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Archit_K
February 13th, 2005, 10:23 PM
Fort Greene
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

The neighborhood of Fort Greene is listed on the National and New York State Registry of Historic Places, and is a New York City designated Historic District. It is bounded, roughly, by The Brooklyn Navy Yard to the north, Flatbush Avenue to the west, Classon Avenue to the east and Atlantic Avenue to the south. Fort Greene is named after a Revolutionary War era fort that was rechristened in honor of General Nathaniel Greene of New Hampshire. General Greene aided General George Washington during the Battle of Brooklyn in 1776. Fort Greene Park is also, obviously, derived from General Greene's name and the neighborhood. In the park is the notable Prison Ships Martyrs monument and crypt, which honors some 11,500 patriots who died aboard British prision ships during the War of Independence. Poet and one-time resident Walt Whitman influenced the creation of Fort Greene Park in 1843.

In addition to Whitman, Fort Greene has also been the home of poet Marianne Mooore and Richard Wright, the author of Native Son, and the rapper Ol' Dirty Bastard.

Fort Greene is comprised of many superb examples of mid-19th Century Italianate and Eastlake architecture, most of which is well preserved. The area is the home of the famed Brooklyn Academy of Music, the Brooklyn Music School, Brooklyn Tech, The Paul Robeson Theater, Urban Glass works, 651 Arts perfoming center for African-American presenters, and the Atlantic Center commercial and transportation hub.

Archit_K
February 14th, 2005, 01:17 AM
383 Carlton Ave.

Meltzer Mandl Architect
http://www.meltzermandl.com/

Archit_K
February 15th, 2005, 02:20 PM
David Mandl, AIA ,NYSA

Experience:
Meltzer/Mandl Architects, P.C.
President
1995-Present

Environetics Group Inc.
President
1995-1997

David Mandl Associates
Architecture/Construction Management
Principal
1980-1995

Mr. Mandl is an architect with nearly 25 years of professional design experience, providing diverse architectural services. In addition to designing a wide range of commercial, residential and institutional projects, he has a particular expertise in New York City building codes and zoning interpretation which enables him to maximize clients' building needs and to fully utilize property opportunities. As a member of the New York Department of Buildings Advisory Panel, he has considerable knowledge of current law and proposed changes in New York, NY zoning laws. He implemented the Professional Certification of the first large-scale residential project in Manhattan under the then rarely-used New York, NY DOB Professional Certification Program.


Mr. Mandl has designed large and medium scale commercial, residential and institutional buildings, primarily in the New York City area, for numerous high-profile clients. He has been involved in over 850 projects, including new construction and rehabilitation of buildings, specializing in commercial to residential projects.


Education:
Bachelor of Arts, 1959
Pratt Institute
School of Architecture, 1976

Registration:
National Council of Architectural Registration Boards
State of New York
State of New Jersey

Affiliations:
The American Institute of Architects (AIA)
New York Society of Architects, Former Board Member

Marvin H Meltzer, AIA, NCARB


Experience:
Meltzer/Mandl Architects, P.C.
1995-Present

Marvin H. Meltzer Architects, P.C.
1972-1995

Britton Development, Ltd.
1976-1984

Marvin H Meltzer, AIA, NCARB

Experience:
Meltzer/Mandl Architects, P.C.
1995-Present

Marvin H. Meltzer Architects, P.C.
1972-1995

Britton Development, Ltd.
1976-1984


Mr. Meltzer has designed and developed many types of buildings and environments over the last 30 years. His experience has included the creation of luxury, affordable and special needs housing, as well as, childcare, educational and community facilities and commercial projects. Mr. Meltzer's philosophy stems from a belief in quality design and sound communication as key factor in all successful projects. He has achieved a solid track record providing responsive, sensitive design solutions on time and within budget. His design for Melrose Court, a high density, low-rise affordable housing community won an award for the best in the country in 1994. In 2002, he was recognized with a Lifetime Achievement Award "for an illustrious career that has added to the betterment of architecture in New York City by the New York Society of Architects.


Education:
Bachelor of Arts, University of Minnesota, 1959
Bachelor of Architecture, University of Minnesota, 1961

Registration:
National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB)
State of New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, South Carolina

Awards:
2003 SARA Design Award of Excellence - Bond Street Lofts, NYC
2002 Lifetime Achievement Award - New York Society of Architects
2002 SARA Design Award, Honorable Mention - Bradhurst Court, NYC
1994 "Best Affordable Multi-Family Housing Project in the Nation"
Pillars of the Industry Award - National Association of Home Builders

Lectures:
FUTURE VISION OF URBAN PUBLIC HOUSING
An International Forum, University of Cincinnati
College of Design, Architecture, Art and Planning, November 1994.

