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Kris
January 15th, 2005, 11:57 AM
This is the permanent topic for those seeking advice for a planned move to the city. Please post your questions here.

Evgeny
January 15th, 2005, 11:50 PM
What is a co-op? What is the difference between a co-op and a condo?

TLOZ Link5
January 16th, 2005, 01:39 AM
What is a co-op? What is the difference between a co-op and a condo?

In a co-op, all residents own a share in the building. A board of elected residents runs the building. In a condo, there is an independent owner and the units are owned entirely by their occupants.

Evgeny
January 16th, 2005, 11:18 PM
What is a co-op? What is the difference between a co-op and a condo?

In a co-op, all residents own a share in the building. A board of elected residents runs the building. In a condo, there is an independent owner and the units are owned entirely by their occupants.
So actually the co-op isn`t your property?

ube
January 16th, 2005, 11:39 PM
Here's a good description of the differnces between the two. http://www.corcoran.com/guides/index.aspx?page=CoopVsCondo.

Evgeny
January 16th, 2005, 11:57 PM
Thanks for the link!

aural iNK
February 16th, 2005, 12:40 PM
This is probably too general a question, but I figure someone might have fun with it:

If I wanted to live in a decent Manhattan neighborhood, split a nice apartment with one roommate, and live comfortably as far as other expenses go, how much would I need to make in yearly salary? By living comfortably I'm talking about things such as going to the movies when ever I wish, not driving a 'Benz to TWC for sushi.

I figure about $1000 a month rent (per person) would get a place. $12,000 a year rent, at the 30% or what ever figure they say to pay in housing, leaves me with a $40,000 salary to make due. That seems awfully low given my expectations above. What do you think?

Schadenfrau
February 16th, 2005, 01:22 PM
I think you'll need to make more than $40,000.

colobikeguy
February 26th, 2005, 10:12 PM
Hiyas,

I am going to be moving to nyc sometime in the near future. I will be working for a law firm while going to fordham law school at night. The firm i am going to be working for is up in Tarrytown. I was thinking of living in the Bronx but am concerned about crime, drugs etc as I have a family. I would like to live in an ethnically diverse neighborhood just for sake of an interesting place to live.
Any advice on moving there?

Feel free to email me.

Thanks,

KC

NewYorkYankee
February 26th, 2005, 10:23 PM
Not all of the BX is crime ridden. The north Bronx is nice and diverse. Good Luck! :)

billyblancoNYC
February 28th, 2005, 02:08 AM
Hiyas,

I am going to be moving to nyc sometime in the near future. I will be working for a law firm while going to fordham law school at night. The firm i am going to be working for is up in Tarrytown. I was thinking of living in the Bronx but am concerned about crime, drugs etc as I have a family. I would like to live in an ethnically diverse neighborhood just for sake of an interesting place to live.
Any advice on moving there?

Feel free to email me.

Thanks,

KC


Northern Bronx ranges from nice to super nice. The eastern Bronx is also nice...old school NYC. While still a bit dicey, even the South Bronx is picking up, as Manhattan and Brooklyn refugees are taking up residence.

Depending on how much money you have for housing...Throgs Neck/Morris Park/Eastern Bronx would be the best bet for moderate prices and nice areas. NW Bronx, ie. Riverdale has mansions, but also nice apartment buildings that are much more reasonable. NE Bronx, like Woodlawn is pretty middle class (Woodlawn, actually, has a subastantial Irish expat population).

Schadenfrau
February 28th, 2005, 11:58 AM
Living in the Bronx is fine, but the public schools aren't the best. Are you planning on sending the kids to private school?

ASchwarz
February 28th, 2005, 01:14 PM
Public schools in the East Bronx are fine. The troubled schools are mostly in the south and central portions of the Bronx. There are excellent public schools in Morris Park, Throgs Neck, Pelham Bay and Country Club, which are all nice, safe East Bronx neighborhoods.

unconstituted
March 13th, 2005, 12:02 PM
Hi all, I'm planning on moving to NY January/February next year. I'll be taking my bar exams then trying to find work. From living in London for the past 3 years I'm used to expense, but am still unsure of the costs of living comparatively. What would my chances be of getting some work/a liveable wage?

I'm 24 now, coming 25 so I'm prepared to take a few risks. NY sounds like a dream.

alex ballard
March 13th, 2005, 03:36 PM
Here's some thoughts on moving to NYC

Apparently, my mom informed me that by the time I'm about 19, it seems my enitre family is moving either south or Arizona. Since that officaly blows my idea of commuting to work/college, what type of jobs can you get out of high school that can help sistain you while also going to college/trade school? Is it true NY jobs pay more than in the rest of the country? What affordable housing programs are available to young men? I mean, any chance of landing an affordable housing voucher/apartment, or even rent control/stablization? Is NY's economy as vital and growing as in the south and west? What careers are growing in the city, is auto mechanics one of them?

Also, do NYers tend to like making friends? I mean, now knowing I will be completely alone in my move, is there any chance that I'll find a group of really good friends for support? Even life long buddies?

Anyway, thanks for your help.

ASchwarz
March 13th, 2005, 04:13 PM
Hi all, I'm planning on moving to NY January/February next year. I'll be taking my bar exams then trying to find work. From living in London for the past 3 years I'm used to expense, but am still unsure of the costs of living comparatively. What would my chances be of getting some work/a liveable wage?

I'm 24 now, coming 25 so I'm prepared to take a few risks. NY sounds like a dream.

NY and London are cost-comparable. As in London, salaries are high. There are many affordable neighborhoods in New York, but few in Manhattan. Lawyers in large NY firms generally make well over $100,000 right out of law school, so you should have no problem finding an apartment, even in the best parts of Manhattan and Brooklyn. I know lawyers who graduated Harvard, Columbia and NYU, and they all make very good salaries at large firms.

A firm like Skadden Arps or Cravath might start lawyers at a $140,000 salary. At that rate, you can afford a nice one bedroom in any neighborhood. If you are working in the public sector or for a nonprofit, your salary will obviously be much less.

NewYorkYankee
March 13th, 2005, 05:05 PM
Alex, where are you from now? Why do your parents and family want to move south? I think it sucks here, but to each his own. Youll be fine in NY yourself, if you go to college youll make friends there. Im moving by myself. I wont know anyone when I come up.

alex ballard
March 13th, 2005, 05:24 PM
Alex, where are you from now? Why do your parents and family want to move south? I think it sucks here, but to each his own. Youll be fine in NY yourself, if you go to college youll make friends there. Im moving by myself. I wont know anyone when I come up.

Becasue old people are nuttos:P. But seriously, they like the warmth. Also, TN doesn't seem to be sharing in the same prosperity Atlanta and Florida have. But my family wants to move to Arizona.

ManhattanKnight
March 13th, 2005, 06:10 PM
Hi all, I'm planning on moving to NY January/February next year. I'll be taking my bar exams then trying to find work. From living in London for the past 3 years I'm used to expense, but am still unsure of the costs of living comparatively. What would my chances be of getting some work/a liveable wage?

I'm 24 now, coming 25 so I'm prepared to take a few risks. NY sounds like a dream.

Almost all first-rate Manhattan law firms, no matter what their size, pay starting lawyers the same "going rate," now around $140,000/year. If you land such a job, your problem won't be finding affordable housing; it will be having enough time outside the office to enjoy it.

Most well-qualified lawyers secure employment well before taking the bar exam, and almost all of those will also have worked as summer associates at law firms during one or two summer-vacations while still in law school, something you might consider doing if you haven't already. Also, since there are special rules governing the eligibility of foreign law students and lawyers to sit for the New York bar exam, be sure that you've fulfilled them before boarding your plane. The Board of Law Examiners' web page is here: http://www.nybarexam.org/

DnH
March 19th, 2005, 07:52 AM
ok my question :

WHAT IS A PUBLIC HOUSING ??

is it an apartment where u rent?

TLOZ Link5
March 19th, 2005, 02:29 PM
Public housing is housing that is built, owned, and operated by the City of New York, similar to council estates in the UK.

Pottebaum
March 24th, 2005, 09:30 PM
I've sort of zoned out on someday wanting to live in NYC, because Chicago has sort of become more of a practical choice (closer to home, more affordable, etc)
but I still love New York, and Im still open to the idea of living there one day.

What are some good, safe, affordable neighborhoods in New York? I can't stress enough how important safety is to me, and I'd also like to live in an active hood, close to transit and all that. I feel like I know the city pretty well, but I'm not certain I understand the benefits of many neighborhoods throughout the city.

Thanks guys!

NewYorkYankee
March 24th, 2005, 10:21 PM
Where exactly did you say you currently reside?

Pottebaum
March 24th, 2005, 10:39 PM
Minnesota :)

sfenn1117
March 27th, 2005, 12:46 AM
Bay Ridge is a nice, diverse neighborhood that is extremely safe. It is also an express bus (20 min max to midtown) or subway ride (same) away from Midtown, and even closer to Lower Manhattan. As you get up toward Dyker Hts, it's a 2 fare neighborhood, so commuting to Manhattan is a bit tougher.

My neighborhood consists of all types of housing, pre-war apartments, small 1-2 family, attached-detached houses, and sprawling never-believe-you're-in-NYC mansions. It's also beautiful, ethnically diverse, great restaurants/shopping, and an awesome park along the entire shore (2.5 miles I think)

They may even be re-instating ferry service to Manhattan from the 69th street pier soon!

Basically my neighborhood offers everything you want if you can't afford Manhattan. Also good public schools, I attend Fort Hamilton HS and it's great.

Any questions, let me know. I'm a transplant from suburbia in CT and I just love it here.

Pottebaum
March 27th, 2005, 09:14 PM
Wow---thanks for the advice! I'm gonna definetely look that one up.

BrooklynRider
March 27th, 2005, 09:26 PM
You'll be fine in NY yourself, if you go to college youll make friends there. Im moving by myself. I wont know anyone when I come up.

Hey! What about all of us at WiredNewYork?

Pottebaum
March 28th, 2005, 10:20 AM
BTW: Do you think an 70-80K income could allow you a comfortable lifestyle in Manhattan?

NewYorkYankee
March 28th, 2005, 02:49 PM
Hey! What about all of us at WiredNewYork?

Of course! You can slap me for forgetting when I move up! :)

RandySavage
March 28th, 2005, 03:34 PM
If you don't have kids or a car and are smart about your spending, you can live quite comfortably in Manhattan on 70-80k.

70-80K gets to be a little tight if you want certain luxuries like a coveted address (i.e. Park Ave., Sutton Place, Central Park West, Far West Village), a spacious apartment, an indoor parking space, eating out a lot, going to shows/clubs/bars a lot, fitness club membership, hi-speed internet, advanced cable tv, etc.

Pottebaum
March 28th, 2005, 06:59 PM
70-80K gets to be a little tight if you want certain luxuries like a coveted address (i.e. Park Ave., Sutton Place, Central Park West, Far West Village), a spacious apartment, an indoor parking space, eating out a lot, going to shows/clubs/bars a lot, fitness club membership, hi-speed internet, advanced cable tv, etc.

Here's what I'd want:
Just a nice, vibrant, safe area with subway access.
1 bedroom apartment; it'd be nice if it was a newer building, but it's alright if it isn't.
-I don't need to go out to eat a ton, or go to fancy clubs or anything. I enjoy a quiet lifestyle.
-I don't need a fitness club membership, but it'd be nice
-I'd want highspeed internet
-Cable TV

I think I'd make it alright.

Even though I LOVE NYC, Chicago is a pretty good option for me, too. It's one of the few other American cities that offers a urban lifestyle even somewhat comparable to New York, it's closer to home, and is more affordable.

NYC will also be an option, though. Who knows, someday living there may even become my goal :)

daphnedelux
March 28th, 2005, 09:29 PM
I got into parsons so i will be moving to nyc shortly. i'm scared. i have a ba all ready and i still can't get a job. that is why i'm going back to school for another degree.so what is the job situation like and combined with living expeses and such. going to school full time and paying rent must be hard. any input on this? being taht i did not grow up in nyc, what is likely hood for good results?

Sir Jimbob
April 3rd, 2005, 08:58 PM
Hello,

While incredibly exciting moving to New York is proving quite a task. Currently located in Pittsburgh we are trying to pull a “rent with pics and email” type deal with craigslist. While a little ways out from a desired June 1st move in we’re still hard pressed to find anything truly worthwhile.


Coming from possibly the best luxury apartment building in downtown Pittsburgh where we pay $1150 for picturesque views and 900sq ft things like guarantors, brokers, and massive 3-month security deposits are somewhat disheartening.


The truth is, we are young 20-some’s looking to take a stab at life. We will be going back to school in the fall and just want to get to the city. It’s hard as we truly don’t know anyone making much more than $50k+ a year to represent a guarantor and don’t have a steady “job” being freelance photographers. Month to month pay between three people is one thing but finding a guarantor that makes 40-100x rent is proving impossibility.


We’ve looked in Brooklyn and found plenty of sub $1800 places but still the 40x guarantor for a nice neighborhood. Sure, this is much better than the 80-100x in Manhattan but still no go for our middle class heritage. Heh.


What are our options? We’re trying to feel out everything and anything possible. Of course we’d also like to be withn 20min ride to Manhattan. What other options are out there besides Craigslist and Brokers that we cannot afford. Is there a non-guarantor mecca out there somewhere in decent parts that we aren’t seeing?


We have to start somewhere. Thanks


----
Cheers,
Matthew Rader
rader@matthewrader.com
www.matthewrader.com (http://www.matthewrader.com/)
AIM: Sir Jimbob.

Scraperfannyc
April 3rd, 2005, 10:38 PM
Try Forest Hills and Kew Gardens. They have access to the F and E express (about 15-20 into midtown Manhattan). Very nice neigborhoods. 1 bedrooms can be gotten at about 1100-1400 on average. Many doorman buildings too.

Sir Jimbob
April 3rd, 2005, 11:10 PM
Try Forest Hills and Kew Gardens. They have access to the F and E express (about 15-20 into midtown Manhattan). Very nice neigborhoods. 1 bedrooms can be gotten at about 1100-1400 on average. Many doorman buildings too.

Any links to buildings? Craigslist?

microserf
April 4th, 2005, 03:36 AM
Try Forest Hills and Kew Gardens. They have access to the F and E express (about 15-20 into midtown Manhattan). Very nice neigborhoods. 1 bedrooms can be gotten at about 1100-1400 on average. Many doorman buildings too.

Thanks for the tip!

