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Kris
January 22nd, 2005, 09:15 AM
January 22, 2005

Raising a Glass in Manhattan. Actually Lots of Them.

By MARC SANTORA

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2005/01/22/nyregion/drink.184.2.650.jpg
O'Connor's bar in Park Slope, Brooklyn, a neighborhood that a report says has more residents who drink to excess than average.

It may not come as news to bartenders, waiters and sommeliers, but New Yorkers drink a lot, a new City Health Department study shows. But what may not be so obvious to those who pour for a living is that New Yorkers in some neighborhoods drink much more than those in others.

The study - based on information collected in 2003 as part of the city's community health survey - suggests that the heaviest drinking neighborhoods are Greenwich Village and Chelsea, where 32 percent of adults report drinking amounts that the report defines as excessive, followed by the Upper East Side and Upper West Side and Gramercy Park in Manhattan, and Brooklyn Heights and Park Slope in Brooklyn.

The study also breaks down the city's drinkers by age and race - white New Yorkers in the most affluent neighborhoods are twice as likely as those in poor neighborhoods to drink excessively - but does not address some of the historic intangibles that make those in one place more likely to drink than those in others. The Upper East Side and Park Slope, for example, have drinking cultures that stretch back decades, to times when the neighborhoods bore little resemblance to those today.

And the report defines "excessive" in a way that may prompt dispute. The survey considers a man to be drinking excessively if he has more than two drinks a day - or 60 a month - and a woman to be drinking excessively if she has more than one drink a day (30 a month). There is no way to tell whether those being interviewed are telling the truth.

In Park Slope yesterday, Jesse Howard, a bartender at the Gate, said that the definitions used by the Health Department classify just about everybody he knows as a problem drinker. "That sounds like a lot of Bloomberg" nonsense, Mr. Howard said, only he did not use the word nonsense. "New York's that kind of town; it always has been. People go out."

Mr. Howard, who wore a Slayer T-shirt and a red goatee, looked off into the distance. It was mid-afternoon, and the bluegrass harmonies of the Old Crow Medicine Show coming through the speakers sounded loud in the uncrowded room. Mr. Howard spoke up again, this time to clarify that his opinion was not colored by his professional experience.

"I've got friends who hate bars, and they still go home and have a cocktail," Mr. Howard said. "People who have any social life in New York City go out and booze."

While 49 percent of New York adults said they choose not to drink at all, and most of those who do drink say they have healthy habits, about 15 percent of all New Yorkers drink to excess, according to the report. A majority of those drinking too much said they were binge drinkers, consuming more than four drinks in a single sitting. The results are similar to national surveys that have been conducted, according to Health Department officials.

After 32 percent of excessive drinkers in Greenwich Village and Chelsea comes Gramercy Park and the Upper East Side (25.6 percent); the Upper West Side (23.5 percent); Brooklyn Heights and Park Slope (22.2 percent); and Union Square and Lower Manhattan (22.1 percent).

Residents of the South Bronx, the Northeast Bronx, Kingsbridge, Flatbush, Eastern Queens and Borough Park reported the least drinking.

The study also found that men were more than twice as likely as women to drink to excess. And men who have never been married drink more than those with a spouse.

By far, the heaviest drinkers are young and white, with 35 percent of those 18 to 34 saying they drink at the level defined as excessive.

"All New Yorkers should understand the difference between healthy and unhealthy drinking," said the health commissioner, Dr. Thomas R. Frieden. "Moderate alcohol consumption - no more than one or two drinks per day for men and one for women - is safe for most adults, and reduces the risk of heart attack and stroke. However, excessive drinking can cause serious health problems."

In the 2003 study, 10,000 adults 18 and older representing every neighborhood in New York City were interviewed by telephone about their health and the health of their families. The first time New Yorkers were surveyed in such detail was in 2002, so there is no good comparison to drinking habits in past generations, health officials said.

At the White Horse Tavern in the West Village, most famous for serving the Welsh poet Dylan Thomas his last drink before he stumbled off and died on his way home, the study's findings did not surprise Fran DeMastri, a bartender.

"I'd be shocked if it wasn't true," she said. "This area is a big tourist attraction. You have so many people coming from out of town. And there are so many bars in this neighborhood."

Ms. DeMastri, who has been tending bar there for two and half years, said that people come into the bar to honor the fallen poet, not to practice temperance. "It's a tavern atmosphere. There's no reason that they would come here for one or two beers."

The city estimates that every year about 25,000 people are hospitalized from various preventable illnesses and injuries caused by excessive drinking.

The report also finds that roughly 1,500 people die annually either directly or indirectly because of alcohol use.

While white men are the most likely to drink to excess, according to the report, black men are twice as likely to be hospitalized for detoxification. Both blacks and Hispanics are also more likely than whites to be hospitalized or die from chronic alcohol-related conditions.

Michael Brick and Janon Fisher contributed reporting to this article.

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2005/01/22/nyregion/20050122_DRINK.gif

Copyright 2005 The New York Times Company


Press Release (http://www.nyc.gov/html/doh/html/public/press05/pr005-05.html)

Michi
January 22nd, 2005, 12:13 PM
Oh... there're a few persons who drink, at least, in the range of my year (22 years) here in Spain the youngs drink (not in weekdays) a lot of, and more than 4 alcohol drinks, and here the alcohol drinks are biggers than there (at least in all the countries in what I have been they were smaller).
My friend and me like to go out every night and I would like to know where are the pubs and discos in Manhattan and more or lees, the prices of the drink.
Thanks
Bye

abbygirl
April 27th, 2005, 04:02 PM
I was wondering if NYC has oxygen bars? I've been to one in las vegas, nevada. and loved trying it so i was curious if NYC had one(s) too. THanks Joyce

Schadenfrau
April 27th, 2005, 04:05 PM
No. Like someone else posted, a simple Google search should clear up questions like this.

abbygirl
May 2nd, 2005, 09:53 PM
I tried doing a google search that's why i asked here. nothing's coming up. thanks though.

sirhcman
May 3rd, 2005, 08:54 PM
google.com > "oxygen bars new york city"

http://www.google.com/search?q=oxygen+bars+new+york+city&sourceid=mozilla-search&start=0&start=0&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&client=firefox-a&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official

abbygirl
May 5th, 2005, 10:11 PM
Thank you very much!!!

aural iNK
September 20th, 2005, 04:55 PM
I'm taking my girlfriend to the River Cafe this weekend, and would like to know of some nicer bars in Manhattan that we could go for a night cap. We'd probably enjoy something more on the quiet side that's not too touristy. We'll be at the ESB after dinner, so something near by would be great. Thanks for all your suggestions.

ManhattanKnight
September 20th, 2005, 05:16 PM
I'm taking my girlfriend to the River Cafe this weekend, and would like to know of some nicer bars in Manhattan that we could go for a night cap. We'd probably enjoy something more on the quiet side that's not too touristy. We'll be at the ESB after dinner, so something near by would be great. Thanks for all your suggestions.

Others may be able to guide you to something trendier, but one suggestion I often make is the Bar at the Rainbow Grill (http://rainbowroom.com/rainbow_grill.htm), at the top of the GE (ex-RCA) Building. The views are stunning and the atmosphere classy and classic. It's not far from the ESB and is probably the best place in the City to watch the ESB. It's not cheap, but if you can afford the River Cafe, you can manage the RG.

http://rainbowroom.com/images/grill2.jpg

aural iNK
September 20th, 2005, 08:19 PM
Great choice. I was thinking of going there for dinner, but hadn't thought about going for a few drinks. The view alone would make this a worthy selection. Any other suggestions are more than welcome.

lofter1
September 20th, 2005, 08:23 PM
In the theatre district you might want to try Angus McIndoe (44th just east of 8th Ave.) -- it's a good bar with some interesting people who show up there:

http://www.angusmcindoe.com/

258 West 44th Street New York, NY 10036 212-221-9222

Hof
October 24th, 2005, 10:28 AM
Try the upper deck of the Staten Island Ferry.
Bud tallboys are $2.50,definitely the cheapest I've found,and the views are better than any bar can provide...

AmeriKenArtist
October 24th, 2005, 02:39 PM
Hmmm, I think I'll suggest a "Ferry Crawl" to a few friends. I'd guess that three or four round trips should be sufficient!

Ninjahedge
October 24th, 2005, 03:12 PM
But Bud?

BLEH!!!!

BEER boy! Better beer! Bye buy Bud Buddy! ;)

ryan
October 24th, 2005, 05:34 PM
Bohemian Beer Garden in Astoria. It's cheap, quality beer. I suppose you could drink $2 pints of reingold, but then you'd be drinking reingold.

I literally missed the boat on a ferry crawl. My friends who caught the ferry said they did get cheap beer, but the bartender made fun of them.

AmeriKenArtist
October 25th, 2005, 12:55 AM
What did they do, or say to have the bartender make fun of them? Ahhhh, if I were there, I would have photographed the 'tender!

ryan
October 25th, 2005, 01:25 AM
I don't think he appreciated the kitsch factor in riding the ferry just for beers.

AmeriKenArtist
November 12th, 2005, 12:49 PM
Hmmmmm, I'd like to think that the bartender, if he had any class at all, would have appreciated the "change" from the routine! An interesting conversation could have taken place, leading to more unusual situations. But then you need a little creativity on both sides to get to that.

"Beer on the Water" "FerryBeers" (hmmmm) "ShuttleBuds"...... err

And I agree with ya Ninja, but ya gotta make best with what's there. It's not like you'd be doing that every day. Personally I dislike Bud and other A-B products. ;)

czsz
November 12th, 2005, 02:36 PM
How can you look at yourself in the mirror after producing a beer as shitty as Rheingold?

Schadenfrau
November 14th, 2005, 12:21 PM
I imagine that you'd be too sloshed on your own product to really care what's looking back in the mirror, Czsz.

ablarc
November 14th, 2005, 02:05 PM
I'd like to think that the bartender, if he had any class at all, would have appreciated the "change" from the routine! An interesting conversation could have taken place, leading to more unusual situations. But then you need a little creativity on both sides to get to that.
Those guys aren'ty really bartenders.

TonyO
November 14th, 2005, 02:18 PM
$3.50 Becks/Bud 32 oz. styrofoam big-gulp size...Greenpoint tavern in Williamsburg (right off the L, first stop at Bedford). The best beer value I've had in NYC.

ablarc
November 14th, 2005, 02:29 PM
Problem with that styrofoam is that it makes the beer foam, so you end up getting less beer, and the residue you get is often a tad flat.

TonyO
November 14th, 2005, 02:52 PM
Problem with that styrofoam is that it makes the beer foam, so you end up getting less beer, and the residue you get is often a tad flat.

I'm sure if you told the surly bartender there (with the bee-hive hairdo) she would compensate the .98 ounces lost beer you miss out on due to their inferior drinking vessels.

AmeriKenArtist
November 22nd, 2005, 03:17 PM
Reminds me of the foamy beer in styrofoam at Yankee Stadium. After being carried around by the vendor, they looked like marshmallowy sno-cones! I never thought I'd see drunkin' lunatics throwing their overpriced beers at one another! By the 7th inning, it was happening!

ZippyTheChimp
December 12th, 2005, 07:55 AM
Intelligencer

The Great Crap-Beer Drought

Hip, cheap PBR goes missing in Brooklyn.

By Joshua M. Bernstein

There’s been a mystery brewing among the sort of dive bars in Brooklyn that appeal to rigorously trendy, budget-minded twentysomethings: What’s become of their favorite watery lager, Pabst Blue Ribbon? Pabst, which took off in popularity in the last few years, became a textbook case of how to market a brand without seeming to. Hipsters, already fascinated by down-market accessories like trucker caps, took to the low-rent beer with ironic fervor. Which is why it was so traumatic that, over the past few months, die-hard Pabst bars have reported that their regular orders have gone unfulfilled. “It’s a bummer,” says set designer Bryn Bowen, who recently tried to order a PBR at Lodge, a bar in Williamsburg, but found it was out. “I’m a connoisseur of working-class shit beer.” Taggart (who wouldn’t give his full name), the manager at another Williamsburg bar, the Southside Lounge, which has a $5 Jim Beam–and–PBR special, says he gave up trying to get Pabst after weeks of trouble. Garal Wholesalers, the brand’s Long Island and Queens distributor, says that a company called Diversified Distribution used to handle Brooklyn for it, until DD recently went out of business. So about a month ago, Garal took Brooklyn back, but a Garal rep admits that there was a “bit of a problem” getting Pabst to the Brooklyn bars during the changeover. “People were pissed off,” says Chase Elder, a bartender at Lodge, “but luckily we have other crappy beer.”

Ninjahedge
December 12th, 2005, 08:54 AM
UGH! Pabst SUCKS!

Man! I can understand getting nostalgic, or just plain being cheap, but complaining about not having crappy beer?

There are dozens that taste exactly like it!

It is like complaining that the piss on the bathroom floor does not smell quite the same anymore!

:P

Hof
December 30th, 2005, 11:57 AM
While visiting the City over the summer,I came across a beer that was new to me--a brew called Stella Artois.
On the way into town from JFK,I noticed large,obviously expensive signs for it,posted seemingly everywhere.On the West Side,the Apple Bank--which is shrouded for renovation--had a flapping,2-story banner wrapping the building and extolling the beer.I'd never heard the name before this,and beer stuff is something I obsess about,like a low-budget oenophile who thinks a lot about bagged wines would obsess over tonight's box.
As a beer connoisseur my curiosity was piqued.

Well,Stella Marketing people,you're advertising worked and I found myself deviating from the Path of Beck's and ordering a Stella at my first opportunity.It happened moments after I left my hotel for my inaugural walkabout.I passed a small bar on Broadway,near the Beacon Theatre,heard Willie Nelson played loudly from inside and had a stop.A Stella banner over the entrance whipped on the wind.I felt a sudden,necessary thirst.
You could smoke at the bar.
Stella was $3.50 a pint,cheap anywhere,extraordinary for New York.I consumed mass quantities all over Manhattan as the days progressed and found it quite good for a cheap drink.It has the color of Heineken's and the flavor of Coors,a mellow beer,lightly bitter with hoppy undertones.European,I thought.Domestic,actually.
A New York-only phenomonon???
From some Bronx microbrewer,possibly?

When I got back to Florida,I swaggered into my favorite bar,"Beer",and confidently ordered a Stella.The bartender,a fellow beer obsessor,had never heard of it,and he knows everything.
He asked around,asked his vendors,even got online.It's not available in Florida,not even in the supermarket-sized liquor stores that stock ALL beers--like,stuff from Zimbabwe or Moldava--so it's back to Beck's and the hopes that Stella Artois is still around--and cheap--when I next visit New York.

Who knows from Stella?
And who the hell is she,anyway?

Hof
December 30th, 2005, 12:00 PM
Woops,I forgot--Stella IS European,from Belgium.Sorry.

ZippyTheChimp
December 30th, 2005, 01:54 PM
It should be ordered like this:
http://www.npr.org/ramfiles/me/20020923.me.streetcar.vid1.ram

lofter1
December 31st, 2005, 12:03 AM
^ excellent :cool:

Hof
January 2nd, 2006, 10:19 AM
Funny as hell,Zippy.
Best laugh I've had all year.

Now,who the hell is Artois???

NYatKNIGHT
January 3rd, 2006, 02:03 PM
Yes, Stella is all over the city, as common as Bass or Guinness. A bartender told me it was like the Budweiser of Europe, so I had always assumed it's popular there. It's a good, crisp, very poundable beer.

mgp
January 3rd, 2006, 02:30 PM
Stella Artois is a very widely distributed Belgian beer. It is supposedly one of the oldest in the world, and more recently (past 10 or so years) was purchased by Interbrew SA. Interbrew is (last time I looked into it) the second largest mass producer of beer in the world (behind A. Busch). Actually Hof, I believe they own Beck's so you may be in luck...

http://www.inbev.com/

LonelyRoad
January 10th, 2006, 04:49 AM
When I was in NY I got free beer (I knew the waitress).:D

timreed
January 18th, 2006, 06:32 AM
Hi. I'm going to NYC tomorrow for the first time and I'm going to the knicks game on Saturday night. Any body now a good place to go before and after the game. How long should I be there before the game?

Also where is the best place to watch the sunrise??

NoyokA
January 18th, 2006, 10:44 AM
West Side bars I would recommend are Latitude at 48th and 8th and Tempest at 31st and 8th (late) and Tracks Raw Bar at Penn Station. Neither are Sports Bars, I'm sure there's no lack of Sports Bars in the area though. Tempest has a good young crowd and same goes for Latitude although the crowd is more Frat there. Tracks has good food fare.

I would arrive a half hour to an hour before the game, but that's just me. I've never gone to a Knicks game, but usually teams practice before games and it good to get your seats and become comfortable with your surroundings.

As for the view of the sunrise/sunset go the Empire State Building a few blocks east of MSG.

NYatKNIGHT
January 18th, 2006, 01:08 PM
Bars closest to the Garden:

Cafe 31 - 31st St. b/w 7th and 8th.
Harp Bar - 32nd St. b/w 6th and 7th - South Side
Blarney Stone - 32nd St. b/w 6th & 7th - South Side
Mustang Harrys - 7th Ave b/w 29th and 30th - West Side
Molly Wee Pub - 8th Ave./30th St. East Side
Blarney Stone - 8th b/w 30th & 31st - East Side
Charley O's - 8th Ave./ 31st St. - East Side
Tempest Bar - 8th b/w 30th & 31st - West Side
Mannys - 7th Ave. b/w 33rd abd 34th - East Side, upstairs

JCMAN320
January 18th, 2006, 09:52 PM
New Jersey Nets fan here!!!! If you are going to see the Knicks play you will need a lot of drinks because that is the only way they will look good is after few. They play horrible!!! Also they play like they go the bars before every game.

lol sry just a few jabs at a fellow rival team, also its against Hornets so you guys might steal one I don't know with Marbury sidelined it will be tough good luck though.

Charley 0's is good as well as the Blarney Stone. Tempest is a personal favorite of mine. There is a Friday's on 8th which maybe good but they charge way too much. Also for sunrise ESB is good also if you wanted to go out of your way for a great sunrise view you could take W or R Train from Herald Square to City Hall and walk on the Brooklyn Bridge and watch the sunrise. Enjoy. :)

drewchad
January 19th, 2006, 06:42 AM
What's the options on getting to a Nets game (and back) from Manhattan by public transport? Is the bus the only way?

lofter1
January 19th, 2006, 09:58 AM
MSG sits above Penn Station, so there are all those trains and subway lines ...

NYatKNIGHT
January 19th, 2006, 10:21 AM
The bus is currently the only way to get to the Meadowlands by public transit. It's easy though.

http://www.njtransit.com/nn_mbs_4.shtml

drewchad
January 20th, 2006, 06:58 AM
Thanks for your help, any idea how long it takes or how much it costs??

JCMAN320
January 20th, 2006, 04:11 PM
Here is another option on the Nets site: NY Waterway to Weehawken and catch a bus to the game!!!

http://www.nba.com/nets/tickets/ny_waterway.html

NYatKNIGHT
January 20th, 2006, 06:24 PM
Thanks for your help, any idea how long it takes or how much it costs??
It takes less than 10-15 and I think it's about $6 round trip.