Publications:
MARVIN H. MELTZER: CITY AS POETRY, L'Arca Edizioni, 2002.
DESIGN FOR LIVING: AFFORDABLE FAMILY HOUSING
"Good Neighbors", Jones, Pettus, Pyatok, Images Publishing", 1997.

Affiliations:
The American Institute ofArchitects (AIA)
AIA New York Chapter - Housing Committee
Central Synagogue, NY - Building Committee Member

Portrait of Mandl and Meltzer.

Derek2k3
February 15th, 2005, 03:00 PM
Nice photos. When did you take them?

Project #1

The GreeneHouse Condos
383 Carlton Avenue/43 Greene Avenue
12 stories 128 feet
Meltzer Mandl Architects
Dev-David Weiss of Carlton Adelphi LLC
Residential Condominiums
27 units 67,919 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2003-Early 2005


REAL ESTATE DESK
POSTINGS; Fort Greene Developers Get a Lucky Break
By JOSH BARBANEL
Published: June 27, 2004, Sunday

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9F02E2DB1E39F934A15755C0A9629C8B 63

When the new owners of the three duplex penthouses atop the GreeneHouse condominium in Brooklyn look out their oversized windows at the panoramic view of the New York skyline, from Staten Island to the Bronx, they will have many of their angry neighbors in Fort Greene's historic district to thank.
Following protests against the height and design of the 11-story project, the Department of Buildings conducted an audit of the building plans. But rather than reduce the size of the building, the department concluded that the developers could legally add a 12th floor.


''The reaction to this was disgusted resignation,'' said Howard Pitsch, chairman of the Fort Greene Association, a civic group, which is now working to change zoning in the area, to eliminate the threat of additional towers. ''It is a done deal now.''

The building, which is due to be completed in December, will have 27 apartments, 20,800 square feet of office space and 19 parking spaces. It is under construction on the corner of Carlton Avenue and Greene Avenue, at the edge of the historic district of ornate row houses.

''This is like going in for an I.R.S. audit and getting a refund,'' said David Mandl, the chief executive of Meltzer/Mandl Architects, the firm that designed the building. ''It is something that never happens.''

Mr. Mandl said that at issue was a zoning provision called the ''height factor.'' The factor sets the maximum height of a building, based on its footprint, which can be calculated several ways. Eventually, the department came up with a slightly more liberal interpretation than the developers had used.

In negotiations with neighborhood groups, the developers, David Weiss and Jonathan Jacobs, agreed to replace a limestone street-level facade with terra-cotta-colored brick, which is common in the neighborhood.

Mr. Weiss said the building would include 10-foot ceilings, balconies for each apartment, large windows, private and shared outdoor decks and a gym.

Final prices have not been set for the building. But as apartment prices have risen in the city, the projected market prices have risen sharply, to an average of $600 a square foot, which would work out to about $660,000 for a two-bedroom at GreeneHouse. The extra floor allowed the expansion of the three three-bedroom penthouses into duplexes, he said.

Jerry Minsky, a broker with the Corcoran Group who will market the condos, said he believed that the building was gaining acceptance in the neighborhood. And the nearby low-rise buildings are a selling point. ''It is very unusual to have views like this that will never be compromised,'' he said. JOSH BARBANEL


Listings:
http://www.corcoran.com/property/listing.aspx?Region=NYC&listingid=731700

Also a thread here:
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=5489

Derek2k3
February 15th, 2005, 03:27 PM
Project # 2

Atlantic Terrace
Atlantic Avenue between South Portland & South Oxford Streets
10 stories
Magnusson Architecture & Planning
Residential Condominiums
80 units
Proposed

http://www.fifthave.org/AffordableHousing/HousingDevelopment/HousingDevelopmentProgramOverview.htm

The Atlantic Terrace Cornerstone project will be a 80-unit, limited equity cooperative housing project on Atlantic Avenue at South Portland Street in Fort Greene. This $14 million development, for which FAC and two other partners were chosen over seven other applicants including for-profit developers, will provide first-time homebuyer opportunities in a central location with excellent access to many types of services. A majority of the units (at least half) will be affordable to low- and moderate-income families. This project involves many financing partners, including the possibility of New Markets Tax Credits for development of ground floor retail spaces.

Archit_K
February 16th, 2005, 01:58 PM
Nice photos. When did you take them?
Feb. 13 2005

Archit_K
February 16th, 2005, 02:06 PM
Project #2

What a nice design.

Archit_K
February 16th, 2005, 07:15 PM
184 Adelphi St.
Designer Michael Marshall Architecture
Architect Brent M. Porter Arch. & Assoc.
Structural/Engineering Pulaski & Sirota Consulting Engr'g
Contractor J.C.C. Contracting

This is going to be a residential apartment. 4 stories. These pictures were taken yesterday. The completion date not sure yet.

Derek2k3
February 16th, 2005, 07:26 PM
You should ask Porter for a rendering. More of the GreeneHouse Condos.