DNYCB
April 5th, 2005, 10:52 AM
If you have a savings you could pay rent with a deposit off for a certain amount of time. Any apartment should take you in

Sir Jimbob
April 7th, 2005, 12:51 AM
How does one find an apartment in New York without having to make $80k a year or have rich guarantors behind them? Even Brooklyn and walkups seem to have this crap. *sigh*

It escapes me as everywhere where I see needs paystubs / guarantor. What ever happened to if you have a deposit and pay the rent you are an amazing tenant? Heck, I cannot even find places in Brooklyn or a walkup that doesn't want a huge financial backing behind a tenant. *sigh*

Does this world still exist? Is there any hope?

Ninjahedge
April 7th, 2005, 09:55 AM
You can also try Jersey City.


A lot are within walking distance to the Path train and can afford quick access to areas around the WTC, Christopher and Hudson (West village) and along 6th avenue from 9th street to 33rd street.

The rents are a few hundred less than Manhattan and a little cheaper than FH.

I would reccomend it if you were working or going to school further downtown. the "express" lines from Queens are only express until you get to midtown, then they take forever and a day to get through that major work-hub.

Hoboken is also good, and they have a rent control policy that few landlords will ever tell you about. It is also a few hundred less than Manhattan, but it is EXTREMELY fast to get to the city.

Look into all of them.

alex ballard
April 7th, 2005, 03:18 PM
I'm thinking about becoming a Archtectect/Engineer. Is there any big firms in the city? Any chance of getting a good career in the city as an architect/engineer? What kind of salaries would a city firm give you coming out? Any links to check out?

billyblancoNYC
April 7th, 2005, 03:38 PM
How does one find an apartment in New York without having to make $80k a year or have rich guarantors behind them? Even Brooklyn and walkups seem to have this crap. *sigh*

It escapes me as everywhere where I see needs paystubs / guarantor. What ever happened to if you have a deposit and pay the rent you are an amazing tenant? Heck, I cannot even find places in Brooklyn or a walkup that doesn't want a huge financial backing behind a tenant. *sigh*

Does this world still exist? Is there any hope?

Surprised to hear that about Brooklyn, keep looking. Queens, I'm certain, would be easier in this respect. Check out Long Island City, Astoria, Sunnyside, Jackson Hts, Woodside. Don't look in Jersey, damnit.

Gothamishome
April 12th, 2005, 05:38 PM
It depends upon where in Brooklyn you're looking. If you look in Brooklyn Heights the rents are going to look like Manhattans. Sure there are some neighborhoods in Brooklyn that you are going to want to avoid, and others (like Brooklyn Heights) are going to be priced through the roof. If you don't mind a little longer commute into the city on the train or express bus, I'd suggest looking into neighborhoods like Gravesend, Bensonhurst and like another poster mentioned, Bay Ridge. In other neighborhoods lilke Park Slope, Carroll Gardens and Cobble Hill you might be able to findffordable housing, but you have to be patient and keep looking for something in your price range that you like.

Boreum Hill and Greenpoint are two more areas where rents haven't skyrocketed too much yet.

Good Luck

Pottebaum
April 14th, 2005, 06:41 PM
I found this apartment:

http://www.apartmentguide.com/Property/photos.asp?wsv_psPropertyID=44809&wsv_psReturnTo=2&wsv_psRownum=&wsv_qsSessionID=261653829&wsv_qsListType=1&wsv_qsPartner=-1&wsv_qsGeoKey=1,35,23681&wsv_qsKeyword=&wsv_qsRegisteredFlag=0&wsv_qsBrowseStatus=0&wsv_qsSearchStatus=0&wsv_qsReferringURL=&wsv_qsSCartStatus=0&wsv_qsLowPrice=&wsv_qsHighPrice=&wsv_qsBR=&wsv_qsTerm=&wsv_qsAdvancedSearch=&wsv_qsNoAreas=&wsv_qsSFlg=&lk=phTb

Is that a safe neighborhood that's well connected to the transit system?

EDIT: Oh, and this one, too.

http://www.apartmentguide.com/Property/property.asp?wsv_qsGeoKey=1,35,23681&wsv_psPropertyID=41396

I'm not used to seeing apartments in NYC go that cheap...What's wrong with them?! lol

ryan
April 14th, 2005, 07:03 PM
I found this apartment:

http://www.apartmentguide.com/Property/photos.asp?wsv_psPropertyID=44809&wsv_psReturnTo=2&wsv_psRownum=&wsv_qsSessionID=261653829&wsv_qsListType=1&wsv_qsPartner=-1&wsv_qsGeoKey=1,35,23681&wsv_qsKeyword=&wsv_qsRegisteredFlag=0&wsv_qsBrowseStatus=0&wsv_qsSearchStatus=0&wsv_qsReferringURL=&wsv_qsSCartStatus=0&wsv_qsLowPrice=&wsv_qsHighPrice=&wsv_qsBR=&wsv_qsTerm=&wsv_qsAdvancedSearch=&wsv_qsNoAreas=&wsv_qsSFlg=&lk=phTb

Is that a safe neighborhood that's well connected to the transit system?

EDIT: Oh, and this one, too.

http://www.apartmentguide.com/Property/property.asp?wsv_qsGeoKey=1,35,23681&wsv_psPropertyID=41396

I'm not used to seeing apartments in NYC go that cheap...What's wrong with them?! lol

Pott- you can use straphangers.org (http://www.cmap.nypirg.org/netmaps/straps/Straphangers.asp?name=Straps&Left=534460.463321644&Bottom=605661.094785572&Right=739475.361307834&Top=758873.513194952&Reg=NYC&UsrD=true&Action=ZoomIn&Address=&Boro=Brooklyn&ByNeighborhood=PARK+SLOPE&Button2=Go&ByStation=Select) to figure out exactly how far the nearest subway is. Can't answer your question with too much confidence b/c I don't know those areas 100%, but Bay Ridge is kind of far out (especially if you're commuting to manhattan) apt #2 is on the "wrong side" of Prospect Park. I bet Brooklynrider could give more detail about that neighborhood, but the conventional (thus possibly out-of-date) wisdom is to stay west of the park. Also, those prices are ranges, so they probably don't have any apts at the cheaper price "available" and there could be a broker fee, which is about a month's rent.

Have you considered Queens? If you plan to work in Midtown, the commute is better than the affordable parts of Brooklyn, and arguably safer/a better value. Also, I found my apt on craigslist (no fee/good deal) and I reccomend it. I second the suggestion to look in Greenpoint.

Pottebaum
April 14th, 2005, 07:18 PM
Cool--thanks for the info.

What are some safe, affordable areas of Brooklyn and Queens? I haven't been reading up on NYC as much lately, so Im pretty out of touch. Time to break out the maps! :P

ryan
April 14th, 2005, 07:49 PM
Try using this (http://www.paulrademacher.com/housing) website - it might help you relate the listings to geography. Craigslist itself has more search options though.

Affordable is subjective - try searching by price and then researching the areas where you find appealing listings. Brooklyn is changing rapidly, but generally the center is the least safe, and the areas closest to manhattan are the most desireable.

Pottebaum
April 17th, 2005, 04:03 PM
Thanks for the link, ryan!

BTW: What's morningside heights like? Affordable?

Pottebaum
April 25th, 2005, 05:13 PM
What sort of rent would you guys call affordable?

What neighborhoods do you guys live in? Is it safe, affordable, etc?

Pottebaum
May 7th, 2005, 12:48 PM
More questions...

Is Astoria, Queens safe? Would you recommend living there? Is it transit dependant? I love taking the bus and getting on the subway....

NewYorkYankee
May 7th, 2005, 01:26 PM
Astoria is a great place. It is also very safe. I talk a guy on here from Astoria often, he takes the subway everyday. Astoria is 15 minutes to Manhattan.

Pottebaum
May 7th, 2005, 02:19 PM
Cool---Ill need to find some pics!

TLOZ Link5
May 7th, 2005, 05:03 PM
A comedian, whose name evades me at the moment, says that if there's ever a scream at night in Astoria, it means that there's a soccer match on TV and Ecuador just scored a goal.

Pottebaum
May 7th, 2005, 06:21 PM
What sort of housing is available in Astoria?

NewYorkYankee
May 7th, 2005, 09:19 PM
Apartments, condos, etc. The neighborhood is very walkable and has many main avenues with shopping and restaurants.

Pottebaum
May 8th, 2005, 02:40 PM
Cool!
JW, what sort of neighborhoods are you looking at in NYC, NYYankee, once you complete college?

Also, I noticed there are some pretty well priced places here:
www.roberthill.com I think it covers Yorkville, mostly. Is that a pretty good neighborhood? (not sure if that's yorkville or not; quite a few of them are in the lower 90's)

NewYorkYankee
May 8th, 2005, 07:33 PM
Yorkville is cool. Its in the Upper East Side. I plan to stay in Manhattan. I want to be in the Upper East Side.

Pottebaum
May 8th, 2005, 08:29 PM
Yeah, Yorkville seems pretty nice. And not way to expensive either!

shinpei_kuroda
May 19th, 2005, 08:36 PM
What do you think is the most luxurious metroplitan area in New York City?

I LOVE THE SOCCER
May 19th, 2005, 09:52 PM
Is Yorkville the German neighbourhood of New York City?

NYatKNIGHT
May 20th, 2005, 09:57 AM
What do you think is the most luxurious metroplitan area in New York City?5th Avenue


Is Yorkville the German neighbourhood of New York City?Yes, there is a German community there, though not as large as it once was.

NYC
May 28th, 2005, 08:03 AM
Is Yorkville the German neighbourhood of New York City?

Yorkville: It used to be. There are still a few stores and shops left. Shaller & Weber is a great deli and next to it is Old Heildelberg restaurant.

I used to live in Astoria, I loved it. Great shopping and people watching. And the only place with real Europen style cafes. It's still like an "off-the-boat" neighborhood. Greeks, Turks, Arabs, French, Germans, Mid-Westerners, you name it. Definitely a good and over all safe neighborhood.

NewYorkYankee
May 28th, 2005, 04:17 PM
Please, This site has been great for me learning about the city now. Ill def. keep up with projects and with the great people on here once Im a New Yorker as well. :)

tiffanyd
May 30th, 2005, 11:22 PM
We have lived in London and surrounds for 10 years and have now been in Brisbane, Australia for 7 years.

We now are considering moving to New York or it's surrounds.

We are in our mid-thirties, have two cats and are self-employed. My partner was born in America so therefore has an American passport.

Since neither of us have been to New York we have no idea what each area looks like apart from the descriptions I have found in this forum.

Because of our cats we would need a property with a garden, be it small. What areas would have the most affordable terraced houses, semi-detached houses etc? Is it mostly apartments in New York.

We are happy to be in reach of New York and live on it's outskirts...again what areas are afforable for buying a property but still safe but interesting.

What is 'Long Island' like? New Jersey?

sbutterfly
June 3rd, 2005, 01:18 PM
I was recently in NYC and now I am considering a permanent shift. My deepest concern is safety. I have been trying to find out what areas are safe to live in, but have nothing.

So I am wondering if anyone living there, NYC (any of the 5 boroughs) can tell me what areas to look into and which to stay out of. Plus I cant afford anything very expensive and I don't want to live in Jersey City but proper NYC either Manhattan, Brooklyn, Bronx, Staten Island or Queens. I am most interested in Manhattan and Brooklyn.

So my question again is: What areas are safe (safest?) to live in?

Thanks a bunch to anyone who responds.

ManhattanKnight
June 3rd, 2005, 02:20 PM
My deepest concern is safety. I have been trying to find out what areas are safe to live in, but have nothing.


The "deepest concern" for anyone moving here really shouldn't be about safety, since there are very few neighborhoods that should be considered unsafe. This wasn't so 20-30 years ago, but it is today.

lotus71
June 3rd, 2005, 09:48 PM
I'd like to recommend Normandie Court.
The apartments are generally in good condition. Maintenanace is free and prompt. Rent is usually lower than what you would find anywhere else.
Good bang for the buck.

Plus the have a great website to get you started in NY, it's called new york residents: http://www.nyresidents.com .
You can meet other residents there, buy and sell stuff from other residents. That makes moving in much better.

krulltime
June 4th, 2005, 12:28 AM
I was recently in NYC and now I am considering a permanent shift. My deepest concern is safety. I have been trying to find out what areas are safe to live in, but have nothing.

So I am wondering if anyone living there, NYC (any of the 5 boroughs) can tell me what areas to look into and which to stay out of. Plus I cant afford anything very expensive and I don't want to live in Jersey City but proper NYC either Manhattan, Brooklyn, Bronx, Staten Island or Queens. I am most interested in Manhattan and Brooklyn.

So my question again is: What areas are safe (safest?) to live in?

Thanks a bunch to anyone who responds.

Unfortunatly, NYC has become too expensive for alot of people wanting to move here. You can live in luxury in another city or town with the same amount you pay for a shitty apartment in NYC, including the safest parts of the 5 boroughs.

But I think if you are really serious of affordability than you should probably look in areas that are close to the safest neighborhoods. Thats is a great deal and you can find bigger apartments and you will be close to the safest neighborhoods. Also crime is really going down in the 'unsafe' neighborhoods. Saying that, I think that is more likely that you get hit by a car than been attack on the streets. As a common rule look at your surroundings as you walk, like you watch the street before you cross so you dont get hit by a car.

I am not too familiar with the areas close to the safest neighborhoods since I live in manhattan. But there is plenty of them. NYC is a very BIG area... Believe me!

umbino
June 8th, 2005, 06:44 AM
i was wondering a couple of things because i wanna move to new york in the near future.....i was born in palermo italy....and then at the age of 10 moved to toronto, canada for 8 years...so i got all my canadian documents.....now im back in italy and im 19 with a canadian diploma and i would like to move to new york to continue studying in college or university....ill be moving there by myself i was wondering how hard it would be for a 19yr old to mvoe in such a big city and to effort a rent and school and also trying to find a job.....

billyblancoNYC
June 8th, 2005, 11:18 AM
There are a ton of great places in NYC to live, many still are reasonably affordable, if not the more prime areas in the city.

As far as many people that are concerned with safety, fear not...

http://www.nyc.gov/portal/index.jsp?epi_menuItemID=c0935b9a57bb4ef3daf2f1c70 1c789a0&epi_menuID=13ecbf46556241d3daf2f1c701c789a0&epi_baseMenuID=27579af732d48f86a62fa24601c789a0&pageID=mayor_press_release&catID=1194&doc_name=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nyc.gov%2Fhtml%2Fom%2Fht ml%2F2005a%2Fpr217-05.html&cc=unused1978&rc=1194&ndi=1

These are based on FBI federal numbers, so there's little room for local BS. NYC is by far the safest big city in America and is down at the bottom for ALL cities in America.

umbino
June 8th, 2005, 12:53 PM
thats a great thing to hear about new york...because everyone thinks new york is full of crime especially in areas like bronx or queens.....so yea is it hard to come live in such a big city by urself....i dont work right now so i dont have much moeny saved up...and i also have no american documents...i heard u gotta go tru alot to get a citizenship and so on

MikeKruger
June 9th, 2005, 11:49 AM
assuming I win the lottery, how much would a nice (>600sq ft) loft cost in the Upper East Side or Upper West Side?

