildings in certain parts of the city. Then we'll start to see towers that are interconnected way above the street level.

The history of NYC shows that when things get crowded one good option is to build UP.

http://www.joehallock.com/wp-images/2006/12/120406_06.jpg

http://0.tqn.com/d/manhattan/1/0/t/D/design_finalist_Meier_Eisenman_Gwathmey_Holl2_1.jp g

http://0.tqn.com/d/manhattan/1/0/w/D/design_finalist_United_Architects_1.jpg

Nico
June 16th, 2014, 09:21 AM
Upper West Side vs. Upper East Side. What's the best zone to move into?

lofter1
June 16th, 2014, 02:39 PM
Uws.

Alexander Maquet
July 28th, 2014, 03:58 PM
It's definitely doable. In Alphabet City, Lower East Side or Chinatown, you can find apartments within that price range with relative ease. You may need to be willing to go up to $1200-1400, but especially in those areas, the cost of living is pretty low for Manhattan. Look into Stuy town, it's probably the nicest affordable neighborhood for you.

mariab
August 8th, 2014, 08:56 PM
Funny Time Out New York list of 31 things that will happen when you move to New York.

http://www.timeout.com/newyork/things-to-do/31-things-that-will-definitely-happen-to-you-when-moving-to-new-york