Derek2k3
February 16th, 2005, 08:18 PM
375 Myrtle Avenue
150 Cleremont Avenue
6 stories 59 feet
Danois Architects
Dev-BRP Development/Myrtle Clermont LLC
Residential Condominiums
29 units 52,227 Sq. Ft.
Proposed 2005-Early 2006


http://www.brpdev.com/images_photos2/375_large8.jpg

Plans are here:
http://www.brpdev.com/property375.htm#


375 Myrtle Avenue / 150 Clermont Avenue

Coming in 2006…

375 Myrtle Avenue / 150 Clermont Avenue is a new 6 story concrete and brick face building located at the corner of Myrtle Avenue and Clermont Avenue, in Fort Greene, Brooklyn. This new development by BRP Development will replace the existing underutilization of the corner with 29 one- and two-bedroom apartments, approximately 7,000 SF of office and retail space, 1,800 SF of commercial storage spots, and 9 below-grade parking spaces.

The design, by Danois Architects, continues the street wall of Myrtle Avenue at a scale that is consistent with buildings found along the avenue. In an attempt to delicately intertwine the residential fabric of the neighborhood with the commercial strip, the wall of Myrtle Avenue conspicuously wraps around the corner, locating the residential and the office entrances along Clermont Avenue.

The apartments, will feature ample room sizes, provisions for washers and dryers, and plenty of closet space. Each two-bedroom apartment features two full bathrooms.Occupants will enjoy the amenities offered by an on-site exercise room, and outdoor recreation space.

Register to Brooklyn Eagle to read article:
http://www.brooklyneagle.com/categories/category.php?category_id=5&id=3508
Neighbors Look Forward to Proposed Myrtle Ave Development
by Linda Collins (linda@brooklyneagle.net), published online 01-05-2005

NoyokA
February 16th, 2005, 08:54 PM
The last building has a nice classic front, it belongs on a concourse.

ltjbukem73
February 16th, 2005, 09:02 PM
if you're remotely interested:

http://greenehousecondos.blogspot.com

Derek2k3
February 17th, 2005, 12:34 AM
120 Adelphi Street
11 stories 110 feet
Ernst Architect, PLLC
Dev-Adelphi Luxury Apartments, LLC
Residential
11 units
Under Construction 2004-2006


http://www.axisd.com/Adelphi%20Steel%20Rendering.gif

Axis Design Group

http://www.axisd.com/projects_Adelphi.htm
This 11-story steel framed Apartment building utilizes a pre-cast plank floor system for fast erection time as required by the owner. The site has existing buildings on two sides that require shoring of the foundations in order to construct the cellar level of the new building. ADGs detailing of the pre-cast seat connection to the steel has allowed for 10 foot floor-to-floor heights reducing building costs while achieving the owners goals.

Archit_K
February 18th, 2005, 01:40 AM
You should ask Porter for a rendering. More of the GreeneHouse Condos.
Good idea, I'll ask Brent tomorrow.

Archit_K
February 18th, 2005, 02:53 AM
81 Hanson Place
Architect Gregory Merryweather
Brooklyn, New York, winter 2001-
with c. hubert studio

http://home.earthlink.net/~gregway/home/home.html
He has before and after pictures on his website. The photos I took are old from spring 04. Cool design right?

Derek2k3
February 19th, 2005, 06:06 PM
81 Hanson Place
Christian Hubert Studio/David Fratianne Architect
4 stories 54 feet
Dev-David Salle/81 Hanson Place LLC
Work-Living Space
1 unit
Completed January 2002-2003

http://home.earthlink.net/~gregway/projects/projimgs/extpersp.JPG

http://www.dfratiannearch.com/projects/salle/001/index.htm

Program: Renovation and creation of a work and living space for a high-profile artist.

Collaboration: Christian Hubert Studio, Brooklyn, NY- Designer; David Fratianne Architect- Architect of Record.

Design Intent: To utilize the two existing buildings for the distinct studio and residence functions, while creating a seamless interior flow between work and living spaces. An existing 19th century schoolhouse and adjoining town-house were combined to create an artist residence and studio. The 2-1/2 story red brick and terra-cotta schoolhouse façade was restored and houses the artist studio and support spaces. The 4-story town-house was rebuilt as the residence, with a new stucco façade and zinc standing seam 'object' added to enlarge the interior spaces on the second, third, and fourth floors. Exterior spaces were added in the form of a roof terrace inset into the third floor between the two exist-ing structures. Additional balconies were added to the fourth floor writer's loft space.



http://www.dfratiannearch.com/profile/press.htm

"Stretching the Boundaries in Fort Greene"
by Deborah Kolben, Brooklyn Papers, October 6, 2003

A man in tennis whites making his way across Hanson Place in Fort Greene on a recent Saturday morning stoppped mid-block to peer up at something that had caught his eye.