Schadenfrau
June 9th, 2005, 12:31 PM
If you're looking for a loft, you'd have better luck downtown. If you're looking for an apartment on the UES/UWS, you'll likely be spending upwards of $1,800.

randomdude
June 12th, 2005, 06:01 PM
Hi all,

I am living in Chicago suburb and will move to nyc in early July. I plan to find a cheaper apartment to live outside Manhattan. The ideal location for me would be Brooklyn. I am not sure if I still need to keep my car. I know you don't need a car in Manhattan. How about other areas, such as Brooklyn and Queens? Can I live without a car? Do I need a car for shopping and going around? Also, how much does the car insurance cost in Manhattan, Brooklyn and Queens? Thanks for your inputs.

Eric

NewYorkYankee
June 12th, 2005, 07:03 PM
I dont believe you will need a car in Brooklyn. The subway goes there, and there is an extensive bus service. What area are you moving into? I know that much of Brooklyn is urban with plenty of streets that are filled with shops, restaurants, cafes that you can walk to.

randomdude
June 12th, 2005, 07:42 PM
Thanks for the quick reply. The information is very helpful. I am not sure what area in Brooklyn I am going to move in. I just start looking for apartment. I will work in lower Manhattan. It seems that all the areas close to there are quite expensive. I am thinking of upper east Manhattan or somewhere further into Brooklyn and is safe and near the subway. I am thinking of Fort Greene, Park Slop and Crown Heights. But I have no idea about these areas. Any suggestions? Do I need a car if I live in these areas? Queens is probably too far away. If possible, I would like to get my commuting time limited to 40 min. Thanks.

alex ballard
June 12th, 2005, 07:59 PM
/\Ft Greene and The Slope will be a squeeze. I would definetly go for Crown Heights. Safe, affordable and the subway takes you to Lower Manhattan in no time.

Bay Ridge also has a direct connection to Lower Manhattan. It is a safe, family oriented coummnity and has an "open" feel while still being quite open.

randomdude
June 12th, 2005, 08:11 PM
Thanks for the input. I will definitely have a close look at crown height. What about Boerum Hill, Cobble Hill, Clinton Heights? Also, it seems that Bay ridge is at the southest Brooklyn from the map? Isn't it too far from there to lower Manhattan? Some website says it takes 80 min to Manhattan.

NewYorkYankee
June 12th, 2005, 08:20 PM
Random, all of those neighborhoods are good. Would you consider Harlem or Washington Heights in Manhattan? Although, I have never been to these neighborhoods, from what I hear they are quite alright. They both have several subway lines to downtown. May I ask what area do you work in? Finance?

randomdude
June 12th, 2005, 08:28 PM
Thanks, Yankee. Is taking ferry or water taxi a good way to work if you live in Sunset park or Bay Ridge? I will work in a IT team for a fiance firm.

alex ballard
June 12th, 2005, 08:30 PM
In terms of access, distances mean nothing. A neighborhood could be across the river and it'd take 40 minutes to get to Manhattan. While you could be deep into the outer boroughs and get there in a snap. Brooklyn works like this. The train to Bay Ridge will drop you off right at Cortland st or Rector. At Crown Heights, you can get off right at Wall St or City Hall.

Carrol Gardens might have a deal. And the closer you are to 4th ave, the easier your life will be, becasue the subway lines to Lower Manhattan are right there. But if you want a neighborhood where you can see yourself being for now and when the kids come, I suggest looking at Bay Ridge/Midwood/Sheepshead Bay/Flatbush/Sunset Park.

Crown Heights isn't quite up to the kiddie set. But in a few years, it will be fine.

randomdude
June 12th, 2005, 09:18 PM
Alex, thanks for the wonderful information. It is very helpful. I am getting some ideas now about living in Brooklyn. My plan is to rent a apartment for a year or less and then find a permanent place to live if I like the job. I find some good deals in Crown Heights and I will come to nyc to have a look. Thanks again!

alex ballard
June 12th, 2005, 09:39 PM
/\ You're welcome! You will enjoy life here in NY.

chrisc1667
June 14th, 2005, 08:58 AM
Planning On Relocating To The City Within The Next 6 Months, Moving From The Midwest, I Am Completly In Love With The City..the Reason I Am Not There Yet Is I Am Trying To Save Money For The Move, I Am Curious What Everyone Thinks About How Much You Should Have In Order To Move To Nyc, I Was Thinking Like 5000 Would Be A Good Start, What Do You All Think.

ASchwarz
June 14th, 2005, 11:03 AM
Randomdude, Bay Ridge is about 40 minutes to Wall Street. Its a very easy one seat ride.

Crown Heights is probably 20-25 minutes to Wall Street. Look for apartments on Eastern Parkway, which is very nice and has great subway access. The neighborhood is mostly West Indian and Orthodox Jewish but is starting to gentrify. I have friends who live in Crown Heights, so send me a message if you need more info.

chrisc1667
June 14th, 2005, 11:18 AM
would like to be in the east village, but probally somewhere in brooklyn, close to the city

randomdude
June 15th, 2005, 09:56 PM
ASchwarz, thanks for the information. It seems Bay Bridge is not that bad for commuting. I do need more choices. This forum is really helpful.

Clarknt67
June 16th, 2005, 03:44 PM
You definately don't NEED a car in Brooklyn. You can get around just fine without one.

Whether you WANT to keep it is something to consider. I have friends in Park Slope & Kensington that keep cars and enjoy them. They don't use them to go to the city (Manhattan). They have minor inconvience of moving the car around the city streets and hunting for parking.

But having had a car for my first 5 years I can say it IS a nice luxury. I used mine for beelines to the beach in the summer and trips to Vermont skiing in the winter (which you can accomplish with less convenience without a car). It gave me a nice sense of freedom I miss since giving it up 7 years ago (and now I'm free from the inconvenience of keeping a car!).

Investigate the parking situation where you want to live and decide from that. If you're farther out in bklyn, the parking may not be a big inconvenience.

Clarknt67
June 16th, 2005, 03:53 PM
I Was Thinking Like 5000 Would Be A Good Start, What Do You All Think.

5000 is probably more than many people save when they move here.

It depends on the standard of living you set for yourself and how quickly you can find home and job. If you have a friend or temporary place you can crash at for a month or so, you will probably have the luxury of shopping for a no-fee apartment (especially if you're willing to become someone's roommate). You can look in the Village Voice, Craigslist.org or use word of mouth for these apartments (there's also a thread on this site that lists no-fee rental buildings).

If you must find a place before you get here, or you're paying a hotel bill, you might have to pay a broker, which can be very expensive (in the thousands, even your whole savings).

Cheapest, easiest way is to find someone looking for roommate. But rent "single white female" first! ;)

alex ballard
June 17th, 2005, 11:19 AM
Are there any neighborhoods where I could grab a rent for less than $1,000? $500 would be perfect but I know that would be a tough find in a good neighborhood. How 'bout it?

Schadenfrau
June 17th, 2005, 11:25 AM
You can definitely find a share for under $1,000.

alex ballard
June 17th, 2005, 11:49 AM
/\ Which is what, a roommate? I wouldn't make a good roomate and I'm a private guy.


Here's my criteria:

No roomate
No roaches
Close to subway or bus that will take me to subway
Shopping close by
relatviely safe

There, that's my criteria.

Schadenfrau
June 17th, 2005, 01:03 PM
I don't think you'll have much trouble finding an apartment for under $1,000, but you're definitely not going to find one for $500.

For around $900, you could find something in Harlem, Washington Heights or Inwood in Manhattan. For $700-800, you could find something in Queens.

randomdude
June 18th, 2005, 08:21 PM
You definately don't NEED a car in Brooklyn. You can get around just fine without one.

Whether you WANT to keep it is something to consider. I have friends in Park Slope & Kensington that keep cars and enjoy them. They don't use them to go to the city (Manhattan). They have minor inconvience of moving the car around the city streets and hunting for parking.

But having had a car for my first 5 years I can say it IS a nice luxury. I used mine for beelines to the beach in the summer and trips to Vermont skiing in the winter (which you can accomplish with less convenience without a car). It gave me a nice sense of freedom I miss since giving it up 7 years ago (and now I'm free from the inconvenience of keeping a car!).

Investigate the parking situation where you want to live and decide from that. If you're farther out in bklyn, the parking may not be a big inconvenience.

Clarknt67, thanks for the information. Do you know how much the insurance costs to keep a car? I saw somewhere on web that Brooklyn has the most expensive car insurance in the country.

NY_Yankees_1979
June 24th, 2005, 03:01 PM
Hiyas,

I am going to be moving to nyc sometime in the near future. I will be working for a law firm while going to fordham law school at night. The firm i am going to be working for is up in Tarrytown. I was thinking of living in the Bronx but am concerned about crime, drugs etc as I have a family. I would like to live in an ethnically diverse neighborhood just for sake of an interesting place to live.
Any advice on moving there?

Feel free to email me.

Thanks,

KC I live in the Bronx and it really just depends on where your going to live..most of the crime in the Bronx happens in the south Bronx (i.e. - Hunts Point, Melrose, High Bridge and places like that you probably wouldn't want to live in with a family) I happen to live off of 157 and Melrose and have walked to Yankee Stadium with no problems.

lofter1
June 25th, 2005, 12:55 AM
Investigate the parking situation where you want to live and decide from that. If you're farther out in bklyn, the parking may not be a big inconvenience.

If you're thinking of having a car, then DEFINITELY check out the parking situation in the area where you're thinking of renting.

10 years ago in my neighborhood (SoHo, Little Italy, NoHo) you could find parking all over the place and even on the main drags after six -- and no problem at all on the weekends. Now the all the parking places are hardly ever available. And parking garages in the area are $400 / month and up.

A new building around the corner has an underground parking lot that goes for $4.75 per HALF hour!!!

One thing to do if you're only going to use your car occasionally is to find a good lot / garage near public transportation but removed from where you'll live -- you can get to the car when you need it, but won't have the hassle of having to figure out the local parking thing.

btw -- I no longer have a car, and hardly ever miss it. If I want to get out of town and don't want to take the train, etc. then sometimes I rent one (a couple of times a year) -- which is far cheaper than insurance, parking, repairs, etc.

Kyth
June 29th, 2005, 03:23 PM
My fiance and I are relocating to Brooklyn in August. He will be attending Brooklyn College full time and I will be working. We have looked at pictures of several apartments on craigslist and talked to a few brokers, property managers, but I could really use some advice on neighborhoods.

The main goal is to find an apartment where it is easy to get to brooklyn college (by subway, bus, walking). I am not planning to bring my car with me. We are looking at 2+ bedrooms for about $1500 with washer/dryer connections. So far, I have two in the running and a couple others I am looking at. Can anyone tell me more about Kensington and Lefferts Gardens? There is one in Bensonhurst, but I am worried about how easy or difficult it will be to get to Brooklyn College from there. So far I haven't seen anything in the Midwood or Flatbush areas.

Clarknt67
June 29th, 2005, 05:09 PM
Clarknt67, thanks for the information. Do you know how much the insurance costs to keep a car? I saw somewhere on web that Brooklyn has the most expensive car insurance in the country.

I don't know insurance rates (www.geico.com?). Truth be told, I kept mine insured in Michigan the whole time I had one, registered at my mommy's address (shhhhh!!!!!!!). And of course, that was 7 years ago. I hear they are very high.

ryan
June 29th, 2005, 05:44 PM
I don't know insurance rates (www.geico.com?) (http://www.geico.com/?%29). Truth be told, I kept mine insured in Michigan the whole time I had one, registered at my mommy's address (shhhhh!!!!!!!). And of course, that was 7 years ago. I hear they are very high.

yup, I do the same thing (though I luckily have NYS plates - I've heard you get ticketed with out of state plates after a few months with the same meter maid). I was looking at insurance over $300 a month for my none-too-special car and perfect driving record. Parking is terrible - in my neighborhood I have to move 3 times a week for street cleaning, though it's sleepy enough that there are always spots somewhere. I've paid my share of tickets though.

Another car issue is bumps, dings and scratches. You have to be ok with them. Not only do people aggressive bump while they park, but they are less... careful in parking lots too. Basically, don't bring a valuable car that you're attached to.

jiw40
June 29th, 2005, 07:32 PM
Kyth,Brooklyn College is located right at a major hub known as The Junction.One train line begins there and many bus routes intersect there.There is a private bus known as the Green Lines that goes to the Junction from Rockaway Beach.You'll have to do some legwork to find a 2 bedroom there for under $1500,but it can be done.You can also check local papers like the Kings Courier in Brooklyn or The Wave in Rockaway.Anyway it will be hard to do long distance with little local knowledge.If you become desperate,say so in this forum and I can divulge to you a secret local technique for finding nicer apartments.(I have a soft spot for NC as we vacationed for quite a few years at Ocean Isle Beach)Good Luck and Welcome to New York.

Kyth
June 29th, 2005, 08:27 PM
Thanks jiw40. The apartment in Kensington is on hold and needs a decision quickly as we are not the only ones looking at it, so I am heading to NYC this weekend to look around. I don't know the neighborhoods very well, only that Park Slope is "the" place to be and an expensive place to be too. I know this might not be the best weekend to view apartments, but I am hoping to look at a few while I am there. It would be easier if I could rent one this weekend. At least I will be there through Tuesday.

Do you have any suggestions on which neighborhoods are nice to live in? The $1500 is firm, I really can't go higher. But I don't have to look at 2-bedrooms. I'm sure we would be just fine in a 1-bedroom.

I'll definitely pick up those two papers when I arrive and have a look through them. And I'd desperately like to know your secret. Looking for an apartment from so far away with no idea about the neighborhoods has been a major cause of stress for me lately. So please, I'd love to know any secrets that will make my search easier.

Ocean Isle is a great beach. If you ever come back to NC, check out Bald Head Island. It is a beautiful beach and definitely a relaxing experience.

RichardB
June 30th, 2005, 03:53 PM
Hello,

I will be moving to NY per August 1st. I hope someone can give me some advise on where and how to look for an appartment or studio. Where do I look? What neigborhoods are nice? I'm able to spend around $1500 a month on preferably a 1 bedroom appartment, although a bit spacious studio would be great too.