Hof
April 21st, 2006, 12:08 PM
I've just bought my first 6-pack of Stella Artois here in Florida,and it was $7.95,not exactly cheap.I had never noticed the beer before around here,but after discovering it on last summers' trip to NYC,I was actively looking for it.
It's Beck's priced.
Each bottle has the neck wrapped in upscale white plasto-paper,and you need a bottle opener to get at it's liquids.
That's how you can tell it's European.No twistoff bottlecap technology in Europe,apparently.They'll forever be 2 steps behind America in some things.

Evidently,Stella was heavily test marketing their suds in NYC last summer,looking for ways to increase market share and consumer recognition,and it worked.Now they have expanded their efforts to cover the East Coast.
It's still not available in draught,and when I ask for it,I always get a "wha..???" from the bartender.
And my favorite bar,"BEER" won't even consider stocking it,since I'm the only one who orders it,and I mostly drink Beck's anyway.

GowanusGuy
April 21st, 2006, 01:25 PM
When I was in college I worked in a beer distributor and one time my boss let me take home a can of every single cheap beer that they sold for a taste test.

We had eveything from Golden Anniversary (which then cost only $1.99 a six pack!) to the most expensive, Budweiser. The winner: Piels. The runner up was Pabst.

Bud didn't even place.

Fabrizio
April 22nd, 2006, 09:43 AM
My fave cheap beer is good old "Birra Moretti". It´s Italian and since drinking in Italy is tied to eating, it´s a great table beer.... with lunch or dinner. In the hot summer I switch to this over red wine with many dishes.

http://www.birramoretti.it/eng/html/premi.htm

Ninjahedge
April 23rd, 2006, 11:45 AM
I've just bought my first 6-pack of Stella Artois here in Florida,and it was $7.95,not exactly cheap.I had never noticed the beer before around here,but after discovering it on last summers' trip to NYC,I was actively looking for it.
It's Beck's priced.
Each bottle has the neck wrapped in upscale white plasto-paper,and you need a bottle opener to get at it's liquids.
That's how you can tell it's European.No twistoff bottlecap technology in Europe,apparently.They'll forever be 2 steps behind America in some things.

Evidently,Stella was heavily test marketing their suds in NYC last summer,looking for ways to increase market share and consumer recognition,and it worked.Now they have expanded their efforts to cover the East Coast.
It's still not available in draught,and when I ask for it,I always get a "wha..???" from the bartender.
And my favorite bar,"BEER" won't even consider stocking it,since I'm the only one who orders it,and I mostly drink Beck's anyway.

It is available in draft.

You can get it at the bowling alley at Port Authority, and I believe there is a signature restaurant with its name in the meat packing district.

I think the guy you asked may have just been confused with the term "draft" and many NYC places don't have anything even remotely resembling a tap.

As for "advanced technology" I hate to say it, but it is usually only the cheap beers that have twist-offs. The most expensive I have seen with that "feature" have been:

Yuengling
Saranack
Killians

That's about it. Sam, Anchor Steam, Brooklyn, Sierra, Magic Hat, 6 Point, and a bunch of otehrs brewed here in the US use the pop-caps.

I think it may have something to do with tehreliability of the seal. I have seen many more rusty threads than pop-caps. It could also be simply the cost of changing all the machinery and supply line for going from one format to another.

Also, you call yourself a beer drinker and do not have a bottle opener on your keychain or pocketknife? ;)

Ninjahedge
April 23rd, 2006, 11:47 AM
When I was in college I worked in a beer distributor and one time my boss let me take home a can of every single cheap beer that they sold for a taste test.

We had eveything from Golden Anniversary (which then cost only $1.99 a six pack!) to the most expensive, Budweiser. The winner: Piels. The runner up was Pabst.

Bud didn't even place.


Bud is to BOSE as Crap is to:

a) Elevator Music
b) Reality TV
c) Brittney Spears
d) Crap
e) All of the above.

Gunslinger
April 25th, 2006, 09:01 AM
Coming to NY in Sept - cannot get tickets for Yanks vs Red Sox, but would quite like to watch the game in a bar

Not really looking for ESPN Zone, seems a bit too huge & impersonal

Can anyone recommend a decent neighborhood/sports bar where Yankee games are likely to be available and the regulars won't mind an English Yankee fan joining in the (hopefully) celebrations

Thanks guys

lofter1
April 25th, 2006, 09:42 AM
What part of town will you be staying in / want to go to see the game?

Gunslinger
April 25th, 2006, 10:27 AM
Staying in Chelsea, but have no problem watching the game in any area (within reason)
Don't really want to go to the Bronx - will be painful to be so close & yet so far

lofter1
April 25th, 2006, 12:13 PM
Here's a Big Batch (http://www.murphguide.com/sports.htm#14-59) of Sports Bars

lofter1
April 25th, 2006, 12:16 PM
And there is always Mickey Mantles (http://www.mickeymantles.com/about.asp)

Gunslinger
April 25th, 2006, 03:38 PM
Thanks Lofter - Most helpful (as always) nt

cathyx
April 27th, 2006, 10:02 PM
:D Ok! Here I am::eek:

Si ou sav exatèman ki moun ka commuiqé tout' frustrasyon y matnik épi tout' koté man passé, ouvè djôl ou an bon fwa pou tout pou nou fini épi sa, you hear me?
Zôt paka fini testé alo ke zôt sav ki moun ka emmerdé mwen!!

Ldjé lestonmac mwen épi arété chèché tout ti prétex ki ni pou frennen landjèt manman zôt!!
épi autre chose: man pa aidé pesonn anlè planèt ta la; une dernière fois: arété chèché mwen!!

Hof
May 9th, 2006, 12:05 PM
Ninja--some of the more expensive beers on my list of 'Yeah,I've had that",came with twistoff bottle caps or pop-top cans.They were:
...Kirin,a delicious Japanese rice beer;goes with sushi like wine does with chicken...;
...Sapporo,another Jap delicacy,which comes in an elegant,tall chrome can(pop top),looking like something salvaged from a MOMA beer bar...;
...A dark Italian beer,whose name I can't recall,in a DaVinci painted longneck bottle with a Bud-easy twistoff...;
...T'sing T'ao (sp),Chinese and inscruitable,except for the pull-tab...;
...Others,which,unfortunately I don't remember much about,nor have since the morning after I was introduced to them....

And yes,I carry a Swiss Army knife-like key ring,mainly for beer emergencies. It's a palm-sized NASCAR Dodge leather pouch that I got at Daytona a few years ago.It's clever as hell...The Dodge Ram comes out of the pouch and the ram horns are:
a bottle opener;
a can opener;
a screwdriver;
a small,sharp blade;
a metal punch; and once,a corkscrew.
It's opened a million Beck's.
TSA attendants get apopleplectic when they see it,so I leave it at home when I fly.

When NASCAR comes to NY,everybody in NYC will have one.

Ninjahedge
May 9th, 2006, 12:16 PM
Ninja--some of the more expensive beers on my list of 'Yeah,I've had that",came with twistoff bottle caps or pop-top cans.They were:
...Kirin,a delicious Japanese rice beer;goes with sushi like wine does with chicken...;

Japanese rice beer. It is OK, but not as good as Yebesu. And it was modeled after Budweiser.


...Sapporo,another Jap delicacy,which comes in an elegant,tall chrome can(pop top),looking like something salvaged from a MOMA beer bar...;

Um.... Yeah. I don't know how to say this, but the Japanese are not really known for their beer. Going to Tokyo last year I was not too impressed with the selection. It is mostly pilsner, and quite a few are riced (they mix their mash with rice to make it lighter, and cheaper to make).


...A dark Italian beer,whose name I can't recall,in a DaVinci painted longneck bottle with a Bud-easy twistoff...;

There may be a FEW that have twist-offs, but for every one you mentioned, I can mention 5 that do not use the twistoff.. ;)


...T'sing T'ao (sp),Chinese and inscruitable,except for the pull-tab...;
...Others,which,unfortunately I don't remember much about,nor have since the morning after I was introduced to them....

ANOTHER light asian pilsner.

The Chinese are also not known for their beer dude. Trust me on this one (Fiancee is Chinese. Their family still looks at me funny when I drink anything but Bud, which only their old smoking aunt drinks...)


And yes,I carry a Swiss Army knife-like key ring,mainly for beer emergencies. It's a palm-sized NASCAR Dodge leather pouch that I got at Daytona a few years ago.It's clever as hell...The Dodge Ram comes out of the pouch and the ram horns are:
a bottle opener;
a can opener;
a screwdriver;
a small,sharp blade;
a metal punch; and once,a corkscrew.
It's opened a million Beck's.
TSA attendants get apopleplectic when they see it,so I leave it at home when I fly.

When NASCAR comes to NY,everybody in NYC will have one.

Yep, the SAK or bottleopener is handy to have. I miss the corkscrew on my current one (it is a slim one) but there are few corked beers, or places that serve wine that do not have an opener.....

Anywho, we are sorta off topic with that. Suffice to say that most cheap beers, whether made or priced, have the twisties. I still do not know why there is that delineation though.

Maybe someone else knows why....

Marksix
May 10th, 2006, 05:20 AM
At Last - a meaningful and useful post in the forum!

American mass market beer IMHO represents all that is evil, bad, culturally threatening, a danger to world peace and the major threat to civilisation and the tourism from UK to US at the very least. In a British pub the mass market swill passed off as beer in the US would be called "Evian"; at best that mass market, bland, tasteless coloured water might be served to children. And why does it have to be so cold? Pop it in a micro wave for a few minutes before serving!

Stella Artois, sponsor of big tennis tournaments is an everyday beer in Europe but in the UK it was branded as an upmarket beer with a seriously up rip off market price, it seems they are trying the same trick in the US. In reality, beers are just a brand and are brewed locally according to local tastes or in American case, tastelessness!

In Belgium there are beers for every time of the day, breakfast beers, mid morning beers, lunch time beers, afternoon beers, dinner beers, getting off your face beers, last chance of the night beer goggle beers so if America can put a man on the moon, why can't they make a decent mass market beer?

There was a big court case here not long ago between Budweiser and the original Czech Budweiser who emerged from behind the iron curtain; same label but totally different beer. The Czechs won. It can be done.

Seriously - this is a topic very close to my heart. Less on military budgets and more on real beer. Sort it out.

Mines a pint of Cain's :¬)

hic.

Hof
May 10th, 2006, 12:53 PM
Maybe this will become as popular as the pizza thread...

I love beer,mostly because it's all I can tolerate in mass quantities and still manouever in a somewhat human manner.Wine burns me with it's sharp acid-reflux afterlife and it quickly doubles my vision,and hard stuff makes me stupid then comatose in rapid succession.

Beer is my default and,due to real-life economic restrictions,must sometimes be purchased on the cheap.My favorite tavern,"BEER" has 7-8 brews on tap (more than half are the undrinkable "Lite" variety),each for $2.50/pint,(a tiny pint,a Pilsner glass)and one draught import--Heineken's--for 3 bucks.Anything else is Bud.Or Corona,which is an exotic drink in "BEER",like a Pina Colada would be at McDonald's.

I have begged them to bring in Stella Artois.After the bartender stops laughing,he'll explain how nobody among the Regulars would bother with it,and besides,he'd piss off his distributor by doing business with another distributor.Is the Mafia into beer?Again?

I run hefty tabs for my brew of choice--Beck's,in the bottle,which they stock just for me,I think--but on ocassion the $4.50/bottle that "BEER" greedily gets from me for a Beck's becomes more than my common sense can bear,and Bud becomes default.
Gak,what a difference.

My friends are mostly low-end beer consumers,having swill like Old Milwaukee or Miller Lite on hand,and if I bring along a 6 pack of Beck's when I visit,they always make jokes about my socio-economic status and my snooty taste in beer as they look out the window to see if I parked my new Bently on my diploma from the London School of Economics.How can I tell them I actively doubt their taste when I'm eating their free cheeseburgers?
So I drink Lite beer on ocassion.It's true.

Ninjahedge
May 10th, 2006, 01:30 PM
Hof, try making your own.

If you have the room, it would probably be the best thing you could do. If your friends think that Becks is high brow, they are definitely not into beer at all. They are into getting drunk.. ;)

Microbrewing on your own takes a bit to get used to, but once you know how to do it, and you know what you like, you can change things slightly to cater to your taste, and all for MUCH cheaper than what you can get even Pabst for.

My only suggestion to you, if you are looking for something different, would be to start looking into the ales. Stay toward the lighter ales first. Pete's, Samuel Addams and Saranac have some good ales to try. There is also the good old British Budweiser (or so I have heard) called Bass.

They are all a little more bitter than a pislner (well, most of them are) but some are richer, some sweeter, some even lightly nutty. They go great with pizza, and even better with steak! Hell, salt and vinegar chips are a good stand-by if that is all you have around! (Actually, I love that combo...).

So don't worry about what your friends say about your beer. Get what you want to drink and leave it at that.

If you want to test your friends, take a look around the liquor stores for a stuff called "barleywine" ale. It is a style, so there are several people that make it. Some beers out there have a rather high alcohol %. Barleywine being the highest at about 10%-15%. To give you an idea of what that means, Bud is about 3.2%. IOW, the alcohol in one Brooklyn Breweries Monster Ale (11.2%) is the same as 3½ buds.

All the liquor stores in my area have caught onto this and have upped their prices almost in accordance with the AC%, but in FL, you may not have that problem. Just look for the content % on the bottle.

One warning though, these stronger beers are usually a little heavier or stronger than the others. As such, you may find one you LOVE, but you are equally as likely to find one you HATE. Look around, and ask us if you want to know a little about what these beers might taste like. We could, at least, tell you where to go if we do not know.. ;)

GL on your "beer expansion" mission!

Hof
May 10th, 2006, 02:36 PM
...in a big blue garbage can in my laundry room.The beer announced it's desire to stop fermenting when the barrel blew off it's top,despite it's being dragooned by endless strips of duct tape.For awhile,until I had to wash it down,that space became my official fermentation room.
Despite the disaster,my homebrew actually had a pretty good taste,but it was mostly gross.

Whenever I travel,I seek out home town microbreweries.I've found some good brewhouses in Denver,Atlanta,Tampa,Charlotte,etc.(I live in The South).My own little adopted town has TWO microbreweries.
There's one,across from Union Station in DC,that was carved from an ornate old Post Office,and they have about a dozen good,fresh beers available.They make it in full view of the bar in huge copper casks that perch overhead in the vaulted ceilings,and the coils snake from above directly to the tap.I can't remember the name.Maybe Capitol Brew House...???DC Brewery...???Worth a visit if you're in DC.

I grew up with good beers around me.I'm 1/2 German,two generations away from using umlats,and I'm 1/2 Irish.Both families drank European beers;I remember a lot of Ales,but it was mostly Pilsner at our house.
An Uncle drank warm Guiness,which would induce vomiting if I ever dared sneak a drink when no one was looking.At a very young age,I remember going to Oktoberfechs and places called "Hofbrau Haus" or "Liederkranz Club" with the family,and St Pat's Day was always a holiday.

When I came of drinking age,I started with ales,bitter and dark.Rochester,where I spent my youth,had a good supply of local breweries,so I began my Life with Beer drinking Standard Dry Ale,a heavy,dark Germanish brew,which greatly pleased my Father.
I hung out at a place called California Brewhouse,which boasted the most eclectic selection of beers in Town,and I sampled their inventory from A to Z.
When I was broke,I'd buy a 99-cent 6-pack of Genesee--Rochester Water--or Schaefer's,the one beer to have when you're having more than one,which is ALWAYS the reason to buy a 6-pack...

I was fatally corrupted in college,when money was tight and beer came in kegs.Frat parties were ALWAYS Budweiser parties,so Bud,and later Coors (...I know...)became MY brand.
Only in my more mature and affluent years have I let go and adapted a particular import beer as my persona,and that is Beck's,and it arrived at after years of clueless experimentation.I've tried them all,but Beck's owns me.

I actually gained my fondness for the stuff over the bars of New York City.I was there on a visit in the late '90s and Beck's was everywhere and cheap,so I consumed a lot in the City and went home a different man.NY does that to me...Prior to my St Paul-like conversion,I had only sampled Beck's.After I left the City,I forsake Coors and continued to drink Beck's,right up to a couple minutes ago...

sqwrell
May 31st, 2006, 11:36 AM
My question is if their is any live jazz aorund "8 E 69 street. Between Madison & 5th" -- because I will be in that area w/ a few free hours Friday night.

Whats the closet jazz club to that location???

thanks!

kliq6
May 31st, 2006, 12:03 PM
Session 73 is great, 73 and first ave

sqwrell
May 31st, 2006, 12:29 PM
Session 73 is great, 73 and first ave


thanks !!!!

sqwrell
May 31st, 2006, 12:34 PM
Session 73 is great, 73 and first ave


Just researched this and it does not seem to be a jazz club - which is where I am better suited to hang out in

Schadenfrau
May 31st, 2006, 04:56 PM
Session 73 is a jazz club, and those are few and far between on the Upper East Side. You'll probably have to travel to find exactly what you want.

sqwrell
May 31st, 2006, 05:10 PM
Session 73 is a jazz club, and those are few and far between on the Upper East Side. You'll probably have to travel to find exactly what you want.


Thanks. From looking at the web site it seems to have hip hop and funk and little jazz http://www.session73.com/

http://www.iridiumjazzclub.com seems better and is only over 1 mile away.

Session 73 looks like a great place to eat anyway

many thanks for your time

ablarc
May 31st, 2006, 05:26 PM
[Iridium] seems better and is only over 1 mile away.
You picked the right one, but don't forget to take along a little money.

Schadenfrau
May 31st, 2006, 05:47 PM
Iridium is on the other side of the park, though.

Ninjahedge
June 1st, 2006, 09:44 AM
Go to the village

milleniumcab
June 3rd, 2006, 12:25 PM
iridium has moved to W 53rd and Broadway... used to be on W 63rd and Columbus...

ablarc
June 3rd, 2006, 12:36 PM
iridium has moved to W 53rd and Broadway... used to be on W 63rd and Columbus...
Did that a while back. 2001, I believe.

And I think it's 51st Street, isn't it?

milleniumcab
June 3rd, 2006, 09:38 PM
Yes ablarc, it has been a while since they moved and you are probably right, it might very well be 51st Street...

Dalmatino
June 4th, 2006, 12:06 PM
Im coming to NYC in august and my location will be upper east side on manhattan.
So for now i know that upper east side is elite part of manhattan (corect me if i wrong ) .
I will like to know what are the best places in manhattan like discoteques an clubs to go and have good time , im not looking for expensive elite places , just normal modern places for young people to go and drink with 21 y with any problems.
I f u have some links or know some of the great cool places i will be so thankfool...

Schadenfrau
June 4th, 2006, 12:33 PM
If you're over 21 and under 65, you probably won't find too much interesting nightlife on the Upper East Side. The Meatpacking District would probably be a good bet.

What sort of music/scene are you into?

Dalmatino
June 4th, 2006, 01:01 PM
Where is that meatpacking district ?

Im ussualy into alternative scene i like the underground alternative clubs , and love allso hip-hop , rap , and that kind of stuff , but is not strange to me to go in some disco/clubs just for meet chicks :D

And im just turn on 21 y...

ablarc
June 4th, 2006, 01:17 PM
Head west towards the Hudson on 14th Street. When you get to 9th Avenue, you’re in the middle of it.

http://newyork.citysearch.com/roundup/40220

http://newyork.citysearch.com/roundup/39770/newyork/upper_east_side_nightlife.html

LeCom
June 4th, 2006, 01:18 PM
Just a heads up - Club Happy Valley sucks.

