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brianac
March 16th, 2008, 04:01 AM
Landmarks Commission Set To Vote On Webster Hall

byLysandra Ohrstrom (http://www.observer.com/2007/author/lysandra-ohrstrom)
March 14, 2008

http://observer.cast.advomatic.com/files/imagecache/article/files/websterhall.jpg wallyg via flickr

The Landmarks Preservation Commission (http://www.nyc.gov/html/lpc/html/home/home.shtml) is gearing up for a busy (and possibly contentious) public meeting on Tuesday, with proposals on the agenda to designate as many as six landmarks and historic districts, and to hear comments on several more possibilities.

The proposed designations include Webster Hall. The Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation (http://www.gvshp.org/) has pushed for the 1887 banquet hall-cum-music venue to get protective status, much to the dismay of Webster Hall’s owner Unity Gallega, The New York Times (http://www.nytimes.com/2007/12/09/realestate/09scap.html?scp=3&sq=webster+hall&st=nyt)reported (http://www.nytimes.com/2007/12/09/realestate/09scap.html?scp=3&sq=webster+hall&st=nyt). The Times quoted Lisi de Bourbon, a spokeswoman for the Landmarks Commission, who said that the company had opposed designation at last October’s hearing.

Another item up for designation after over a decade of community lobbying is the Fiske-Terrace Midwood Park Historic District. Last Oct. 12, blocks of the adjacent Brooklyn neighborhoods—bounded by Foster and Ocean avenues, Avenue H and the subway tracks of the B and Q trains—moved one step closer to designation when the LPC held a long-awaited public hearing.

Probably the most controversial item of all will be a hearing on the extension of the NoHo Historic District. NoHo first got protective status in 1999, and a separate NoHo East parcel was designated in 2003. But a core section of the neighborhood recommended for protection–running from East 4th Street to Bond Street and Bowery to Lafayette–has been excluded.

NoHo is one of the Historic District Council’s “neighborhoods at risk” (http://www.hdc.org/neighborhoodatriskNoHo.htm) and one of the six suffering from what they call an “under-designation” dilemma, meaning the “boundaries were too narrowly and arbitrarily drawn to provide full protection for the traditional neighborhoods.”

Even if the March 18 hearing goes well, the proposed extension of the NoHo district over Bond, Great Jones, and East 4th streets between Lafayette and Bowery has a final vote hurdle before the LPC gives it protective status. And then it needs to pass the City Council.

Copyright 2008 The New York Observer.

voodoochild
March 17th, 2008, 01:37 PM
Name for me one club, still open for business, that has the kind of feeling/diverse crowd that could be found at the Tunnel, Limelight, Area, Nell's, the Loft, Choice, Save the Robots, Afterlife, the list goes on of the dearly departed.
It makes me question how long you have been clubbing, and exactly what kind of music you like. The fact that it's marginally better than other American cities is not very strong praise considering what's out there. We were once the best in the world, now we should pat ourselves on the back because we're still better than Dallas? Good grief.
OMG!!!!!!!! ARENA! I lived there on Sunday mornings;)...here is another oldie but goody...Club USA!!!!!! I was 13 years old(way ahead of my time) and would go every friday and Saturday night with my 18 year old friends. I remember doing A Night of 1,001 Fashion Victim runway show there. Arena was my all time favorite place to go though. I had some memorable times there. Now you go out and there are a countless amount of Meatheads starting fights and being stupid. I used to be able to sit down and have the most intense conversations with the dragqueens about life etc. Tunnel was awesome too, Twilo for Sasha and Digweed, The Roxy on Friday nights, I can go on and on. Good times.:D

voodoochild
March 17th, 2008, 01:38 PM
Midtown, I see you wrote Area but I assumed you meant Arena no??? If not sorry, but that place was the pleasure dome for all clubbers back then.

SilverLiner
March 29th, 2008, 09:25 PM
Hey guys :-) I'm off to New York in just over 3 weeks and wanted to ask about bars.

A while ago I stumbled on a website about a bar very similar to the one in Coyote Ugly? Anyone know what it might have been? I know there is a bar called Coyote Ugly but it wasn't called that.

I'm a big country fan and would love to find a country bar if there are any decent ones in Manhatten?

Thanks :-)

brianac
March 31st, 2008, 05:13 AM
Brooklyn, The Borough: The Kings of Beer

by Nicole Brydson (http://www.observer.com/node/36073)

March 28, 2008

http://observer.cast.advomatic.com/files/imagecache/article/files/soda.jpg themechanism via flickr


It seems like every time you turn the corner these days you run into yet another new bar. This is especially true in the gentrified neighborhoods of Brooklyn and very much so in Prospect Heights. Time Out New York recently ran a page-long charticle on the heavy bar presence on Vanderbilt Avenue, the go-to strip for ProHo nightlife.

The eight-block avenue boasts restaurants, cafes and boutiques for moms and dads puttering around with their stroller-strapped kids during the day and by night there are no less than four drinking establishments and one on the verge of receiving its liquor license. Recently, my friends Adam and Dave joined me in hitting a few of my local spots, including the brand-new Weather Up and the six-year-old Soda.

A few years back the three of us would have happily traveled into Manhattan to hop a few bars and head back to Brooklyn for a late night drink before heading home. The bars we frequented on Brooklyn's north side were rarely getting their parties started before 1 or 2 in the morning on a weekend anyway. But as more of Manhattan's great dives become extinct, to be replaced by trendier and pricier nightlife spots, Brooklyn is increasingly drawing the attention of Manhattanites out for a fun, interesting night on the cheap(er). Though, there are still a few of you islanders that don't know much about the Borough of Kings, even though you have three bridges and a tunnel to get you here.

So around 11 on a recent Saturday night we were surprised to find the back room of Soda totally bumping. Having just left Weather Up - a beautifully designed, low-key, yet more expensive joint down the street - we were sort of expecting the same general low-key atmosphere. We were wrong.

It was like a scene out of a college house party: bodies were strewn across the rectangular room filled with musty old couches while the resident DJ held court in the back. Soda gets a serious A+ effort on the bohemian effect.

Before long the three of us were surrounded by couples shoved up against the wall passionately making out. The plan had been to have a drink or two and catch up, not the all-night booze fueled adventure, though - don't get me wrong - those are fun too.

After a little while we gave up trying to ignore the chaos around us and shoved through the crowd to have a cigarette outside. A preppy type of guy wandered over with a loud group of about five similar looking friends in their late 20s and asked what nearby watering hole has a pool table. For better or worse I pointed the bar hoppers to the pool hall on Flatbush Avenue and Park Place. He wasn't familiar enough with the area to know how to get there.

Clearly they weren't neighborhood folk.

These inner-borough revelers were exploring and for good reason. Often drink prices are lower than Manhattan waterhing holes and Brooklyn neighborhood bars offer a more casual atmosphere, generally cater to the local set and want to keep reeling them in week after week. At which Soda succeeded. After giving out directions we returned to the bar to find a cozy window booth free at the much quieter front of the bar and we chatted, ordered a few sandwiches and headed home for the night.

Just the other day I found out that one of my oldest friends is opening a bar. The Second Chance Saloon (659 Grand Street, Brooklyn) will have its grand opening party today. So how about we make room for yet another local spot?

Copyright 2008 The New York Observer.

voodoochild
April 3rd, 2008, 03:37 PM
Hey guys :-) I'm off to New York in just over 3 weeks and wanted to ask about bars.

A while ago I stumbled on a website about a bar very similar to the one in Coyote Ugly? Anyone know what it might have been? I know there is a bar called Coyote Ugly but it wasn't called that.

I'm a big country fan and would love to find a country bar if there are any decent ones in Manhatten?