I'll be working north of New York (in White Plains) so the commute should be possible (either by train or by car). Who can gove this 27 year old Dutchy a bit of advise?
Thanks a lot,
Richard

Clarknt67
June 30th, 2005, 04:12 PM
Hello,

I will be moving to NY per August 1st. I hope someone can give me some advise on where and how to look for an appartment or studio. Where do I look? What neigborhoods are nice? I'm able to spend around $1500 a month on preferably a 1 bedroom appartment, although a bit spacious studio would be great too.

I'll be working north of New York (in White Plains) so the commute should be possible (either by train or by car). Who can gove this 27 year old Dutchy a bit of advise?
Thanks a lot,
Richard


Well, with $1500 to spend and if you're willing to settle for a studio you're in OK shape to shop in Manhattan.

Metro North trains which will take you to White Plains depart from Grand Central Station at 42 & Park, which is midtown east. Your best bet is to work from there. You could probably find a studio in or near your price range. It's not considered the hippest or coolest area. (Which is why it's less expensive than the Village, Chelsea, Soho or Tribeca.)

What sort of neighborhood do you wish to live in? Hipster? Yuppy? Homo? Barrio?

If you wanted to go for more space for your money, you could try Queens as it's an easy commute to Grand Central. Try Astoria and Jackson Heights.

billyblancoNYC
June 30th, 2005, 04:20 PM
Well, with $1500 to spend and if you're willing to settle for a studio you're in OK shape to shop in Manhattan.

Metro North trains which will take you to White Plains depart from Grand Central Station at 42 & Park, which is midtown east. Your best bet is to work from there. You could probably find a studio in or near your price range. It's not considered the hippest or coolest area. (Which is why it's less expensive than the Village, Chelsea, Soho or Tribeca.)

What sort of neighborhood do you wish to live in? Hipster? Yuppy? Homo? Barrio?

If you wanted to go for more space for your money, you could try Queens as it's an easy commute to Grand Central. Try Astoria and Jackson Heights.

Yes, Queens or even upper Manhattan like Harlem and Upper East Side might work.

Schadenfrau
June 30th, 2005, 04:27 PM
Definitely live on the east side. I lived in Westchester for six years and loathed anything that required me to visit the west side. After a long day and that commute, the 7 train/Shuttle are not going to be very appealing.

ryan
June 30th, 2005, 04:33 PM
White Plains is a reletively easy commute - and you'll be going against rush hour traffic, which is a plus. I'd suggest looking at harlem, as you can get on your train at the Metro North 125th street station. The area around Grand Central is quite expensive, but you should check it out anyhow. The 7 train goes right through Grand Central, so it would be the train to look along in Queens (long island city and jackson heights are nice - and along the 7 train, if not-yet-very-hip) Astoria is very nice, but on the wrong train - you don't want a 2 train commute just to Grand Central(!)

If you're into the suburb thing, you should also look into communities along the Metro North Hudson line (that's the only one that goes to White Plains) as some are kind of suburban/urban hybrids, and many are quite nice, if you're into that kind of thing. The commute would be even nicer. White plains itself is a kind of affordable place to live, but not very exciting (although people get excited by the Westchester Mall)

ryan
June 30th, 2005, 04:38 PM
Definitely live on the east side. I lived in Westchester for six years and loathed anything that required me to visit the west side. After a long day and that commute, the 7 train/Shuttle are not going to be very appealing.

wus - I commuted from New Haven to Midtown (for a very short time... turns out I'm a bit of a wus myself when it comes to a 5 hour daily commute)

Schadenfrau
June 30th, 2005, 04:45 PM
Actually, it's the Harlem line that runs to White Plains. If you're looking to live on that line, Bronxville and Scarsdale are very nice towns about 15 minutes from White Plains. $1,500 would rent you a palace.

ryan
June 30th, 2005, 05:04 PM
Actually, it's the Harlem line that runs to White Plains. If you're looking to live on that line, Bronxville and Scarsdale are very nice towns about 15 minutes from White Plains. $1,500 would rent you a palace.

corrected, and humbled. I like tuckahoe too, but mostly because of the name.

Schadenfrau
June 30th, 2005, 05:13 PM
Westchester is chock-full of colorful names.

Did you do the Yale-Manhattan post-grad commute? I've heard it's awful, but nothing on the poor kids from Bard and Vassar.

jiw40
June 30th, 2005, 05:19 PM
Kyth,I just went to rocawave.com and there were lots of apartments in the classifieds.It's a nice residential area,by the beach,you could even call it secluded.I highly recommend you look there when you come.I lived there when I was a teenager(actually Belle Harbor)and it was great.As far as Bald Head,I don't think there is a house big enough there to hold my wife's whole family.We used to get as many as 20 of us into the house we rented.Almost all of our kids grew up wiyh going there every summer,for about 15 years.My kids ask all the time if we'll be going back,but quite a bit has changed,(My mother-in-law passed last year and my brother-in-laws older kids are becoming world travelers.)but we will return soon.As for the secret technique,I'll send you a private message through this site.(It is a SECRET)

ryan
June 30th, 2005, 05:40 PM
Westchester is chock-full of colorful names.

Did you do the Yale-Manhattan post-grad commute? I've heard it's awful, but nothing on the poor kids from Bard and Vassar.

I was merely a yale wife. Don't pity me too much (though the commute - and living in Connecticut for 2 years - was a bear)

RichardB
July 1st, 2005, 03:06 AM
Yes, Queens or even upper Manhattan like Harlem and Upper East Side might work.

Thanks for al the replies!
I was looking at the Upper East Side already, where I think I will be able to find something. Is it nice to live in? I'm looking for somewhere with quite a few young people.
Any ideas for websites or agencies to use are more than welcome!!

Clarknt67
July 1st, 2005, 11:53 AM
Thanks for al the replies!
I was looking at the Upper East Side already, where I think I will be able to find something. Is it nice to live in? I'm looking for somewhere with quite a few young people.
Any ideas for websites or agencies to use are more than welcome!!

Upper East Side seems to be a popular neighborhood with young, preppie, post-college heteros, in my experience.

I_Claudius
July 1st, 2005, 02:02 PM
Westchester is chock-full of colorful names.

Did you do the Yale-Manhattan post-grad commute? I've heard it's awful, but nothing on the poor kids from Bard and Vassar.


The commute to New Haven is just about the same as Poughkeepsie. But yeah, it sucks for the Bard kids.

determined
July 2nd, 2005, 07:43 AM
hello! I've been lurking...great, useful info. I'm in need of some advice, here's my situation- (and this is just my vision of how it will happen)

I'm in NC now and planning to move to the city sept/oct. My job is personal trainer/fitness instructor and needing to get the job lined up there. I'm thinking if it's like any other one i've had there will be auditions for the job. So, i'll take a week to go up there just for the auditions. BTW, money-wise there isn't much saved up bc of my car and i'm ready for it to go away.:D So would least expensive route be to rent out a room from someone apartment in the city? (saw a few on craigslist) Hotel would certainly be out of my reach.

well, I was going to keep typing but I think this is good for now, i'll post the rest after I have this part down. Thanks for any help and if not enough info let me know. Thanks, Jen

Clarknt67
July 5th, 2005, 05:21 PM
Craig's list is a good resource. I was talking to a girlfriend of mine and realized she'd found her apartment, job and boyfriend off Craig'slist.

lofter1
July 7th, 2005, 10:24 AM
So would least expensive route be to rent out a room from someone apartment in the city? (saw a few on craigslist) Hotel would certainly be out of my reach.

Renting a room in someone's home / apt. is a great way to get started. Craig's List is a good place to start.

Be careful about putting down money up-front without some sort of written agreement; for a few reasons why see this recent article in the Village Voice, "Nightmare on Orchard Street": http://villagevoice.com/nyclife/0526,theessay,65341,15.html

Make certain you have a clear agreement regarding $$ due (rent + utulities, cable, etc.) and if there are any "rules" you need to be aware of.

Be sure that the time commitment is clear (3 months , 6 months, etc.).

Good communication between you and your new "landlord" (i.e.: the person whose home you are moving into) is really important.

And go into your search with a clear head. Trust your instincts!

Toonami
July 8th, 2005, 06:23 PM
Thanks to everyone who responded when I stupidly put this in the "Thigns to do in NY" thread. :p

I'm a latino who wants to move to Manhattan What's a good latino neighborhood that's fairly safe and not too far uptown? At first i wanted to live in Spanish Harlem but I realized that it's dangeirous there and too far uptown, I'm thinking anywhere below midtown or a little above.

BTW I despise the suburbs and i want to move into a bust noisy neihgbrohood

I think the reason i want to surroudn myself with my people is because we have more in common in terms of culture, politics, religion, etc for examle i'd hate to be the only one on my block whos conservative ;)

HarlemRep
July 11th, 2005, 01:22 AM
Thanks to everyone who responded when I stupidly put this in the "Thigns to do in NY" thread. :p

I'm a latino who wants to move to Manhattan What's a good latino neighborhood that's fairly safe and not too far uptown? At first i wanted to live in Spanish Harlem but I realized that it's dangeirous there and too far uptown, I'm thinking anywhere below midtown or a little above.

BTW I despise the suburbs and i want to move into a bust noisy neihgbrohood

I think the reason i want to surroudn myself with my people is because we have more in common in terms of culture, politics, religion, etc for examle i'd hate to be the only one on my block whos conservative ;)

There's no such thing, really. The only "hispanic neighborhood" is Washington Heights and Spanish Harlem. If you think you're gonna move to Manhattan and be picky about who you live around and where it is (unless you're loaded with cash), you should probably not move here.

You claim you want to live around "your people", but not in a higher crime area. News for you: There are no high income, low crime Hispanic neighborhoods.

Schadenfrau
July 11th, 2005, 11:27 AM
Add conservative to that mix and you've got yourself an impossible, not to mention bizarre, dream. Maybe try Miami?

billyblancoNYC
July 11th, 2005, 11:48 AM
Thanks to everyone who responded when I stupidly put this in the "Thigns to do in NY" thread. :p

I'm a latino who wants to move to Manhattan What's a good latino neighborhood that's fairly safe and not too far uptown? At first i wanted to live in Spanish Harlem but I realized that it's dangeirous there and too far uptown, I'm thinking anywhere below midtown or a little above.

BTW I despise the suburbs and i want to move into a bust noisy neihgbrohood

I think the reason i want to surroudn myself with my people is because we have more in common in terms of culture, politics, religion, etc for examle i'd hate to be the only one on my block whos conservative ;)

Jackson Heights is a very nice area, dense and busy, with people from all over Latin America...Columbia, Uruguay, Mexico, DR, Argentina, Ecuador...

Issue...it's in Queens, but it's a 15 min train ride to midtown.

HarlemRep
July 11th, 2005, 12:35 PM
I agree, billy, but even that is not a "hispanic" neighborhood. It's even getting to the point where "SpaHa" (so corny) and Washington Heights are moving away from being one ethnic group. But Jackson Heights is so diverse it's insane. Definitely not fair to label that as hispanic. I know there's a huge Indian population there, as well.

billyblancoNYC
July 11th, 2005, 02:31 PM
I agree, billy, but even that is not a "hispanic" neighborhood. It's even getting to the point where "SpaHa" (so corny) and Washington Heights are moving away from being one ethnic group. But Jackson Heights is so diverse it's insane. Definitely not fair to label that as hispanic. I know there's a huge Indian population there, as well.

Well, this is true, but there are sections. Like 37th ave by 74st is like "Little India." The parts more east, like closer to Corona, are mostly hispanic. Corona is another mostly hispanic area. For those that don't know, it boders Shea Stadium. Then, on the other side of Shea is Flushing...the other China/Koreatown.

Toonami
July 11th, 2005, 10:55 PM
The only real reservations i have abut living in new york are that everyone is SO LIBERAL... which is fine but in small doses ;) everything else about the city i love, but i guess if its impossbile to find a latino neighborhood i'll live on the lower east side or something... as long as i'm away from homosexuals (yes i'm one of those old school immigrants)

ryan
July 11th, 2005, 11:12 PM
The only real reservations i have abut living in new york are that everyone is SO LIBERAL... which is fine but in small doses ;) everything else about the city i love, but i guess if its impossbile to find a latino neighborhood i'll live on the lower east side or something... as long as i'm away from homosexuals (yes i'm one of those old school immigrants)

If you really want to keep away from those damned homosexuals, the Lower East Side is not the place to go - they're there too. No place south of 14th, really. Murray Hill, Midtown East and the Upper East side might be good fits for you. I hear they keep the homos out of Carnasie, Brooklyn. Perhaps Howards Beach, Queens? Houston?

sfenn1117
July 11th, 2005, 11:31 PM
The only real reservations i have abut living in new york are that everyone is SO LIBERAL... which is fine but in small doses ;) everything else about the city i love, but i guess if its impossbile to find a latino neighborhood i'll live on the lower east side or something... as long as i'm away from homosexuals (yes i'm one of those old school immigrants)

Not many gays in my neighborhood. (Bay Ridge Brooklyn). I don't really care either way. But one did just move in next door, he's my neighbors boyfriend, he's lived there for 30 years and none of us knew he was gay. The long time neighbor is such a nice guy but his boyfriend is so obnoxious. I can't stand him b/c of that, not because he's gay.

Anyway politically I'd describe myself as leaning ever-so slightly conservative, and while there are a lot of liberals in the city, it's not that bad.


Look up Sunset Park Brooklyn- It has a large hispanic population, it's safe, quiet, has a nice park, subway line, nice brownstones. But it's ~15 minutes by subway to lower manhattan and ~25 minutes to midtown. I don't know how close you want to be to the real action.

Schadenfrau
July 12th, 2005, 11:14 AM
Honestly, you should just stay wherever it is you are, Toonami. You're far too bigoted and ignorant to live in New York.

ryan
July 12th, 2005, 11:15 AM
Honestly, you should just stay wherever it is you are, Toonami. You're far too bigoted and ignorant to live in New York.

Houston? Alabama?

NYatKNIGHT
July 12th, 2005, 12:41 PM
New York is the wrong place to move if you want to surround yourself with people just like you, and a narrow-minded attitude won't make the transition any easier, I promise you that.

billyblancoNYC
July 12th, 2005, 02:33 PM
Once again, if you are all so liberal, you should be liberal enough to allow ALL people to live in NYC, not just those that share your even so lefty views. Just as you all seem to not like conservatives, this guy doesn't really like gays. Do I agree with that...no, but is it his right...of course.

Isn't that what "diversity" and "open-mindedness" is all about, kids?

