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voomo
February 13th, 2005, 06:25 PM
Hello all, new member here. I am a Michigan native who loves NYC. I was there 3 times last year (all leisure) and am coming again in April. Obviously for the amount of trips there I have done most everything. I am wondering if you all know any secret new york things to do. What I mean by "secret" is not some covert things, but more things that most tourists do not do, or see. Maybe a cool spot to see the view, etc. Anything that a person living in NYC would know, but a tourist would not.

Thanks for any info!

TLOZ Link5
February 13th, 2005, 08:11 PM
Check out a neighborhood that's "off the beaten [tourist] path." My recommendation would be the East Village/Lower East Side. Take a walk in Tompkins Square Park or take a look at some of the community gardens; a lot of them are really cool.

ryan
February 13th, 2005, 08:34 PM
Jackson Heights is a great "little India" with amazing food and street life. Also check out Forgotten NY (http://www.forgotten-ny.com/) to find lesser traveled sights to aim yourself at: wandering is the best way to see the city.

voomo
February 13th, 2005, 09:21 PM
Wandering will be done for sure. I am setting a half day for rollerblading through the city with no real destination in mind. Hopefully I can see some new things.

Thanks for the tips, keep them coming.

billyblancoNYC
February 13th, 2005, 10:45 PM
Hello all, new member here. I am a Michigan native who loves NYC. I was there 3 times last year (all leisure) and am coming again in April. Obviously for the amount of trips there I have done most everything. I am wondering if you all know any secret new york things to do. What I mean by "secret" is not some covert things, but more things that most tourists do not do, or see. Maybe a cool spot to see the view, etc. Anything that a person living in NYC would know, but a tourist would not.

Thanks for any info!

No offense, and I'm not being smug, but I kind of doubt you did not do most everything in NYC in 3 trips.

It might be good to tell us what you have done and then we could fill in the blanks.

voomo
February 14th, 2005, 06:34 PM
No offense, and I'm not being smug, but I kind of doubt you did not do most everything in NYC in 3 trips.

I've been to NY over 10 times in 6 years. My reference to 3 times was just last year. I should have elaborated on that. Most of the early trips were business and pleasure mixed.

I have done all the normal things. Statue of Liberty, Empire State, Ground Zero, Today show, TRL, Daily Show, Brooklyn Bridge walk, helicoptor ride, etc. If I listed all I did there I would bore you I am sure. But looking around these forums there are very few things mentioned that I have not done.

Hopefully that clarifies a bit.

billyblancoNYC
February 15th, 2005, 12:16 AM
I've been to NY over 10 times in 6 years. My reference to 3 times was just last year. I should have elaborated on that. Most of the early trips were business and pleasure mixed.

I have done all the normal things. Statue of Liberty, Empire State, Ground Zero, Today show, TRL, Daily Show, Brooklyn Bridge walk, helicoptor ride, etc. If I listed all I did there I would bore you I am sure. But looking around these forums there are very few things mentioned that I have not done.

Hopefully that clarifies a bit.


Sorry about that. My apologies for misunderstanding you.

A few quick suggestions:

1) SI Ferry Ride to Snug Harbor or the Tibetan Museum.
http://www.snug-harbor.org/

http://www.tibetanmuseum.org/

2) Go over to Brooklyn and check out Brooklyn Heights and the promenade. The explore historic brownstone areas like Park Slope, Cobble Hill, Carroll Gardens, and DUMBO.

3) Go to Wave Hill, Bronx Zoo, NY Botanical Garden, or Arthur Ave. in the Bronx.
www.wavehill.org/

www.bronxzoo.com

www.nybg.org/

www.arthuravenuebronx.com/

4) Take the Roosevelt Island Tram over and explore the island.

5) Go over the Long Island City and enjoy Gantry Park
http://queens.about.com/library/weekly/gantry/bl-gantry1.htm

and all the LIC cultural offerings.

http://www.ps1.org/ - What many believe to be THE contemporary arts space in the country.

www.socratessculpturepark.org/ - NYCs only outdoor sculpture park

www.noguchi.org - works of the great artist Noguchi

www.ammi.org - now the world's only space dedicated to the moving image

www.5ptz.com - working graffiti museum

www.sculpture-center.org

http://www.africanart.org

http://www.licartists.org./ - Check out some studios

I'm not sure if this is stuff you've seen, so I'll stop. Let us know if you'd like more to do.

poppy
February 16th, 2005, 11:30 AM
I am not from New York and have only been there twice, so I´d like to offer an apology in advance for potentially ramdom or unqualified posts on this matter... but when I´ve been there for the last time 2 years ago, Carl Schurz Park in what I believe was Yorkville (Upper East Side) was a place that I deeply enjoyed...

And I know it´s odd, but one cannot stress it enough to go to Times Square at any time of day (morning, noon, evening, night,...) - the spectacle is yours whenever you go there!