Thanks :-)
It's called Hogs & Heoffers
Gotto the one in the Meat packing district, it's much cooler. If you have any questions let me know, I know the owner Michelle

brianac
April 13th, 2008, 05:43 AM
Urban Studies | Rooting

Where Irish Eyes Hope to Smile Again

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/04/13/nyregion/knic600.jpg Joe Fornabaio for The New York Times
The tap is primed for a Knicks rebound at Tir Na Nog, an Irish pub near Madison Square Garden.

By SAKI KNAFO
Published: April 13, 2008

FEW people have suffered more as a result of the monumental failures of the New York Knicks than the Irish. For years, the blocks surrounding Madison Square Garden have been strewn with Irish pubs — West Side joints, the old-timers might say — and when the Knicks are doing well, these Blarney Stones and Blarney Rocks do a brisk business.

Lately, though, the Knicks have not been doing well.

Tony Colbert, the Irish-born part owner of Tir Na Nog on Eighth Avenue near West 33rd Street, estimated that the bar’s Knicks crowd had declined by 60 percent as a result of the team’s struggles in the past five or six years.
“It’s a shame like, you know,” he said in a heavy brogue at the wood-paneled pub.

But it seems there is hope. Last week, amid talk of extensive renovations to the Garden itself, the Knicks announced that Donnie Walsh (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/w/donnie_walsh/index.html?inline=nyt-per), a New York native and longtime executive for the Indiana Pacers, would be assuming control of the arena’s basketball operations. Thus ends an era in which the Knicks have been led — or, as many would say, led astray — by Isiah Thomas (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/t/isiah_thomas/index.html?inline=nyt-per).

Mr. Colbert was particularly warmed by the thought of a Knicks president with an Irish name. “Maybe he’ll get a little bit of luck of the Irish,” he said of Mr. Walsh.

Mr. Colbert personally prefers rugby, soccer and Gaelic football to basketball. In the past year, he and his partners, Bill Harnett and Maurice Collins, have crossed the Atlantic four times to watch rugby matches featuring the team from Munster, the region where they grew up, or the Irish national team.
Over the same period, Mr. Colbert has crossed West 33rd Street and Eighth Avenue for a Knicks game exactly twice.

Before this year, he said, he made a point of seeing about six Knicks games a season. His first was in 1985. Predictably, he and his partners rooted for the Boston Celtics. “Because of the green,” he said.

On Wednesday night, while the Knicks played across the street, two of the bar’s seven televisions were set to a basketball game between the New Jersey Nets and the Cleveland Cavaliers. The other televisions showed a hockey playoff opener: the New York Rangers versus the New Jersey Devils.

The Knicks game, however, did supply the pub with some business that night.

Perched at the bar were Ed Cunning, a 27-year-old publicist, and Tom Duggan, 28, a bond evaluator. Former roommates at Seton Hall University (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/s/seton_hall_university/index.html?inline=nyt-org) in New Jersey, the men had left the Garden at halftime.

“The hockey game was a better game,” Mr. Duggan said.

Copyright 2008 The New York Times.

brianac
April 19th, 2008, 03:52 PM
4 A.M. Last Calls Could Be Headed The Way of Smoky Bars

By CHRISTOPHER FAHERTY (http://www.nysun.com/christopher-faherty), Staff Reporter of the Sun | April 17, 2008

City nightlife industry insiders fear that the days of 4 a.m. last calls are numbered.

In most parts of Manhattan (http://www.nysun.com/related_results.php?term=Manhattan), bar and club owners say, it has become nearly impossible to open new nightlife establishments that are permitted to serve alcohol until 4 a.m. — the Prohibition-era curfew that is seen as a bedrock of New York City (http://www.nysun.com/related_results.php?term=New+York+City)'s party town identity.

Community boards that now hold substantial clout with the New York State Liquor Authority (http://www.nysun.com/related_results.php?term=York+State+Liquor+Authori ty) are increasingly requesting that liquor licenses be tied to earlier closing times, often at or before 2 a.m., a number of advocates for the nightlife industry said.

"It is a trend that has certainly increased in the last six months, and if it keeps increasing there are going to be serious problems for the nightlife industry and the city's economy," a lawyer for the New York Nightlife Association (http://www.nysun.com/related_results.php?term=New+York+Nightlife+Associ ation), Robert Bookman (http://www.nysun.com/related_results.php?term=Robert+Bookman), said. An independent study conducted at the request of his association found that city nightlife establishments garner 58% of their revenues between the hours of 1 a.m. and 4 a.m., he said. Under state law, which says the closing time for bars in the city is 4 a.m., the liquor authority lacks the power to place stipulations on the operating hours of bars and clubs. However, if a bar owner agrees to limit its hours of operation with the local community board, the liquor authority will write it into the license.

Community boards for years have provided the liquor authority with recommendations for liquor licenses, but only recently has their influence become a determining factor in designating them. "The new leadership that took over during the last few years of the Pataki administration has been dramatically more responsive to the community than any I've ever seen with many years of experience with the SLA, and I think that's a good thing," a state assemblyman who represents the Chelsea area of Manhattan, Richard Gottfried (http://www.nysun.com/related_results.php?term=Richard+Gottfried), said.

A spokesman for the liquor authority, William Crowley (http://www.nysun.com/related_results.php?term=William+Crowley), said the agency determines liquor licenses on a case-by-case basis and follows the letter of the law.

Some say community boards are wielding their newfound power with the liquor authority to force bars to close earlier than ever before.

"More and more of the community boards are insisting that bars close at 2 a.m. or earlier," Ben Leventhal (http://www.nysun.com/related_results.php?term=Ben+Leventhal), the editor in chief of Eater.com (http://www.nysun.com/related_results.php?term=Eater.com), a Web log that chronicles many of the liquor license issues arising in the city, said. "It's become the community boards' de facto bargaining chip."

Matthew Piacentini (http://www.nysun.com/related_results.php?term=Matthew+Piacentini), an entrepreneur poised to open a European-style parlor, said he decided to back out of plans to open the lounge in a commercial building on Hudson Street in TriBeCa (http://www.nysun.com/related_results.php?term=TriBeCa) after the community board stipulated he would have to close at midnight on weekdays and 1 a.m. on weekends. Mr. Piacentini pitched his establishment as an upscale anecdote to nightclubs for a clientele interested in having conversation. "If I could only be open for six hours there was no chance I could bring in the necessary revenue," he said.

Brad Hoylman, the chairman of Community Board 2, which covers Greenwich Village (http://www.nysun.com/related_results.php?term=Greenwich+Village) and SoHo, said the board approves 90% of all liquor license applications, and 80% of those are tied to certain stipulations such as time constraints.

"In our neighborhoods, most people don't want to live next to a nightlife establishment, he said. "What we try to do is be reasonable and have a fair negotiation with the applicant."

Community Board 3, which covers the bar-saturated neighborhoods of the East Village and the Lower East Side, is widely described as the stingiest board in the city when it comes to obtaining a new liquor license. The board's district manager, Susan Stetzer (http://www.nysun.com/related_results.php?term=Susan+Stetzer), said her board doesn't stipulate closing times, but that the applicants themselves come to the board with their own closing times.

According to minutes from the board's monthly meetings in November, December, and January, the most recent records available, not a single liquor license recommendation was granted to a bar that would close after 3 a.m. on weekends and 2 a.m. on weekdays.

Copyright 2008 The New York Sun.

brianac
May 23rd, 2008, 01:19 PM
Kenn's Broome Street Bar, at 363 West Broadway.

Does anyone know anything about this bar?

It appeared to have an extensive menu, but I wasn't tempted in.

I understand the building dates from 1825 but it did not look in a good condition.

http://i194.photobucket.com/albums/z245/brianaclift/New%20York%20Pubs/js1024_js800_Pictures_from_small-10.jpg

NYatKNIGHT
May 23rd, 2008, 01:41 PM
I used to go there for its good 'locals' atmosphere but it morphed into something pricier and less fun.

brianac
August 16th, 2008, 06:45 AM
Urban Studies | Competing

Where Everybody Knows Yao Ming

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/08/16/nyregion/thecity/17olympics01_600.ready.jpg Annie Tritt for The New York Times
At Tropical 128, a bar in Little Italy, the Olympics are stirring more than the usual interest.