BrooklynRider
July 12th, 2005, 02:37 PM
Not many gays in my neighborhood. (Bay Ridge Brooklyn).

Brooklyn's newest gay bar just opened in Bay Ridge. Hope you will be a good neighbor.

Schadenfrau
July 12th, 2005, 02:45 PM
It's not up to WiredNY posters to allow or disallow anyone from moving to the city. As far as I know, none of us have been appointed Keeper of the City.

However, it's pretty clear that Toonami's vision of the city has nothing to do with the actual reality, unless there's a right-wing, gay-hating Latino enclave conveniently located near Midtown Manhattan that I'm not aware of.

NYC certainly isn't going to conform to Toonami's standards, so he'd be better off finding another place to live. You can't escape diversity here.

BrooklynRider
July 12th, 2005, 02:46 PM
Once again, if you are all so liberal, you should be liberal enough to allow ALL people to live in NYC, not just those that share your even so lefty views. Just as you all seem to not like conservatives, this guy doesn't really like gays. Do I agree with that...no, but is it his right...of course.

Isn't that what "diversity" and "open-mindedness" is all about, kids?

Who said we are all "so liberal". The only ones tossing the labels around are those who felt compelled to declare themselves as "conservative". The labeling is a bit much. You are the one who is calling everyone "liberals". Actually, I read the responses to Toonami as posts from your TYPICAL New Yorker, who understands that this city is the best in the world because of its desire (if not 100% practice) of being inclusive and encourage diversity. Toonami wants to move here and be segregated from people. With 8 million people, its not possible. Also, I don't know of any conservative who feels "threatened" in New York.

But, I can understand Toonami's concern, sounds like his behavior, attitudes and hostility would likely lead him to get his ass kicked by a homosexual man or woman in NY.

We can try to educate ignorant people, but don't defend the ignorance. Conservative and homophobic are very different. There are conservative gays (see the Log Cabin Republicans). The assumptions and labels being tossed about are way out of line.

Toonami
July 12th, 2005, 03:34 PM
Who said we are all "so liberal". The only ones tossing the labels around are those who felt compelled to declare themselves as "conservative". The labeling is a bit much. You are the one who is calling everyone "liberals".

It's a well known fact that New York is the bluest of the blue states, I didn't say that to call people names, but it's the truth, It's not like I was insulting you. But the reason I WANT to live in NYC is because of its diversity, different people of different races, as opposed to the white liberal suburban wasteland I live in now. I want the excitement and noise of a big city, where I grew up (raised in Toronto) and I WANT to be surrounded by different kinds of people. I now realize what I said about homosexuals was wrong, because NY is supposed to be diverse for everyone, and not jsut for me. If I discriminate against homosexuals I'm no better than the stupid ****s who run this sanitized, nosy, shallow town I live in now (AKA London, ON), where the main source of recreation is gossiping, spying on the nieghbors, working on thier yards and badmouthing americans. So I'll try to find an apartement anyplace I can is The City, because everytime I visit it I grow to love it more and more. It's like, even though it's more expensive and I'll probably have a sub-par quality of living on my income, I'd rather be poor in NYC than rich in London, Ontario. There's just something about NYC that I love, how people "tell it like it is" and how it's not too clean or neat or sanitzed. That NY attitude you guys showed me when i said those stupid things is why I want to live there. :D


However, it's pretty clear that Toonami's vision of the city has nothing to do with the actual reality, unless there's a right-wing, gay-hating Latino enclave conveniently located near Midtown Manhattan that I'm not aware of.

It's not like I was "Expecting" it to be that way or thinking "this is how it should be", but it there was a barrio near that area, it would have been perfect for me, it's not like It was the only place i was prepared to live, It was jsut a question to see IF there was one.

Thank you all for your insight, this'll help my search tremendously. Peace out.

billyblancoNYC
July 12th, 2005, 04:52 PM
I wasn't putting anyone down or trying to start an arguement by calling people liberal. Many on this board are liberal. So what? My point was simply this...if people profess to loving NYC b/c it has so many types of people, etc., then I think it's a tad bit hypocritical to tell someone not to move to NYC b/c he expressed a viewpoint or opinion that is different than yours.

I think most people on this board know that gay people are no different than straights for the most part and that, frankly, the "gay areas" of the city and some of the best and most enjoyable to be in. I think this person, once he's here, would see the same and change his tune. But it's not really for us to tell him he can't. People need to learn for themselves.

msburton
July 12th, 2005, 07:06 PM
I'm moving into a Murray Hill walkup this weekend. My brother, a New Yorker since February, says I should hire some pros to help us move the heavy stuff (couch, mattress, dresser) up the narrow stairwell. Is this a good idea? And where can I find reputable, reasonably priced help?

HarlemRep
July 13th, 2005, 09:23 AM
It's a well known fact that New York is the bluest of the blue states, I didn't say that to call people names, but it's the truth, It's not like I was insulting you.

New York as a state is EXTREMELY "red".

HarlemRep
July 13th, 2005, 09:24 AM
I'm moving into a Murray Hill walkup this weekend. My brother, a New Yorker since February, says I should hire some pros to help us move the heavy stuff (couch, mattress, dresser) up the narrow stairwell. Is this a good idea? And where can I find reputable, reasonably priced help?

yes, and newyork.craigslist.org

BrooklynRider
July 13th, 2005, 10:04 AM
New York as a state is EXTREMELY "red".

God yes! I lived in Lake Placid for a year and upstate is not only red, it is akin to being the Mississippi of the North.

Schadenfrau
July 13th, 2005, 11:47 AM
Definitely get some help, Ms. Burton. I nearly broke my back trying to move a couch a few weeks ago. We ended up paying the super to take the front door off the hinges to get the damn thing inside.

ryan
July 13th, 2005, 11:57 AM
New York as a state is EXTREMELY "red".

Look at stats, not NYC stereotypes. We're a mostly purple state, and the red spots are much less populated. Contrast rural NYS with rural PA below.

http://www-personal.umich.edu/%7Emejn/election/countymaplinear.png

HarlemRep
July 15th, 2005, 12:36 AM
Look at stats, not NYC stereotypes. We're a mostly purple state, and the red spots are much less populated. Contrast rural NYS with rural PA below.

http://www-personal.umich.edu/%7Emejn/election/countymaplinear.png

The same could be said for a few states, including North Carolina and Arkansas. Doesn't make a difference. Ultimately, regardless of how many people live in the city, it's still just one city. I'm talking about the entire state, regardless of population density. New York is large geographically and diverse culturally. As well, NYC has more out of towners and immigrants that want to gather here with like kind than any other city in America. Therefore that dilutes the numbers statewide. If you want to talk about just people born and raised in New York State (including the city), I guarantee you you'd see a big difference compared to that map. Facts are facts and numbers are numbers, but that doesn't mean the majority of the rest of the state isn't "red". However irrefutable the map you posted may be, it's hardly a "mostly purple state". Compare the counties in N.Y. state to say Maine or Wisconsin. You'll find that their colors are MUCH more purple. Most of New York's counties seem to be on the "redder" side.

A nonlinear color scale of the same map:

http://www-personal.umich.edu/%7Emejn/election/countymap3070large.png

An even less detailed image:

http://www-personal.umich.edu/%7Emejn/election/countymapredbluelarge.png


You may have your own opinion on what being a mostly red state means, but according to this, the majority of counties in NY voted republican, and if even by the slimmest of margins, are still, by definition (if there is one), "red counties".

I don't know if you're an uber-lib and were offended by this, but it is fact. The gentleman above who lived in Lake Placid seemed to agree.

NYatKNIGHT
July 15th, 2005, 11:21 AM
Calling New York state "extremely red" is inaccurate. Utah is extremely red, Upstate merely leans red in unpopulated counties. Even if you take away NYC and Long Island, New York would have gone to Kerry. The majority in Albany, Rochester, Buffalo, Schenectady, Syracuse, Ithaca, Binghamton and even some rural counties all went for Kerry. Ryan's right, New York is a mostly purple state. It's only red if you use those useless and misleading county maps that only show red or blue.

Toonami
July 15th, 2005, 04:25 PM
I shouldn't have said NYS is blue, my mistake, but NYC is certainly very liberal.

NoyokA
July 27th, 2005, 05:37 PM
http://nycworstlandlords.com/

Bob123
July 29th, 2005, 08:56 PM
Great site stern. Will keep it in mind in my apartment search.
I've found www.realtypostings.com (http://www.realtypostings.com) to be pretty useful. Anybody know where else I could look?

HarlemRep
July 31st, 2005, 06:41 PM
.
(http://www.nycaptsinc.com)

Thanx
August 17th, 2005, 01:53 PM
LA seems to have used me up. I'll arrive in NY in a couple of weeks Sept 1st '05. Taking a two month sub-let in Williamsburg for cheap -hoping in that time I can find a job and cheap place to live.
I'm an artist and am looking for a job in a high-end photo lab, gallery, museum, or as an artist's assistant.
Are you privy to any leads? What would be your advice as to how to get started? I'm feeling a lil' lost. :confused:

TonyO
August 17th, 2005, 02:25 PM
LA seems to have used me up. I'll arrive in NY in a couple of weeks Sept 1st '05. Taking a two month sub-let in Williamsburg for cheap -hoping in that time I can find a job and cheap place to live.
I'm an artist and am looking for a job in a high-end photo lab, gallery, museum, or as an artist's assistant.
Are you privy to any leads? What would be your advice as to how to get started? I'm feeling a lil' lost. :confused:

network, don't be shy.

KatherineG
August 19th, 2005, 10:21 PM
Ok, I am sure ya'll are sick of this same scenario over and over again but I'm desperate for information! =)

I'm making the big move October 1. I lucked out really big with an apartment, and that's pretty much the reason I'm doing it. I've never harbored a long-supressed dream to move to NYC, but the way this happened everything seems to be lining up too perfectly for me to not do it.

Anyways, my concerns are, of course, about a job. My rent is about $600 a month and I'm prepared to eat nothing but plain rice for my time spent there. How hard is it going to be for me to find a job that will support $600 a month? In podunk, Florida that's an insane amount of money but I'm assuming that I'll make more up there due to cost of living.

Is every single actor/actress in the city monopolizing the retail/waitressing jobs? Are temp agencies a good source of money? Am I totally, completely screwed as far as jobs go? Can you tell I'm freaking out a little?

Any advice you have for this broke, terrified 22 year old would be appreciated. Thanks!

walkietalkie
August 21st, 2005, 02:21 AM
A few quick questions. I'm starting a job in midtown in October, pay is around 40k a year.

I've started looking into apartments, but the whole system of paystubs/credit checks/guarantors has me confused. I just got out of school so I have no real paystubs(other than summer jobs/part-time jobs during school), my credit is shaky and I don't have any guarantor who can sign onto an apt. Can anyone give me some general tips about dealing with the apt hunt? must i use a broker? do all apts have the insane 3 month security deposit? any help would be appreciated.

oh and if it helps, I'm not looking for anything fancy, just a basic studio in Manhattan. I'm currently in Boston and doing apt hunting over the internet, but I am gonna head down there soon enough.

HarlemRep
August 21st, 2005, 12:41 PM
A few quick questions. I'm starting a job in midtown in October, pay is around 40k a year.

I've started looking into apartments, but the whole system of paystubs/credit checks/guarantors has me confused. I just got out of school so I have no real paystubs(other than summer jobs/part-time jobs during school), my credit is shaky and I don't have any guarantor who can sign onto an apt. Can anyone give me some general tips about dealing with the apt hunt? must i use a broker? do all apts have the insane 3 month security deposit? any help would be appreciated.

oh and if it helps, I'm not looking for anything fancy, just a basic studio in Manhattan. I'm currently in Boston and doing apt hunting over the internet, but I am gonna head down there soon enough.

A few things... I'll start off with "it's going to be very hard for you to find a place in Manhattan". It really will be borderline impossible. A broker is going to be the only person who can probably help you, and that will have to be with a small landlord that they likely have an exclusive listing with, as they're usually easier to deal with. No "apt. by owner" will be willing to work with you probably as they'll have many more qualified people with an interest in their place.

To address your question about an "insane 3 month security deposit", that just sounds made up. That's not normal or a regular occurance. Also, you can't "apartment hunt" over the internet unless you're willing to take something sight unseen (and they would be willing to take you as a tenant, which seems unlikely). GOOD apartments rarely sit around more than a day or two. If somethings around for a week or more, there's a reason.

I think your best bet, if you MUST live in Manhattan, is Central Harlem or Washington Heights or Inwood. It still may be kind of tough for you to get in though. My real recommendation would be Queens or Brooklyn or BX.

walkietalkie
August 21st, 2005, 03:09 PM
thanks for the help, and for the straight answers. Guess I'll most likely be heading down to go apt hunting in Brooklyn in a couple weeks then. Once I'm in town whats the best way to go? local newspapers? craigslist? brokers?

and the 3 month security deposit was on a few listings I saw(1st month rent+ last month's rent+ security deposit) and someone else mentioned it earlier in this thread. Glad to hear its not standard since I don't have that kind of cash.

HarlemRep
August 21st, 2005, 05:57 PM
Yeah, I don't think I'd call last month's rent or extra security "standard" by any measure. I'd recommend using craigslist, see if there are any outer borough listings either "By owner" that doesn't look to tough or "apt broker no fee". in a place like brooklyn, I don't think fees ever go over a month on most places if you do have to pay one (that's just a guess though).

Unless you're really weird about living with someone, I'd also recommend checking out the roommate route. Usually don't need as many qualifications, and you get more for your money... people always need roommates.

Ninjahedge
August 22nd, 2005, 10:15 AM
I would also reccomend areas of Jersey City as well. Hoboken is too expensive.

There are also areas like Fort Lee that might have decent rent prices with a commute that will not kill you.

Don't let the demon of NJ Rumor make it so you don't even consider it....

ryan
August 22nd, 2005, 11:17 AM
The commute to midtown east would be shortest from North Brooklyn or Queens. NJ is closer to downtown or midtown west. Follow harlem rep's advice and you'll find owner occupied buildings with far less restrictive credit qualifications. I paid 1 month's security and had no credit check at all, plus my landlord gave me a tour of the neighborhood.

A lot of people move into nyc into a share situation, then after they have a job, some credit and their bearings, they get their own place.

sarahsmile
August 23rd, 2005, 08:17 AM
I own real estate that I don't live in (not in NYC) so in the city I sublet. It seems to be the best deal. I found my place on sublet.com and also had good luck on craigslist. You might want to sublet before you sign a lease. They usually don't ask for first/last/security with a sublet and you can come to the city and look around and get the know the neighborhoods before deciding where you want to live.