MidtownGuy
June 4th, 2006, 02:16 PM
Meatpacking district is an interesting spectacle, but mostly a lot of trust fund posers and celebrity wannabes whose idea of a good time is rude doormen and overpriced bottle service, without much diversity (90% White,and they're all style clones of each other.)

Check out the Lower East Side, East Village, Williamsburg, etc. for more down-to-earth or even underground flavor, and real people whose idea of a good time isn't looking down their noses at someone whose wearing last season's Prada.

Dalmatino
June 4th, 2006, 04:20 PM
Check out the Lower East Side, East Village, Williamsburg, etc. for more down-to-earth or even underground flavor, and real people whose idea of a good time isn't looking down their noses at someone whose wearing last season's Prada.[/quote]


Yeah thats what i talking about , can u recomend some underground clubs to visit ?;)

Schadenfrau
June 5th, 2006, 11:36 AM
Are you talking about clubs or bars? There's a big difference between the two.

All of the neighborhoods mentioned are great for bars, but clubs, not so much.

Dalmatino
June 5th, 2006, 05:55 PM
I like the bouth , but i love clubs the moust !!
Bars and pubs are just for warming up hehe :D

andyschest
June 5th, 2006, 06:19 PM
Anyone got an opinion on whether it's worth seeing Les Paul on a Monday? It's about twice the cost of other nights but I suppose it could be worth it to see a legend. Is he still good?

kurokevin
June 5th, 2006, 06:32 PM
Now I like to bash the Stripped-Button-Up-Shirts and Jeans guys as the next (99.9% of Meatpacking on Thur-Sat), but you can still find an amazingly diverse and exciting nightlife in the Meatpacking Sun-Thur(!!!!!!!!!!). Like all neighborhoods in Manhattan, the worst of Jersey invades killing the city on weekends. It can be quite a strugle during this time trying to find a group of people who do not own an SUV or came aboard a "Party Van". I recomened Mon-Thur in any neighborhood to find a colorful selection of the local scene. For instance, Cielo holds a Monday night party called Deep Space which draws partiers from all neighborhoods creating an interesting and unique atmospher with AMAZING music

Now this post may seem like a Bridge and Tunnel rant, but man oh man, are the stereotypes true. Those people just try way too damn hard while putting in zero effort (if that makes any sense). Of course there are exceptions.

Dalmatino
June 6th, 2006, 03:45 PM
So its better on working days from mon-thu to go see da klubs and night places then a weekend hehe thats like so strange to me , but i will see whats going on , on weekends when i come to NYC but defenetley i gonna check out clubs in meatpacking districs ;)

Schadenfrau
June 6th, 2006, 04:15 PM
I agree that nightlife is best Sunday-Wednesday. The out-of-towners take over Thursday-Saturday.

MidtownGuy
June 6th, 2006, 04:33 PM
For instance, Cielo holds a Monday night party called Deep Space

I've heard a lot about the Cielo party, I'll have to check it out!

Dalmatino
June 8th, 2006, 04:46 AM
I've heard a lot about the Cielo party, I'll have to check it out!



Is that Cielo a club or ??
If it is is there a link behind :D

krulltime
June 8th, 2006, 09:03 AM
^ Here is a good website about clubs and stuff...

http://www.velvetlist.com/

David
June 27th, 2006, 02:21 PM
We'll be staying about the Central Park area. Are there any bars nearby that will be showing it? Failing that, do you think the hotel channels will show it? ESPN, I think it's on?

Schadenfrau
June 27th, 2006, 02:32 PM
East side or west side?

ETA: Central Park runs from 59th to 110th Street, so it would help if you could narrow it down.

lofter1
June 27th, 2006, 07:14 PM
About 3:30 this afternoon it seemed that every other storefront in the Village (bars, shops, restaurants, delis -- everywhere) had a TV on showing the Spain / France match.

It should be no trouble finding a place to watch just about anywhere in Manhattan.

caspian915
July 24th, 2006, 04:22 PM
Anyone have suggestions for good/best places to buy beer in any of the boroughs (though a pref for Manhattan and Queens). Qualifiers = selection (this is key), price (important, but obviously it varies), and location (least important). Places with 6 packs, 12 packs, cases, kegs, etc.

In addition, where some of the best places to go to find new, interesting, odd, etc beer varieties? I swear I remember an episode of Law & Order that involved a bar that had a banana beer on tap. I also remember a friend of grad school who grew up here telling me about a place that had "beers" tha were 15% or more (something like that). Stuff like that and an interesting mix of US micro and imported beers. Places with good prices are obviously always nice.

Thanks.

Ninjahedge
July 24th, 2006, 06:07 PM
The place he was talking about was probably the Blind Tiger.

try www.blindtigeralehouse.com

They are not in buisness now, but they have two "sister" bars that are close to the same type of crowd. BT will re-open soon though.

BTW, beers that have high contents like that are usually called "barleywines" and can range anywhere from malty-sweet to some of the bitterest stuff on earth.

You want a smattering? Go over to the Peculiar Pub. It is bretty much a NYU hangout though, so although it has "100s of beers" about 50 or 60 of them are "Insert name here" Light.

Oh, one other place people have reccomended is the Beergarden in, I think, Astoria.


Hope this helps!

As for $$, just go to NJ. It is WAY to $$ in NYC.

shocka
July 24th, 2006, 06:32 PM
I like Hop Devil Grill on St Marks and Ave A. they have the best selection I have encountered in Manhattan This place can get pricey.. but for the best beer selection you will have to pay at a bar.

Astoria Beer garden isnt the place to go if selection if what u are looking for. But its fun none the less. (29th st and 24th Ave) A pitcher of Hoegardden will run you $14 here.. its about 3 glasses.

There is also a croxley's ale on 28th and ave b. I have never been to this location but been to both of the long island locations.

I also suggest making the trip to the Brooklyn Brewery in williamsburg.. you will get to try some of the brews u can not find that easily in the market.. and u might be able to pick up a free beer or 2. Plus you can always pick up a cse of their beer....like the good ole monster ale.

hope this helps...

Schadenfrau
July 24th, 2006, 08:57 PM
Ugh, I was not a fan of the sausage party known as The Blind Tiger.

DBA has a great beer selection, and is friendly to both women and the gays:

http://newyorkmetro.com/listings/bar/dba/

lofter1
July 24th, 2006, 10:19 PM
It's not retail but Zum Schneider on Avenue C at E. 7th St. has good Bavarian beer and (very tasty Bavarian food, too) ...

RATE_BEER (http://www.ratebeer.com/Place/new-york/new-york/zum-schneider/123.htm)

Zum Schneider

"...a welcome respite from the claustrophobic Sturm und Drang
of so many East Village booze parlors."

http://www.zumschneider.com/index.htm (http://www.zumschneider.com/index.htm)

107 Avenue C
New York, New York 10009
(212) 598-1098


[map] (http://www.mapquest.com/maps/map.adp?country=USA&address=107+Avenue+C&city=New+York&state=New+York&zipcode=10009)

lofter1
July 24th, 2006, 10:22 PM
New Beer Distributors (http://www.ratebeer.com/Places/ShowPlace.asp?PlaceID=1253) (Manhattan) -

RateBeer (http://www.ratebeer.com/Places/ShowTour.asp?TourID=14)'s #5 Best U.S. Beer Store for 2006.

The largest selection and lowest prices. Lower East Side - essentially 2nd Ave, three blocks south of 1st St.

New Beer Distributors
167 Chrystie St.
New York, New York 10002 [map] (http://www.mapquest.com/maps/map.adp?country=USA&address=167+Chrystie+St.&city=New+York&state=New+York&zipcode=10002)
(212) 473-8757

ryan
July 25th, 2006, 01:39 AM
Mugs Alehouse (http://www.mugsalehouse.com/) in Williamsburg has variety on tap.

GowanusGuy
July 25th, 2006, 05:14 PM
My local store, Thrifty Beverage Center in Cobble Hill, is probably the best beer retailer in the city. They also sell kegs.

256 Court Street
Brooklyn, NY 11231
(718) 875-0226

some reviews:
http://www.yelp.com/biz/8fQKT4wS-PxdKjhY1sI9Iw

"As a Brit who is quite partial to some English ale this was my most exciting discovery after moving to the neighbourhood. Best selection of imported beer I've found anywhere in the US. Domestic beer selection is great too and some available in jug and keg. I think I cleaned them out of the finest English ale (Black Sheep bitter), but I'm hoping my request to get some more in didn't fall on deaf ears..."

"If you love beer and you know it, get yourself on over to Thrifty's. If you don't live in the neighborhood, you'll need a car, or call a service, because you're going to want to stock up on not just the imports, but also all the fabulously-priced domestic beers on the shelf here. Plus, they have tons of great non-alcoholic drinks that you can't really find anywhere else. Like Fizz. I love that stuff. And tons of Canadian beer, although I can never find Sleeman's or Warthog. If someone knows how to get their hands on some of that stuff down here, let me know. I miss the Honey Brown Ale."

TranspoMan
July 25th, 2006, 10:11 PM
If you really want to try some obscure beers, go to Spuyten Duyvil in Brooklyn. It's located at 359 Metropolitan Avenue near the Lorimer Avenue station on the L train.

Ninjahedge
July 26th, 2006, 08:52 AM
Ugh, I was not a fan of the sausage party known as The Blind Tiger.

Did you go on a weekday? ;)

I usually went on Cheese Wednesday. I heard that it got rather packed on the weekends though.



DBA has a great beer selection, and is friendly to both women and the gays:

http://newyorkmetro.com/listings/bar/dba/

Um.... somehow I do not think "friendliness to girls and gays" was one of the criteria....

I, for one, go looking for a bar with great beer and good prices (as well as nice atmosphere). What the heck does the rainbow room have to do with beer selection? :confused:


But, back on topic. There is one more place for some good German beer and food. Lorely's down near the Bowrey Ballroom. (Two blocks down, on the left south of Houston, halfway between Bowrey and the small strip-park).

I would also recommend Brooklyn Brewery too, but ONLY if you are a beer fan. There is not much else there it has to offer (besides T-shirts! ;) )

Ninjahedge
July 26th, 2006, 08:54 AM
PS Shade, the place you linked to DOES sound nice (beer wise)


Profile

There's a long-running debate as to whether the name stands for "doing business as," "don't bother asking" or "drink better ale." We'll argue for the latter: d.b.a. boasts more than 150 varieties of beer, from hand-pulled ales and seasonal boutique microbrews to fruit-infused lambics. One hundred thirty single-malt Scotches and more than sixty tequilas round out the list. In summer, a giant, covered back patio does a convincing impression of a Bavarian beer garden—and creates breathing room. After work and on weekends, the crush of khaki can be unbearable, as can the wait for attention from the leather-clad ladies behind the bar.
— Jenifer Van Vleck

lofter1
July 30th, 2006, 11:42 AM
Good news for all on these hot summer days ...

New Law Allows Earlier Beer Sales On Sundays

NY1 (http://www.ny1.com/ny1/content/index.jsp?stid=1&aid=61406)
July 30, 2006

A new state law is in effect Sunday that allows stores to start selling beer at 8 a.m., instead of waiting until noon.

The old rule was part of the state's so-called blue laws.

Lawmakers say the change will make it easier for those who are traveling, among others.

Before 2003 stores couldn't sell liquor on Sundays at all.



Copyright © 2006 NY1 News.

CaliFemme
August 9th, 2006, 06:51 PM
Hi there,

Heading to NY and will be staying in Murray Hill 'round Sept. Looking for a good bar/pub with a Cheers like atmosphere in the Murray Hill/Midtown area for the 30-40 crowd. Read about some of the pubs in Murray Hill being heavily laden with young college grads, not interested in that. Just looking for a good place to go and have a drink or two after a long day of sightseeing. Thanks!

Schadenfrau
August 9th, 2006, 10:56 PM
You're not likely to find a "Cheers" aesthetic anywhere outside of syndication, but I love the Cabin Club at Pinetree Lodge:

http://newyork.citysearch.com/profile/7120947/

CaliFemme
August 10th, 2006, 07:30 PM
You're not likely to find a "Cheers" aesthetic anywhere outside of syndication, but I love the Cabin Club at Pinetree Lodge:

Ha, yes. Well, you know what I meant. Someplace not too overcrowded and ultra hip where the drinks cost more than the food. I will check this one out, thanks.

shocka
August 16th, 2006, 09:27 AM
The hairy monk on 25th and 3rd . its a personal fav!

GINGER
August 24th, 2006, 02:21 PM
When we were over in February McHales had just closed it's doors for the last time,also word was that Kevin StJames bar in Hells kitchen was to be levelled!
Has there been any movement on either building,has any work started yet???What are they to be replaced with?
Thanks in anticipation.
Ginger.

lofter1
August 24th, 2006, 02:55 PM
McHales is now a hole in the ground.

St. James is still there, but a tower is planned for that block.

Info starting HERE (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showpost.php?p=110420&postcount=76)

bigkdc
September 15th, 2006, 11:52 PM
Downtown Manhattan is slowly losing its biggest and best sports bars. Busters Garage is fighting the good fight down in Tribeca but it is not looking good. It is currently closed and its most recent plan to reopen got shot down by CB1.

I just heard that Steve Hanson is taking over the lease at Park Avenue Country Club and is opening yet another big, wildly successful restaurant (most likely a steak house). While the restaurant may be a welcome addition to that neighborhood, PACC has become one of the mainstay sports bars downtown.

With PACC and Busters gone (and Hudson sports grill a few years back), what is left? I know of a bunch of small bars with TVs but there don't seem to be any big, good sports bars left downtown. My sense is that they can make money if the lease is right so I don't get it.

Anyone know of any hidden gems? Obviously there is ESPNZone and the stuff on the upper east or upper west but I don't know if anything decent downtown other than The Tonic which is enormous but has seating for about 20 people.

tonton
September 16th, 2006, 03:32 PM
Nevada Smith is great for a staple soccer bar.

http://ontheinside.info/?p=16

bigkdc
September 18th, 2006, 08:33 AM
Nevada smith's is great for soccer but doesn't seem to get too into it for college and pro football. The Tonic on 29th and 3rd may end up being the new place to go. Everything else downtown is really small.

NYatKNIGHT
September 18th, 2006, 02:50 PM
I like Paris Tavern on South St. and Peck Slip to watch sports. It's not a "sports bar", but they have all the games on, and usually a fun, mixed crowd.

ZippyTheChimp
September 18th, 2006, 02:57 PM
.http://img189.imageshack.us/img189/9723/frontst123oj.th.jpg (http://img189.imageshack.us/my.php?image=frontst123oj.jpg)

Ninjahedge
September 18th, 2006, 03:08 PM
And look!

There is an apartment for rent! You could get a place right upstairs!!! You could think of it as your living room!!!

;)

As for Sports bars in general, I think they are being relegated to the suburbs. Hoboken has tried, but most of the places that have people who wnat to watch anything are too small to have enough screens, and the others try to cater to different crowds.

I just do not know if there is THAT much of a devoted sports crowd that would be worth the rent AND the upkeep (they are one of the most destructive clientelle out there).

GL finding one though! I always liked the less commercial establishments for watching these things. Much more homey.

ZippyTheChimp
September 18th, 2006, 03:16 PM
Any bar can be a "sports bar" with enough screens.

Little place on Chambers near W Broadway called Mudville is pretty good for Sunday football.

Has anyone been to Jeremy's Ale House since they moved up Front St?

http://img189.imageshack.us/img189/2463/frontst101tb.th.jpg (http://img189.imageshack.us/my.php?image=frontst101tb.jpg)

Looks a little upscale from the old truck garage. Wonder if they still serve beer in giant styrofoam cups, and if there are bras and ties hanging from the ceiling.

NYatKNIGHT
September 18th, 2006, 04:56 PM
Yes^ Jeremy's brought the bras and styrofoam with them when they moved. Still good for a cheap bender.

Ninjahedge
October 27th, 2006, 05:02 PM
Hells Kitchen/PA area. Anyone know a good beer bar around there?

Collins is nice with a nice selection, but it is a tiny little hovel with very little seating room. Also, unless you are a popcorn fiend, there is nothing to eat (DUH! it is a bar!!!)

Anyone have any other suggestions for that area?

Schadenfrau
October 27th, 2006, 05:29 PM
Rudy's!

http://www.yelp.com/biz/4nohlTsGHEDdpwYkRTt-fA

Ninjahedge
October 27th, 2006, 05:36 PM
Heh. I know that piggy!!!!!!

shocka
October 30th, 2006, 01:03 PM
I have always been a fan of scruffy duffys.

http://www.scruffyduffys.com/


House of Brews is pretty good as well.

Ninjahedge
October 30th, 2006, 01:15 PM
Went to Rudys.

Definitely defines the term "dive". Nice place though.

Free dogs and relatively cheap beer (decent selection too).

Thanks for the tip Schade!

poppet69
November 26th, 2006, 01:41 PM
Going to New York on the 28th December till the 2nd january and wanted ask the lovely people of New york are there any bars that we can enter with the kids ?? also does anybody know if you can drink in the bar of the Westin Time Square which is where we are staying ???
be great if anybody can help ??

Stuart

lofter1
November 26th, 2006, 06:54 PM
If you're booked at the Westin I suggest contacting them and finding out about their policy -- and what alternatives you might have.

Generally in booze-only bars minors below 16 years (I believe) are not allowed.

Schadenfrau
November 26th, 2006, 07:29 PM
I think there's maybe one bar in Brooklyn that welcomes children, but you'll find that most places here frown upon that.

Cornus
November 26th, 2006, 08:32 PM
http://www.talkinbroadway.com/eopinions/detail.php?id=44

Check this thread for some opinions about this restaurant located near where you're staying. It's not only for pizza! If we want a quick lunch or dinner we often stop in here.

plado37
December 8th, 2006, 08:41 PM
Im new to the city. I was curious as to why the high end clubs only let certain people in. I was denied from one place and let into 2 others the same night... How do they get lists, and where do you get on the list. So my question is... How come they take some people and reject others, even when its not full?

gradvmedusa
December 9th, 2006, 06:56 AM
Im new to the city. I was curious as to why the high end clubs only let certain people in. I was denied from one place and let into 2 others the same night... How do they get lists, and where do you get on the list. So my question is... How come they take some people and reject others, even when its not full?
Are you an (very)attractive female or a (very)rich male? If not that is your answer.

ironmike9110
December 10th, 2006, 01:58 PM
Are you an (very)attractive female or a (very)rich male? If not that is your answer.

what about an attractive male??? (very ;) )

Punzie
December 10th, 2006, 02:06 PM
what about an attractive male??? (very ;) )

Any upscale place in Chelsea and the West Village will let you in.;)

lofter1
December 10th, 2006, 03:02 PM
what about an attractive male??? (very ;) )

you should let the forumers here be the judge of that ;)

ironmike9110
December 10th, 2006, 03:16 PM
Any upscale place in Chelsea and the West Village will let you in.;)

lol

shocka
December 10th, 2006, 05:12 PM
Im new to the city. I was curious as to why the high end clubs only let certain people in. I was denied from one place and let into 2 others the same night... How do they get lists, and where do you get on the list. So my question is... How come they take some people and reject others, even when its not full?