"Look at that," he said as he placed his hands into a frame and peered through as if looking at modern art.

The object of note was not the monstrous brick-and-glass Atlantic Terminal going up just blocks away, but rather a four-story modern construction with a metallic outcropping looming in its shadow.

If the metallic roof and side didn't make the building noticeable enough, the fact that it was attached to an old red brick church certainly did.

These conjoined buildings at 81 Hanson Place and South Oxford Street belong to artist David Salle, who snatched them up several years ago and has been watching over the major renovations ever since.

Salle, an Oklahoma-born artist who has exhibited everywhere from the Guggenheim to the Whitney, will move into his quaint, 10,000-square-foot home and studio by the end of the year.

In addition to the architectural boldness of the structure- the contrast of the zinc protrusion with the old, brick building- also of note is that Salle was among the first artists to roll up canvas and head south to colonize a small neighborhood now known as TriBeCa.

Salle, 51, has since sold off his TriBeCa digs, according to his studio assistant, Mary Schwab, who said he was looking in Harlem and other parts of Brooklyn before he stumbled upon Hanson Place.

"He had been looking around other parts of Brooklyn but fell in love with Fort Greene," Schwab said, adding that it was not easy to find a space that met his requirements.

It also just so happened that Salle was friends with Harvey Lichtenstein, who was then president of the Brooklyn Academy of Music, and plans were already in the works for the new BAM cultural district, which will include thousands of square feet for artists (which is never bad for property values). Salle snatched up both buildings, which had been abandoned for decades, just as Fort Greene was embarking on its real estate boom.

Over the years the red-brick building had been used as everything from a Masonic Lodge to a school to a church. To create his new abode, Salle hired architect Christian Hubert, who had designed his TriBeCa loft back in 1984.

Hubert spent more than a year on the designs, which include the zinc-covered roof and side extension. While Salle wanted to add more space, the zoning for the area made it impossible. So instead Hubert came up with the metal outcropping that allowed him to "move space around".
Asked about how the buildings fit with the rest of the neighborhood, Hubert said ,"I think it's part of the upgrading that's going on in that area. A lot of new buildings going up, some of high architectural quality, others not so much."

Just across thestreet, an eight-story abandoned building is being refashioned into 30,000 square feet of office space for art organizations. And until October, an art installation by Clara Williams sits on the third floor. Every hour, life-size marionettes pop out of the third-story windows and enact a sequence from "The Price," a play by Arthur Miller about two estranged brothers who meet in their dead father's New York City brownstone two weeks before it is to be demolished.

Asked why Salle chose Fort Greene, David Fratianne, an architect working on the project said, "It's an edgy neighborhood and he's and edgy guy and the house is a little edgy."

Despite all that edge, not everybody is thrilled with what they see.

"It's exciting to have such a high-profile artist in the neighborhood," said Chris Gullian, a sculptor who lives just a few blocks away. "But I think that building is a blemish on an otherwise beautiful community of old buildings."

Derek2k3
February 23rd, 2005, 03:24 PM
70 Hanson Place
5 stories 60 feet
Scarano & Associate Architects
Dev-Meilich Aber
Residential Condominiums
9 units 9,406 Sq. Ft.
Proposed 2006?


http://www.scaranoarchitects.com/

A narrow site split by a striking masonary wall creates a unique, imaginative expression within a cultural community of Brooklyn.

Derek2k3
February 23rd, 2005, 03:46 PM
The Clermont Family Residence
65-67 Clermont Avenue
6 stories 60 feet
Bricolage Designs
Dev-The Wolf Group
Transitional Shelter-Hotel
24 units 14,479 Sq. Ft.
Completed 2001-2002


The Village Voice

http://www.villagevoice.com/news/0241,robbins,39044,5.html

Homeless Profit-Taking
Brooklyn Developer Pulls Bait and Switch on Neighborhood
by Tom Robbins
October 9 - 15, 2002 alert me by e-mail

October surprise: Concerned neighbors outside 65 Clermont Avenue. Developers originally planned rental housing at the site, but then leased it as a revolving-door hotel for homeless families.
photo: Lauren Fleishman
Not that it ever really left, but New York's homeless crisis is back—full throttle. And so are those who always figure out how to make money on people in need.

A case in point is one of the city's latest prospective homeless shelters, a spanking new six-story red-brick building that towers above its two- and three-story neighbors on a side street in Fort Greene, Brooklyn. A year ago, when developers first began work at 65 Clermont Avenue, they posted a large sign out front declaring that luxury apartments would be offered. This pleased many of the block's residents who had seen fires and abandonment wipe out the homes that once stood there. For years, they said, they had waited to see the rubble-strewn lots alongside the elevated Brooklyn-Queens Expressway become something other than a dumping ground.

"Every morning I would walk by and see them at work," recalled Virginia Schwartzberg, who lives three doors up from the site. "I'd say, 'Hi, howareya? Lookin' good.' They'd wave back. They must've thought we were so dumb."