NewYorkYankee
August 28th, 2005, 08:14 PM
As you all know this Sunday Ill be living in NY. Im wanting a part time job, I dont know what to look for. I would prefer something at a desk. I know that being only a high school grad this limits my areas. What jobs/positions do you all rec. for me to look for? I DO NOT work with food, I hate it, and will never do it. Also, where should I look for jobs? (Besides Craigslist) Is the Times a good source? Thanks guys!

BPC
August 28th, 2005, 09:52 PM
Try a temp agency. At a law firm (I work at one), about the only job you can get with a hs diploma is mail room.

ryan
August 29th, 2005, 03:11 AM
Yankee, your school should have some resources for you - there's probably a career center where you might find job listings or advice. You might find a part time office job out there, but most often they require a full day's work during regular business hours, which is not great for a student's schedule. There's always retail...

HarlemRep
August 29th, 2005, 02:26 PM
As you all know this Sunday Ill be living in NY. Im wanting a part time job, I dont know what to look for. I would prefer something at a desk. I know that being only a high school grad this limits my areas. What jobs/positions do you all rec. for me to look for? I DO NOT work with food, I hate it, and will never do it. Also, where should I look for jobs? (Besides Craigslist) Is the Times a good source? Thanks guys!

Why would you move here if not for a job or not with a job? Do you have tons saved up or something?

BrooklynRider
August 29th, 2005, 02:44 PM
Why would you move here if not for a job or not with a job? Do you have tons saved up or something?

It has been done by hundreds of thousands of people before him. New York, in and of itself, is something that people aspire to. Getting here is easy. Making it here is a matter of determiniation. It's available to anyone from anywhere and, yet, not everyone can do it.

HarlemRep
August 30th, 2005, 09:25 PM
It has been done by hundreds of thousands of people before him. New York, in and of itself, is something that people aspire to. Getting here is easy. Making it here is a matter of determiniation. It's available to anyone from anywhere and, yet, not everyone can do it.

Yeah I know it's done before and I've never gotten it. I could see if you even LINED UP a job. I wasn't implying people should only come if they were being transferred or something. It just seems ignorant to move anywhere, especially somewhere as expensive as here without at least a job offer; unless you already have plenty of money, which was my next question.

NewYorkYankee
August 30th, 2005, 09:25 PM
Im going to college HarlemRep. I hope that clears some things up for you. Brooklyn, your right. If I can make it here, I can make it anywhere. :)

Tom63376
August 30th, 2005, 10:48 PM
My lease is up in 2 months and I would like to move to Manhattan
and so I need some help picking the right neighborhood.

I would like to spend $2600-$3400/mo for a 1 bedroom apt
in a very new/luxurous Hi-rise.

I am a straight male, late 20s, preppie/yuppie looking for
a fun and vibrant area with a good dating pool of women.

I have read that the Upper East Side is the preppie area but
when I visited NY, I seemed to really feel an energy around the
Time Square area. It was just full of life and I liked that.
The excitement or "Energy" seemed cented from 38th street
up to about 48th street. When I walked North of 48th it seemed
like everything died. Maybe it's just me.. When I left and
returned home, the feeling I had was that I needed to live
somewhere very close to Times Square. But since it was just
a short visit, I wanted to ask the people who acually lived
in Manhattan for advice before I make any moves...

I'm a single guy so I eat out almost all the time and I like
all the "cheap eats" and take-out places. Resturants get
too expensive for a guy who eats out 80% of the time.

So to summarize, what area would best fit my needs of
being the most fun, high energy, lot's of cheap eats,
with a good pool of single women for a single preppie-like
guy to move to?


Thanks in advance..
Tom (in St. Louis)

NewYorkYankee
August 30th, 2005, 11:31 PM
Whats the nicest Cingular store in downtown? Ive been to one in NY. It was dirty and the help wasnt very, well...helpful. Im trashing my TN service for NY, obviously.

BrooklynRider
August 30th, 2005, 11:39 PM
There all over. I think there is one at Union Square next to Barnes and Noble. Verizon has best service on NYC. I think T-Mobile is best overall in national coverage.

ryan
August 31st, 2005, 12:14 AM
It was dirty and the help wasnt very, well...helpful.

Sadly, this is a huge part of living in NYC. Chain stores that you go to in the suburbs or country b/c they're clean and have good customer service are the opposite here. You're treated better at mom & pops or expensive specialty stores. Welcome to culture shock.

Morrissey
August 31st, 2005, 09:31 AM
My lease is up in 2 months and I would like to move to Manhattan
and so I need some help picking the right neighborhood.

I would like to spend $2600-$3400/mo for a 1 bedroom apt
in a very new/luxurous Hi-rise.

I am a straight male, late 20s, preppie/yuppie looking for
a fun and vibrant area with a good dating pool of women.

I have read that the Upper East Side is the preppie area but
when I visited NY, I seemed to really feel an energy around the
Time Square area. It was just full of life and I liked that.
The excitement or "Energy" seemed cented from 38th street
up to about 48th street. When I walked North of 48th it seemed
like everything died. Maybe it's just me.. When I left and
returned home, the feeling I had was that I needed to live
somewhere very close to Times Square. But since it was just
a short visit, I wanted to ask the people who acually lived
in Manhattan for advice before I make any moves...

I'm a single guy so I eat out almost all the time and I like
all the "cheap eats" and take-out places. Resturants get
too expensive for a guy who eats out 80% of the time.

So to summarize, what area would best fit my needs of
being the most fun, high energy, lot's of cheap eats,
with a good pool of single women for a single preppie-like
guy to move to?


Thanks in advance..
Tom (in St. Louis)

you should try lower east side, soho, gramercy, murray hill (i am biased now!)
no seriously - try tribeca/greenwich

Schadenfrau
August 31st, 2005, 11:36 AM
Tom, if you're looking to pick up the ladies, you might want to stop referring to yourself as "preppy/yuppie". Also, try the Upper West Side.

ebrigham
August 31st, 2005, 11:53 AM
... When I left and returned home, the feeling I had was that I needed to live somewhere very close to Times Square. But since it was just a short visit, I wanted to ask the people who acually lived in Manhattan for advice before I make any moves...


Thanks in advance..
Tom (in St. Louis)

There are definately *many* options besides Times Square - so no need to limit yourself to one area. As far as dating and "energy" is concerned, most of Manhattan has something to offer someone - depending on their preferences. If you are only looking for "preppies" I am not sure where they hang out these days, but I will keep a look out for you. There might be a sign somewhere I missed.

hastybreaching
September 2nd, 2005, 04:52 AM
.

ebrigham
September 2nd, 2005, 08:07 AM
I can only recommened that you do not completely write off the village and surrounding environs. That is a rather large and very diverse swath of land to completely ignore. And not all the neighborhoods are as you describe.

As far as eliminating neighborhoods, what are you looking for? Considering that vast majority of NYC is safe, it is hard to eliminate outright any place specific without knowing you needs/wants. Conveniences to food? Convenience to shopping? Transportation? Bars/clubs/lounges? Do you need the best dim sum? Waterfront?

NewYorkYankee
September 2nd, 2005, 09:22 AM
Hasty, I think the Upper West side sounds good for you, maybe Yorkville? Any thoughts on the neighborhoods guys?

kliq6
September 2nd, 2005, 09:30 AM
He sounds to closed minded to live in NY, the best part of NY is ther differences and he starts with i need a white, non gay area to live in, please

NewYorkYankee
September 2nd, 2005, 10:15 AM
Good Morning all! This is my last day living in TN! I must admit to you all though, Im nervous. Im not nervous about the city or anything of that nature. Im nervous becuase I dont know anyone. My roomate and I share nothing in common and he dosnt seem to want a roomate to hang out with anyways. Im sure once I get into the city and meet new people (Thats the hurdle for me), Ill be fine. I wont be on tomorrow at all, were driving up. Were staying overnight in NJ, coming to NY Sunday. Thanks again everyone for the help, wish me luck, and I'LL SEE YOU GUYS IN NEW YORK!


P.S. Anyone would like to give me a neighborhood architecture/development tour please IM me. Im up for all neighborhoods in every borough. Anyone for the Bronx esp.

HarlemRep
September 2nd, 2005, 12:09 PM
Im going to college HarlemRep. I hope that clears some things up for you. Brooklyn, your right. If I can make it here, I can make it anywhere. :)

It wasn't some kind of weird personal attack on you. Just something I had been wondering about in a general context. People who come up here with no real reason or money then wonder why things are hard.

Oh and good luck. I'd be happy to help you out with your questions regarding neighborhood.

NewYorkYankee
September 2nd, 2005, 12:39 PM
Thanks HarlemRep! BTW Does ANYONE know a good salon for a mens cut? I need one for Tuesday. Id prefer to spend 50 and under for one.

hastybreaching
September 3rd, 2005, 12:56 AM
.

Schadenfrau
September 3rd, 2005, 01:18 AM
Hire a broker.

hastybreaching
September 3rd, 2005, 06:23 AM
.

redhot00
September 3rd, 2005, 07:26 AM
When I left and
returned home, the feeling I had was that I needed to live
somewhere very close to Times Square.
Thanks in advance..
Tom (in St. Louis)

If you want to live near Times Square, try Hell's Kitchen. You may see it referred to as Clinton among the real estate people.

ebrigham
September 3rd, 2005, 09:45 AM
The reason I mentioned safety is because that is the single most important factor I consider a potential deal killer when looking at a neighborhood. Saying the vast majority of NYC is safe in no way implies you can live *anywhere*. It simply means that few neighborhoods should be ruled out due to safety (even more true if we narrow our search to Manhattan). Personally, I have lived as far as up 103 St and CPW, and though it was a mixed income area at that time (~8 - 9 yrs ago), I considered generally OK to live. If we cut off our Manhattan search to everything below 96th St (some would consider this a bit extreme), nearly every single area is safe enough to live - and I don't mean in a PC sort of way. There are also many areas north of 96th that are likely suitable as well, but I get the vibe you may not consider them high on your list of places to live.

As far as places around the Village that might be worth while - I would consider the Central Village, West Village, Chelsea, Flatiron, Union Square area. Though still quite upscale, the vibe in these areas is different than what you see on CPW and 5th ave along Central Park. You might want to consider eliminating the Meat Packing district and immediate streets - this place is a real scene (albeit a fun place to hang out).

Tom63376
September 3rd, 2005, 02:52 PM
Can anyone give me a general feel for how Chelsea and
Hell's Kitchen differ? I know Chelsea is just south of
Hell's Kitchen but I was wondering how they differ in
regards to general atmosphere, vibe, resturants, etc.

Thanks

Schadenfrau
September 3rd, 2005, 04:09 PM
If you'd like advice, Hastybreaching, you'd do well to avoid insults and generalities. Telling you to hire a broker is hardly politically correct.

You've provided us with little information other than the fact that you're straight, white, not inclined to live near hipsters, have negative feelings toward the village and have an incorrect concept of the definition of a WASP.

I'd suggest that you look into Murray Hill and other areas on the far east side, but then again, what do I know?

Schadenfrau
September 3rd, 2005, 04:11 PM
Additionally, with the amount of money you're planning to spend, I think you're well aware that you're not going to be duped into renting a spot in the worst ghettos/projects in the city. Are you looking for advice on where you should live, or horror stories about where you should not?

ManhattanKnight
September 3rd, 2005, 06:08 PM
Can anyone give me a general feel for how Chelsea and
Hell's Kitchen differ? I know Chelsea is just south of
Hell's Kitchen but I was wondering how they differ in
regards to general atmosphere, vibe, resturants, etc.

Thanks

They differ enormously. But first, a correction: Chelsea isn't "just south of Hell's Kitchen." There are no precise boundaries for either neighborhood, but most would agree, I think, that the area between West 34th and West 42nd Streets isn't in either Chelsea or Hell's Kitchen; it's a distinct area known as the Garment District.

Hell's Kitchen is part of Midtown; it's generally noisier and more highly built-up than Chelsea and includes a bunch of horrifically ugly, recently-built "luxury" high-rise apartment slabs, as well as many late 19th-century apartment houses and a small number of individual houses. It's next to or includes the Theater District (depending upon how it's defined).

Chelsea has a much more "downtown" feeling and location. It has fewer high-risers and includes a number of landmarked blocks filled with early- and mid-19th-century houses. The pace is generally a lot slower. It is Manhattan's primary gay neighborhood.

Both neighborhoods abound with restaurants.

Schadenfrau
September 3rd, 2005, 08:07 PM
Hell's Kitchen is wildly overpriced and highly overvalued, in my opinion. A friend just threw her hands up and moved back to Toronto after spending $1,400 a month on a 300 square foot walk-up. Renter beware.

TLOZ Link5
September 3rd, 2005, 10:06 PM
Hell's Kitchen is wildly overpriced and highly overvalued, in my opinion. A friend just threw her hands up and moved back to Toronto after spending $1,400 a month on a 300 square foot walk-up. Renter beware.

I've heard many good things about Toronto. I agree that your friend should have invested elsewhere, though.

hastybreaching
September 3rd, 2005, 11:32 PM
.

Schadenfrau
September 4th, 2005, 03:18 AM
For the record, this is the just answer I was looking for, though you were just as PC and evasive in that thread.

Please explain to me how exactly I'm being obtuse.

If I'm being uninformative and annoying, it's only in response to the fact that you seem doubly uninformed and annoying. Wired New York really isn't the place to look for horror stories- the vast majority of the posters on this board are very familiar with the city and all of its nuances. So much so, in fact, that they're not given to hyperbole or repeating gory urban legend.

I've lived in neighborhoods widely considered to be quite safe and I've lived in neighborhoods that are viewed as the worst of the lot. I actually experienced more personal danger in Soho than I have in the South Bronx, but honestly, I doubt that would have much of an impact on the opinion of someone who identifies themselves as a straight, white man in need of housing in non-ghetto, non-hipster Manhattan.

I'm sure that you know you won't be paying $5,000 a month to live in the East Coast equivalent of Compton. If you really are so unaware of New York's reality, you should probably spend a bit of time researching before you make such broad and offensive comments to a group of proud New Yorkers.

As for your concept of the definition of a WASP, I'd reexamine Manhattan Beach. WASP? No. Nouveau Riche? Yes.

And as for my attitude? In this situation, I refuse to apologize. Just call me politically correct.

yetmail
September 4th, 2005, 07:59 AM
I am a foreigner,and I don't know this.After I see the leave word,I know it.Thank forum and everybody.:)

Tom63376
September 4th, 2005, 12:08 PM
Thanks ManhattanKnight. Great info. I guess I was mistaken about
where Chelsea was. I thought it started where Hell's Kitchen stopped.
I should have just used a range of streets in my question since I
am not at all fluent on where different neighborhoods start or stop.
If anyone wants to comment on my revised question I'd be happy
to hear your opinions...