A lot of clubs like to hold lines when it is empty to give a perception that the club is really good inside. Also these "high end" clubs try to taylor to the rich.
Here are some tips:
Get in line next to some females, become friends with them in line, from my experience women usually dont mind helping guys get in.
Do not travel in a large group of guys, usually 3 is max.
Dont argue with the bouncer its a waste of time, instead try to be friendly to them and they might let you in.
This one might seem extreme but it has worked for me on occations, try to grab a limo to the club, in many cases, when you step out of a limo the bouncers get the perception you are extremely weathy and will let you in. But the ride will only cost like $5/per.

Unfortunatly, money talks in this city. If all of this are not your style, then go elsewhere there are hundreds of places u can go have a great time, spend less and get treated better. Just because a club seems high-end it does not mean its good.

plado37
December 10th, 2006, 05:36 PM
Yeah. I am good looking and I do dress well. I was only denied from one place and found it kind of strange. However I was flying solo that night.

ThisIsntMyRealName
December 11th, 2006, 11:58 PM
Just out of curiousity, what clubs did you try? What was the clientelle like?

chal7ds
December 13th, 2006, 08:15 PM
Hey ya'll,

I live in Pennsylvania right now as a bartender, but I am wanting to get moved up to NY, but only if I can find the right situation. the bars I've worked in before out in California were great, some had punk rock themed bars (where the jukebox/DJ would play punk music) and most of the crowds that came in were goths and punks. Most of these bars were out in Long Beach.

Anyways, my question is..I'm not familiar with NY yet at all..and I want to get a bartending job up there, but I don't want to work in like a Hilton or an Irish Pub or high class restaurant type bar, I want to work in a grungy goth club or punk rock themed bar or pub. Soooooooooo..does anyone who is familiar with New York know of any of these type of places I can check out? Names would help! That way I can look them up, maybe do some walk-ins...

Any suggestions I would much appreciate..thx

chalu7ds

OmegaNYC
December 14th, 2006, 02:18 PM
The only place I can think of is this:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/d/da/CBGB_club_facade.jpg/350px-CBGB_club_facade.jpg


And they're closed.

chal7ds
December 14th, 2006, 02:22 PM
yeah, i thought of CBGB's actually..lol..but then..ya... :(

man, it's sad that a city as big as New York doesn't have any more bars or clubs open of this type

OmegaNYC
December 14th, 2006, 02:31 PM
NYC still does have punk and goth style clubs. You just gotta look around. :)

chal7ds
December 14th, 2006, 03:30 PM
that's the whole reason i posted though, is because i have no idea where to start looking. like i said, it's a big city, so i need somewhere to start from such as a district or area these type of places might be. if i take a train from where i live in PA, it's gonna take 4 hours just to get to Penn station, and then from there who knows how many hours it will take just to find a place by walking around out of the blue (needle in a haystack) or just asking people. It'd be better if i knew exactly where to go so i don't waste a whole day/evening not finding anything, wasting travel $ etc etc

so does anyone know of specific places or areas where they might be? the more specific, the better! :)

mgp
December 14th, 2006, 04:19 PM
There is a great punk bar called 7B, which is predictably located at 7th and Avenue B. It has a very good jukebox that is mainly punk/hardcore.

Here, I just looked it up, I guess it is called "Horseshoe Bar." I had no idea that was the real name...

http://nymag.com/listings/bar/horseshoe_bar/

chal7ds
December 14th, 2006, 04:36 PM
sweet. cool..cool...any more that anyone else knows of, hit up the thread! thx mgp

oh, also..if anyone knows any in upper Jersey..around the Hoboken area too..hit me back thx

pacz
December 14th, 2006, 05:24 PM
You can do a bar search by category here:

http://www.sheckys.com/newyorkcity/nightlife/

mgp
December 14th, 2006, 05:53 PM
Chal7ds - Sorry, I named the first bar that came to mind and then lost my train of thought. There are dozens upon dozens of bars that fit your description. If I were you, I would focus on the East Village / Lower East Side (or Williamsburg). I don't know anything about northern Jersey...

plado37
December 14th, 2006, 08:28 PM
Mars Bar, its the gungiest place that I have been to. However its a good time every once in a while. Sign up for Sheckys (sheckys.com) and you can do all kinds of searches. Search for Goth or Punk bars by keyword. That should help you out. All the best

raycanales
December 19th, 2006, 08:54 PM
anyone recommend a good Irish or plain old Whiskey Bar in the Manhattan Area .. that plays good old Irish Music or Rock N Roll ..
thanks

Emma06
December 20th, 2006, 06:03 AM
Ok, so Im a student and I'm not yet 21 but I still want to be able to go to bars in New York. It doesn't bother me that I won't be able to drink in them because I'm not over 21. But does anyone know of any of the bars that will allow you in if you're over 18 but you can't drink...

I don't want to arrive there and have to spend forever looking for these places and I'd like to have a rough idea of what I'm looking for and where.

Thanks to whoever can help!

:)

Gunslinger
December 20th, 2006, 12:41 PM
Blarney Stone & Blarney Rock
Both near Empire State Building - Think 32nd & Broadway - City Search will have more details.

Both play decent music, have a few TVs for the ardent sports fan and seem friendly enough

Front_Porch
December 20th, 2006, 01:13 PM
Olunneys in Times Square is big, but actually run by O'Lunneys . . . good for a group.

Ninjahedge
December 20th, 2006, 01:44 PM
All depends on what you are looking for.

You can try places like newyork.citysearch.com if you want. You may be able to get a few more ideas.

BTW, "blarney" is very common here. You may be able to find things easier by loaction than name!!! ;)

I just looked, Blind Tiger is still trying to get their license. Damn NIMBYs!!!!!

shocka
December 20th, 2006, 01:53 PM
Hairy Monk on 25th and 3rd.

Lolita88
December 20th, 2006, 03:53 PM
Plz let me know if you find anything. I should be moving in August and Ill be 19. I dont care about drinking I just wanna PARTY! lol

shocka
December 20th, 2006, 08:10 PM
Are places like Exit, Webster Hall and such still around, thats where I use to go when I was under 21. Also people in college use to throw alot of parties so there was always something going on.

Also I remember seeing on Citysearch.com having a 18+ category.

Lolita88
December 20th, 2006, 09:15 PM
Thanks I'll see how I deal. Im pretty sure I'll find a way. :p

raycanales
December 21st, 2006, 01:17 AM
I am looking for a good Irish Bar in Manhattan that plays Rock and some Irish Jams .. serves plenty of Irish Whisky been in love with that Whisky for a few years now

will be in NYC mid January

actually I like good old Rock N Roll Dives as long as the music is good and the drinks are flowing ..

;)

EtherealMist
December 22nd, 2006, 01:20 PM
Theres the Playwright near Times Square and Ulysses' near Hanover square in Lower Manhattan if you want nicer Irish bars. There are so many around the city you can probably find one you'll like by just walking around. Heres a link with a pretty thorough list:

http://www.murphguide.com/irish.htm

Punzie
December 23rd, 2006, 08:02 AM
I am looking for a good Irish Bar in Manhattan that plays Rock and some Irish Jams .. serves plenty of Irish Whisky been in love with that Whisky for a few years now

will be in NYC mid January


In 2007, Saint Patrick's Day falls on a Saturday. Come to New York on the 16th and spend the weekend here. Go to the Saint Patrick's Day parade in Manhattan. All other times, roam around from one bar/club to the other -- most of them will be playing Irish music, some live. It will seem as if all of New York is Irish. You'll have a terrific time.

haloperi
February 4th, 2007, 06:12 AM
i know you all would just love to see my pics but unfortunatly i dont have a scanner :( :D
People still use that excuse?
Lol, just kidding :P

lofter1
February 4th, 2007, 09:56 AM
ELEVATOR PLUNGE KILLS CLUBGOER

http://www.nypost.com/seven/02042007/img/front020407.jpg

PARTIER KNOCKED INTO SHAFT IN FIGHT WITH STAFFER

nypost.com (http://www.nypost.com/seven/02042007/news/regionalnews/elevator_plunge_kills_clubgoer_regionalnews_erika_ martinez_________john_mazor_and__________lukas_i__ alpert.htm)
By ERIKA MARTINEZ, JOHN MAZOR and LUKAS I. ALPERT

February 4, 2007 -- A Bronx man celebrating his birthday plunged five floors to his death down an elevator shaft yesterday at the swanky Chelsea nightclub BED, after being knocked through the door by a club employee he fought with, police said.

The rumble between Orlando Valle, 35, and a club floor manager erupted at around 4 a.m. near the coat-check counter of the sixth-floor club on West 27th Street.

It ended with Valle crashing through the nearby elevator door and landing on the top of the elevator car five floors below, police said.

Early this morning club worker Granville Adams, 43, of Clinton Street in The Bronx was charged with criminally negligent homicide for his role in the incident.

http://www.nypost.com/seven/02042007/photos/news005c.jpg (http://javascript<b></b>:SLIDES.hotlink())
A cop examines the elevator shaft
where the tragedy occurred.

The trouble started when Valle's underage friend - identified by sources as Tiffany Turner, 20 - got into an argument with a coat-check girl.

When the floor manager stepped in, Valle got involved and the confrontation became physical with punches were exchanged, police said.

As the two sparred, Valle, of Soundview, was knocked into the closed elevator door so hard that the bottom edge slipped off its runner and swung inward, sending him plummeting to his death, officials said.

http://www.nypost.com/seven/02042007/photos/news005a.jpg (http://javascript<b></b>:SLIDES.hotlink())
DEATH BED: Orlando Valle, with his son, Jordan.
Club worker Granville Adams was charged last night
with criminally negligent homicide in Valle's death.

Friends said Valle, a mailroom employee at the publishing company W.W. Norton & Co., was not violent and had just been trying to protect Turner.

"Orlando was trying to de-escalate things," said one of the 10 pals Valle had been celebrating with. "He was trying to get her to get her coat and go. The bouncer came and pushed her down."

How Turner got into the club - which has a strict 21-and-over policy and aggressively employs ID scanners - is not clear. A spokeswoman for BED did not return calls for comment.

A sobbing Turner declined to comment as she left the police station house yesterday afternoon.

BED, best known for accommodating its patrons on actual beds and was once featured on an episode of "Sex and the City," has been a trouble spot in the neighborhood, according to the local community board.

"BED is a problem for us," said John Weis, the board's business and licensing committee co-chairman.

A spokesman for the State Liquor Authority did not return calls for comment.

A spokeswoman for the Department of Buildings said the elevator had been cited for six violations dating back to 1989, but none of them were serious.

Valle's death left his son, Jordan, 13, devastated. "He was my best friend. He was everything in my life," the boy said.

Valle's father, Felipe, 57, said his son did not get into fights and had just been out to have a good time.

"He is not the type to get into altercations. He's a gentle guy," he said. "He didn't believe in the abuse of women. It was not what he was taught. Stepping in was the gentlemanly thing to do."

Last year, Valle was shot in the neck in his neighborhood, and he was arrested in 2004 for drug possession, the sources said.

Additional reporting by Georgett Roberts, Angela Montefinise, Elizabeth Wolff, Douglas Montero and Melissa Jane Kronfeld

Copyright 2007 NYP Holdings, Inc.

IrishGal
March 7th, 2007, 08:49 AM
Hi,

I'm going to New York for 3 nights on St Patricks weekend and I was hoping to get some reccomendations for nightclubs for the saturday/sunday night. I've been doing some researching for the best clubs but what I seem to get is the 'VIP' clubs like Marquee, Pink Elephant, etc but is it really feasible (assuming you even get in the door) to enjoy yourself in a club like this for under $200? I just want a nice place where I can dance late into the night and enjoy some drinks. Can anyone advise me for/against these clubs or recommend any others?? I'm staying around East 51st, lexington ave. but I really dont mind jumping in a cab and travelling down quite a bit.

Thanks in advance for any help!

NoyokA
March 7th, 2007, 01:43 PM
Hi,

I'm going to New York for 3 nights on St Patricks weekend and I was hoping to get some reccomendations for nightclubs for the saturday/sunday night. I've been doing some researching for the best clubs but what I seem to get is the 'VIP' clubs like Marquee, Pink Elephant, etc but is it really feasible (assuming you even get in the door) to enjoy yourself in a club like this for under $200? I just want a nice place where I can dance late into the night and enjoy some drinks. Can anyone advise me for/against these clubs or recommend any others?? I'm staying around East 51st, lexington ave. but I really dont mind jumping in a cab and travelling down quite a bit.

Thanks in advance for any help!


My advice for St. Patty's Day is go to a bar/club that isn't usually very popular. On St. Patty's everybody in the entire city and the surrounding area is out, as well as people on spring break, so the hot clubs are going have a long wait, and there is no need because even the crummiest dive is going to be wall to wall people and its going to be a good time. Last year I actually partied at local bars in your area, not known for its night life and had a great time, just go bar-hopping close to home on 2nd avenue.

IrishGal
March 8th, 2007, 03:40 AM
Thanks! So there is nowhere in particular that you would recommend? I guess I'll prob end up what I do in Galway on Paddy's Day - stick my head in the door and see if the craziness is to my liking! I'm terrible for planning things and usually just wing it but with such little time in NY I've been attempting to plan a little!

Schadenfrau
March 8th, 2007, 11:18 AM
Clubs here tend to be more popular with out-of-towners. You're more likely to find locals at bars, where dancing isn't usually part of the scene.

IrishGal
March 8th, 2007, 11:41 AM
I noticed when I was looking up that most places don't involve dancing but it's gonna be a belated birthday celebration for me so I have to go dancing. :) I'd prefer to go sober and dance than get drunk and not! I'm hoping for somewhere in between on both fronts which is why I'm specifically looking for a good club as I know a lot of bars dont do the dancing thing! I'm very prepared for a jammed venue and the queuing as I’d have to put up with it here anyway!

MidtownGuy
March 8th, 2007, 02:03 PM
There is an underground dance scene in NYC, going back decades to the era of "the Loft"(legendary dance club), which is very different from the well-known and commercial clubs. There most certainly IS a dance scene among locals here, how can it be otherwise in a city full of cultures that love to dance (Black, Latino, Asian, etc.)

Reflected in statements by some other posters, most of the well known commercial clubs have a crowd that's very mainstream, where alcohol consumption is the main activity and whatever dancing takes place is of the stumbling side-to-side variety. This is the scene with which most New Yorkers are familiar, the poo-poo-la-la clubs that have bottle service and people who don't dance because of hang ups. Not very inspiring to adventurous souls who truly love to dance.

Ah, but there is a different scene that happens at late hours behind unmarked doors. The underground dance scene is quite different from its mainstream counterpart. You will see a crowd of very diverse backgrounds
where alcohol is not the focus, but rather the MUSIC and letting one's body release all inhibitions on the dance floor. This is the kind of club where people do not dress up, but rather put on comfortable clothes and dancing shoes and prepare to sweat away the hours on a wood floor. It is the continuance of New York's legendary dance heritage. New York City is where House Music was born, so yes we have dance clubs. You just have to
ask New Yorkers whose lives include a love of dance. If you'd like more
info please PM me, I've been dancing for years here, and although the scene has taken a beating through the Giuliani years (who targeted clubs where people of color frequented, or just people who didn't fit the crusty mold he approved of), it still survives. And what does survive, has more soul than any city I have ever visited.
These pictures are from my favorite Saturday night party, though technically it's Sunday morning since it starts at 4:00am. It's in lower Manhattan. I did not take these pictures, thet are from a club website that I'll give you if you PM me.
you know, it's underground...;)
http://farm1.static.flickr.com/152/414808442_d67fa1aa98.jpg

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/152/414808444_d89e640597.jpg

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/177/414808445_1094e6661e.jpg

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/159/414808447_02c3f553a3.jpg

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/175/414808448_02371ad6bc.jpg

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/150/414808449_1382e00b39.jpg

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/180/414809850_2858d773ac.jpg

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/152/414809863_c049a77873.jpg

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/175/414809868_28c27f1017.jpg

MidtownGuy
March 8th, 2007, 02:04 PM
http://farm1.static.flickr.com/180/414809869_a1a25d89a9.jpg

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/173/414809878_7c9f070ab4.jpg

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/176/414809886_3bade0f7ae.jpg

MidtownGuy
March 8th, 2007, 05:22 PM
IrishGal,
I forgot to tell ya- there's no queue:)

metalextasy88
April 2nd, 2007, 07:25 PM
Hey im looking for bars or clubs that either dont ID or just really easy to get into. Any NYU or Fordham Kids on this forum that know?

Thanks

NoyokA
April 2nd, 2007, 09:16 PM
You do realize that this is a popular website and that also the NYPD is cracking down on underage drinking as of late. If you find out a place through this method, it wont be serving underage drinkers for long, so what's the point? If you want to find a place that doesn't ID, you need to do your own leg work, ask around.

conezone
April 2nd, 2007, 09:36 PM
Is it too hard to walk up to a bar and if they card you act like you forgot your ID?

NoyokA
April 2nd, 2007, 09:39 PM
Is it too hard to walk up to a bar and if they card you act like you forgot your ID?

You can do that, but act with confidence. If they ask for your ID, act surprised. If you're looking for bars that serve NYU or Fordham Kids your best bet is to find them and to ask them.

Punzie
April 2nd, 2007, 11:15 PM
Stupid, stupid 21-y.o. drinking age!

You're old enough to die in Iraq...
... but you're not old enough to drink in the U.S.!

I got to drink when I was 18...
... and so did the very legislators who foist the 21-y.o. age on young people!

http://i71.photobucket.com/albums/i130/Rapunzel61/Black-Cats/blackcatsing.jpg

718Bound
April 3rd, 2007, 12:01 AM
You know that reminds me of when I got an underage drinking ticket once. My mom was bitching at me for it... I said "well if your generation had not f ucked it up for us I would have been drinking legally and would not have to pay this $50 ticket." After that I thought I probably should not have said that and was bracing to get bitched at hardcore.... Nope nothing... Infact my mom seemed ok with me going out drinking before I turned 21... I could actually tell her.:eek: Who would have thought!?!

Anyway be careful if you do! I am not going to tell you not drink underage or go the bar underage because I did. I could tell you it is a bad idea ID to have a fake ID... but I had one:( ... I was lucky though. If you have someones ID that looks like in the State of NY you can face some pretty serious consequences.

I don't know about NYC but I have been in many bars in Upstate NY that have been raided. To get out of the bar you get in a line by the door show a cop your ID you can go... everyone who is left gets a ticket before they leave. Then you get a few geniuses who end up in the back of cop cars because they are dumb enough to give their fake ID to the cops thinking they can get away with it, or someone is dumb enough to think him and his beer muscles can fight 20 cops.:confused: If you think you can get away as the come in think again. The New York State Police have Troopers inside the bar in their 20's who look like bar patrons dancing, sitting at the bar, drinking (atleast looking like they are drinking) then one goes up flashes a badge and tells te DJ to shut off the music and as the lights come on you see about 20 cops pull out badges like it is CSI: drunk.:cool:

Ninjahedge
April 3rd, 2007, 09:13 AM
1. It is just not worth it. It is only beer. There are plenty of parties you can go to (private) that will allow you to get stupid drunk and embarrass yourself.

2. Rap, relax. The main reason for the drinking age was driving. Hell, there are some municipalities thinking of raising the DRIVING age because of the amount of accidents with young drivers (Either because of peer pressure, lack of experience, or distraction. Hell, hormones have a lot to do with it too!). Don't start with the "They can go to war but they can't drink." spiel.