By JOSEPH HUFF-HANNON
Published: August 15, 2008

IN the evenings, many of the mostly Chinese-American patrons of Tropical 128, a cavernous bar in Little Italy, walk past the fake Chinese fortune tree and gurgling fish tanks filled with baby sharks and dragon fish near the entrance. They head straight to the dimly lighted back room, there to hone their formidable skills at the nine pool tables and the snooker table in the corner.

Interactive Schedule (http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2008/08/05/sports/olympics/2008_OLYMPICS_TRACKER.html?hp)

Follow the schedules of your favorite sports, day by day and event by event.

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/08/16/nyregion/thecity/17olympics02_450.ready.jpgAnnie Tritt for The New York Times
Tropical 128 is located on Elizabeth Street near Broome Street.

Lately, though, Olympic fever has set in at Tropical 128, which is on Elizabeth Street near Broome Street and has been a magnet for young Asians from Chinatown and points beyond.

For the past 10 days, all eyes have been transfixed by the images on the two flat-screen television sets atop the bar, where the Summer Games in Beijing have been broadcast nonstop. On Aug. 8, the night of the lavish opening ceremonies, the crowds were so large, they spilled out onto the sidewalk.

The bar’s owner, Bill Guo, a boyish 35-year-old who grew up in a small town in southwestern China, decorated the space outside the bar with seven crisp white flags, emblazoned with the Olympic rings and the words “Beijing 2008.” Olympic flags flutter outside the squat, red-brick storefront.

“I’m always crazy about the Olympics,” Mr. Guo said a few nights ago, perched on a bar stool. “But having them in Beijing, it makes me even happier. That’s why we put the flags up.”

On Monday night, the banter between the bar’s patrons, most of them Asian, and the staff, which is largely Russian, seemed to keep pace with the action on the screen. Ksenia Nikitina, a Russian-born 21-year-old who has learned some Chinese in her nearly seven months as a bartender, expressed her firm belief that Russia would walk away from the Games with a handful of gold medals.

Mr. Guo has his eye on China’s basketball team, particularly its towering superstar from the Houston Rockets (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/news/sports/probasketball/nationalbasketballassociation/houstonrockets/index.html?inline=nyt-org), Yao Ming (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/y/yao_ming/index.html?inline=nyt-per). “Of course you know who Yao Ming is,” he said to a visitor. “That’s China’s secret weapon.”

Kevin Pan, a Hong Kong native who lives near Yankee Stadium in the Bronx, stopped in during happy hour to watch televised replays of the games, even though he’d been listening to updates and scores all day on the radio.

During commercial breaks, Mr. Pan and his friend Kinfy Lee, a 31-year-old Chinese-born accountant, faced off against the Russian bartenders over rounds of Chinese dice.

Five dice were rattled inside a leather cup, then slammed onto the bar.

For Ms. Nikitina, the competition was unexpectedly soothing.

“After working here, I can’t drink beer without playing dice, or without doing something competitive,” she said. “It just doesn’t seem natural.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/08/17/sports/olympics/17olym.html?ref=thecity

Copyright 2008 (http://www.nytimes.com/ref/membercenter/help/copyright.html) The New York Times Company (http://www.nytco.com/)

brianac
September 10th, 2008, 01:36 PM
September 10, 2008, 12:31 pm

Bellying Up to the (New) Bar at ‘21’

By Corey Kilgannon (http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/author/ckilgannon/)

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/09/09/nyregion/09corey.533.jpg
The old bar, before it was removed in August, at the “21″ Club. (Photo courtesy of the Demolition Depot)

There are few entries in the annals of New York alcoholism to rival the bar at the “21” Club (http://www.21club.com/web/onyc/onyc_a2a_home.jsp) in Midtown Manhattan. The broad, mahogany bar stood since the 1940s in the center of the first floor. Drinks were had there by the likes of Humphrey Bogart and Ernest Hemingway.

With its celebrity patrons and speakeasy heritage, it was the subject of paintings by artists like Leroy Neiman (http://www.artbrokerage.com/artretail/neiman/neiman_2956.htm) and immortalized in films, notably “The Sweet Smell of Success. (http://movies.nytimes.com/movie/48117/Sweet-Smell-of-Success/overview)”

But now in the celebrated dining room of “21,” which reopened this month at “21” West 52nd Street after renovation, there is only the sweet smell of shellac, given off by — egads — a sleek new bar, freshly varnished.
It resembles the old bar, down to the brass foot rail, but there are differences. It is much narrower (about half as wide as the four-foot-wide old one), and shorter (by about 12 feet), leaving more space in the dining room for tables. And there are no spittoons.

“No one really uses spittoons anymore,” said Bryan McGuire, the general manager of “21,” looking over the new bar last Friday. Also approaching extinction are the consistently large crowds of drinkers at the bar at “21,” whose owners say they plan to celebrate the establishment’s 80th birthday next year.

“They used to make bars wider because there was more emphasis on beverages 30 years ago,” he said. “We don’t really get the shoulder-to-shoulder crowd at the bar anymore. You don’t get the three-martini lunch crowd like you did years ago.”

It was between lunch and dinner at “21,” and the dining room was empty except for a man dressed in a tuxedo, sitting at a table filling out reservation forms.

The man was Oreste Carnevali, who came to “21” in 1994 from the Four Seasons. In the lounge, all leather and oak, a party of four women drank Champagne and talked about their exercise regimens. Not exactly the stand-up, straight-up drinkers of yesteryear.

Replacing the historic bar may seem unusual for a place like “21,” which clings tightly to its history. The brass plaques designating certain tables as belonging to certain patrons — for Bogart, Robert Benchley and Richard M. Nixon — still remain, as do all the mementos hanging from the ceiling donated by famous patrons.

But as Mirko Blaskovic, a bartender at “21” for 16 years, pointed out, what is lost in historical authenticity is gained by increased efficiency and comfort. The new bar, he said, as he mixed drinks, was much more efficient, and more organized in the storage of ice, glasses, liquor and condiments. With a narrower bar, he no longer has to lean way over to slide a patron a drink.

“The drinks taste the same,” he said.

With all the modern touches of the new bar, it has a curious throwback to its predecessors: a hidden chute for the quick disposal of liquor bottles. It is hidden behind a wooden panel, and through it, the bartender can quickly dump bottles of booze to drop down a chute into the basement.

This goes back to the establishment’s days operating as a speakeasy during Prohibition.

The original bar, along the west wall, would sweep the liquor bottles down a chute toward the sewer system, at the touch of a button that could be operated by a lookout at the front door.

The modern chute is not there to elude lawmen, but rather to facilitate recycling.

“The bottles go into a recycle bin,” Mr. McGuire said. “This way, we’re keeping with our heritage and also being green-conscious.”

The old bar was acquired by the Demolition Depot (http://www.demolitiondepot.com/vo/demo/), whose owner, Evan Blum, said he would likely set a price of around $50,000. Mr. Blum said the bar was in storage at his warehouse in Middletown, Conn.

He said he has handled the sales of many historic bars from New York City saloons and private homes, including the bar from the Artists and Writers Club and the bar from the original Lutèce restaurant. There was the one he recovered from a tavern on 32nd Street and sold to the Odeon and Sugar Ray Robinson’s personal bar, which now serves as the reception desk at the Middletown warehouse.