If someone wanted to live near Times Square he/she would be looking
from 34th-42nd or from 43rd-50th. They would also consider how the
areas were different to the East of Time Square and to the West of
it. So I guess my real question would be if anyone could give me
some general info on how these 4 areas differ?

34th-42nd and 43rd-50th is a huge area and when I was exploring
Midtown, everything started to blend together after a short time.
Locals know this area best so I'm here to learn from the pros.


Thanks
Tom

Schadenfrau
September 4th, 2005, 12:33 PM
If you'd like to live near Times Square, you should probably look to the west of Seventh Avenue between 40th and 48th streets or so. The area to the east of Times Square is primarily office space and gets pretty dead at night.

TLOZ Link5
September 4th, 2005, 05:20 PM
So Yankee, are you in New York yet?

NewYorkYankee
September 5th, 2005, 08:58 AM
Im currently typing and looking out my 16th floor dorm window. I can see the entire Williamsburg Bridge and some paerts of the Brooklyn skyline. Things are going good so far, we went to Times Square last night and hung out at a Starbucks for a lonnng while. We went to Little Italy for dinner were we left without eating. We waited an hour for our food and it still didnt come. We left and went to Rosellas back near Pace. Welcome to the city I guess, right?

Schadenfrau
September 5th, 2005, 11:55 AM
I'm glad you finally got here, NewYorkYankee. The longer you're here, the easier things will be. You'll find your favorite places and your niche.

I spent quite a few days wandering around midtown and wondering what the big deal was until my 18 year-old self happened upon St. Mark's Place and spent many too many hours just standing around.

HarlemRep
September 5th, 2005, 12:38 PM
YOU LUCKY BASTARD.

???

What just happened here?

BPC
September 5th, 2005, 01:39 PM
Im currently typing and looking out my 16th floor dorm window. I can see the entire Williamsburg Bridge and some paerts of the Brooklyn skyline. Things are going good so far, we went to Times Square last night and hung out at a Starbucks for a lonnng while. We went to Little Italy for dinner were we left without eating. We waited an hour for our food and it still didnt come. We left and went to Rosellas back near Pace. Welcome to the city I guess, right?

Leave Little Italy for the tourists. You are a New Yorker now. Try Grimaldi's (Old Fulton St. in Brooklyn, on the waterfront) for pizza, and Forlini's (on Baxter by the Courts -- popular with the City's judges) for pasta. Both can be enjoyed (occasionally) on a student's budget. When you make your first million, go celebrate at Il Mulino on West 3rd Street, surely the best Italian restuarant this side of the Atlantic, and priced accordingly.

NewYorkYankee
September 7th, 2005, 05:21 PM
Haha yeah yeah, I need to get an issue of TONY.

TLOZ Link5
September 7th, 2005, 05:32 PM
Don't forget about the $2 falafel joints on MacDougal Street :)

lofter1
September 7th, 2005, 07:57 PM
Welcome to NYC...

(If you're where I think you are then I hope you're enjoying your view of the courthouses.)

Here's some great Vietnamese restaurants nearby on Baxter Street (behind the big courthouse / jail on Centre St.)

http://www.menupages.com/restaurants.asp?areaid=0&cuisineid=69&neighborhoodId=24

And don't forget Lombardi's Pizza on Spring / Mott -- terrific pies and what claims to be the oldest coal-burning oven in Manhattan:

http://gonyc.about.com/cs/restaurantreviews/a/lombardis.htm

NYatKNIGHT
September 8th, 2005, 09:54 AM
Excellent Chinatown options too. Cheap and delicious dumplings abound. For good entrees I recommend New Green Bo on Bayard St.

Don't forget about the $2 falafel joints on MacDougal Street :)Right! Mamouns - they don't get much better than that.

Congratulations on the move - now get out there and explore!

TLOZ Link5
September 8th, 2005, 03:07 PM
I was actually thinking Ali Baba's, which is catty-corner to Mamoun's across the street. The same price, the same quality, and there's never a crowd or a line.

NYatKNIGHT
September 8th, 2005, 05:44 PM
You think it's the same quality? I'll have to go back and try, last time I went it wasn't nearly as good, it's been a while though. I assumed everyone shared the same opinion, which is why no one is ever there and the line is out the door at Mamouns. But I don't get gyros there, usually at Yatagan.

TLOZ Link5
September 9th, 2005, 03:58 PM
I guess it depends upon your taste. But I'm not going to wait fifteen minutes outside Mamoun's in the middle of February to get a falafel to go; when I can spend the same amount of money at Ali Baba's, to stay, without having to wait.

ryan
September 9th, 2005, 04:18 PM
Best falafel I've ever had is from the halal truck at Park & 48. It's amazing, but this is veering much off topic...

NewYorkYankee
September 11th, 2005, 01:11 AM
Ive been busy everyday Im here. I havnt read any of the threads except this one. I have no time to read! Maybe Ill catch up on this tomorrow. Hmm...Am I losing my southern accent yet? haha

Schadenfrau
September 11th, 2005, 01:18 AM
You'll lose it soon enough. I actually taped myself speaking when I'd first moved to New York. When I listen to it now, I can't get over the Northwestern drawl.

BrooklynRider
September 11th, 2005, 09:06 PM
Ive been busy everyday Im here. I havnt read any of the threads except this one. I have no time to read! Maybe Ill catch up on this tomorrow. Hmm...Am I losing my southern accent yet? haha

Can't hear it at all...

QNS104
September 12th, 2005, 07:24 AM
Here is a story about looking for apartments, from a friend of mine:

I have learned a lot during these past few weeks of apartment hunting.

It’s amazing what people will try to charge you for an apartment. I have to tell you one story.

I went to see an apartment in Kensington (an area of Brooklyn). It was listed in Craigslist as a two bedroom apartment for $1100 by the owner. Well we went to see that apartment. The neighbourhood was so-so, not great and the house was equally far from the F train as it was to the B/Q train.

When we got there the hallway was really dirty and I felt uncomfortable on the block. When I got into the apartment, I was mortified at how disgustingly dirty the apartment was. It was spacious and bright but the bathroom sink and bathtub were leaking and it looked like someone had no skills when it came to caulking and grouting the bathroom tiles (I could of done a better job with my eyes closed).

The second bedroom couldn’t even fit a twin bed and a desk. And finally the kitchen…… Well, the rack they installed above the sink was crooked (I don’t know what they were expecting to put on the shelf since it was so slanted).

The fridge was the clincher for me. When I opened it there were (can you guess?) dead roaches!!!!! How the hell can there be dead roaches in a working fridge? Too frightening.

I’m not done with the fridge. When I looked on top of the fridge, all you could see were mouse droppings everywhere. It was the most vile thing ever. At that moment I said “I think we’ve seen enough, thank you.”

It’s amazing how some people just don’t care about the apartments they’re renting. I mean, this place looked like a dump and they had the nerve to try and rent it for $1100 (they originally said it was for $1200 but people were saying it was too much, HA!). I pity the fool who took it.

Seeing that apartment shows you one thing…The landlord doesn’t give a crap about you. If somebody can show you an apartment that looks like that and not flinch, they are not gonna help you when your heat goes out or your stove breaks down or pretty much anything else.

lofter1
September 12th, 2005, 08:37 AM
Here is a story about looking for apartments, from a friend of mine:
... the bathroom sink and bathtub were leaking and it looked like someone had no skills when it came to caulking and grouting the bathroom tiles (I could of done a better job with my eyes closed).
Hey, that is classic NYC tile work you're talking about!

This is why I do 99% of the repairs in my rental (where I've lived for the past 25+ years).

It's this kind of landlord attitude you talk about that ultimately cost the owner of my building thousands of dollars to take care of some fairly simple building maintenance -- after years of letting the "super" dick around with the boiler it was so screwed up that the repairs / up-grade cost them way more than if the owner had a professional take care of it in the first place.

katerina
September 12th, 2005, 01:03 PM
Hello everybody! I am a psychologist coming from Greece but i currently live in London for my MSc and i was thinking of moving to NYC for my PhD and i would like a piece of advice as to how the situation there is. Meaning whether i could easily get a job, a house to stay in and what difficulties i might face concerning immigration.
Thanks about it.
Cheers to everybody,
Katerina.

Edward
September 12th, 2005, 01:19 PM
So, Katerina, how do you feel about your name - the name of the recent devastating hurricane?

lofter1
September 12th, 2005, 03:36 PM
i currently live in London for my MSc and i was thinking of moving to NYC
From what i hear if you can afford London then NYC should be no problem.

katerina
September 13th, 2005, 02:21 PM
Well, i feel sorry for all those people who lost all their belongings and maybe relatives as well but i would not compare myself with the menace of the Katrina hurricane; we have a letter different after all which is a defining difference!
Anyway, Edward would you be able as administrator to help me in my enquiry please? Thanks, i appreciate it a lot.

Lofter i can afford London as i found a job here even before i move and i do not need a visa and all those immigration department procedures but i am not sure about NYC though; if you could fill me in though i would really appreciate it.. But yes London is a very expensive city beyond your imagination! I pay $1500 per month for a studio of just 30sq.m. with no other than the basic facilities in the beginning!!!


Anyway, thank you guys for the reply.
Katerina.

lofter1
September 13th, 2005, 05:04 PM
Easy to get a job? This is a hard question to answer without specifics...

Your field
Your experience
Your connections

If you know people in NYC start networking now, before you come, so you have some job prospects lined up.

Hopefully you have some savings to tide you over (enough to get you through 6 months - 1 year) just in case things don't turn out as you envision.

NYC always has jobs available. The harder part is getting the one that fits you.

ryan
September 13th, 2005, 05:21 PM
It has become harder in the past few years to secure a work visa without an employer sponsor, and I would think that given your field, you would have another layer of red tape due to licensing, certification, or whatever hoops they make practicing psychologists jump through. If you wanted to attend a phd program, you would have an easier time with an education visa.

You should probably seek out the advice of someone in your field who has recently immigrated to the US. I haven't heard anyone one these boards mention they're in that field, and I would think that other sites might give you more immigration expertise.

katerina
September 16th, 2005, 11:23 AM
Thank you Ryan, thank you Lofter1 about that. Ryan could you please tell me any other site that i could register and ask maybe about the immigration procedure and staff?
Yes i have many friends in NYC but none of them is aware of the procedure. Anyway, thanks again.
Regards,
Katerina.

Dom
October 1st, 2005, 09:06 AM
Hi,
I currently live in Sydney, Australia with my husband and 2 young kids. We'll be moving to NY in the next couple of months for a 2 year work assignment. I could really do with some of your advice for what areas I should be looking at for apartments. The work will be mostly in the Theatre District.

Ideally we'd like to live close to work or at least an easy/short commute away. I'd prefer a 3 bedroom place that has some kids oriented facilities nearby. Safety is also a major concern as I'm likely to be out and about a lot with the kids. The rental budget would be $2000- $3000/month. Closer to $2000 hopefully.

I really appreciate any pointers ;)

cheers,
Dom

lofter1
October 1st, 2005, 09:15 AM
A couple of questions for you:

Are the kids school age or pre-school?

Do you want 2 bedrooms or 3 bedrooms? Or more?

Meanwhile you might check this out: http://www.rentmanhattan.com/apt_lists.php

Dom
October 1st, 2005, 09:22 AM
My kids are pre-school, one is 10 months and the other nearly 3 years old. I'd prefer a 3 bedroom place.

tackledspoon
October 1st, 2005, 05:30 PM
I'm a college student, currently living in Pittsburgh, PA, but I've slowly found that I'm not enjoying it so much here and I'd rather be in New York. I'm thinking about transferring back for next fall.
I'm trying to get as much of a head start on this as I can, though, so I'm gonna ask now to A) help decide if coming back is really the right thing and B) be prepared for if/when I do come back.
Basically, I get this picture like everyone exagerrates the cost of going to college in New York. I mean, tuitions are generally high and so is room and board, but, unlike most kids coming to college in New York, I've lived no more than 20 minutes from it my entire life and know how to spend sensibly. I also know that, by splitting a small apartment with a few friends in Brooklyn or SOHO, I can get way more for my money than anyone does with university housing.
I've heard horror stories about kids going to school in New York and leaving with massive debts, but, the way I spend (currently, I'm spending about $25 a week, not including stuff that's on my meal plan- I don't dine out, I cook for myself and the only thing I really buy is music) I don't see that happening. I would have to assume some extra money to pay for tuition itself, but I'm already getting some financial aid going to a cheaper school, so I don't know how much more I'd actually have to pay.
Okay, so my question is: how expensive is it for a native New Yorker, who's used to living on a tight budget to go to school in New York?

Also, if you know of any other pros/cons of going to college in the city (namely NYU), could you maybe list them?
Thank you very much.

Dom
October 2nd, 2005, 07:32 PM
Hi,

Can anyone please help with my questions above???
We'd also consider living outside of Manhattan, as long as it doesn't take more than 30 minutes to get into Midtown.

thanks heaps,
Dom

ablarc
October 2nd, 2005, 07:57 PM
Dom, I think you need to revise your rental budget upward or your space requirements downward. Once you've done that, look into the Upper West side, from the 70's all the way up to Columbia (116th St).

Easy subway commute to Theatre district, with no transfers.

Nice, lively neighborhood. Everything at your fingertips. Riverside Park and Central Park. Broadway's the main drag; east and west of it are equally good.

You'll feel right at home. Or maybe you'll think you're in Paris.



While you're looking for a place, use the Hotel Beacon as your HQ. Reasonable rates, kitchenettes, great location on Broadway, near 72nd Street subway stop.

BrooklynRider
October 2nd, 2005, 08:11 PM
Dom-

You will probably be looking at closer to the $3000 range for an apartment suitable to house such young children (meaning space to spread out and "live"). The most obvious place to start looking would be in the Clinton neighborhood (also known as Hell's Kitchen). It has seen a great deal of new builing and covers the area directly west of the Theater District. It encompasses everything west of Eighth Avenue, from West 4nd Street to roughly West 59th Street. It would allow easy walking distance to the Theater district, but the nearest subway is on Eight Avenue, so each block further west takes you away from Mass Transit (Subway).

Other viable alternatives (meaning offering easy access to the Theater District) would be the Upper West Side (ideally for you, from West 59th Street to West 77th as the West 72nd Street subway stop offers express servive to Times Square and the Theater District). This is a wonderful residential neighborhood with great infrastructure and renowned retail, restaurants and amenities. It also has access to both Central Park and Riverside Park - important parks/ recreation facilities you'll want with kids.