3. Asking around at a well known site for things like this is just plain stupid. You do not go to AVSforum to ask about cable decoders or "back of the van" electronics, you do not come here to ask about fake ID's or underage drinking spots. Why? As was mentioned, cops have computers too.

Duh!


So just relax. Drinking for the sake of getting drunk is just not worth it. You either drink crap beer or a fruit smoothy that hides the taste of what you are injesting. You may even have shots of stuff that tastes like crap or cough medicine all for the same result, so that ugly chick/dude over there does not look as ugly. ;)

On that note.....

NewYorkDragon
April 3rd, 2007, 02:40 PM
Ninja hit it spot-on,...but I just want to point out that even at my old job, you couldn't get away with forgetting your ID. I don't see how it could be done at a bar.

I used to work at a theme park and you had to have your employee ID with you at the check-in point. Somebody I know forgot it just once, had her uniform on and all -- and still wasn't let in.

So; I'd be hard-pressed to find this happen at a bar. A kid here was arrested about a month ago just for using a fake ID. I say don't do it.

Not worth what could happen -- this is N.Y. we're talking about here.

metalextasy88
April 6th, 2007, 04:50 AM
its so easy for you guys to say, "hey! dont drink or go to bars till your 21", when all of you can easily walk down to any local bar to get a beer and meet some people. All i want is place to hit up when i am back from college, it gets very boring at times when you cant find a place to chill at. And i think that dude hit it straight on, if I can get sent to Iraq or vote for the president how the hell is it okay for the man to tell me I cant have a drink?

Thanks for the help

Ninjahedge
April 6th, 2007, 08:59 AM
its so easy for you guys to say, "hey! dont drink or go to bars till your 21", when all of you can easily walk down to any local bar to get a beer and meet some people.

What world are you living in?

Gee, I never went to college! I never was denied access to a bar because I did not have any ID.

Come on man! You have to realize that with some things, time does not change them.

Drinking has always been there, and this has been a topic since before I was born. Doesn't matter the age, people will always be asking to do something that they are not allowed to do.


All i want is place to hit up when i am back from college, it gets very boring at times when you cant find a place to chill at.

Then find a coffee house man! Geez, WTH do you need to get roaring drunk on the 3 months you have at home? You have enough $$ to be able to drop it on $5 Manhattan drinks? Bars here are EXPENSIVE man! Hell, when I first moved to Hoboken I could easily drop $40-$50 a night.


And i think that dude hit it straight on, if I can get sent to Iraq or vote for the president how the hell is it okay for the man to tell me I cant have a drink?

Yep. Damn strait. he three have nothing to so with each other. You can also operate a lawn tractor at 12, leave your family at 16, or get lower car insurance at 35. There are ages for everything, but somehow holding drinking as a right is a little weird.

The main reason drinking from 18-21 was established was because of the number of drunk driving incidents in that age group. Not saying that people older than that still do the same. But going to parties in college, you see a MAJOR difference in the maturity and mindset of the drinkers there in just a few years.

Not everyone changes that much, but enough to make it so that raising the limit saved lives.


Thanks for the help

Like I said, relax. We can't really give you any direct help here. And if you can't get a case of good stuff and have a bottle or two while watching TV or X-Boxing, then that probably means your family is not exactly in favor of you going out and drinking.

You will have plenty of time to blow your stash on booze in a few years. Don't think you are missing anything big by not being able to do it RIGHT NOW!!!!! NOW NOW NOW!!!!

I know it sucks to feel like you are excluded from something, but that something is not as great as everyone wants you to believe.

VinnyTheMick
April 6th, 2007, 04:30 PM
You don't have any college friends in the city that throw parties?

ZippyTheChimp
April 6th, 2007, 08:21 PM
I could understand the I can get sent to Iraq but can't have a drink argument if there was a draft.

Bojangleman
April 6th, 2007, 11:13 PM
Eh, it's be best for you (the topic creator) to buy a fake.

NoyokA
April 7th, 2007, 10:17 PM
Eh, it's be best for you (the topic creator) to buy a fake.

As long as the creator doesn't start a thread asking where to buy fakes. As Ninjahedge already mentioned law enforcement might check this site, it usually comes near the top of google searches, and WNY doesn't need to be in the middle for the recent crackdown on underage drinking. This is also in your own best interest, once the fake ID places and bars that serve underage drinkers get shut down, you'll have no place. Just ask around, also dives usually arent in the buisness of asking for ID's, unless ofcourse you look the part.

pianoman11686
April 7th, 2007, 11:32 PM
2. Rap, relax. The main reason for the drinking age was driving. Hell, there are some municipalities thinking of raising the DRIVING age because of the amount of accidents with young drivers (Either because of peer pressure, lack of experience, or distraction. Hell, hormones have a lot to do with it too!). Don't start with the "They can go to war but they can't drink." spiel.

[...]

Yep. Damn strait. he three have nothing to so with each other. You can also operate a lawn tractor at 12, leave your family at 16, or get lower car insurance at 35. There are ages for everything, but somehow holding drinking as a right is a little weird.

Can't agree with you there, Ninja. Give me one other example where a rather basic right is withheld older than the age of 18. (Anything not enforced by the government, like renting a car, doesn't count.) It is absolutely ridiculous, that we can be allowed to buy cigarettes for three years legally before we can start drinking. The former is a lot more hazardous to our health and the health of those around us.


The main reason drinking from 18-21 was established was because of the number of drunk driving incidents in that age group. Not saying that people older than that still do the same. But going to parties in college, you see a MAJOR difference in the maturity and mindset of the drinkers there in just a few years.

Not buying that argument. The law's passage was a misguided attempt to redirect federal funding for highways through the Federal Highway Traffic and Safety Administration, whose bureaucratic failures I don't even want to begin talking about.

Fact: the U.S. has always had much higher rates of traffic accidents and fatalities than other 1st world nations. This includes the time since the law was passed.

Fact: the U.S., with its legal limit of 21, joins other countries like the UAE, Egpyt, and Bahrain - all notorious for restricting individual freedoms.

Fact: since the passage of the law, college drinking (especially binge), has been on the rise. Psychological logic argues that if you make something like drinking illegal, it also makes it more desirable a law to break.

Fact: passage of the law has led to unknowingly more costs in enforcement, and encourages even more illegal behavior, such as faking identification.

Finally, there's the simple fact that 18-21 year-olds just don't have nearly as high a rate of car ownership as older people. Using the law as an excuse to substantially reduce traffic accidents just doesn't make much practical sense.

Alonzo-ny
April 10th, 2007, 06:13 PM
Theres probably a thread for this but anyway,

I was in the city at christmas having just turned 21, however, being from scotland where there is a bar on every second step you take i was suprised how hard it is to find bars in the city. Over here you seem to stumble upon bars at every turn but me and my buddys couldnt seem to find anything. Where exactly are the good bar areas and i dont mean really expensive "hot" bars but just good bars/lounges with a good crowd and some nice ladies.

NoyokA
April 10th, 2007, 07:09 PM
Theres probably a thread for this but anyway,

I was in the city at christmas having just turned 21, however, being from scotland where there is a bar on every second step you take i was suprised how hard it is to find bars in the city. Over here you seem to stumble upon bars at every turn but me and my buddys couldnt seem to find anything. Where exactly are the good bar areas and i dont mean really expensive "hot" bars but just good bars/lounges with a good crowd and some nice ladies.


2nd Avenue 96th Street to Houston Street.

Fahzee
April 10th, 2007, 07:10 PM
there's a fun stretch of bars on Amsterdam btwn 86th & 80th

Schadenfrau
April 11th, 2007, 12:00 AM
What sort of crowd/ladies are you looking for?

It's a general question, but narrowing it down by musical taste might be a good place to start. We've clearly got a wide range of opinions here at Wired NY.

Capn_Birdseye
April 11th, 2007, 05:07 AM
Anyone got any views on the Back Room, a speak-easy sort of bar?

Alonzo-ny
April 11th, 2007, 05:15 AM
What sort of crowd/ladies are you looking for?

It's a general question, but narrowing it down by musical taste might be a good place to start. We've clearly got a wide range of opinions here at Wired NY.

I like almost all music so it will be easier to say what i dont like, im not into extreme music like death metal, not into reggaeton or country music but pretty much everything else id be cool with, its kinda hard to pin down a prefered music type, kinda crowd is where id meet alot of interesting people from all walks of life. I like a student crowd at the moment and you could say id like a crowd of people who used to be students but are now in professional life but are still cool interesting people!! and easy going

Ninjahedge
April 11th, 2007, 09:12 AM
The areas around NYU and Columbia would be the best bet then.

I would suggest the villages and areas on either side of Houston street almost all along the island.

You can also do the 2nd avenue strip, and there are quite a few along Hudson/9th avenue as well once you start walking above Christopher street.

Bleeker is also filled with places, but not many dance halls.

Just bring your walking shoes and get out early and you can find dozens all within earshot of each other.

Alonzo-ny
April 11th, 2007, 09:43 AM
The areas around NYU and Columbia would be the best bet then.

I would suggest the villages and areas on either side of Houston street almost all along the island.

You can also do the 2nd avenue strip, and there are quite a few along Hudson/9th avenue as well once you start walking above Christopher street.

Bleeker is also filled with places, but not many dance halls.

Just bring your walking shoes and get out early and you can find dozens all within earshot of each other.

sounds great, now does anyone have any bars/lounges/clubs that are their favourite and consider to be that bit more special than the rest?

Xarius
April 15th, 2007, 04:50 PM
On Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays, don't even try, most bars ID in Manhattan and many even scan or can recognize fake IDs.
On other days or early (like Sundays afternoon for example), you should be fine in many places, but there has been a crackdown lately so bars pay more and more attention.
The easiest thing is just to buy your beer/liquor at a store and drink with your friends at home. Just remember to be responsible.

shocka
April 16th, 2007, 12:11 AM
its so easy for you guys to say, "hey! dont drink or go to bars till your 21", when all of you can easily walk down to any local bar to get a beer and meet some people. All i want is place to hit up when i am back from college, it gets very boring at times when you cant find a place to chill at. And i think that dude hit it straight on, if I can get sent to Iraq or vote for the president how the hell is it okay for the man to tell me I cant have a drink?

Thanks for the help

last i checked.. drinking WAS NOT THE ONLY WAY TO HAVE FUN IN NYC! Being in my 20s i have many friends who dont drink and love it here and go out everynight.

As for meeting people, there are also clubs which are 18+.

PaulG
May 14th, 2007, 08:04 PM
Don't have the intersections for all of these but here you go. I guess if you Google these you'll get the locations

Botanica (Houston and ?)

The Stoned Crow (West Village)

KGB (East Village)

Liquids (East Village near Avenue A)

The Pharmacy (14th Street between A and B)

Dempsey's (East Village, 2nd Avenue)

Some of these may be defunct now since I haven't been back to them in quite a while -- the Village-centeredness of the list shows I went to NYU, eh?

itsallgoode9
May 19th, 2007, 11:45 AM
Anyone got any views on the Back Room, a speak-easy sort of bar?

i've been there a handfull of times and generally enjoy it. Don't think it's a place you want to go to all the time though; I generally only go there when people from out of town are in or somthing. It is definitely a place to go if you want to show your out of town friends the "no sign, secret, new york bar place"

For me, it's a little bit too over-themed...which is why I wouldn't recommend it all the time. I stay away from the mixed drinks there, as they serve them in coffee cups that are filled with ice, so for 8 bucks you're lucky if you get 1/2 shot in the mix, ugh.

itsallgoode9
May 19th, 2007, 12:14 PM
places i've gone that I've liked...i'm 25 so these may be a different scene than you're in to, I dunno :

Double Happiness-hidden bar 173 Mott St

Happy Endings-hidden bar 302 Broome http://www.happyendinglounge.com/2005/

Libations-club-esque bar 137 Ludlow St.
couple floors, dancing, music good place for meeting girls/guys..$10 cover in lower east side, WTF!!

230 Fifth www.230-fifth.com-midtown (http://www.230-fifth.com-midtown), 230 fifth ave.
roof top bar in midtown GREAT view expensive drinks ($9 beers, mixed drinks are normal priced, $12 bucks and up) PRETTY people. I've only been after work and it gets PACKED. Don't know how it is at night. Probably empties out considering it's a midtown after work bar

Dove Bar 228 Thompson St- West Villiage nice chill bar...good little spot

Welcome To the Johnsons 123 Rivington Street Dive bar- CHEAP BEER $3 PBR Funny theme bar that is made to look like your grandmas house decorated from the 80's haha-indie/punk/hipster crowd. Smells badddd though. shower ya damn hipsters!!! I only hit this up once in a loooong while

Plunge (Gansvoort Hotel) 18 9th Ave (at 13th Street)-Meat Packing District-rooftop bar, great view of the river (this was the only meat packing place i've been too, proabably better places over there, but it was pretty cool if that area is your scene)

Paris Tavern http://www.theparistavern.com/home_1.html
South street Seaport 119 South Street (1 Block North of Pier 17) Stumbled onto this one a couple weeks ago when walking down to the seaport and LOVE it. Not a place to go for a night probably, but walk around the area during the day and stop in for a couple pints. it's a block down from the seaport so you don't get stuck with all the touristy crap.


that's all that sticks in my mind right now, other than these I generally hit up some random bars or wherever. I find it funny that you couldn't find a bar in Manhattan!!!!
http://newyork.citysearch.com/bestof/categories go to that link and check out the Nightlife section, you'll be able to find a bar for any taste

GINGER
May 20th, 2007, 08:14 AM
We enjoyed Kevin StJames bar,somewhere like 47th street and 8th avenue,near the Milford plaza hotel.

ablarc
May 20th, 2007, 11:39 AM
Paris Tavern http://www.theparistavern.com/home_1.html
South street Seaport 119 South Street (1 Block North of Pier 17) Stumbled onto this one a couple weeks ago when walking down to the seaport and LOVE it. Not a place to go for a night probably, but walk around the area during the day and stop in for a couple pints. it's a block down from the seaport so you don't get stuck with all the touristy crap.
I second this one. Found it by accident one evening; it had a raucous band, an eclectic clientele and plenty of good cheer. Well-hidden just around the corner from the Seaport tourists, but not frequented by those folks. Convenient if you're staying at the Seaport Inn. Not far from Gehry's big new project.

Atmospheric in a completely unselfconscious way.

ZippyTheChimp
May 20th, 2007, 11:57 AM
http://img189.imageshack.us/img189/9723/frontst123oj.th.jpg (http://img189.imageshack.us/my.php?image=frontst123oj.jpg)

User Name
May 20th, 2007, 03:26 PM
The Collins bar on 8th at 45th(?) Across the street and North of the Milford Plaza Hotel.

It seems sort of a relaxing spot, relatively tiny though.

MikeKruger
May 20th, 2007, 04:43 PM
I recently visited the Belgian Beer Garden for the first time, it's around West 4th but when I got there I was already tipsy and couldn't care less about location. As the name implies, they have a great selection of beers.:)

ablarc
May 20th, 2007, 05:11 PM
^ Do they have a garden?

Ninjahedge
May 21st, 2007, 09:22 AM
The Collins bar on 8th at 45th(?) Across the street and North of the Milford Plaza Hotel.

It seems sort of a relaxing spot, relatively tiny though.

Decent beer, free popcorn, good for small groups.

Not a non-beer friendly place though. (I like it, woman doesn't.)

Blind Tiger (Bleeker and Joned) is good. Great for beer, decent for light fare, small bar.

Kettle of Fish, behind the Duplex on Christopher and 7th. Kind of like the "finished basement" game room. Small, but decent tap selection. Dart boards, couches. Very friendly.

Loreley: http://www.loreleynyc.com/ great German spot. Decen German food, back outdoor atrium, good German Beer, a little $$ though.

2A, a place at the corner of 2nd and avenue A. very comfy little spot, get there early to get a couch upstairs.

MikeKruger
May 21st, 2007, 01:33 PM
^ Do they have a garden?


there is a small outdoor area past the entrance.
from my hazy memory of the place, the setup of rooms in this establishment is very random...

Francis OP
June 24th, 2007, 02:22 PM
HI,
I would to know the most famous bars/lounges and Clubs in manhattan (i need also the addresses).
thanks a lot!!

MidtownGuy
June 24th, 2007, 04:05 PM
My gosh, this is impossibly general! Do you know there are literally thousands of bars/lounges and clubs, to suit many different tastes. Perhaps if you told us the type of vibe you're going after, the type of music, something more to go on.
By the way, in New York the most "famous" clubs are certainly not the "best". By the time they're famous, they're either closed down or eclipsed by some other new spot that does it better. Here, famous means "played out".

Alonzo-ny
June 25th, 2007, 07:45 AM
My other thread got me thinking.

Which bar is good for specialist beers, particularly my fav Zyweic?

Which bar is good for specialist whisky?

Which bar might show Glasgow Rangers football (soccer) games?

ablarc
June 25th, 2007, 07:56 AM
^ What about evergreen classics? Used to be the Rainbow Lounge. Carlyle?

Blue Note, if you like jazz.

(For fogeys, I guess.)

kliq6
June 25th, 2007, 10:16 AM
Cant really answer that as it depends on your likes and interests

jersey_guy
June 25th, 2007, 02:22 PM
Zywiec is a Polish beer, so check out any bar in Greenpoint - it should be there.

As far as the Rangers are concerned, Nevada Smith's on 3rd Ave is by far the best soccer bar in the city, if not in the entire Northeast. They post their schedule of televised games online:
http://www.grahamecurtis.com/nevadasmiths/main.html

Punzie
June 25th, 2007, 03:33 PM
Alonzo, are you asking for bars that just have specialized drink types, or also for bars that have specialized themes? ('Beach' and 'Hawaii' come to mind right this sec.:))

tdp
June 25th, 2007, 04:13 PM
Break it down into categories then;

Best Jazz club?
Best Rock club?
Indie?
Blues?

I for one would like to know where I can find some decent "Americana" in NYC...

...and what about places to just chill after a long day tramping the streets of Manhattan??
Somewhere with a bit more character than a hotel bar, without music drowning out any attempts at conversation...

Punzie
June 25th, 2007, 05:00 PM
Nightclubs: Most Famous, Infamous? (Like 'old Studio 54'?) (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=12476)

Alonzo-ny
June 26th, 2007, 03:52 AM
Hmmm hawaii sounds nice but i meant specialised drinks, once thats taken care of ill go pretty much anywhere!

718Bound
June 26th, 2007, 10:54 AM
*

NYatKNIGHT
June 27th, 2007, 10:30 AM
You've come upon a new sticky thread for bars and clubs. I've merged many past threads with good advice that have been forgotten. Not that everyone will start reading every page, but hopefully this might help streamline our discussion of NYC nightlife. Related questions and discussions will be funneled here, and suggestions are appreciated. Cheers!

Punzie
June 27th, 2007, 02:49 PM
NY@K, I'm so glad that you decided to go through with this idea of yours. More people will get more use out this thread than you will ever know.:cool:

ZippyTheChimp
June 28th, 2007, 07:03 AM
http://nymag.com/nightlife/barbuzz/11025/

It's More Fun on a Roof

The city's rooftop bars provide plenty of options for tippling on top of the world: ostentatious luxury, hidden budget gems atop, and the first "adult rooftop."