The building rose three stories, fitting in snugly next to the modest brick and frame homes beside it on the residential block, which also has a public school and three day care centers. Then, as neighbors gaped, the structure grew another three floors, to a towering 60 feet, dwarfing all else around it.

In late summer, Margaret Delapp, who has lived next door for 30 years, watched as a truck pulled up and workers began unloading dozens of used mattresses and bunk beds. Another delivery contained freestanding closets. What are those for? she asked. "Shelter," was the response.

"That's when we found out they had turned it into a hotel," said Dan Borrero, 39, who grew up a block away, and runs Mr. D's Video across the street on Park Avenue. "Nobody knew a thing about it. Not the community board, not the politicians. No one."

The news was especially jarring to Borrero. He had purchased the lots three years earlier and installed chain-link fences to stop the illegal dumping. As the neighborhood improved, he got offers to sell. One was from a businessman who wanted to install pillars for a mammoth billboard sign. "I didn't like that idea," said Borrero. He later accepted $10,000 less from a Borough Park-based development firm called the Wolf Group, which told him it was going to erect three-family homes.

After he realized he had been victimized in a kind of bait-and-switch game, Borrero and other neighbors tried to reach the Wolf firm without success.

In the jargon of the homeless business, plans call for the building to serve as a "transitional shelter-hotel." Its 24 tiny rooms, each crowded with bunk bed, double bed, desk, bureau, and kitchen appliances, will serve as temporary homes for families while they are evaluated to see if they should be provided other housing by the city.

There were 37,000 homeless in the city's shelters last month, a figure that is mainly women and children. It is the most since 1987, when the population crested at 29,000 after rising in an ever-swelling wave through the early '80s. The numbers subsided only after public pressure compelled the city and state administrations, then led, respectively, by Ed Koch and Mario Cuomo, to fund new, low-cost housing. A new system of humane shelters was also created. Run by nonprofit organizations and staffed by specialists who helped the homeless cope with their individual problems, they provided day care, job training, drug counseling, and help in finding a new home.

Prior to these new transitional residences, the official policy was to send families to squalid, rundown hotels like the old Martinique on Herald Square, the Hotel Carter on West 43rd Street, and the execrable Brooklyn Arms, now demolished, that stood across from the Brooklyn Academy of Music. The city paid a fortune to the operators of these hotels, who treated their guests like cattle, made few repairs, and tried to bar the doors to anyone who sought to examine the horrific conditions. Like wartime profiteers, the hotel managers understood that, in an emergency, there are shovelfuls of money to be made.

Now, with homeless numbers soaring again, some landlords are reaching the simple economic conclusion that there is more profit to be made putting up the homeless than providing regular housing. The city no longer does business with the worst hotels, but it still pays top dollar. The going rate for a provider of emergency shelter is $90 to $95 a night, according to the city's Department of Homeless Services, which is struggling to cope with the exploding crisis. The developers of the Clermont Avenue building refused comment, but the emergency payments appear to be well above the income the owners might have expected had they offered their apartments as conventional rentals.

During the city's last homeless crisis, advocates finally drove home the point that as long as the city was going to spend huge amounts sheltering the homeless, it was better off directing the funds to nonprofit organizations, which would provide decent lodgings along with a panoply of services that helped pull the families out of homelessness.

"The [nonprofit] providers are the best equipped, the most sensitive to the needs of homeless New Yorkers," said Lauri Cole, the director of ASPHA/Tier 2 Coalition, an organization representing 58 nonprofit shelter operators. "They are the ones you would turn to first."

But interest in sustaining the push for more affordable housing and the creation of additional nonprofit shelters waned during the Giuliani and Pataki administrations. And now, under pressure of a decades-old court order that compels it to provide shelter for needy families, the city is once again scrambling to enlist private landlords motivated solely by profit.

Neighbors of the new shelter on Clermont Avenue, fearful of the old welfare-hotel-style conditions, met with city officials to ask if an experienced nonprofit organization could at least be brought in to manage the hotel. They said they were told that wasn't possible. "We are working aggressively to understand and address the issues raised by the community," said Jim Anderson, a spokesman for the homeless agency.

The neighbors had good reason for concern about operations at the new site. This February, the building's contractor, Moshe Junger, was sentenced to four months in prison for ignoring unsafe conditions that caused the death of one of his employees in a building collapse at another site in nearby Williamsburg.

The owner's architect, Henry Radusky, also ran afoul of authorities after he was found to have "repeatedly failed to follow the building code and the zoning resolution in his filings," according to the city's buildings department. Radusky has voluntarily surrendered his right to self-certify plans, officials said. The building plans for the Clermont Avenue project themselves reveal a tangle of often contradictory assertions. In order to meet minimum requirements of 400 square feet per apartment, the owner asked that city inspectors include the exterior and interior walls in their computations. Then, in an effort to avoid a requirement for secondary emergency exits, such as fire escapes, for the units, the owners asked that the square footage calculations be reduced. The owners also never filed an application to create a transient hotel, which buildings department officials said would be an improper use for the area, which is zoned for residential dwellings.