The area known as the Midtown West or the Far West Side (from West 30th to West 42nd) is in a state of transformation and not an area I would personally recommend for a family, due primarily to lack of amenities.

Chelsea from West 14th to roughly West 29th Street, is a lovely neighborhood. It has a sizeable gay population, and that is only an issue if you find it to be one. There are parks, playgrounds and great neighborhood amenities.

The West Village is a great neighborhood and, again one I would highly recommend. You can also check out Tribeca.

What you will want to focus on is transportation. Subway is the way to travel. If you want to walk, Clinton is ideal. Other than that, you'll probably want to stay by the 7th Ave line (1,2,3 trains), the 8th Ave lines (A, C, E Lines) or the Broadway lines (Q, R, W, N).

You might also want to check out Midtown South (Between 34th Street and 23rd Street), but along the Sixth Ave corridor. There are a number of new rental buildings with great amenities and you can grab the F train up to 42nd Street and walk to the theater district.

If you have more questions, feel free to Private Message me and I can provide you with more information and details. I can also direct you to some good websites and / or rental agents.

HarlemRep
October 3rd, 2005, 02:15 AM
Dom,

While the posts above have some helpful information, I can't say that they'll be very relevant in your search for housing. Most of those areas are quite expensive. I'm a licensed real estate agent, have been for over a year and I'm pretty successful and I know the market quite well. You're going to have a tough time even finding a 'decent' 2BR anywhere in Manhattan for 2000$ unless you go way far uptown, like Harlem and above. A good 3BR for a family in, say, Midtown could run you 3200 or more right now. Demand is high and so are the rents.

Your best bet would be to check some of the outer boroughs. Probably Williamsburg in Brooklyn. Even most of the 'good' 1BR's I see start around 1700-1800 right now in Manhattan. I'd be more than happy to give you any information you need, and even help you find something. Don't think of this as me advertising myself, as I'm not. I only work in Manhattan, but I'll be happy to give you advice on anything. I just don't think you're going to find what you're looking for in any of those areas listed. Chelsea, Greenwich Village, Midtown east or west... Upper West is even more expensive. So much of the property up there is co-op/condo and people own and live in them. Supply is low while demand is high. A 3br in the west 70s could run you 4000 or more. Feel free to message me or post in here if I can provide any information for you.

Schadenfrau
October 3rd, 2005, 12:54 PM
A safe, spacious three bedroom in a child-friendly place? You're going to have to go to either Queens or New Jersey.

ryan
October 3rd, 2005, 01:08 PM
Yeah, Williamsburg is terrible advice for parents - it's relatively expensive in the small desireable area, and I've heard the schools are atrocious. No kid-oriented amenities at all, though there is a fun bar scence. Go to Queens. It's still stimitized enough to keep it affordable, and I think it's generally cleaner than all but the most desireable areas in Manhattan or Brooklyn. You might also consider living in the suburbs in Westchester.

lofter1
October 3rd, 2005, 01:35 PM
The work will be mostly in the Theatre District.



If by any chance the work is involved in the actual theatre business then you might find something good (sublet) through one of the unions (Actor's Equity, IATSE, etc.).

If your work is not in that field then info on these connections might not be so easy to come by.

HarlemRep
October 5th, 2005, 01:47 AM
Yeah, Williamsburg is terrible advice for parents - it's relatively expensive in the small desireable area, and I've heard the schools are atrocious. No kid-oriented amenities at all, though there is a fun bar scence. Go to Queens. It's still stimitized enough to keep it affordable, and I think it's generally cleaner than all but the most desireable areas in Manhattan or Brooklyn. You might also consider living in the suburbs in Westchester.

I'd ask how well you know Williamsburg and surrounding areas, or if you live there, but even if the answer was yes, it'd retain little importance. Williamsburg is HUGE and there's TONS of family friendly areas. As for the schools being 'atrocious', you say that this is something you 'heard'; would you care to provide a source for that? Even if it WERE true, kids don't go to schools based on districts here, so I don't see what difference it would make. As for Westchester, parts of that are just as expensive as NYC. And for the parts that aren't, you're going to end up spending so much on transportation and lose so much time on the train, it won't even be worth it.

lofter1
October 5th, 2005, 08:38 AM
Go to Queens. It's still stimitized enough to keep it affordable ...
What the heck does that mean?

Any reference to Stimy (aka Stymie) from the Little Rascals?

http://movies2.nytimes.com/gst/movies/filmography.html?p_id=4775&mod=bio


http://www.findagrave.com/photos/2002/89/5560_1017616943.jpg

ryan
October 5th, 2005, 10:21 AM
Williamsburg is HUGE. Northside, the only neighborhood someone from outside NYC would consider living in is really quite small (unless you think someone listing safety as a primary concern would love Bushwick)
Williamsburg is HUGE and there's TONS of family friendly areas. Like where? One hip kid's consignment shop does not a family friendly area make. Greenpoint - maybe - but williamsburg is for post college kids, period. I would consider Williamsburg among the last neighborhoods for a young family looking for space and - hello - an easy commute to times sq.

ryan
October 5th, 2005, 10:22 AM
What the heck does that mean? Why thanks for being my very own personal spell checker.

ablarc
October 5th, 2005, 02:16 PM
A safe, spacious three bedroom in a child-friendly place? You're going to have to go to either Queens or New Jersey.
Amazing how readily we New York sophisticates buy the stereotypical suburban myth about what is and isn't child-friendly.

I have three kids, and I can't think of a place on the face of the earth where I'd rather raise them (if I could) than Manhattan, which I think is the most child-friendly place I know --every bit as friendly as Paris, where I spent some of my childhood in delirious happiness.

When I was in college, all the smartest kids came from Manhattan; they were savvy and sophisticated beyond their years, and they made the rest of us feel like hicks.

When I visit New York, I turn my kids loose under the supervision of my sixteen-year-old, and never worry about their well-being; I wouldn't do that in my sunbelt suburban paradise, where traffic is vicious, and a fair percentage of the very few pedestrians seem dangerous, and are.

ASchwarz
October 5th, 2005, 02:41 PM
Northside, the only neighborhood someone from outside NYC would consider living in is really quite small (unless you think someone listing safety as a primary concern would love Bushwick) Like where? One hip kid's consignment shop does not a family friendly area make. Greenpoint - maybe - but williamsburg is for post college kids, period. I would consider Williamsburg among the last neighborhoods for a young family looking for space and - hello - an easy commute to times sq.

Not true at all. The Italian area of South Williamsburg is very safe and family- friendly. The Northside is quite large and has lots of families. The Southside has fewer yuppie families but you see increasing numbers of hipster babies on Broadway, Havemeyer and other Southside streets.

ryan
October 5th, 2005, 03:49 PM
Sorry to criticize the hype of Williamsburg. Yes, I'm aware there are families - I live on the border with Greenpoint. There are kids in every corner of the city, but I would not suggest that every area is child-friendly. Williamsburg - north, south, east, wherever, is short on amenities (aside from bars, restaurants and hipsterness), and a bad value for rent, unless being close to the nightlife on Bedford is an amenity. I'm guessing a mom with kids listing safety and space as priorities is not going to be too impressed by 20 something hipster bars. I love the area and would reccomdend it to anyone looking for this kind of neighborhood. I'm guessing the poster is not. ablarc, I think you're completely right about kids in manhattan (though I'd also offer that every college-aged kid I've met was quite, um, full of themselves), but the poster is looking for a 3 bedroom apt for $2000-$3000, which is why I suggested queens or the suburbs.

lofter1
October 5th, 2005, 05:13 PM
Why thanks for being my very own personal spell checker.
Just couldn't resist giving a plug to good ole Stymie.

Thanks for giving me another chance:

http://heustess.com/soundbytes/stymie.wma

http://cache.eonline.com/On/Holly/Shows/LittleRascals/Images/02.lilrascals.jpg


Join the whole Gang while they celebrate the "Birthday Blues":

http://heustess.com/filmclips/birthdayblues1.wmv


Although I gotta admit my favorite was Butch:

http://heustess.com/soundbytes/butch.wma

http://heustess.com/pictures/butch.gif


And for you Petey lovers (can I assume that means everybody?):

http://www.pitbullsontheweb.com/petbull/pete.php


http://picpal.com/pete.gif

Schadenfrau
October 5th, 2005, 07:46 PM
To reiterate what Ryan stated: it's unlikely, if not impossible, to find a three-bedroom apartment in a child-friendly neighborhood in Manhattan if you're looking to spend under 3K a month.

New York "sophisticate" stereotyping aside, any schools you're going to find in a Manhattan neighborhood with those rents will not be great.

I'd wager that the Manhattan kids you knew were savvy and sophisticated not so much because they grew up in Manhattan, but more because they were wealthy. I know that's the case with Manhattan babies I've known.

ablarc
October 5th, 2005, 08:49 PM
I'd wager that the Manhattan kids you knew were savvy and sophisticated not so much because they grew up in Manhattan, but more because they were wealthy.
If you wagered that, you'd lose; some were, but others weren't. The ones from more prosperous families went to private schools like Trinity, while the not-so-rich ones went to Bronx High School of Science or Music and Art (which maybe no longer exists), both really great schools.

They were all middle class; I didn't know anyone who was dirt poor in college, since they mostly took different paths.

Either way, the kids I knew were smart for reasons that city kids have always been smarter than bumpkins or suburbanites: you see more of the world in the city and you learn more from observing daily life first hand; that's what we all celebrate about city life on this forum.

It's obvious that stimulation and observation are prime components of learning (that's even true for rats), though obviously if you grow up in the projects you may learn the wrong things, in which case growing up in the city isn't much help in life. Also it doesn't help if you mess up your mind with drugs or develop a bad attitude, though that's something you can do in the suburbs too.

I take my kids to the city as often as I can, they love it, and they're sharp as tacks. Some of that smartness I can trace directly to their experiences in the city.

I'd guess that if you're middle class, growing up in Manhattan adds fifteen to twenty points to your IQ.

lofter1
October 5th, 2005, 09:03 PM
I take my kids to the city as often as I can, they love it...

Aha - so you live outside the city, eh?

(Is that because Manhattan scares the pants off of ya? hee hee :p )

ablarc
October 5th, 2005, 09:20 PM
Aha - so you live outside the city, eh?

(Is that because Manhattan scares the pants off of ya? hee hee :p )
No, it's because I'm too unmotivated and average to be a success among Manhattan's masters of the universe.

Schadenfrau
October 6th, 2005, 02:35 AM
NYC kids can select high schools, but earlier schools are determined by neighborhood. I've smartie friends who attended Bronx Science, but that doesn't really have anything to do with the question.

arbeiter
October 6th, 2005, 01:37 PM
Regarding South Williamsburg, it is NOT an italian area. It is heavily Puerto Rican in the areas between the bridge and Metropolitan, and southeast of that, and it is mostly Chassidic Jewish south of Broadway. The historically italian areas of Williamsburg are Northside and the Graham Ave. area (in fact, the Graham Ave. area is really the only area that even still resembles an Italian hood, with pastry shops and the like). The Graham area would be nice to raise a kid I think, but northside is very industrial and not very kid-friendly.

the South 1st-South 5th area near Broadway and Marcy is pretty scary and no place for kids.

Eros_Amor_Victorious
October 7th, 2005, 05:08 PM
hello guys i need someone to tell me a little about new york cuz im moving on 28 of this month. My e-mail is petrochik@hotmail.com and you can talk instantly in the msn right now.

Username
October 12th, 2005, 11:27 AM
I might be getting a job offer for a Manhatten-based company. I live in VA right now, suburbia actually. The office is located in the (ca.) 100-block of 5th Ave. I asked for a $90K salary and that hasn't thrown me out so i assume i'd get that initially.
- i am looking for a 1bedroom apt. in Manhattan, preferrably near a subway line that runs by the office. [which line?]
- i need storage to keep excess stuff like containers, skis, windsurf boards and sails etc. [where? not necessarily Manhattan?!]
- with the above, i'd like to keep my car to get me and my skis/windsurf stuff around North (winter) or South (summer) and the occassional week-long Hatteras trip. How do you manage your own car? (It's a car actually, not a honking SUV). What am i facing keeping a car... having to move for city cleaning, how often? Are there "affordable" long-term parking garages somewhere out of town which can reached easily by public transportation? Near storage (see above)?
- i assume keeping a car would be getting old starting day 1. Are there alternatives other than rental car companess, Avis, Hertz etc.? I found this: http://www.zipcar.com - [anybody have experience? Other offerings?]

THX in advance!

ablarc
October 12th, 2005, 11:32 AM
^ Just rent a car every time you leave town, like most of your future neighbors. You'll save money and hassle. There's a car rental place around every corner.

Plus: you'll always have a nice, new car to drive. No dings, no scratches.

nameless_guy
October 25th, 2005, 05:54 PM
I've found a couple prospective places in Brooklyn and Staten Island.

After a 2 year break, i'm starting to travel again as part of my job.

My question is: are these 2 places alright to leave an apt untended for some time. My travel might take as long as 3-4 months at a time living in a suitcase.

My choices for these 2 places are the modest rent which i'm looking for, between 400-800, and the availability of public transports.

What do you guys/gals think? is this feasible or are there other options?

Thanks in advance for any help or advice.

ryan
October 26th, 2005, 12:51 AM
- with the above, i'd like to keep my car to get me and my skis/windsurf stuff around North (winter) or South (summer) and the occassional week-long Hatteras trip. How do you manage your own car?

Ablarc summarizes the probable majority opinion, but I know quite a few people who keep their cars because renting can be inconvienient, inflexible and expensive.

It probably comes down to math. I live in Brooklyn, so I can park on the street moving three times a week (You'll have a harder time in Manhattan - or find you just have to move too often to park on the street). I figure it costs me the same $$$ to keep my car as it would to rent a car once a month. I leave at least twice a month, I go places that trains don't, and I never go alone, so I keep it. It's also paid for, so I don't stress over the multiplying dings and scratches.

If you're thinking you'll use it for suburb-style trip to the store or around manhattan, think again. You might try a few times, but it's much more hassle than it's worth. Spend the month on a cab or delivery service.

karenp333
October 31st, 2005, 12:22 PM
You should try Astoria, we have really changed here.



Hiyas,

I am going to be moving to nyc sometime in the near future. I will be working for a law firm while going to fordham law school at night. The firm i am going to be working for is up in Tarrytown. I was thinking of living in the Bronx but am concerned about crime, drugs etc as I have a family. I would like to live in an ethnically diverse neighborhood just for sake of an interesting place to live.
Any advice on moving there?

Feel free to email me.

Thanks,

KC