By Daniel Maurer , Carla Spartos & Lauren Fonda

SIGHT LINES

Plunge (http://nymag.com/listings/bar/plunge_at_the_hotel_gansevoort/)

http://nymag.com/nightlife/barbuzz/plunge070604_560.jpg

Hotel Gansevoort, 18 Ninth Ave., at 13th St.; 877-426-7386
Those willing to weather the line outside and suffer the cramped elevator ride consider the Gansevoort Hotel's fifteenth-floor penthouse an airy (and cruisy) escape; those who believe untucked dress shirts are an aesthetic affront consider it the inner ring of meatpacking hell.
The View: Great shots of lower Manhattan and New Jersey, whence many of the patrons come.
The Menu: Basic cocktails start at $14.
The Hours: Daily, 11 a.m.–4 .a.m.

230 Fifth (http://nymag.com/listings/bar/230-fifth/)

http://nymag.com/nightlife/barbuzz/230fifth_198.jpg

230 Fifth Ave., nr. 27th St., twentieth fl.; 212-725-4300
Fresh air meets stale pick-up lines at the city's largest rooftop drinkery. Since it opened last year, a steady stream of finance types have flocked here for the Miami Vice-like decor of palm trees, stuffed safari animals, and an endless expanse of wooden benches.
The View: The Empire State Building to the north, the MetLife building to the east, and Jersey to the west.
The Menu: $15 cocktails incorporate fresh grape and pear juices; bar snacks range from fried shrimp to the Malaysian Romli Burger.
The Hours: ; Daily, 4 p.m.–4 a.m.


Bookmarks (http://nymag.com/listings/bar/bookmarks/)

http://nymag.com/nightlife/barbuzz/bookmarks_198.jpg

Library Hotel, 299 Madison Ave., at 41st St.; 212-983-4500
With its brick walls, lovely floral displays, and abundance of reading material, the terrace of the Library Hotel's rooftop bar could pass for the patio of an Upper East Side townhouse.
The View: The majestic Lefcourt building rises across the street.
The Menu: Elegant concoctions like the $12 Chambord Royale, which artfully blends Stoli Vanilla, Chambord, and fresh grapefruit juice.
The Hours: Mon.–Sat., 4 p.m.–midnight; Sun., closed


Hotel Metro Rooftop Bar (http://nymag.com/listings/bar/hotel_metro_rooftop_bar/)

http://nymag.com/nightlife/barbuzz/hotelmetro_198.jpg

Hotel Metro, 45 W. 35th St., nr. Fifth Ave.; 212-279-3535
When it reopens in late June, this favorite after-work spot, for better or worse, won't be as shabby as it once was. For the first time servers will deliver specialty cocktails from the bar, now fully stocked and located in the middle of a newly tiled floor.
The View: A close-up of the Empire State Building.
The Menu: $5 cans of Bud or $6 bottles of Corona ($3, 5:30 p.m.–7:30 p.m.)
The Hours: When it opens again, closing time may be extended to 11 p.m.


Hudson Sky Terrace (http://nymag.com/listings/bar/sky_terrace/)

http://nymag.com/nightlife/barbuzz/husdonsky_198.jpg

The Hudson Hotel, 356 W. 58th St., Ninth Ave..; 212-554-6303
Should the techno and chatter of the Hudson Bar's terrace get to you, pretend you're a hotel guest and grab a beach chair (or a hammock!) on the breezy and beyond-serene 15th floor deck.
The View: Glimpses of the Hudson River as well as Ninth Avenue stretching toward lower Manhattan.
The Menu: The $15 Maracuya Martini is made with raspberries and passion fruit puree; the Yuki Mizu gets its spicy kick from wasabi-infused vodka and ginger puree.
The Hours: Daily, 10 a.m.–10 p.m. through October


Mé Bar (http://nymag.com/listings/bar/me_bar/)

http://nymag.com/nightlife/barbuzz/mebar_198.jpg

17 W. 32nd St., nr. Fifth Ave.; fourteenth fl.; 212-290-2460
This Koreatown rooftop boîte, hidden atop the La Quinta budget hotel, is the antidote to karaoke-room claustrophobia. Although throw pillows and beach chairs lend a beach-house vibe, the drink prices are decidedly left of Hamptons.
The View: The Empire State Building is all aglow directly overhead.
The Menu: Be swayed by the pomegranate martini, made with liqueur and cranberry juice. During the 5:30 p.m.–8 p.m. happy hour, a $1 discount means $4–$5 beers and $5–$8 wines.
The Hours: Daily, 5:30 p.m.–midnight.


Roof Garden Cafe (http://nymag.com/listings/bar/iris-and-b-gerald-cantor-roof-garden/)

http://nymag.com/nightlife/barbuzz/roofgardencafe_198.jpg

The Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Roof Garden, Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1000 Fifth Ave., at 82nd St.; 212-535-7710
So...if that Andy Goldsworthy sculpture could speak, what do you think it would say? We'll let you puzzle that out, up on the romantic rooftop of the Met, where art, hot Italian tourists, frozen daiquiris, and colossal Central Park views converge into one juggernaut of a drinking experience. If you can't manage a pickup line in a place like this, well, then, you're hopeless.
The View: A fifth-floor garden surrounded by the park, its skyline, and sculpture installations that change every summer.
The Menu: Sparkling wine and ham-and-brie baguettes.
The Hours: Fri.–Sat., 10 a.m.–8:30 p.m.; Tues.–Thurs. and Sun., 10 a.m.–4:30 p.m.; Mon, closed, open May–October


Pen-Top Bar and Terrace (http://nymag.com/listings/bar/pen_top_bar_and_terrace/)

The Peninsula Hotel, 700 Fifth Ave., at 55th St.; 212-903-3097
Though the patrons can be stuffy (some of them seem to confuse the Pen-Top for the Penn Club) the views from two terraces and a smoking balcony abutting a glassed-in bar certainly aren't.
The View: Stunning vistas of Fifth Avenue and Central Park, as well as midtown architectural gems like the Citicorp Center.
The Menu: $20 apple martinis and the $80 Jewel in a Glass (Louis Roederer Cristal and Dolce Far Niente) keep out the riffraff.
The Hours: Sun., 3 p.m.–10 p.m.; Fri.–Sat., 4 p.m.–1 a.m.; Mon.–Thurs., 4 p.m.–midnight through September 30

ZippyTheChimp
June 28th, 2007, 07:35 AM
BOOZY AND CRUISY

The Delancey (http://nymag.com/listings/bar/delancey/)

http://nymag.com/listings/bar/mainthedelancey.jpg

168 Delancey St., at Clinton St.; 212-254-9920
Once again the Lower East Side's standby rock club and goth hangout puts on a happy face by opening its roof deck for, among other things, $5 all-you-can-eat barbecues on Tuesdays from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Grab a burger and sit next to a central fountain surrounded by benches and foliage.
The View: A clear shot of the Williamsburg Bridge.
The Menu: The margarita machine churns out frozen blends for $8 apiece. Meanwhile, bottled beer and well drinks run a reasonable $6.
The Hours: Daily, 5 p.m.–4 a.m.


Private Roof Club and Garden at Gramercy Park Hotel

http://nymag.com/nightlife/barbuzz/gramercyhotel_198.jpg

Gramercy Park Hotel; 2 Lexington Ave., at 21st St.; 212-920-3300
Like the downstairs Rose Bar, the indoor space takes its cues from a Renaissance palace; add to that an outdoor space that resembles a tropical greenhouse and you have one of the most coveted members-only hangouts in the city.
The View: A Blade Runner–inspired light installation and paintings by Andy Warhol and designer Damien Hirst are as alluring as the panorama of Manhattan.
The Menu: Cocktails from the downstairs bar and room-service items such as caviar and croque monsieurs.
The Hours: Daily, 6:30 a.m.–midnight.


A60 (http://nymag.com/listings/bar/a60/)

http://nymag.com/nightlife/barbuzz/a60_90.jpg

60 Thompson, 60 Thompson St., nr. Broome St.; 877-431-0400
This hangout favored the Varvatos set happens to be less exclusive than it seems. Haven't received your membership card this year? Try telling the doorman that it got lost in the mail.
The View: The thirteenth-floor terrace showcases the skylines of midtown and lower Manhattan.
The Menu: Mixed drinks with fresh exotic fruits run $10–$14 while the spicy Thai hors d'oeuvre are similarly priced at $12–$16.
The Hours: Daily, 5 p.m.–midnight through Labor Day


Cabana at the Maritime Hotel (http://nymag.com/listings/bar/cabana_at_the_maritime_hotel/)

http://nymag.com/nightlife/barbuzz/cabana_1132.jpg

Maritime Hotel, 363 W. 16th St., nr. Ninth Ave.; 212-242-4300
Heat lamps keep Amy Sacco's airy eatery open year-round, but it's best visited in the summer, when jet setters in from L.A. come here to pretend they never left.
The View: Sean Penn, Sam Rockwell, and the sisters Hilton have been sighted in the past.
The Menu: No more frozen mojito, but cool off with a bottle of sake or a martini with fresh lychee juice ($12).
The Hours: Tue.–Wed., 7 p.m.–1 a.m.; Thurs.–Sat., 9 p.m.–3 a.m.; Sun.–Mon., closed.


The Rooftop at Patroon (http://nymag.com/listings/restaurant/patroon/)

http://nymag.com/nightlife/barbuzz/patroon070604_198.jpg

160 E. 46th St., nr. Third Ave.; 212-883-7373
With its paper lanterns, grill station, and awning-clad bar, it'd be easy to mistake this i-banker go-to for a Hamptons patio if not for the view.
The View: Buildings rising above the 3rd-floor terrace remind drinkers they have to get back to the office to finish those P&Ls.
The Menu: Flame-grilled sliders can be paired with $14 martinis like the gibson (made with house-pickled onions instead of olives).
The Hours: Daily, noon-midnight.


Rare View (http://nymag.com/listings/bar/rare_view/)

http://nymag.com/nightlife/barbuzz/rareview_198.jpg

Shelburne Murray Hill, 303 Lexington Ave., at 37th St.; 212-481-1999
The Murray Hill summer staple above hamburger joint Rare has doubled in size, meaning there are now ten bed-style loungers, including (take note, birthday revelers) five of them in a VIP area that's obscured by bamboo trees.
The View: A sixteenth-floor bar with outstanding midtown views, including the Chrysler Building
The Menu: $15 mango margaritas and blood-orange cosmos.
The Hours: Mon.–Sat., 4:30 p.m.–11 p.m.; Sun., closed.


Jade Terrace (http://nymag.com/listings/bar/jade_terrace/)

http://nymag.com/nightlife/barbuzz/jadeterrace_198.jpg

China Club, 268 W. 47th St., nr. Eighth Ave.; 212-398-3800
Off the packed and sweaty dance floor, an Asian-themed terrace offers a serene palm-frond oasis. Unlike the other rooftops on this list, the Jade Terrace is primarily a dance club, so if you're looking to avoid cover charges, beefy bouncers, and a hey-baby vibe, go elsewhere.
The View: A walled-in fourth-floor terrace results in neck-craning to see the Times Square towers.
The Menu: Summer drinks ($9 to $15) include mojitos, a white sangria made with champagne instead of wine, and a cocktail incorporating mango vodka and lemon and lime juices.
The Hours: Mon. and Thurs. to Sat, 10 p.m.–4 a.m.; Sun. and Tues., closed.


Larry Flynt's Hustler Club (http://nymag.com/listings/bar/larry-flynts-hustler-club/)

641 W. 51st St., at Twelfth Ave.; 212-247-2460
The vision of the West Side Highway from the new "adult rooftop" wouldn't inspire anyone to propose to his girlfriend, but that's just fine for the cigar puffers who aren't thinking of marriage when they're staring at the busty barmaid.
The View: Banker wankers killing bills on silicone sisters.
Menu: The Hustler hasn't served food for a while, so make do with a beer or cocktail.
The Hours: Mon-Fri ($20 cover), 6 p.m.–4 a.m.; Sat ($25), 8 p.m.–4 a.m.; Sun (free), 8 p.m.–2 a.m.


Tonic East (http://nymag.com/listings/bar/Tonic-East/)

411 Third Ave., at 29th St.; 212-683-7090
If you can make it past the throngs of Stern Schoolers, up three flights of stairs and beyond the bouncer, you'll be rewarded by a rooftop scene that's slightly less of a crush than the top-40 fueled maelstrom downstairs.
The View: The Empire State Building and a bunch of Murray Hill condos.
Menu: Four types of steak, Szechuan spaghetti, tofu burgers, fried ice cream, and just about every imaginable variety of pub grub your heart desires.
The Hours: Daily, 11 a.m.-11 p.m.

ZippyTheChimp
June 28th, 2007, 07:50 AM
LAID BACK


Local West (http://nymag.com/listings/bar/local-west/)

http://nymag.com/nightlife/barbuzz/localwest_560.jpg

1 Penn Pl., Eighth Ave. at 33rd St.; 212-629-7070
Okay, so not much is exhilarating about the rooftop of a one-story building, but those looking to unwind before their train back to the burbs could do worse than snagging a seat at the smattering of tables or at the elevated patio bar atop this casual beer bar near Penn Station.
The View: Chat up the folks on the upper decks of the tour buses that constantly roll by.
Menu: Sliders, nachos, chicken tenders: You get the idea. Pomegranate martini, $10; beers, $8.
The Hours: Daily, 11 a.m.–2 a.m.


Bar 13 (http://nymag.com/listings/bar/13/)

http://nymag.com/nightlife/barbuzz/bar13_198.jpg

35 E. 13th St., at University Pl.; 212-979-6677
NYU students who couldn't make it to Florida for spring break (and downtowners too lazy to travel for a rooftop) seek solace at this campus clubhouse. Amid the palms and illuminated panels, revelers can pretend they're in South Beach—and of legal drinking age.
The View: Opaque screens surrounding the deck mean the only place to look is up.
The Menu: Well drinks are $6, while the 13-ini, the bar's signature Absolute Mandarin–based beverage, costs $7.
The Hours: Mon., 7 p.m.–midnight; Tues., 6 p.m.–3 a.m.; Wed.–Fri., 5 p.m.–4 a.m.; Sat., 9 p.m.–4 a.m.; Sun., 10 p.m.–4 a.m.


The Park (http://nymag.com/listings/restaurant/park01/)

118 Tenth Ave., nr. 17th St.; 212-352-3313
Time has passed since scads of A-list celebs and Vice-toting debs flocked to these kooky environs, but the multi-area greenhouse-cum-funhouse still makes for a transporting experience, especially during Fridays and Saturdays after 11 p.m., when the penthouse hot tubs are open to the public.
The View: Eye candy compensates for a lackluster third-floor-level take on West Chelsea.
The Menu: Nobody's here for the food: It's all about the sangria, $11 fresh-fruit cocktails such as the banana coolata (vanilla, Kalhua, fresh banana purée, and sweetened coconut milk) and mango and raspberry mojitos.
The Hours: Fri.–Sat., 11 p.m.–4 a.m,; Mon.–Thurs., Sun.–closed


The Heights Bar & Grill (http://nymag.com/listings/bar/heights_bar_and_grill/)

http://nymag.com/nightlife/barbuzz/heightsbar_198.jpg

2867 Broadway, nr. 111th St..; 212-866-7035
Students and locals flock to this second-story Morningside Heights bar that has a semi-retractable roof and AC for when it gets humid. You'll pay $6 for a margarita, but dude, you'll be so wasted you won't even care.
The View: The only thing that will make you feel high up are your beer goggles.
The Menu: Frozen margaritas ($4 during happy hour from 5 p.m.–7 p.m.; $6–$6.50 thereafter) and stuffed-to-bursting burritos ($5.50 to $11.95)
The Hours: Mon.–Wed., 4:30 p.m.–11 p.m., Thurs.–Sun., 11:30 a.m.–11 p.m.


The Terrace at Sutton Place Bar & Restuarant (http://nymag.com/listings/bar/sutton_place/)

1015 Second Ave., nr. 53rd St.; 212-207-3777
The good news first: Sutton Place has a huge rooftop patio with lots of tables and a long, snaking bar worthy of Club Med. The bad news: It's a tad bland in that East Side sports-guy kind of way. Apparently some people just feel more comfortable in khakis.
The View: A third-floor terrace overlooking Second Avenue.
The Menu: $8 cocktails and generic pub grub.
The Hours: Sun.–Wed., noon–1 a.m.; Thurs.–Sat., noon–4 a.m.


Broadway Bar and Sky Deck (http://nymag.com/listings/bar/Broadway-Bar-Deck/)

226 W. 52nd St., nr. Broadway; 646-459-5818
There's nothing remotely glamorous about the bar on the Novotel's 10th floor (the loungers on the narrow terrace appear to be terra cotta, but they're actually plastic) but if you're looking for a relatively inexpensive patch of sky, this is the place.
The View: To the south, a straight shot down the Great White Way.
The Menu: Beers are $5.50, mixed drinks $9, and martinis are $12. The eats are basic: wings, quesadillas, and the like.
The Hours: Daily, noon-midnight.

AmeriKenArtist
June 29th, 2007, 06:35 PM
I'm looking for the cheap watering holes in Manhattan. UES, UWS, and southern 'hoods. It's been a while since I did a pub crawl. I'd appreciate suggestions and hearing experiences you people have enjoyed!!

In the 70's and 80's my buds and I would each buy a six-pack in the Village or Chelsea and drink it on the street, watching humanity flow by. The last time we did that, was in Times Square. We sat, leaning against Father Duffy. Police passed by with no incident.

I think I'm too old to do that now, so a heads-up on a few cool cheap bars would be appreciated.

Thanks, -Ken

Punzie
June 29th, 2007, 08:15 PM
In the 70's and 80's my buds and I would each buy a six-pack in the Village or Chelsea and drink it on the street, watching humanity flow by. The last time we did that, was in Times Square. We sat, leaning against Father Duffy. Police passed by with no incident.

I think I'm too old to do that now..
I'm 45 and I still brown bag it outside with my pals -- who are even older! Is there a cut-off age I should know about?:D

AmeriKenArtist
June 29th, 2007, 11:42 PM
Mebbe I'll try it again, before I go into a dive bar.... I don't know why I have this fear of getting arrested. It never dawned on me decades ago.

Punzie
June 29th, 2007, 11:48 PM
Arrested for drinking beer in a paper bag in public? I don't think that you're too old; you may have become too fearful.

brianac
June 30th, 2007, 06:00 AM
Upper West Side

AmeriKenArtist
June 30th, 2007, 08:06 AM
That must be the case Rapunzel! Out of practice. Mentally corroded!!
Okay brianac. What's the name of that wateringhole!?

brianac
June 30th, 2007, 08:42 PM
AmeriKenArtist.
Do you know I never spotted a name.
I went past almost every day last week. It is on the east side of Broadway just north of 75th. St.
I am ashamed to say I never had the nerve to go in there alone.

I did venture into this one, I'm glad to say.

ablarc
July 1st, 2007, 01:34 PM
I did venture into this one, I'm glad to say.
Due to the fact that it has never been renovated, that one operates with a collection of grandfathered code violations. That's why it has so much character.

If they ever renovated it, they'd have to partially ruin it by bringing it up to code.

Punzie
July 1st, 2007, 02:10 PM
New York Magazine
July 2-9, 2007

Drink in the Open Air
Fifteen sublime outdoor spots.

http://nymag.com/guides/summer/2007/zumschneider070702_560.jpg

Zum Schneider's curbside beer garden.