The hotel itself is to be managed by David Somerstein, of Somerstein Associates in Flushing, Queens. Somerstein operates more than a dozen separate for-profit homeless shelter sites in the Bronx, Manhattan, and Brooklyn. He did not respond to calls to his office.

Neighbors said they were not opposed to having the homeless as neighbors. "We wouldn't have any problem if they made this into permanent housing for the homeless," said Schwartzberg whose husband, Howard, teaches at several nonprofit homeless shelters. "But as a hotel, there could be as many as 200 strangers on this block every month, coming and going."

The first families are expected to arrive sometime this month, according to workers at the building. But the owners have already started earning revenue from the site. A large mesh banner advertising the new Eddie Murphy movie, I Spy, has been hung over the top four floors, covering the rear windows. The banner hangs neatly against the wall because there are no fire escapes to get in the way.

Gulcrapek
February 23rd, 2005, 06:29 PM
That could have gone up in the sixties.

Kolbster
February 23rd, 2005, 07:44 PM
That building is old news....its been completed for a year now. It's right near the farrogot houses

Derek2k3
February 24th, 2005, 02:06 PM
Project #10

Navy Yard Brig Site
Between Flushing and Park Avenues and Clermont and Vanderbilt Streets
Mixed Use
~400 apartments, as well as commercial and community space
Proposed


Apartments to replace
crumbling Brig

http://www.nydailynews.com/boroughs/story/217034p-186786c.html

BY MICHAEL SAUL
DAILY NEWS CITY HALL BUREAU

The Brig is coming down - and apartments are going up!
Mayor Bloomberg announced yesterday that a 14-person task force has been formed to guide redevelopment at the site of the Brig, a 104,600-square-foot former naval prison in Fort Greene.

The dilapidated building on the block bounded by Flushing, Vanderbilt, Park and Clermont Aves. has been a major blight on the neighborhood.

Now it will be demolished, paving the way for up to 400 new homes and commercial and community space.

"The essence of today, I suppose, if you want to have a headline is: Fewer jails and more housing," said Bloomberg.

"There's been a lot of misery on this site over the years," he added, "and now there's going to be a lot of joy."

The Brig, built in the early 1940s as a naval prison, became a detention center for the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service right after the Brooklyn Navy Yard closed in 1966.

In 1984 the city moved to take over the facility because of serious overcrowding in city prisons. The Brig served as a minimum-security prison for the city until it was closed in December 1994.

Its last occupants were volunteers involved in the cleanup effort after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

The city hopes to send out a request for proposal for the site's redevelopment next spring, with the goal of new housing to begin to go up in the fall of 2006.

The redeveloped site will include affordable and market-rate apartments as well as facilities for the homeless.

"Providing housing for all is our top priority," Brooklyn Borough President Marty Markowitz said. "Converting this Brig will unlock the site's potential, opening the door to an even greater future for this neighborhood."

Karen Neroulias, 26, a neighborhood resident who attended the news conference with her 8-month-old daughter, Isabelle, said she's concerned about the city using part of the site for homeless people.

Still, she said, "I'm glad that they're doing something with it - this building is a major eyesore."

Originally published on July 30, 2004


More info here:
http://www.ibrooklyn.com/site/aboutchamber/recentnews/current/77

Derek2k3
February 24th, 2005, 02:13 PM
62 Clermont Avenue
6 stories 57 feet
Sandor Weiss
Dev-George Rolf
25 units 35,176 Sq. Ft.
Residential Rentals
Under Construction 2003-2005


NYPost

http://www.nypost.com/realestate/31855.htm

FORT GREENE HIPSTERS MOVE A BLOCK NORTH. WHERE WILL THEY STOP?

By ALEC APPELBAUM

October 16, 2004 -- Pop quiz: What's Fort Greene's main street? If you said DeKalb Avenue, home to legendary cheesecake outpost Junior's and Long Island University, think again. Myrtle Avenue, parallel to DeKalb on the north side of Fort Greene Park, is hopping with new residents and chichi stores.

On maps, Myrtle Avenue has always run through the heart of Fort Greene, Clinton Hill and Bedford-Stuy. But upmarket merchants and condo buyers have only "discovered" it in the past couple of years. Perhaps that's because it's a longer haul from the subways than DeKalb; perhaps that's because a reputation as "Murder Avenue" had outlasted reality about crime rates.

With a bidding frenzy for properties close to BAM, however, new investors have started seeing Myrtle Avenue as an alternative. And a city project to build apartments and a supermarket at Fort Greene's edge by 2008 could make Myrtle the center of the diverse 'hood.