In a way, Mr. Blum covers both ends of the saloon experience: he also specializes in bar urinals (http://www.demolitiondepot.com/vo/demo/inv/list.asp?CAT1=Plumbing+Fixtures&CAT2=bathroom+-+urinals&CATC=plum-baur). He acquired several huge ones from P. J. Clarke’s and used them as models to create numerous replicas for that tavern’s franchises, he said. At his showroom on East 125th Street in Manhattan last week, he showed them off, pointing out “P. J. Clarke’s” stamped near the urinal handle into the thick, shiny glazed terra cotta.

“I call them cathedral pissoirs,” he said, noting that their heft makes them seem almost ceremonial. Mr. Blum browsed the huge selection of urinals, including some prodigious ones that he said came from the horse stables of Jock Whitney. There were tall ones, he said, that came from New York City Department of Education offices.

Mr. Blum continued a tour of the place, which was essentially a romp through artifacts of old New York. Along a staircase were railings from the Kenmore Theater in Brooklyn.

He stepped outside, where a homeless man slept on marble columns laying on the sidewalk. Inside, there was a baby stroller next to an $8,000 antique tub. In it — the stroller, not the tub — a baby slept while his mother shopped, both seeming equally at bliss. Mr. Blum said he has sold artifacts to many celebrity clients. He said he sold a claw-foot tub to John Lennon for his apartment in the Dakota, and sold several items to George Harrison.

Mr. Blum walked out the back door and descended an iron staircase taken from a city subway station. He pointed out some aluminum decorative panels that came from Kings County Hospital, and some streetlights from Independence Hall in Philadelphia.

There was an old New York City park bench, and an old-fashioned street clock that once stood at 2 West 37th Street. There were railings from the Williamsburg Bridge sold by a scrap man, and pieces of the marble hallways from the Plaza Hotel. There were ornaments form the Commodore Theater in Brooklyn and marble archways from Mrs. Whitney’s apartment in Gracie Terrace.

Inside, he pointed out some old wallpaper from the Gramercy Hotel, and a huge hanging lamp that once illuminated the office of Oscar Hammerstein, Mr. Blum said, before passing a door in the hallway with a window of frosted glass bearing the words: “Office of the Chancellor Joel I. Klein.”

Of course, the “21” proprietors also gave a tour of their establishment, which included numerous historic aspects and artifacts, including the 5,000-pound cellar door disguised as a brick wall. It leads to the wine cellar, which was once used to hide alcohol and is still opened by inserting a meat skewer through a crack to pop the latch inside. Inside are wines that were stored there by Nixon, John Jay Astor, Burgess Meredith and other “21″ regulars.

Phil Pratt, the wine director, used the skewer to pop open the vault and he showed me a bottle of Romanée Conti from 1985. It sells for $9,000, which he called a bargain price.

http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/09/10/bellying-up-to-the-new-bar-at-21/

Copyright 2008 (http://www.nytimes.com/ref/membercenter/help/copyright.html) The New York Times Company (http://www.nytco.com/)

JimmyC00
September 16th, 2008, 10:13 PM
Hey People,
I just joint today, my name is James I'm 25 & i am from London UK, I'm going out to New York in January 5th - 11th, & just wanted to ask really what the scene is like on the Bars & Club front, a club / bar that plays your average commercial type of music, somewhere that people can recommend maybe from experience of going their or what they may have heard.

Thanks, look froward to hearing some people's reply's

JimmyC00 ;)

shaarmin
September 17th, 2008, 12:11 AM
James,
manhattan is the place. lots of awesom bars out here... try 235th... it is the name of a rooftop bar... google it... also, i just got home from the Coffe Shop bar which is on 16th street....google it again.... and times square has innumerable bars... Touch is an alright club, Pacha is good again... 3 floors... different kind of music on each floor, Kemia is an Indian-English club if you're interested in dancing till you drop...

brianac
September 17th, 2008, 04:57 AM
There is already a thread covering this, look HERE (http://wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=246218)

MOD. EDIT - Thanks brianac, I just merged them together.

JimmyC00
September 17th, 2008, 09:40 AM
Thanks Shaarmin for the info i'll have a look into it, see what atracts my attention

meakin88
September 17th, 2008, 12:15 PM
dont waste your time at Touch, you will be disappointed coming from London clubs, also go to Pacha in london its alot better IMO

KenNYC
September 17th, 2008, 07:50 PM
Not that I'm a huge fan of Touch really, but I like NY nightlife more than London, by far. It's a different type of nightlife for sure, more 'lounge oriented' (no unauthorized dancing, thank you!). Personally I got a thing for Cain, but each to their own.

I LOVE THE SOCCER
November 8th, 2008, 11:38 PM
4 A.M. Last Calls Could Be Headed The Way of Smoky Bars

By CHRISTOPHER FAHERTY (http://www.nysun.com/christopher-faherty), Staff Reporter of the Sun | April 17, 2008

City nightlife industry insiders fear that the days of 4 a.m. last calls are numbered.

In most parts of Manhattan (http://www.nysun.com/related_results.php?term=Manhattan), bar and club owners say, it has become nearly impossible to open new nightlife establishments that are permitted to serve alcohol until 4 a.m. — the Prohibition-era curfew that is seen as a bedrock of New York City (http://www.nysun.com/related_results.php?term=New+York+City)'s party town identity.

Community boards that now hold substantial clout with the New York State Liquor Authority (http://www.nysun.com/related_results.php?term=York+State+Liquor+Authori ty) are increasingly requesting that liquor licenses be tied to earlier closing times, often at or before 2 a.m., a number of advocates for the nightlife industry said.

"It is a trend that has certainly increased in the last six months, and if it keeps increasing there are going to be serious problems for the nightlife industry and the city's economy," a lawyer for the New York Nightlife Association (http://www.nysun.com/related_results.php?term=New+York+Nightlife+Associ ation), Robert Bookman (http://www.nysun.com/related_results.php?term=Robert+Bookman), said. An independent study conducted at the request of his association found that city nightlife establishments garner 58% of their revenues between the hours of 1 a.m. and 4 a.m., he said. Under state law, which says the closing time for bars in the city is 4 a.m., the liquor authority lacks the power to place stipulations on the operating hours of bars and clubs. However, if a bar owner agrees to limit its hours of operation with the local community board, the liquor authority will write it into the license.

Community boards for years have provided the liquor authority with recommendations for liquor licenses, but only recently has their influence become a determining factor in designating them. "The new leadership that took over during the last few years of the Pataki administration has been dramatically more responsive to the community than any I've ever seen with many years of experience with the SLA, and I think that's a good thing," a state assemblyman who represents the Chelsea area of Manhattan, Richard Gottfried (http://www.nysun.com/related_results.php?term=Richard+Gottfried), said.

A spokesman for the liquor authority, William Crowley (http://www.nysun.com/related_results.php?term=William+Crowley), said the agency determines liquor licenses on a case-by-case basis and follows the letter of the law.

Some say community boards are wielding their newfound power with the liquor authority to force bars to close earlier than ever before.

"More and more of the community boards are insisting that bars close at 2 a.m. or earlier," Ben Leventhal (http://www.nysun.com/related_results.php?term=Ben+Leventhal), the editor in chief of Eater.com (http://www.nysun.com/related_results.php?term=Eater.com), a Web log that chronicles many of the liquor license issues arising in the city, said. "It's become the community boards' de facto bargaining chip."

Matthew Piacentini (http://www.nysun.com/related_results.php?term=Matthew+Piacentini), an entrepreneur poised to open a European-style parlor, said he decided to back out of plans to open the lounge in a commercial building on Hudson Street in TriBeCa (http://www.nysun.com/related_results.php?term=TriBeCa) after the community board stipulated he would have to close at midnight on weekdays and 1 a.m. on weekends. Mr. Piacentini pitched his establishment as an upscale anecdote to nightclubs for a clientele interested in having conversation. "If I could only be open for six hours there was no chance I could bring in the necessary revenue," he said.