BÄR-BÕ-NÉ RESTAURANT AND WINE BAR (http://www.nymag.com/listings/restaurant/bar-bo-ne/)
186 Ave. B, nr. 12th St.; 212-254-6047
Outdoor hours: Mon.–Sat. 6–11:30 p.m., Sun. 5:30–10:30 p.m.
This wine bar’s small, hidden garden is a Lower East Side anomaly with its anti-grunge ambience and clientele. Wine enthusiasts will appreciate the creative list with ten wines served by the quartino for $10 to $12. Even during peak evening hours, it’s possible to secure a wicker chair, kick back, and smell the ferns and the puttanesca sauce wafting from the kitchen.

TROUT (http://www.nymag.com/listings/bar/trout/)
98½ Pacific St., nr. Smith St., Boerum Hill, Brooklyn; 718-935-1294
Outdoor hours: Mon.–Thurs. 4 p.m.–midnight, Fri. 4 p.m.–2 a.m., Sat. 3 p.m.–2 a.m., Sun. 3 p.m.–midnight
The redneck-chic fish-camp aesthetic of this outdoor-only bar attracts Brooklynites who don’t mind the Raconteurs cranked on high, cocktails served in plastic cups, or picnic-table seating. Drink specials ($6) are determined by a wheel of fortune spun every hour. Plan your visit around the two peak periods—one at 7:30, and another at eleven (after the restaurants on Smith Street close). But you can often fit in a few friends as long as you don’t mind sitting with strangers.

ZUM SCHNEIDER RESTAURANT & BIERGARTEN (http://www.nymag.com/listings/bar/zum_schneider/)
107 Ave. C, at 7th St.; 212-598-1098
Outdoor hours: Nightly 5–11 p.m., Fri. opens at 4 p.m., Sat.–Sun. opens at 1 p.m.
Although the “biergarten” is actually situated on a sunny Alphabet City sidewalk, German drinking spirit translates to the cramped, cacophonous outdoor tables. Purists approve of the humongous one-liter-size beer mugs ($10 to $14) and pork-heavy menu. Reservations are not accepted for parties smaller than ten (and not at all on weekend nights), making for substantial waits during dinnertime as the crowd lazes away the evening drinking and eating.

HABANA OUTPOST (http://www.nymag.com/listings/restaurant/Habana-Outpost/)
757 Fulton St., at S. Portland Ave., Fort Greene, Brooklyn; 718-858-9500
Outdoor hours: Daily noon to midnight, closed Tuesday
Here, $2.50 pints of locally brewed Six Point beer wash down Cuban sandwiches ($7.25) and sweet plantains ($3). The no-frills concrete drinking lot is powered by an array of solar panels, and the smoothie blender gets its energy from a stationary bike. All this draws a fun, kid-friendly crowd at lunch and dinner. The Saturday-afternoon flea market and Sunday-night movie screenings ensure there is no downtime.

GRAMERCY PARK HOTEL (http://www.nymag.com/listings/hotel/gramercy-park-hotel/) ROOF CLUB AND LANDSCAPED GARDEN
2 Lexington Ave., at 21st St.; 212-920-3300
Summer hours: Sun.–Tues. 6:30 a.m.–midnight; Wed.–Sat. 6:30 a.m.–2 a.m.
Strictly for guests (and virtuosic gate-crashers), the stunning rooftop facility wraps around three sides of Ian Schrager’s latest painfully cool hotel. If the skyline view isn’t enough, there’s the lush garden and its fashionable creatures. When the weather turns, a roof unfurls. Those who want in, beware: The drinks ($15 for a cosmo), much like the hotel’s rooms (from $545), will cost you.


http://nymag.com/guides/summer/2007/delancey070702_198.jpg

The Delancy's rooftop bar.

THE DELANCEY (http://www.nymag.com/listings/bar/delancey/)
168 Delancey St., nr. Clinton St.; 212-254-9920
Outdoor hours: 5 p.m.–4 a.m.
The roof deck of this Lower East Side club follows a jungle theme, with dramatic spotlights accenting bamboo stalks and palm trees. Bartenders dispense bottled beer and mixed drinks in plastic cups—it’s up to you to source a table and chairs, which are scarce on weekend nights, despite the $10 cover charge and reservation policy. The good-looking crowd of singles dances when the music pumps, though they rarely notice the up-close view of the Williamsburg Bridge.

MAGGIE BROWN (http://www.nymag.com/listings/restaurant/maggie-browns/)
455 Myrtle Ave., nr. Washington Ave. Clinton Hill, Brooklyn; 718-643-7001
Outdoor hours: Sun.–Thurs. 10 a.m.–11 p.m., Fri.–Sat. 10 a.m.–midnight.
This restaurant’s adorable garden is like a North Carolina grandmother’s backyard: There’s comfort food on the menu and toddlers running about (as the swarm of strollers out front suggests). If you get there between 4:30 and 7:30 p.m. you can catch the two-for-one draft-beer and house-wine special. The tasty summer mixed drinks, including margaritas and spiked frozen lemonades, range from $4 to $9.

HOPE LOUNGE (http://www.nymag.com/listings/bar/hope-lounge/)
10 Hope St., nr. Roebling St., Williamsburg, Brooklyn; 718-218-7191
Outdoor hours: Mon.–Fri. 3 p.m.–4 a.m., Sat.–Sun. 2 p.m.–4 a.m.
Bypass the Pottery Barn style of Hope Lounge for its large concrete outdoor space that’s appointed with cushioned chairs and umbrella tables and is rarely oversubscribed. The bar has eight drafts on tap and cocktails so fruity they may actually be nutritious. Berries, apples, oranges, and grapes garnish the $7 pint of fresh sangria, while cocktails like the cherry margarita, and frozen piña colada (both $10) are equally fruit-forward. The bar occasionally rents the patio, so call in advance to make sure it’s open.


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Water Taxi Beach's sandy bar.

WATER TAXI BEACH (http://www.nymag.com/listings/bar/harrys_lic_at_water_taxi_beach/)
Hunters Point, Long Island City, entrance on Borden Ave. at 2nd St.; no phone
Outdoor hours: Officially Wed.–Fri. 4 p.m.–midnight, Sat. noon–midnight, Sun. 1 p.m.–midnight
Four hundred tons of trucked-in sand, spectacular views of midtown, and swimsuit-clad boys and girls—these are the rewards for finding your way to the Water Taxi Beach in Long Island City. A rotating cast of D.J.’s and frozen cocktails ($7.50) simulate a Cancún vacation—sans swimming, which is forbidden. At night, the beach often gets packed, resulting in buzz-negating lines at the bar and portable toilets.

http://nymag.com/guides/summer/2007/stonehome070702_560.jpg
The Stonehome Wine Bar in Fort Greene. (Photo: Jessica Boucher/Courtesy of Stonehome Wine Bar)

STONEHOME WINE BAR (http://nymag.com/listings/bar/stonehome-wine-bar/)
87 Lafayette Ave., nr. S. Portland Ave., Fort Greene, Brooklyn; 718-624-9443
Outdoor hours: Mon.–Thurs. 5 p.m.–12:30 a.m., Fri.–Sat. 5 p.m.–1:30 a.m., Sun. 5 p.m.–midnight
Fort Greene residents without a garden of their own find the tasteful ivy-draped backyard at Stonehome a perfect stand-in. For a wine-and-cheese (and fancy bottled beer) establishment, it draws an edgy crowd, including collage art star Wangechi Mutu. On weekend evenings, couples have a shot at getting a seat on the romantic patio; larger drinking parties should shop elsewhere.

4th AVENUE PUB (http://nymag.com/listings/bar/4th-avenue-pub/)
76 Fourth Ave., at Bergen St., Park Slope, Brooklyn; 718-643-2273
Outdoor hours: Daily 3 p.m.–4 a.m.
Brick apartment buildings rise up around the pub’s walled-in garden patio, their windows overlooking drinkers below. Loyalists come to appreciate a rotation of 25 reasonably priced exotic draft beers. The popcorn is always free, as is the Friday-through-Sunday hot-dog-and-hamburger barbecue, and there always seem to be a few empty tables and chairs both inside and out.

THE BOWERY HOTEL (http://nymag.com/listings/bar/bar-at-the-bowery-hotel/)
335 Bowery, at 3rd St.; 212-505-9100
Outdoor hours: 7 a.m.–midnight
The new Bowery Hotel’s lobby bar has a lovely, small patio that’s officially the domain of hotel guests—and, to keep it that way, reserved placards are placed on most of the low, candlelit tables and couches. During the day, the spot is quiet enough for you to attempt entry by smooth-talking the maître d’. Eight-dollar Heinekens buy you the pleasant atmosphere and an attractive wait staff that stay friendly even as the crowd outside grows to capacity around midnight.

BOHEMIAN HALL & BEER GARDEN (http://nymag.com/listings/bar/bohemian_hall_and_beer_garden/)
29-19 24th Ave., nr. 29th St., Astoria; 718-274-4925
Outdoor hours: Weekdays 5 p.m.–3 a.m., weekends noon–3 a.m.
New York’s last true beer garden is worth a visit to Astoria. Amid an unpretentious parklike atmosphere with row upon row of wooden picnic tables, wash down kielbasa and sauerkraut ($8) with $14 pitchers of frothy Czech beers like the smooth pale lager Staropramen. Those with groups of twenty or more should arrive closer to noon than 5 p.m. on weekends to get a prime table under a shady tree.

THE CROW’S NEST (http://nymag.com/listings/bar/the-crows-nest/) AT THE WATER CLUB (http://nymag.com/listings/restaurant/water_club/)
500 E. 30th St., at the East River; 212-683-3333
Outdoor hours: Mon.–Thurs. 4 p.m.–midnight (or earlier), Fri.–Sun. 2 p.m.–midnight (or later)
Perched atop the crusty Water Club restaurant, the Crow’s Nest has a front-row view of the East River, making it feel like the upper deck of a cruise ship. (The hardwood floors, white railings strung with lightbulbs, and porthole windows contribute to the effect.) Whether on a weeknight, when a youngish, after-work khakis crowd dominates, or weekends, when a mix of locals and tourists man the deck, the Crow’s Nest rarely overflows. Even small groups won’t have trouble finding a table in the sun or under an awning.

http://nymag.com/guides/summer/2007/hudsonriver070702_198.jpg
Harlem's new Hudson River Café. (Photo: Rebecca McAlpin/Courtesy of Hudson River Café)

HUDSON RIVER CAFÉ
697 W. 133rd St., nr. Riverside Dr.; 212-491-9111
Outdoor hours: 5 p.m.–2 a.m.
The brand-new Hudson River Café joins Dinosaur Barbecue and Fairway market on a gritty stretch of West Harlem. There are two large, sparkling outdoor patios—a ground-level deck with views of the Hudson and a two-level dining terrace. The expensive drinks (a mojito costs $10) and attractive staff make the place feel like a poolside restaurant in Miami. For now, the bar is busy but not overrun; groups arriving at peak hours (7 to 9 p.m.) on the weekend shouldn’t wait long for an outdoor table.


http://www.nymag.com/guides/summer/2007/33996/?imw=Y

ablarc
July 1st, 2007, 02:55 PM
^ Hudson River Cafe: the flying wedge of Columbia's imminent gentrification of Manhattanville?

Looks pretty good.

Punzie
July 10th, 2007, 11:40 PM
Clubzone.com - New York, NY (http://www.clubzone.com/c1/New_York/All_Other.html)

I'm not a promoter of this website, nor do I know anybody who's affiliated with it. I've just found it to be a useful reference on occasion when I'm doing a keyword search or looking for a theme place in Manhattan.

A huge website flaw: for all of New York City and NY State, only Manhattan places are listed.:eek:

NYatKNIGHT
July 11th, 2007, 10:27 AM
July 11, 2007

The Fleet’s In: In the Harbor, and the Bar

By MICHAEL WILSON


http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/07/11/nyregion/11journal-600.jpg
Chester Higgins Jr./The New York Times



Getting to Montero’s Bar is easy: take Atlantic Avenue to Brooklyn Heights, and it’s the last bar on the right before the harbor. Unless, of course, you’re coming from Britain on a warship, chugging six days across the Atlantic and docking at Pier 7 at the end of Atlantic Avenue, in which case it’s the first bar on the left.

For members of the British Royal Navy on the two warships at the pier, it became something more than just a bar last week.

“It’s the ‘duty watch bar,’ ” Mark Smith, 41, a petty officer sitting in Montero’s on Sunday, said with a thick accent that was part British and part Rolling Rock. “It’s an expression. The nearest pub to the ship is the duty watch bar.”

The two warships, the destroyer Manchester and the aircraft carrier Illustrious, arrived in New York last week, the former in Brooklyn and the latter in Manhattan first, then Brooklyn a few days later. Things were going considerably smoother on this visit than the Royal Navy’s trip to Brooklyn in 1776, during the Revolutionary War.

For these visitors there was plenty of free time, free housing, great views, and $2 Rolling Rocks at Montero’s, a dark, cool, neighborhood bar that has not generally been known as a tourist destination in its 60 years on Atlantic Avenue. But for these guests, a chalkboard out front last weekend declared it the headquarters of the Royal Navy.

On Sunday, the last night the warships were docked here after a week in town, a couple dozen men and women at Montero’s grew to better than 50, and many carried themselves as regulars. They waved to the owner, Joseph Montero, and called him Joe or by his nickname, Pepe, and declared him brilliant, but not in the brains department, necessarily. Just brilliant, as in: “Ah, there’s Joe. Brilliant.”

There were, not counting Mr. Montero, 60, and his wife, Linda, both tending bar, exactly three people there who were not in the Royal Navy, including this reporter, his old roommate Dave from Prospect-Lefferts Gardens and an older woman playing scratch-off lottery games and trying to ignore more than 50 increasingly loud British sailors.

Greg Deverell, 19 and, in accord with local custom, not drinking, was one of several men who took credit for first spotting Montero’s, as if through a spyglass in a foggy night at sea.

“Since the first day, we came straight here,” he said. He thought back to that day and what was going through his mind: “Just thinking, ‘We’ll have a nice beer,’ and we saw the word, ‘bar.’ ” He shrugged. “Sounds good to me.”

But Harry Skinters, 22, remembered it differently. “We were walking up the road, looking for a subway, and this is the first bar we found, and we stayed.”

Mr. Montero knows you run a good bar by keeping track of just these sorts of things. He said, “The Manchester came in first,” as if seamen flying foreign flags were always popping in at Montero’s. “They wandered in. One or two sort of commented that this was like a pub at home.”

Montero’s décor is best described as seaman-tchotchke. Every spare inch of wall space seems covered: a shelf of nautical knickknacks, a sepia photo of a man at sea, an orange life preserver.

“They enjoyed the memorabilia,” Mr. Montero said. “They plopped themselves down and stayed. Their highlight — you ready for this? — Twinkies.”

On Sunday, every flat surface was covered with Rolling Rock bottles either empty or rapidly moving in that direction. James Smith, 20 and seemingly not inclined to observe local custom, peered warily at anyone’s approach, for it was well known that he had been brutally sunburned in soccer matches — he called it football — against two New York Police Department teams in Queens the day before. Now his friends kept slapping him on the shoulders.

“One of the teams was rubbish,” he sniffed. “The other was quite good. We lost to the decent team, 2 to 1. Way too hot Friday. That’s why they beat us. They’re used to it. We’re not.”

The juke box was a big hit with the visitors. Freddie Mercury’s voice rose over the din, and a 26-year-old leading seaman stopped mid-sentence to ask a stranger, “You like Queen?” After a yes, he said, “Brilliant.” The group also played “In the Navy,” by the Village People.

Mr. Montero produced a box of cookies, and someone called them pastries.
Mr. Montero said the group had to be constantly reminded not to take their beers outside when they smoked. Most of the sailors wore T-shirts and jerseys; none were in uniform. Dozens signed a poster with a picture of the Manchester for Mr. Montero, who promised to frame it and hang it.

Caterina Rullo, 23, a canteen assistant, described her typical day in Brooklyn: “We do some work, until half 10. Stop off at the duty watch bar and have a few Rolling Rocks. Then off to Manhattan, like proper tourists.”

Several sailors mentioned visits to ground zero and the Empire State Building, and other bars. “Hogs and Heifers,” Mr. Deverell said. “It’s mad in there.”

The Queen fan said: “Hooters was good. Bubba Gump Shrimp was good.” His only regret was not visiting the firehouse in the film “Ghostbusters,” but he was not sure where it was.

His friend said: “Free meals, free drinks from people. Absolutely brilliant.”

Mr. Smith, the sunburned sailor, said, “Times Square is the place to be.”

Sailors said that in Europe, Brooklyn is generally regarded as unsafe and run down compared to Manhattan, and that they were surprised to learn otherwise.

“People come up and say, ‘Where are you from?’ ” said Able Seaman Luke Flint, 21. “You’d never get that in England.”

In this country, it was a work night, and eventually the sailors had the place to themselves. At last glance, there were easily as many on the sidewalk as there were inside, holding their beers and smoking, Mr. Montero too busy to call them back in.

Mr. Montero said, “I wish they’d stay a year.”

The Queen fan said he had come not only to enjoy his time on Atlantic Avenue, but to prefer it to Manhattan.

“You go to Manhattan to see the tourist things,” he said. “But you go to Brooklyn to see the real people.”

Copyright 2007 (http://www.nytimes.com/ref/membercenter/help/copyright.html)The New York Times Company (http://www.nytco.com/)

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/11/nyregion/11journal.html?pagewanted=1&_r=1

Hof
August 9th, 2007, 10:27 AM
Today's NY Times (August 9,2007) has a pretty entertaining article on where to find cheap beer in the City.Someone should archive it for future reference.

NYatKNIGHT
August 10th, 2007, 01:57 PM
August 5, 2007

For Beer Tastes, on Beer Budgets

By SETH KUGEL (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/k/seth_kugel/index.html?inline=nyt-per)

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/08/05/travel/05week600.1.jpg
Floyd N.Y. in Brooklyn features a pot-luck six pack for $12.

VISITING the big city can leave you parched, especially in summer. It's easy to develop a more-than-one-beer thirst as you gamely tramp from museum to museum, from landmark to landmark.

But hunting cheap beer on the New York City bar scene is a bit like trying to find a cheetah on the African savanna. Sure, $7 pints dot the landscape like plump antelope, but the rare sub-$3 brew lurks in the underbrush like the fleetest footed of the big cats, hard to bring down without the help of a skilled guide savvy in sniffing out tell-tale footprints or happy-hour specials.

But unlike cheetahs, cheap beer won't dash off at 70 miles an hour when you find it. For example, you have two hours to enjoy 50-cent Bud and Bud Light drafts at Bourbon Street on the Upper West Side on Fridays from 9 p.m. to 11 p.m.

Bourbon Street is hardly genteel: bras hang from above the bar and snapshots of women who had apparently until recently been wearing those bras are posted on the wall, a nod to the Girls Gone Wild traditions of the real Bourbon Street. Hey, at two 10-ounce brews for a buck, beggars can't be choosers. (Apparently, a significant number of beggars do like this kind of thing. The place gets crowded, but not so much so that it's hard to place your order.)

The fratty Upper West Side bar scene is not for everyone, and although a dive bar is a dive bar, at least the surroundings in the East Village are more eclectic. Maybe the best deal — with no happy hour restrictions — is the $7 pitcher of McSorley's at Cheap Shots, a narrow, raucous bar on First Avenue. Unlike most of what you'll find at less than $2 a pint, the amber brew, with origins at its namesake pub a few blocks away, is never compared to bodily fluids.