So much for my first post here

voomo
February 16th, 2005, 03:12 PM
Thanks for all the ideas! Making a list and doing some research on everything. Should be a good trip.

poppy> Absolutely. I love Times Square. So much so its the only place I stay when I go to NY now. ;) I am staying at Novotel this time as I have never been there. Before I have stayed at the time (several times), doubletree(twice), Millenium Hilton (once. client paid for it. lol EXTREMELY nice though, but not in Times Square) and Milford Plaza (once - yuck, never again).

Hof
March 11th, 2005, 01:46 PM
I return to the City about once a year.Some years more,some not at all.I used to live in The Village,but being young and dumb,I never really paid close attention to New York.I just lived there.
Nowadays,I pay attention(some would describe it as an "obsession") and I explore the place at every opportunity,discovering something new with each visit.
I work for a company based on Long Island,and when I go to meetings and seminars there,I always find a way to stay in the City.I reverse commute,going to Hicksville in the AM,returning to Manhattan in the early evening.
Often,on the way back to my hotel,I'll exit somewhere in Brooklyn and walk.Everybody is getting home and the restaurants are awaiting the evening crowd,so tables at curbside are always available.At certain times of the day,Downtown Bkln really comes alive.
Stores are uncrowded,pizza is being made fresh and trains to Manhattan are almost empty.Traffic is in a crush,but what the hell,I'm walking.
I've walked across the Bkln Bridge a lot,and love to explore The Heights,DUMBO,the new parks,etc.I've been watching DUMBO and the transformation of the once-foreboding under-the-bridge property with great interest for about 5 years.It's undergoing historic change at a rapid pace.Each time I come back it's different,demanding a new exploration.
Now the Fulton Fish area has my attention as it morphs into something new.
I also change hotels when I come to Town,exposing me to new,less familiar neighborhoods on each visit.I've stayed near the UN,on both the Upper Sides,off Times Square and in SOHO.Penn Station area is busy all the time and I like staying there,Lower Manhattan isn't,at least after 7 PM and one stay was plenty,but doing this has re-acquainted me with a City I've come to love.
Once,though,I had to stay in Queens,near Laguardia.I won't do that again.
Each area of the City offers unlimited opportunities for the serious walker,and exploring New York's interesting diversity of neighborhoods is what I always look forward to whenever I come to Town.
But,no matter where you are based,a few minutes walk from your hotel and you'll find your own secrets about the City.

NewYorkYankee
March 11th, 2005, 04:54 PM
What was the hotel near LAG like? Not really the hotel, but the neighborhood and street life etc etc.

Hof
March 13th, 2005, 06:31 PM
The place was one of a cluster of airport motels in the 90s,just across Grand Central Parkway from LAG.There are dozens of motels in the area,filled with pilots and stews on layover,evidently.I took off walking,looking for a place to eat,and wound up on Astoria Blvd.
I walked through several quiet blocks of tightly packed,detached single family homes in what looked like a solid middleclass neighborhood.A five on a scale of ten--OK but I personally wouldn't want to be living there.Astoria Blvd,at least where I was,seemed to be surrenduring it's Italian heritage for something else,but I found a family run restaurant and had some good pasta,later walking a few blocks to a place where I watched planes flying in and out.
I don't know that part of Queens at all.Still don't.I spent 2 nights there,finally finding a place in Manhattan.

Edward
March 15th, 2005, 05:01 PM
I am setting a half day for rollerblading...
You can also rent a bicycle, have a ride in Central Park or Hudson River Park.

Ferry ride is highly recommended - Circle Line, NY Waterway, or NY Water Taxi.

In the cultural arena, you can visit Chelsea art galleries - hundreds of galleries, all free, in the area of several blocks, 24th, 23rd Streets, between 10th and 11th Avenues.

thomasjfletcher
March 15th, 2005, 05:44 PM
perhaps a stroll on the high line?

http://www.nyc-architecture.com/CHE/Pict0022b.jpg

http://www.nyc-architecture.com/CHE/CHE029-TheHighLine.htm

Edward
March 16th, 2005, 11:54 AM
perhaps a stroll on the high line?

A recipe for unforgettable vacation – have a stroll, get arrested ;)

jpettinato
July 30th, 2005, 09:21 PM
So it is illegal to walk there?

Moe14
August 9th, 2005, 07:41 PM
It's "illegal" No one's ever gotten arrested for going up there. The worst I've heard of is that a cop once caught a guy and made him delete his photos. A couple years ago I went up there in the middle of the day, and monkeyed my way down on W. 13th street with a ton of people on the sidewalk and nobody cared at all.

The High Line is generally people's first introdution to the real "secret" New York - i.e. the interesting stuff that's not quite technically legal (or nowhere near technically legal) to see. It gets addictive really quick.

letscount23
January 10th, 2006, 03:37 PM
I would love to take a walk on the High Line. Can anyone share with me the best way to access it?

tdp
January 11th, 2006, 01:44 PM
Can I join the list of people that want to get on the High Line?

Ninjahedge
January 11th, 2006, 02:07 PM
Can I join the list of people that want to get on the High Line?