Brad Hoylman, the chairman of Community Board 2, which covers Greenwich Village (http://www.nysun.com/related_results.php?term=Greenwich+Village) and SoHo, said the board approves 90% of all liquor license applications, and 80% of those are tied to certain stipulations such as time constraints.

"In our neighborhoods, most people don't want to live next to a nightlife establishment, he said. "What we try to do is be reasonable and have a fair negotiation with the applicant."

Community Board 3, which covers the bar-saturated neighborhoods of the East Village and the Lower East Side, is widely described as the stingiest board in the city when it comes to obtaining a new liquor license. The board's district manager, Susan Stetzer (http://www.nysun.com/related_results.php?term=Susan+Stetzer), said her board doesn't stipulate closing times, but that the applicants themselves come to the board with their own closing times.

According to minutes from the board's monthly meetings in November, December, and January, the most recent records available, not a single liquor license recommendation was granted to a bar that would close after 3 a.m. on weekends and 2 a.m. on weekdays.

Copyright 2008 The New York Sun.

What is the actual situation about the closing time of the new bars / clubs in NYC ? I hope that it is better and that also the most of new bars and the new clubs have the LAST CALL at 4 AM.
NEW YORK CITY : THE CITY THAT NEVER SLEEPS !!!!!

Gregory Tenenbaum
May 29th, 2009, 11:18 AM
Well, I read on Sleep New York today (where I contribute) that we have nothing on the nightlife in London Towne.

Watch the video posted here (http://sleepny.lefora.com/2009/03/02/the-troof-is-out-there-london-towne-society-and-cu/page1/)

ablarc
August 11th, 2009, 01:04 PM
RIight between the two: http://www.balthazarny.com/

lushking
January 7th, 2010, 10:32 PM
yes, pls google it.:)

brianac
February 16th, 2010, 05:03 AM
Kingsbridge.

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/packages/images/photo/2010/02/10/0214stop/33157726.JPG
The Bronx Ale House, which opened last summer, aims to introduce the borough to a world of beer beyond Budweiser. Brian Duffy, a bartender, promises it will never serve Coors Light.
Photo: Suzanne DeChillo/The New York Times

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/packages/images/photo/2010/02/10/0214stop/33157693.JPG
Beer lovers can find perhaps the most eclectic beer selection in the borough at the ale house. A rotating list that focuses on American microbrews means you can try a different beer on every visit.
Photo: Suzanne DeChillo/The New York Times

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/packages/images/photo/2010/02/10/0214stop/33157723.JPG
The ale house hosts serious darts games on Tuesday nights. The brewery also offers free popcorn with every round and free tastes of any beer that piques your curiosity.
Photo: Suzanne DeChillo/The New York Times

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/packages/images/photo/2010/02/10/0214stop/33157822.JPG
Bronx Ale House bartenders could give a master's class on the finer points of beer. They also sell growlers, 64-ounce glass jugs you can fill up with your favorite new brew to take home, legally. Just return and refill.
Photo: Suzanne DeChillo/The New York Times

http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2010/02/14/nyregion/0214stop_index.html

Copyright 2010 (http://www.nytimes.com/ref/membercenter/help/copyright.html) The New York Times Company (http://www.nytco.com/)

Ninjahedge
February 21st, 2010, 02:04 PM
A lot like Blind Tiger! :D

brianac
February 21st, 2010, 04:35 PM
--^--


Blind Tiger Ale House


281 Bleecker St., New York, NY 10014 40.731779 -74.003271
at Jones St. See Map (http://wirednewyork.com/search/dblistings-search.cgi?map_view=1&listing_id=20883) | Subway Directions http://images.nymag.com/listings/popup-blue.gif (http://www.hopstop.com/route?zip2=10014&address2=281+Bleecker+St.&mode=s)
work212-462-4682 Send to Phone (http://javascript<b></b>:void(null))


http://images.nymag.com/listings/bar/mainblindtigerb.jpg (http://wirednewyork.com/forum/#)http://images.nymag.com/listings/detail-slideshow-v2.gif (http://wirednewyork.com/forum/#)
Photo by Shanna Ravindra


Official Website blindtigeralehouse.com (http://blindtigeralehouse.com)


After its beloved Hudson Street location was usurped by Starbucks, this premiere microbrewery built itself a new home using handsome woods salvaged from a 19th-century farmhouse. Predictably one-time "Tigerites" on the prowl are now cool cats sitting with their wives at cracked-wood tables near the stone hearth and under the copper fans. NYU newcomers, too, circle around beer-belly-level tables or settle for standing and calling out their favorites from an idiosyncratic list of 31 draft beers. You'll have no luck ordering a Bud: Even a Guinness seems boring in the face of a Sly Fox Irish Stout, a sweet Lagunitas Hairy Eyeball, rotating cask ales, or one of the small-batch, vintage beers (like Bigfoot barley wine) touted on the chalkboard; a second board advertises small plates like deviled eggs, caviar-and-potato spread, and sliders such as the Bloody Beast made of roast beef, sheep cheddar, and red onion topped by Bloody Mary sauce. — Daniel Maurer



Read more: Blind Tiger Ale House - - West Village - New York Magazine Bar Guide (http://nymag.com/listings/bar/blind-tiger/#ixzz0gCz2HQ6Y) http://nymag.com/listings/bar/blind-tiger/#ixzz0gCz2HQ6Y (http://nymag.com/listings/bar/blind-tiger/#ixzz0gCz2HQ6Y)


http://nymag.com/listings/bar/blind-tiger/

matt_tee
February 25th, 2010, 08:33 PM
Hi, coming to NYC in march and staying in Times Square, can anybody tell me of any Karaoke bars in this are that you don't have to book, I was looking for somewhere casual that you can walk in, have a beer and a good old sing a long.

Thanks in advance for any help and advice.

Matt.:)

brianac
February 26th, 2010, 11:13 AM
In Only Bar of Its Kind in City, Haven (or a Hideout) for Smokers

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2010/02/26/nyregion/26smoke_CA0/26smoke_CA0-articleLarge.jpg Michael Appleton for The New York Times
Suzanne Roche, vacationing from Dublin, took advantage Saturday night of the no-smoking exemption at the Karma Lounge. It opened as a hookah bar in 1999 in the East Village and occupies a singular niche.

By DIANE CARDWELL (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/c/diane_cardwell/index.html?inline=nyt-per)

Published: February 25, 2010

The first sign that the place is different is out front: Arriving customers do not walk the gantlet of exiled smokers that greets them at the doors of other bars. Here, those people are all inside.

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2010/02/26/nyregion/26smoke_CA1/26smoke_CA1-popup-v2.jpgMichael Appleton for The New York Times
The Karma Lounge sells shisha, flavored tobacco smoked with a water pipe, as well as cigarettes.

This bar, the Karma Lounge, offers a whiff of New York night life, circa 2002, right down to the brimming ashtrays and burning cigarettes. All low seating, red velvet and dim lights, it is the only place of its kind left in the city: a casual neighborhood spot in the East Village where smokers can light up indoors — legally.

Despite the city’s ban (http://www.nyc.gov/html/doh/html/smoke/tc1.shtml) on smoking in bars, which went into effect in 2003 and helped spark a global explosion of similar ordinances, there are many places to inhale with varying degrees of furtiveness and legitimacy. At the upscale end are the seven clubby tobacco bars, mostly emphasizing cigars, that were exempted from the ban, according to the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, as well as the velvet-roped celebrity hangouts (http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/03/fashion/03smoking.html) that have been illegally allowing patrons to smoke. Then there are the smoke-easies, dark little places where bartenders simply bring out the ashtrays at a particular hour.

But the Karma Lounge occupies a singular niche. Opened in 1999 as a hookah bar, it was able to get the cigar-bar exemption because it served alcohol and derived at least 10 percent of its income from tobacco products by the cutoff date in 2001.