Alain Da Sylveira of the Corcoran Group says increasingly, clients consider Myrtle desirable, want to be near Fort Greene Park. "The park is the cornerstone of the community," says Da Sylveira, who notes that developers have started asking about sites on North Portland Avenue, across the park from Fort Greene's bistro-and-brownstone buzz.

Da Sylveira sold three condos, all at their asking prices, in a converted five-unit brownstone facing the park on Myrtle. The condos, called Washington Park, sold for roughly $700 per square foot - as high as $795,000 for a unit with a roof deck.

As places like natural-foods store Karrot replace 99-cent shops, the "edge" of gentrification keeps pushing northward. This territory differs sharply from central Fort Greene.

A couple of years ago, for instance, many Brooklyn newbies didn't know their borough had a Park Avenue. Now a Queens developer named George Rolf is putting up rentals - 30 units are expected - on Clermont and Park avenues, a block north of Myrtle.

At that corner, the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway is an iron viaduct running charmlessly overhead. Two blocks past Myrtle, at Flushing, there's a brick wall and a sign reading "Brooklyn Navy Yard." But neither of these things is a dead end.

In the Navy Yard, the city plans to tear down the old brig, located at the foot of Adelphi Street, next year. (The Bloomberg administration has been eyeing the site since last December, when it convened neighborhood leaders for a design workshop.) Specifics will emerge over the next year.

Still, Shaun Donovan, the city's Housing Preservation and Development commissioner, says the city hopes to follow "the broad outline" of that workshop's recommendations. Those include a central courtyard, with townhouses fronting Clermont and Vanderbilt avenues, and a taller building, possibly with views of the Manhattan skyline, on Flushing.

The project will almost certainly include 60,000 square feet of retail - probably a supermarket and another supplier of staples - at the corner of Flushing and Navy. It will also, says Donovan, "reflect a full range of incomes and include supportive housing" for people with special needs.

A mix is important, too, to the artists and families who've lived in the area since before the words "Fort Greene" showed up on expensive sweatshirts.

"As I'm getting older, having a safer neighborhood makes a difference," says Ragnar Naess, a potter and sculptor who bought a building on Hall Street between Myrtle and Park for $20,000 back in 1973. "The streets have always been varied with people of all ages and races. I hope that spirit stays."

John Faulk, an officer for HPD, agrees. "People appreciate that there are families on these blocks," he says. Faulk bought a 129-year-old Hall Street house 10 years ago for $143,000 with his wife, Mary Chang. They're still renovating the upstairs kitchen, and they love "participating" in the neighborhood.

But he sees a new market coming. A house on their block sold for $550,000 this spring.

There's reason to think these prices can still increase. Steiner Studios, a 15-acre movie production center with 75 soundstages, plans to open in the Navy Yard later this year. It promises to spur demand for convenience stores, dry cleaning and car services.

Transportation remains the area's weak link: The proposed supermarket site is a 10-minute hoof from the F train's York Street stop.

Nonetheless, Faulk says "bargains" remain available to buyers willing to invest their time. He says an "on-foot, building-by-building" search can turn up steals for less than $400,000. Hey, sometimes it takes a little effort to stay on the edge.

Derek2k3
February 24th, 2005, 02:43 PM
The Clermont Armory/Armory Towers I
167-171 Clermont Avenue
Scarano & Associate Architects
Dev-Strategic Construction Corp./IBEC
6 stories 62 feet
Residential Rental
111 units 149,202 Sq. Ft. (Overall)
Completed Summer 2000

The Clermont Armory/Armory Towers II
167-171 Clermont Avenue
Scarano & Associate Architects
Dev-Strategic Construction Corp./IBEC
6 stories 62 feet
Residential Rental
111 units 149,202 Sq. Ft. (Overall)
Completed Summer 2000

http://www.clermontarmory.com/pic9c_.jpg

http://www.clermontarmory.com/

The Clermont Armory is a new residential development built on the site of one of the oldest armories in New York City. Scheduled for occupancy by August 1, 2000, this 110 unit rental building is located at 171 Clermont Avenue in Fort Greene, one of the trendiest brownstone neighborhoods near downtown Brooklyn. Built in two wings behind the facade of the original armory, the apartments face an elevated courtyard. Three of the wrought iron trusses that spanned the original drill hall (built in 1873), were retained in the courtyard, exposed to the sky, in an attempt to capture some of the character of the original Clermont Armory.

The apartments, ranging in size from studios to three bedrooms, are equipped with dishwashers, state of the art intercom system, hardwood floors, and many have breathtaking views. Ten of the apartments on The Clermont Avenue side have spacious balconies facing a front atrium created behind the original facade. The building amenities include a doorman/concierge, elevators, a laundry room, video surveillance and magnetic locks with card access for tenants. On site attended parking is also available.