At McSorley's itself, a mug of about 8.5 ounces goes for $2.25 and is also available in a darker version. That's a decent price, especially considering the old-school saloon atmosphere that includes sawdust on the floor.

Anyone planning to assault the overpriced, overhyped meatpacking district later in the evening might consider fueling up at McKenna's a few blocks east of there with a few cheap ones. P.B.R. goes for $2 a can, even as its price elsewhere in Manhattan seems to be edging toward $3. Knowing what P.B.R. stands for, by the way, is a prerequisite for all drinkers of cheap beer; if you're baffled, please do a Google search before continuing. (Hint: It's not Professional Bull Riders or Petróleo Brasileiro, which also pop up.)

Near the South Street Seaport, the $5.75 quarts of Bud Light or Coors Light at Jeremy's Ale House are a surprising value for a tourist spot. A quart, for the lactose-intolerant or metric-loving among you, is 32 ounces, equivalent to two pints or nearly three cans of beer. As at McSorley's, you have to tolerate a beer stench. When the brew is this cheap, spilling a bit doesn't bother anybody, and the bar's slim profit margin doesn't leave a big budget for mops.

Most of these spots are bargain islands in a sea of exorbitant brews. But the capital of cheap beer in New York City is the Williamsburg section of Brooklyn, a one-stop hop on the L train from Manhattan. You almost don't need guidance, as the bustling blocks around the Bedford Avenue station are crowded with bars where both prices and atmosphere are surprisingly pleasant.

Even so, a couple of deals stand out: From 5 p.m. to 8 p.m., seven nights a week, Levee offers dollar cans of Carling Black Label, the result of its dollar-off-all-drinks happy hour. Black Label distinguishes itself from P.B.R. and other bottom-of-the-barrel brands by actually having some taste. But if it's not enough for you, the dollar-off deal knocks down already reasonable prices on pints of Brooklyn Pennant Ale (to $3) and Yuengling ($2).

And making Jeremy's Ale House seem both pricey and smelly by comparison is the Greenpoint Tavern, a beer joint from Williamsburg's working-class days that has made a seemingly happy transition to modern life while keeping a handful of its blue-collar clientele — apparently they all find common ground in their love of hanging pots with plastic flowers. The standard, always-available bargain is a quart of Bud or Bud Light for $3.50 and, in a nod to people who think they're being chic, quarts of Becks for $4.50.

But cheap beer in Brooklyn is more than Williamsburg. The call-a-spade-a-spade experts at Floyd N.Y. on Atlantic Avenue in Cobble Hill have comfy seats with a view of the boccie court, the perfect place to enjoy a “Crap-o-copia,” a bucket of ice jammed with six cans of whatever the beer-loving cat dragged in for $12. On a recent visit, that included American classics like Stroh's, Schmidt's, Genesee Cream Ale and Miller High Life. It's easy walking distance from the downtown Brooklyn subway stops and is even on the route of the Brooklyn Loop of the Gray Line sightseeing bus.

Oh, and take this, Africa: We have cheetahs, too, and they're easy to spot — in the Bronx Zoo.


VISITOR INFORMATION

Bourbon Street, 407 Amsterdam Avenue, between 79th and 80th Streets, (212) 721-1332.

Cheap Shots, 140 First Avenue, between Ninth Street and St. Marks Place, (212) 254-6631.

Jeremy's Ale House, 228 Front Street, between Beekman Street and Peck Slip, (212) 964-3537.

McSorley's Old Ale House, 15 East Seventh Street, between Second and Third Avenues, (212) 473-9148.

McKenna's Pub, 245 West 14th Street, between Seventh and Eighth Avenues, (212) 620-8124.

Levee, 212 Berry Street, at North Third Street, Williamsburg, Brooklyn, (718) 218-8787.

Greenpoint Tavern, 188 Bedford Avenue, between North Sixth and North Seventh Streets, Williamsburg, Brooklyn, (718) 384-9539.

Floyd N.Y., 131 Atlantic Avenue, between Henry and Clinton Streets, Cobble Hill, Brooklyn, (718) 858-5810.

Copyright 2007 (http://www.nytimes.com/ref/membercenter/help/copyright.html) The New York Times Company (http://www.nytco.com/)

http://travel.nytimes.com/2007/08/05/travel/05weekend.html

Padre
August 16th, 2007, 10:09 AM
I was wondering if you could tell me if there are any house music clubs, like perhaps those in europe, in nyc?

veroslist
August 26th, 2007, 07:57 PM
Hi,

My name is Arnaud and I’m actually working for Vero’s list as an « Event Planner ».

We are in charge of planning parties in the hottest nightclubs of NYC such as : Pink Elephant, Marquee, Plumm, Cain, etc... We also have a Guestlist which allow you to come in without any charge.

Here you will find the link of our website so don’t hesitate to have a look on it : www.veroslist.com (http://www.veroslist.com/)

You can contact me when you want if you need any details or if you have any questions, this is my email: arnaud@veroslist.com (arnaud@veroslist.com)

I hope to see you soon in one of our parties,
Arnaud

NYatKNIGHT
August 27th, 2007, 11:03 AM
August 27, 2007

From Either Side of the Bar, Firefighters Embrace a Tradition

By KATE HAMMER

On Thursday, after the funeral of Firefighter Joseph Graffagnino, and on Friday, after the funeral of Firefighter Robert Beddia, many of the city’s bars filled with grieving men in navy blue uniforms who wore pins in remembrance of their fallen brothers.

But the Salty Dog on Third Avenue in Bay Ridge, Brooklyn, where black and purple bunting hung above the bar’s bright red garage door, had its own special connection with that grief: Firefighter Graffagnino tended bar there on the side.

In a city with so many kinds of bars that telling them apart requires modifiers — sports bars, gay bars, Wall Street bars, college bars, sake bars and topless bars — firefighter bars are distinctive because the customers are often served by a fellow firefighter. As it happened, Firefighter Beddia, 53, of Staten Island, who along with Firefighter Graffagnino, 33, of Brooklyn, was killed fighting a blaze at the Deutsche Bank building at ground zero, had also tended bar, at Chumley’s in Greenwich Village, not far from the firehouse where both firefighters worked.

Other firefighters, or retired firefighters, own bars or restaurants.

“We like to go to the places that are owned by a firefighter, the places where you know they’re going to take care of you,” said Firefighter Frank Blackstone of Ladder Company 173 in Howard Beach, Queens.

While the Salty Dog no longer has a firefighter as one of its owners, it embraces its motif with no subtlety. A shiny 1947 Mack fire truck, parked across from the bar, houses a D.J. booth. A cast-iron bucket that predates fire hoses hangs overhead, and around the bar, only a few inches of red brick separate old portraits of fire companies and photographs of famous American fires.

“It’s all made to look like a firehouse,” said Larry Kaplan, an assistant manager. “The only thing we don’t have is a pole, and that’s only because we don’t have room.”

Most firefighter bars are not quite so elaborate, but they are part of a long tradition that dates to the late 1700s, according to Gary R. Urbanowicz, who has written books about the Fire Department’s history and lore.

“Going out to a bar after a shift or after a bad fire once you’re off duty is certainly something that’s been done for years upon years,” said Mr. Urbanowicz, the son of a Brooklyn firefighter. Those encounters have always involved “socializing beyond just talking,” he said, adding that in the early 19th century, firefighters gathered at chowder bakes and gun clubs.

By the late 19th century, some firefighters had begun gathering at Walker’s, a restaurant and bar on North Moore Street in TriBeCa. Firefighters still occupy the tall bar stools there today; Ladder 8 is across the street.

“We’ve been a firefighter bar for ever and ever,” said Linda Anthonijsz, Walker’s manager. She says that firefighters remain faithful to their bars, and that once a bar becomes a firehouse favorite, the tradition lasts for generations.

At Walker’s, firefighters prefer burgers, “no quiche,” she said. “They order it, they eat it all. You don’t even have to clean their plates.” And with the food and drink come the firehouse stories.

At Farrell’s Bar in Windsor Terrace, Brooklyn, which employs three firefighters as bartenders, Dan Mills, a co-owner, said that a casual atmosphere and inexpensive cold beer attract firefighters as well as police officers.

While the police also have a long-established bar culture, officers are prohibited, by their department and the New York State Liquor Authority, from working in establishments that serve alcohol. There is no such rule for firefighters. Firefighters do not need special permission to take bartending jobs, and are allowed to work within the districts covered by their engine or ladder companies, though they are expected to cooperate if, say, their bar or club becomes overcrowded and the Fire Department is called.

To be sure, the drinking traditions have raised concerns. In 2003 and 2004, when a high number of firefighters were arrested on drunken driving charges, Fire Commissioner Nicholas Scoppetta increased the departmental penalty for those offenses from several days suspension without pay to as many as 30 days.

Along with several city firefighters at the Salty Dog on Friday, there were two firefighters from Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, who met Firefighter Beddia in 2002 through union activities.

They said that firefighters everywhere appreciated a good place to share a beer, especially after a difficult fire or the loss of a colleague, and that they had never known a place to embrace that tradition as well as New York City.

“We wanted to come to a firefighter bar,” said Rob Hogan, one of the Canadian firefighters. “We’re firefighters so we had to come.”

As he raised a pint of ale, Bruce Siemen, the other Canadian, said, “It’s firefighter history and tradition and it accumulates here like nowhere else.”

Copyright 2007 (http://www.nytimes.com/ref/membercenter/help/copyright.html)The New York Times Company (http://www.nytco.com/)

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/27/nyregion/27salty.html?ref=nyregion

NYatKNIGHT
November 1st, 2007, 11:30 AM
November 1, 2007

Down days for NYC nightlife

By Justin Rocket Silverman

Long gone are the days when clubs like Studio 54, Palladium and Limelight were institutions that captured the essence of their time and defined New York City nightlife. The era of the big dance clubs that had universal appeal is fading, replaced by predominately smaller venues targeting specific groups of clientele.

There is a sense that money has won out over creativity; rules about dancing, smoking and security cameras have trumped personal freedom; that the night belongs to a starched collar crowd that prefers dropping $400 on a bottle of vodka rather than supporting anything weird or edgy.

"There are a lot of reasons why the days of Studio 54 and other great clubs of the '70s are not here anymore," said David Rabin, the owner of Lotus and president of the New York Nightlife Association, a trade group. "For one thing, crowds have become much more self-separating. When I first started gong out in the late '70s and early '80s, everyone was under the same roof. Straight, gay, black, white, male, female, it was awesome."

Opinions vary on why clubland has lost its diversity. Cost is certainly a factor. Gone are the days when everybody paid $5 to get into Nell's on 14th Street (now called The Plumm). There was no bottle service, or ways to buy yourself into the legendary club Area, a massive space complete with a swimming pool, skateboard ramp and tank stocked with live sharks. If you impressed the doorman with your style, you got in. Otherwise, you'd be standing outside all night.

One venue from the heydays of clubbing that hasn't lost its popularity is Webster Hall, which is in the process of being landmarked by the city. But most other mega-clubs are instead being replaced by smaller lounges.

"In the '80s and '90s there was big group of people who helped each other and made it interesting," said Sydney Masters, a clubber since 1985. "Those same people have since learned to make a business of it, and a lot have opened smaller clubs. Nightlife is a commodity now."

Yet even the most well-financed nightclubs were thrown a curve ball in September when high-end burlesque operator Ivan Kane was denied, by unanimous vote, his request for approval of a liquor license by the local community board. Kane's investors included David Bowie and Sting, and the defeat could have a cooling effect on investment industry-wide.

While such community votes used to be routinely ignored by the State Liquor Authority, within the past year they inexplicably began to be the determining factor of whether a new club is allowed to sell booze. The shift to more community input is something that has the potential to deter nightclub owners from opening larger venues in New York City, industry heads say.

"Our establishments were never designed simply to serve the 1.2 million residents of Manhattan," said Robert Bookman, chief counsel for the nightlife association, who explained that with 65 million admissions annually, more people come to the city for its clubs than they do for every Broadway show and professional sporting event combined. "We can't expect entrepreneurs to put millions into new places in New York if it is a popularity contest with people living a block away. We are not here to serve the people who live a block away anyway."

Money that would have been invested locally in clubs is therefore sent to other cities, Bookman and Rabin said.

"Everyone that I know in our business is just hoping to do a place that's successful enough for someone from Vegas to come along and say, 'Let's do one of these in Vegas,'" Rabin said. "That has really become the pot at the end of the rainbow."

Copyright © 2007, AM New York (http://www.amny.com)

http://www.amny.com/news/local/am-nightlife1101,0,2278749.story?coll=amny_home_rail_ headlines

MidtownGuy
November 1st, 2007, 11:42 AM
SO Sad! I remember when we had nightlife here in New York. It's so sad and true about the loss of the big clubs that drew a diverse crowd. More than just dancing, networking happened in those clubs across the social spectrum and the income brackets. From what was once an endless variety of choices, I'm now reduced to just a couple of clubs that I'll go dance at, the rest are just like the article describes. Who here remembers Nell's on 14th St...gosh what memories from that place.
I think large nightclub venues ( and other social networking places) are just as important to an economy as large trading floors. Too bad so many members here see value in the latter but not in the former, it really is an oversimplified way to look at an economy when you think only investment firms and banks should get fertile ground and a lease.

cysthead30
November 1st, 2007, 11:53 AM
SO Sad! I remember when we had nightlife here in New York. It's so sad and true about the loss of the big clubs that drew a diverse crowd. More than just dancing, networking happened in those clubs across the social spectrum and the income brackets. From what was once an endless variety of choices, I'm now reduced to just a couple of clubs that I'll go dance at, the rest are just like the article describes. Who here remembers Nell's on 14th St...gosh what memories from that place.
I think large nightclub venues ( and other social networking places) are just as important to an economy as large trading floors. Too bad so many members here see value in the latter but not in the former, it really is an oversimplified way to look at an economy when you think only investment firms and banks should get fertile ground and a lease.

I still think NYC nightlife is great. Its still far better than any other American city.

MidtownGuy
November 1st, 2007, 01:01 PM
Name for me one club, still open for business, that has the kind of feeling/diverse crowd that could be found at the Tunnel, Limelight, Area, Nell's, the Loft, Choice, Save the Robots, Afterlife, the list goes on of the dearly departed.
It makes me question how long you have been clubbing, and exactly what kind of music you like. The fact that it's marginally better than other American cities is not very strong praise considering what's out there. We were once the best in the world, now we should pat ourselves on the back because we're still better than Dallas? Good grief.

Schadenfrau
November 2nd, 2007, 08:49 PM
Who here remembers Nell's on 14th St...

Me! That was the first clubby-type of place that me when I was 18, in August of 1994. I was hanging out at the Tunnel (not a big fan) and Save The Robots (loved) shortly thereafter.

I know I've done it before, but I've got to agree with MidtownGuy again- New York City nightlife borders on the hideous, especially on weekends. The pendulum seemed to start swinging from diverse to homogeneous back in the late 90s. Bottle service? Please.

I'd still wager that there are more than a few American cities with a more interesting nightlife than NYC, unless your idea of nightlife is screeching girls in Forever 21 tube tops and the men who want to take them home.

MidtownGuy
November 4th, 2007, 04:49 PM
Wow! :D we share a real moment in time. The vibe in some of those clubs was truly amazing! I'm not even that old and I often find myself talking wistfully about that era to recent NYC arrivals- as if I'm an old geezer reflecting on a glorious but distant past or something!!:cool: That's how much of a sea change there has been.
I have found a couple of small places here and there where a person can get their groove on, but nothing like it used to be. We used to sprinkle baby powder on the dancefloor to help us spin and slide, people would take naps in the corner sofas and then get up and dance some more. Dancing until it was time to crawl home at noon or later!
Them was the days.:(
I curse what they have done to NY's once legendary, world-reknowned nightlife. They've gone and killed a beautiful thing, and it's sad because the kids in their young 20's will never know what it was like, never have a frame of reference...thinking Webster Hall or some chi-chi poser lounge is the real deal.
I hope it rebounds before I get too old to boogie right. Trouble is, all the big old industrial spaces that used to house the great clubs are being torn down and replaced by condos. Soon, most of the sizeable Manhatttan venues just won't exist anymore.

pricedout
January 5th, 2008, 11:47 PM
I must confess, I truly loved many clubs (many of the names have disappeared from the memory, there was also a period of time in the mid-80's when you showed up at a club downtown without a clue as to it's name.) But a couple of the fun ones: Pyramid Club, King Tut, SOB's, Danceteria, Nightengales, Dan Lynch, Rudy's, etc. There's still a fabulous amount of life after dark in this city, but now it seems to be much more exclusive. (Although I still love many of the places in the east village).

Sheff1
January 18th, 2008, 02:14 PM
Can anyone suggest an all-night bar (not a club) near Union Square where I can get a couple of (pre-European timezone soccer) drinks at around 6am? Thanks!

Alonzo-ny
February 24th, 2008, 09:38 PM
I was taken to 'The Back Room' in the LES yesterday. Its a really cool 'hidden' bar. Anyone know of any others?

ladyrainbownewyork
March 8th, 2008, 07:24 PM
My heart bled when I read your post! It made me wish you'd been hanging out with us at VISIONS party Thursday night with Kervyn Mark who is def old school. Surely you have heard of him? Melting Pot NYC? I love Kervyn because he is so damn real and skillful on the decks and the party is really anybody anything at the old tried and true Sapphire lounge. (The day that places closes I will weep.) I have seen powder on the floor as recently as two weeks ago at Francois K. deep space party. It was Ali who pulled out the powder. Also saw powder at ANBAHP. Thank goodness Jellybean was wise enough to buy that place so we still have a place to go. It's the old lament; artists make a place vibrant, don't buy property and then get pushed out. There are still those of us who hold the torch and sacrifice to keep the REAL New York alive and we could use your support. For the most part Deep Space is cool although sometimes there are these suits that blow in from Ibiza or wherever and don't get that we don't to go home with them and that they really need to get down on the dance floor! (They usually leave bewildered after a couple of hours girl-less!) Jeannie Hopper from the LSL is another stalwart who just keep on trucking no matter what and there is the old guard from Body and Soul. Reggie Johnson of Deep Dance Promotions is a good egg that just wants to throw an old fashioned party and who could use the support of sincere New Yorkers like yourselves. He throws the monthly at the Sapphire lounge whether there is 10 in the room or more...or less!
I am a musician/poet/singer/writer/ activist type who has been producing events and hanging in year after year since 1999. I am a bit younger than you guys I think but in spite of the fact that I have seen The Palladium, Brownies,CBGBs,Wetlands, The Fez,The C-Note and countless other spots close their doors I just won't give up. I need to do this and it's IMPORTANT. The tide has got to turn sometime. Gritty determination are the watch words. check http://www.myspace.com/deepdance

MidtownGuy
March 10th, 2008, 03:46 AM
Wow, welcome.
Powder on the floooor:D:D:D Mu hu waaa hahahaha...oh my god you are definitely down.:eek: There was a time I wouldn't go to the club without my powder for the floor packed in my bag ( and a bottle of water, pack of lifesavers, clean socks, T-shirt and underwear, deodorant, 3 blunts, you know the deal.... Then the places starting confiscating baby powder 'cause they said it messed up the wood floors. :D But the good places still let us throw it down.
Jeannie Hopper is a trooper.
What can I say, we're fellow travelers.
See you at Sapphire sometime...