Today the bar, on First Avenue between Third and Fourth Streets, is a telling index of how much New York has changed in the seven years since the start of the ban, when smokers fumed that they would defy the prohibition as an attack on their civil liberties. Though a big sign on the front door shouts, “Cigarette Smoking Permitted,” that was not the main lure for those who sipped cocktails and tossed back beers last week.

“I know everybody — it’s like my Cheers,” said Andre Evans, 50, a chef who lives around the corner and was lighting a few dozen red votives on Thursday afternoon, just to help out. “I come in, I sit down, all the bartenders know what I drink,” he continued. “Most of the regulars here, we’re just like a regular group and we all get along great.”

Mr. Evans said he would stop in even if he couldn’t smoke and, like several other patrons sitting in the flickering glow of two large televisions above the bar, said he would not visit a cigar bar to indulge his habit.

Josie Rodriguez, 34, an administrative assistant who lives across First Avenue and was perched on a neighboring stool, summed up why, referring to a tiny cigar place she went to once with her brother-in-law:

“It smells really bad.”

“Yeah, as opposed to this place, which smells of cigarettes,” Mr. Evans broke in, laughing.

Some of the regulars do not even smoke, like John Garbarini, 57, a contractor who hopes his first film role, as a homicidal rat mutant in the 2006 horror film “Mulberry Street,” will lead to others. He just likes the place, he said, and comes in for a nice glass of wine, casual conversation, free WiFi and the chance to work a crossword puzzle with one of the mostly young and female bartenders.

Not that there wasn’t a whole lot of smoking going on. There was, whether among those at the bar with their Newports and Camel Lights and American Spirits, or the clusters of newcomers trying out the hookahs, or a couple smoking cigars up front where paintings of half-naked women in stilettos smoking in bed hung from the brick walls.

Indeed, William Watkins, the general manager, is considering installing a more elaborate ventilation system to kill the smell.

“You do have a lot of people coming in and immediately turn around and walk back out,” Mr. Watkins said. “Even if it’s faint, it still tends to turn a lot of people off.”

The bar does a brisk business in tobacco, he said, selling cigarettes and about 20 varieties of shisha, the flavored tobacco that is smoked through a water pipe. Smoking tobacco at other hookah cafes is illegal, said Elliott S. Marcus, an associate health commissioner, but officials have had trouble enforcing the law because owners often say their products are made from herbs and it takes time and effort to prove that they are tobacco.

Over all, the Karma Lounge is surprisingly low-key about its rare smoking prerogative, preferring to use its Facebook page (http://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/New-York-NY/Karma-Bar-and-Lounge/168588263561?ref=search&sid=580192236.1387994352..1) to post the special events it holds in its basement performance space. They are an eclectic mix, including a weekly gay night, hip-hop dance parties, comedy sets and regular sessions for the B.D.S.M. crowd. (A recent invitation to those who play with bondage and discipline, dominance and submission, or sadism and masochism read, “We now have coat-check as well.”)

It is all part of what distinguishes the place from the city’s other smoking dens.

“Cigar smokers tend to be very particular about their cigars,” Mr. Watkins said, “all the way to the point that you don’t light your cigar with a match, you use a piece of wood because you don’t want any sulfur tainting your cigar.

“Cigar bars tend to be a little more high-end with the humidors and things, and your single malts and expensive Scotches and whatnot, and I guess we just chose to go a different route: a place where anyone can come and enjoy themselves no matter where you’re from.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/26/nyregion/26smoke.html?ref=nyregion

Copyright 2010 (http://www.nytimes.com/ref/membercenter/help/copyright.html) The New York Times Company (http://www.nytco.com/)

Evan M. Rose
June 3rd, 2010, 04:41 PM
Hey Everyone,

Looks like this thread has been defunct for a while but I'm trying to get the word out now on my website that seeks to get you the best deals (and events if you're looking for em) in Manhattan based on your location and what you're looking for.

You can find the cheapest margarita in soho or the best beer deal in the East Village. The possibilities are endless. Just enter your destination or a neighborhood and we'll find what you're looking for. We're doing a big redesign of the site over the next week so stay tuned!

Check it out (the site is completely free) at http://www.nite-fly.com

brianac
January 4th, 2011, 06:08 PM
January 4, 2011, 12:06 pm
The Rum House Rises

By SAM SIFTON (http://dinersjournal.blogs.nytimes.com/author/sam-sifton/) The Rum House was a shabby little piano bar off the lobby of the Edison Hotel (http://www.edisonhotelnyc.com/) on 47th Street west of Seventh Avenue, marvelous in its way as a place to stop in before a show for a whiskey sour. Irene Gandy (http://www.tdf.org/TDF_Article.aspx?id=134), the legendary Broadway press agent, often held court in one corner. Tyros with musical-comedy in their blood sketched out bits in another. Always, tourists mooned. The bar was a tie to the Rialto of old – an adult-beverage version of the Polish Tea Room next door, where producers gathered to dream and scheme over tuna fish on rye, a scene out of Runyon (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Damon_Runyon), a simple place for a drink. And then, in the summer of 2010, after 37 years, it closed (http://vanishingnewyork.blogspot.com/2010/09/rum-house.html).

Now it rises again. Next week, the Rum House will re-open under the ownership and management of Michael Neff, Kenneth McCoy and Abdul Tabini, the owners of the bespoke cocktail bar Ward III (http://www.ward3tribeca.com/)in TriBeCa.

The piano remains, said Kate Telfeyan, a spokeswoman for the owners, as do some vestiges of the original nautical theme – including the immense circular lighting fixture over the bar itself. There are still 60 seats. There will be performances, the owners say, at least five nights a week.

But rail vodka poured over watery ice will not be available. The walls and floors and bar itself have been scraped down and polished, and three decades of nicotine stains and the burnish of flop-sweat sent out the door. Some metalwork has been added to replace wood panels on the walls, and red leather accents the space as well as covers the banquettes along the walls.

Ms. Telfeyan said the new Rum House will serve an extensive collection of whiskeys and rums, classic cocktails and some of the more esoteric concoctions available at Ward III.
Until then, here’s Karen Brown, the bar’s longtime pianist, backing up Nika for a 2008 performance of “Fever.”

http://dinersjournal.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/01/04/the-rum-house-rises/

brianac
January 6th, 2011, 10:48 AM
January 6, 2011, 9:59 am

Glasses Are Hoisted Once Again at Fraunces Tavern

By DIANE CARDWELL (http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/author/diane-cardwell/)

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2011/01/06/nyregion/06fraunces-cityroom/06fraunces-cityroom-blog480.jpgJosh Haner/The New York Times

The beer flowed anew, under new management, at the Fraunces Tavern on Wednesday night.

It may be almost a year later than originally expected, but Fraunces Tavern (http://www.frauncestavern.com/), where Gen. George Washington bade farewell to his officers at the end of the Revolutionary War and where patrons have been eating and drinking on and off since 1762, has finally taken a big leap forward in its reincarnation.

The bar, operated by an Irish outfit called the Porterhouse Group (http://www.porterhousebrewco.com/), opened last night for the first time since closing in February (http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/02/09/fraunces-tavern-to-close/), attracting a mellow crowd of industry insiders, people who worked on the project and longtime patrons drawn to the place’s sense of history and extensive collection of craft beers.

“To be the first customers at Fraunces Tavern, we couldn’t give up that opportunity,” said Mike Carroll, a lawyer who, along with his friends Kevin McAdams and Eddie Brady, was the first to come in for a drink. “It means we’re here before George Washington.”

Well, sort of. First opened in 1762 as the Queen’s Head Tavern, the building once housed the administrative offices for the fledgling nation, when New York was its capital. But by 1904, after centuries of operating as a tavern, rooming house and hotel and falling victim to fire, it was rundown and significantly altered.