They are looking to redevelop all of that into parkland, so it might be harder to get to pretty soon (construction has a way of shutting things down...)

david lee
January 31st, 2006, 10:03 AM
I would love to take a walk on the High Line. Can anyone share with me the best way to access it?

What is the high line?
I am curious now :rolleyes:

NYatKNIGHT
January 31st, 2006, 10:41 AM
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=2868

lofter1
January 31st, 2006, 01:12 PM
What is the high line?
I am curious now :rolleyes:
You can get unauthorized access to the High Line at a number of places along the route, but new fences are going up soon in anticipation of restoration...so you'd better get yourself over ther this week.

lofter1
January 31st, 2006, 01:15 PM
Initial work on High Line park’s south end to begin next month

By Albert Amateau
The Villager
http://www.thevillager.com/villager_143/initialworkonhighline.html

Preliminary construction on the conversion of the High Line into a one-of-a-kind elevated park is scheduled to begin in mid-February when fencing will be installed to protect the railings of the structure between Gansevoort and W. 20th Sts.

The estimated timetable and scope of work involved in preparing the southern end of the derelict railroad viaduct for its transformation into a landscaped promenade was presented this month to the Community Board 2 Parks Committee by Friends of the High Line and the City Department of Parks and Recreation.

“There’s no specific date yet for construction, but by the end of February we’ll have protective fencing for the decorative iron railing at the street crossings and the iron pipe railings in between,” said Joshua David — a founder of Friends of the High Line, which has led the movement to save the 74-year-old structure — commenting on the project last week.

“We want to protect as much of the original structure as possible and replace or restore what we have to remove,” David added.

At the same time, crews will install netting under the structure to protect the streets and properties below during the actual construction of High Line Park’s first nine blocks along the west sides of Washington St. and 10th Ave.

If all goes according to plan, the infrastructure and landscape work between Gansevoort and 20th Sts. will be completed and this section will open to visitors in the spring of 2008.

After the protective fencing and netting are in place at the end of February, site preparation work will begin later this spring.

The structure, built by the New York Central Railroad to raise railroad freight tracks above street level, consists of a steel frame enclosing a concrete lining 18 feet to 30 feet above street level. The lining holds gravel ballast, which supports the rail ties and rails that once carried freight from north of the city down to the St. John’s Rail Terminal near Canal St. The Downtown end, from Canal to Gansevoort Sts., was taken down in phases starting more than 25 years ago.

In the first phase of the project, to prepare the structure for park use, the railroad ties, rails and gravel will be removed to allow restoration of the steel and concrete. The work will include repairing the drainage, removing the lead-based paint and repainting with a nontoxic paint.

“We’ll be doing pigeon mitigation,” David added. “Anyone who has walked under the High Line can notice the nesting and mess that pigeons have made over the years,” he observed.

The second phase involves construction of the public landscape, including access systems — stairs, elevators — pathways, seating, lighting and safety features.

The landscape work is being designed by a team led by the Field Operations firm of James Corner with the architectural firm of Diller Scofidio + Renfro. It will require new ballast, with sections of the old rail ties and rails replaced. “We don’t want people to forget that the High Line was a railroad,” David said. “The rail ties and rails will be numbered and stored so that we can replace them wherever appropriate,” he said.

The High Line’s vegetation of weeds, grass, bushes and even trees, sown by the wind and birds and rooted in the gravel ballast over the years, will be reproduced as much as possible by plantings, and the new ballast will accept new wind-sown seeds to germinate, take root and flourish.

Friends of the High Line will sponsor a presentation by Field Operations and Diller Scofidio + Renfro of the latest plans for the park at 6:30 p.m. Mon. Feb. 13 at Cedar Lake Theater, 547 W. 26th St. between 10th and 11th Aves.

The elevated park will eventually extend 1.5 miles up to W. 33rd St. where the railroad tracks dip underground south of the Javits Convention Center and connect with rail lines to the north and to Penn Station. Currently, $84 million in public funds — $62 million from the city and $22 million from federal sources — has been appropriated for the entire project.

At the park’s southern end at Gansevoort St., the entrance to the High Line will be incorporated into the Dia Art Foundation’s new Manhattan museum, to be built on Meat Market property owned by New York City.

“We’re still negotiating with various city agencies about the lease for the property and we hope to have our plan certified by City Planning sometime in March,” said Laura Raicovich, Dia’s external affairs director.

Certification by the Department of City Planning begins the city’s uniform land-use review procedure, required for major projects and land use changes. The procedure, which takes from six months to a year, involves a series of hearings and reviews by community boards and the Department of City Planning, culminating in City Council action.

“We are a few months behind the High Line,” said Raicovich. “So if the High Line opens in the spring of 2008, we’ll open in the fall.”

NoyokA
January 31st, 2006, 09:36 PM
Getting on the highline is easy. Go to 12th Avenue and 34 I think. Whatever is the south face of the Javits. Theres a parking lot across the street and there's the entrance to the highline, no climbing involved.