The Sons of the Revolution in the State of New York (http://sonsoftherevolution.org/) acquired the building, at 54 Pearl Street, and turned it into a museum, restoring the Long Room on the second floor, where General Washington bade his famous adieu, with a restaurant on the ground floor. The Porterhouse Group plans to reopen that restaurant in about two weeks, but the pub is in another connected building, at 58 Pearl Street, which was acquired later by the Sons of the Revolution and is now part of the complex that houses the museum as well as administrative offices, storage and the Anglers’ Club.

After the place closed in February, it took a few months for the Sons of the Revolution to connect with the Porterhouse Group, who were looking to expand into the United States to help build an export market for their beers. They had planned to open in the fall, but delayed the opening several times.

There was not any single reason why, said Oliver Hughes, a co-owner of the Porterhouse Group, which brews its own beers and operates bars in Dublin, Bray, London and Shanghai. But when you are opening a “proper Irish bar” rather than a clichéd version, things can take on a life of their own, especially when you’re dealing with a different culture and its bureaucracy with a landmark building, he said.

“We do bars, we happen to be Irish, but it doesn’t necessarily mean we do shillelaghs and bicycles on the ceiling, which is the world perception of Irish bars,” Mr. Hughes said.

Instead, there was a painstaking renovation that included installing an elaborate beer cooling system in the basement and importing a number of furnishings that were delayed in customs. The bar area — designed to suggest age with a modern vibe — has been expanded and features handmade tables, distressed mirrors and dangling exposed filament bulbs (http://www.nytimes.com/2010/06/08/nyregion/08bulb.html).

“I don’t think I’ve ever had a bar open on time,” Mr. Hughes said, laughing. “Over budget, never on time.”

http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/01/06/glasses-are-hoisted-once-again-at-fraunces-tavern/?partner=rss&emc=rss

brianac
January 12th, 2011, 06:05 AM
January 11, 2011, 4:34 pm

A Reprieve for Max Fish

By BEN DETRICK (http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/author/ben-detrick/)

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2011/01/11/nyregion/11maxfish-cityroom/11maxfish-cityroom-blog480.jpgNancy Siesel/The New York Times
Back in the day: Max Fish, 1997.

Several weeks before its doors were scheduled for shuttering, Max Fish (http://www.maxfish.com/) has been granted a reprieve. Monday afternoon, a lease extension was finalized giving the venerable Lower East Side bar another year at its Ludlow Street location. The extension, which maintains the terms of the current lease, is the result of an agreement between Arwen Properties and the bar’s owner, Ullie Rimkus. The lease now ends Jan. 31, 2012.

The extension gives Max Fish time to find a new location, a task it has thus far been unable to accomplish. “It’s a positive thing,” said Ms. Rimkus, a native of Germany who opened Max Fish in 1989. “We will not be unemployed.”

She plans on remaining in the neighborhood, an area that has increasingly become a raucous entertainment district. “We can find a place, build it out, and move on in,” she said. “Hopefully it’s that easy.” The extension also applies to the Pink Pony (http://www.pinkponynyc.com/), a restaurant on the same piece of property.

Since Max Fish’s imminent closure was announced in early December (http://www.nytimes.com/2010/12/16/fashion/16maxfish.html), crowds have swarmed in to pay their last respects. On one night in mid-December, Yelawolf, a rapper from Alabama, gave an impromptu performance from a tabletop.

“People sort of treated the situation like a relative with terminal cancer,” said Shannon Moore, who works at Max Fish as a bouncer. “There was a mass reaction to be in there as much as possible before it was over. But the space is just the space. 178 Ludlow didn’t make Max Fish; Max Fish made 178 Ludlow.”

http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/01/11/a-reprieve-for-max-fish/

brianac
February 4th, 2011, 02:13 PM
Last Call

(http://ny.curbed.com/tags/last-call)
Party Promoters Come to Praise Mars Bar, and to Bury It (http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2011/02/03/party_promoters_come_to_praise_mars_bar_and_to_bur y_it.php)

http://ny.curbed.com/uploads/2011_2_marsbar.jpg

Legendary East Village dive Mars Bar and its neighbors will be replaced with a 12-story, 60-unit apartment building (http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2010/12/09/mars_bar_faces_wrecking_ball_as_new_tower_gets_unv eiled.php), which means that the next time you step into the bar, it might be your last—at least when talking about Mars in its current scruffy form. Perhaps hoping to tug on these heart strings, recent promos for upcoming events in the watering hole play up the bar's doomed fate. One flyer is pictured above, and later this month there's an event billed (http://reverendjen.wordpress.com/2011/01/29/mars-bar-book-launch/) as Mars Bar's first and last literary event. Word on the street is that the gentrification holdout might close this spring, though that could just be the whiskey talking.

· Mars Bar coverage (http://ny.curbed.com/tags/mars-bar) [Curbed]

brianac
February 18th, 2011, 12:07 PM
McSorley's Bar Celebrates 157 Years in East Village Updated 6 hrs ago


February 17, 2011 4:18pm Updated February 18, 2011 6:31am


The landmark bar McSorley's on East 7th Street celebrated its 157th anniversary Thursday


Read more: http://www.dnainfo.com/20110217/lower-east-side-east-village/mcsorleys-bar-celebrates-157-years-east-village#ixzz1EKaV9YpI

Slideshow (http://www.dnainfo.com/20110217/lower-east-side-east-village/mcsorleys-bar-celebrates-157-years-east-village/slideshow)

http://s3.amazonaws.com/sfb111/story_xlimage_2011_02_R5377_MCSORLEYS_ANNIVERSARY_ 21711.jpg


By Patrick Hedlund
DNAinfo News Editor


EAST VILLAGE — Landmark bar McSorley's Old Ale House (http://www.mcsorleysnewyork.com/) celebrated its 157th anniversary Civil War-style on Thursday with a historical reenactment outside the longtime 7th Street saloon.


Actors dressed in 19th-century garb fired off muskets in the street to ring in another year for the famous pub, considered one of the oldest continuously operating taverns in the city.


"We're lucky enough to still be here," said McSorley's owner Matthew Maher, 71, who's been working at the bar since 1964 and took it over in '77.


"Those are the people that keep us here," he said, gesturing to his packed house on Thursday afternoon. "We don't keep them here — they keep us here."


An actor playing Abraham Lincoln delivered the Gettysburg Address before the crowd, as patrons sipped on endless mugs of the bar's trademark "light" or "dark" ales.


"Everyone comes back to re-associate with the virtues and values we all grew up with," said Rich Kiernan, 57, a bartender at McSorley's for the past 16 years, speaking of the historical-themed celebration. "Family, freedom and the pursuit of happiness."


Ed McKinney, 50, has been a regular at McSorley's since the early '80s, when he used to work around the corner and would stop in for lunch or an after-work drink.


"It's like a living museum," said the Long Island City resident, adding that he used to plan his vacation around the bar's anniversary celebration. "I've known the bartenders here for 25 years, so it's like coming home. The history is so fantastic."


Kiernan said the event always brings out an old-time crowd — "everyone's over 50" — to celebrate the no-frills "ideology" McSorley's has maintained through the decades.


"It's melting pot of many generations who have come here before me — and probably [will] after me."


Maher added that the event ultimately marks just another year in the saloon's storied history.


"We'll be here for many more," he said.



Read more: http://www.dnainfo.com/20110217/lower-east-side-east-village/mcsorleys-bar-celebrates-157-years-east-village#ixzz1EKatG1hj

Shaps
December 21st, 2011, 03:39 PM
Friday, December 23rd, 2011 - Kiss and Fly Nightclub

http://img28.imageshack.us/img28/3782/fridayf.jpg (http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/28/fridayf.jpg/)
http://kissandflyclub.com/

"Since December 2007, Kiss & Fly has been catering to the jet set crowd, bringing a unique lifestyle destination to Manhattan. Kiss & Fly is an unprecedented nightclub that combines extraordinary decor with an unbeatable sound system and world renowned DJs. The decor mixes Roman accents with modern lighting and decor to create a beautiful elegant atmosphere. Each night at Kiss & Fly starts of as a Lounge with soft jazz music and slowly transitioning into a nightclub complete with 250 strobe lights and high energy Euro house music."

---

Contact me for birthday parties, group rates, RSVP, Bottle service, or anything else! Say Alan at the door for reduced price (ladies are free).

Facebook event: http://www.facebook.com/#!/events/289200081132413/

Ninjahedge
February 4th, 2012, 06:45 PM
Ignoring the spider above... (If it is till there...)

Went over to Blind Tiger for lunch. Expensive, but a nice (little) Kimchee and pulled pork and a good IPA to wash it down.

I miss that place.

manhattanscout
March 30th, 2012, 09:20 PM
Last Call

(http://ny.curbed.com/tags/last-call)
Party Promoters Come to Praise Mars Bar, and to Bury It (http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2011/02/03/party_promoters_come_to_praise_mars_bar_and_to_bur y_it.php)

http://ny.curbed.com/uploads/2011_2_marsbar.jpg

Legendary East Village dive Mars Bar and its neighbors will be replaced with a 12-story, 60-unit apartment building (http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2010/12/09/mars_bar_faces_wrecking_ball_as_new_tower_gets_unv eiled.php), which means that the next time you step into the bar, it might be your last—at least when talking about Mars in its current scruffy form. Perhaps hoping to tug on these heart strings, recent promos for upcoming events in the watering hole play up the bar's doomed fate. One flyer is pictured above, and later this month there's an event billed (http://reverendjen.wordpress.com/2011/01/29/mars-bar-book-launch/) as Mars Bar's first and last literary event. Word on the street is that the gentrification holdout might close this spring, though that could just be the whiskey talking.

· Mars Bar coverage (http://ny.curbed.com/tags/mars-bar) [Curbed]

Such a shame. I loved that bar.

Jacob Kesey
November 19th, 2013, 05:34 PM
This thread has been pretty useful but I haven't been able to find a good bar that offers a variety of craft beer. I found The Ginger Man (http://nightlifeinnewyorkcity.com/the-ginger-man-midtown-east-new-york/) the other day and was impressed. Highly recommended for the avid beer drinker.

IrishInNYC
December 2nd, 2013, 07:30 AM
This thread has been pretty useful but I haven't been able to find a good bar that offers a variety of craft beer. I found The Ginger Man (http://nightlifeinnewyorkcity.com/the-ginger-man-midtown-east-new-york/) the other day and was impressed. Highly recommended for the avid beer drinker.

Amity Hall on West 3rd is a good craft beer bar. Nothing on my local in NJ though, Cloverleaf Tavern voted #1 craft beer bar in the North East and #3 in the nation.

mariab
February 23rd, 2014, 09:37 AM
Anyone know or personally remember anything about Danny's Hideaway, other than what little there is on the net?

IrishInNYC
February 25th, 2014, 10:48 AM
Village residents fight reopening of historic speakeasy Chumley’s

Residents of Bedford St. in the West Village have gone to court to block the reopening of the historic pub and former speakeasy that was once a favorite spot for famous writers, artists and activists. They want to overturn the Liquor Authority's decision to give a new license to the pub, which closed in 2007 when the face of the building collapsed.

BY BARBARA ROSS (http://www.nydailynews.com/authors?author=Barbara%20Ross)/ NEW YORK DAILY NEWS

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2014, 2:07 PM


http://assets.nydailynews.com/polopoly_fs/1.1700080.1393289784!/img/httpImage/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_635/lifecov18.jpgRON ANTONELLI

Photos of famous writers, including F. Scott Fitzgerald, hang on the walls at Chumley’s on Bedford St.

Tony residents of Bedford St. in the West Village have gone to court to block the reopening of Chumley's, an historic pub and former speakeasy that was once a favorite spot for famous writers, artists and activists.
The residents are trying to overturn a decision by the state Liquor Authority to give a new license to the pub, which closed in 2007 when the entire face of its building at 86 Bedford St. collapsed into the street after decades of neglect.
http://assets.nydailynews.com/polopoly_fs/1.1700079.1393268547!/img/httpImage/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_635/bar25n-4-web.jpg

Residents of Bedford St. in the West Village have gone to court to block the reopening of the historic pub Chumley's.

The 47 residents say the West Village is already bombarded by hordes of raucous young people from New Jersey and counties east of Manhattan, who swarm into the neighborhood to take advantage of myriad late night bars.

They contend that even though the new Chumley's will have to close at 1 a.m. during the week and 2 a.m. on weekends, their new patrons will be as "unruly, drunk and extremely loud" as the old ones, who routinely disturbed the peace and quiet of Bedford St. until the building facade's fell.
http://assets.nydailynews.com/polopoly_fs/1.1700082.1393289916!/img/httpImage/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_635/bar25n-1-web.jpg

Nick Saluzzi officiates behind the bar at Chumley's.


"This neighborhood already has enough places to eat and drink. This block cannot tolerate another drinking venue," the residents argue in papers filed in Manhattan Supreme Court.
They said the SLA improperly ignored state law, which says there should be no licenses granted if there are three or more other bars within 500 feet of the new establishment. In this instance, the residents say, there are 21 places with liquor licenses within 500 feet of Chumley's.
http://assets.nydailynews.com/polopoly_fs/1.1700081.1393289951!/img/httpImage/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_635/collapse.jpgCOREY SIPKIN/NEW YORK DAILY NEWS

The facade of the building occupied by Chumley's collapsed in 2007.


The residents fighting the reopening of the former speakeasy live on Bedford, Barrow, Grove and Commerce Sts.
The owners of Chumley's could not be reached for comment.

mariab
May 6th, 2014, 04:02 PM
So weird. Just this weekend spontaneously picked up a used copy of "Clubland", about the whole underbelly of the '90s club culture including sanctioned drug dealing, murder, etc. and this guy's story was in it. He seems more concerned about his notoriety than anything else.


'Club kid' killer Michael Alig free after 17 years

http://newsbcpcol.stb.s-msn.com/amnews/i/25/536f9837e9903d5062a2c2ccbee/_h353_w628_m6_otrue_lfalse.jpgGetty Images: Steve Eichner
Club kids and denizens (from left:) Michael Alig, Richie Rich, Nina Hagen, Sophia Lamar and Genetalia attend New Year's eve festivities at Club USA in New York City, 1994.
http://newsbcpcol.stb.s-msn.com/amnews/i/e3/12e7ff08bf55a6d7449b766b4e23c/_h17_w0_m6_otrue_lfalse.jpg5 hr ago By Associated Press



NEW YORK (AP) — Notorious "club kid" killer Michael Alig has been released from prison after serving 17 years for killing his roommate over a drug debt.
Alig was released from the Mid-State Correctional Facility in Marcy, N.Y., on Monday.

Alig, 48, was part of a decadent 1990s party scene characterized by wild costumes and rampant drug use. He pleaded guilty to manslaughter in 1997 for killing Andre "Angel" Melendez.
Alig admitted that he and co-defendant Robert "Freeze" Riggs killed Melendez, cut the body up and dumped the parts in the Hudson River. Riggs also pleaded guilty to manslaughter. He was released in 2010.

The story was turned into the 2003 movie "Party Monster," in which Macaulay Culkin played Alig. The newly freed Alig joked on Twitter that so many cameras were recording his release he felt like Kim Kardashian. He also tweeted a photo of his "first burrito of freedom."

Alig maintained a social media presence while behind bars although he had no access to a computer, dictating tweets to a friend over the prison phone.
According to his Twitter bio, he is finishing a book he wrote in prison titled "Aligula."


http://news.msn.com/crime-justice/club-kid-killer-michael-alig-free-after-17-years