Mass transit is available within a 15 minute walking distance to the Dekalb Avenue Station (B,D,Q,N,R), Nevins Street Station (2,3,4,5), or the Clinton-Washington Station (G). Bus service (B54) is also available at Myrtle Avenue, connecting to the Jay Street Station (A,C,F) or the Lawrence Street Station (N,R). (See area maps).

This project has been financed by the "New Housing Opportunities" Program of the NYC Housing Development Corporation, providing rental units targeted to middle income families or persons. Please refer to the application for more detailed program requirements and guidelines.


NYCHDC
http://www.nychdc.com/pressroom/pr_armory.htm

Oldest Standing Armory in NYC Converted to Middle Income Housing
111 Unique Apartments Created in Fort Greene Through Successful HDC Program

New York, NY, September 20, 2000
BROOKLYN (September 6, 2000) - New York City Housing Development Corporation (HDC) President Russell A. Harding cut a ribbon today at the Armory Towers, commemorating the opening of 111-units of unique middle-income housing. The ceremony took place in the large central courtyard of the twin, six-story elevator buildings. The Armory, located in the historic Fort Greene section of Brooklyn, has been rehabilitated through HDC's middle-income New Housing Opportunities Program (New HOP).

Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani launched the New Housing Opportunities Program in October 1997 as the first effort by the City in more than 25 years to create housing for middle-income New Yorkers. The program finances the new construction or substantial rehabilitation of rental and limited-equity cooperative housing that is affordable to moderate and middle-income families in all five boroughs.

"What makes New HOP so remarkable is the immediate impact it has had in producing much needed housing, as well as its positive influence on many communities throughout New York City," said HDC President Russell A. Harding. "In just 30 months, 2,000 units have been financed, and many abandoned buildings like the Clermont Armory have been restored, bringing with them renewed neighborhood vitality."

Located at 171 Clermont Avenue, the former armory was converted into two six-story elevator buildings connected by a large landscaped central courtyard. The development's 111 units include 25 studios, 45 one-bedroom units, 35 two-bedroom units, and 5 three-bedroom units, plus a superintendent's apartment. In addition, the project features 8,000 square feet of commercial space occupied by a charter school, offering a unique learning opportunity for neighborhood children. A 113-space parking garage is located in the armory's former rifle range.

Through New HOP, HDC issues taxable bonds to provide long-term, fixed-rate financing for rental and cooperative housing projects. In addition, HDC uses its corporate reserves to provide second mortgage loans of up to $40,000 per unit to ensure that rents are affordable.

The Clermont Armory was originally constructed in 1873 and is the oldest standing armory in New York City. The Armory was built for the New York State 23rd Regiment, which saw military action in the Civil War, World War I and at Normandy in World War II. Until the mid-60's, the Armory was used by the Department of Sanitation as a storage warehouse. The building then stood vacant for many years, with vandals looting and destroying much of the original structure. In 1995, the developers, Samy and Hesky Brahimy, along with John Frezza, purchased the property at a City auction.

"After debating several options, including a movie studio, we decided on rental apartments based on the guidelines of HDC's middle-income housing loan program," said Mr. Frezza, who is also a founding board member of the New York State Association For Affordable Housing (NYSAFAH). "The availability of financing, inclusive of interest and capital subsidies through the HDC middle-income loan program, have helped to make this unique project feasible in the City's effort to further expand the development of affordable housing."

Armory Towers is well suited to Ft. Greene. With extensive housing development and new shops and restaurants, it is an especially attractive community for middle-income residents. Located nearby is Fort Greene Park, a 30-acre recreational site designed by Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux, the designers of Central Park and Prospect Park.

"HDC is to be commended for its initiative in producing these 111 new middle-income housing units," said Rep. Edolphus "Ed" Towns, who has served Brooklyn's 10th Congressional District, the site of Armory Towers, since January 1983. "For the first time in over a quarter of a century, NYC is putting families first."

HDC provided a $12,540,000 construction loan for the Clermont Armory, and the European American Bank (EAB) guaranteed HDC's construction loan with a letter of credit. Now that the project is completed, HDC holds a $10,340,000 million permanent mortgage. HDC is also providing a $2,200,000 second mortgage loan from its corporate reserves at an interest rate of one percent.

"EAB is proud to be involved in this innovative housing initiative in Brooklyn. We look forward to a long working relationship with the Housing Development Corporation. Innovative projects such as the Armory Towers are good for New York and New Yorkers alike," said Richard Roberto, president of the EAB Community Development Corporation.

Ground floor commercial space at Armory Towers will be occupied by the newly created Community Partnership Charter School, which will welcome its first students on September 7th. "I'm thrilled to be a part of such an exciting endeavor here in the Armory Towers in Fort Greene," said Ellen Rice, Director of the school. "I am confident that the Community Partnership School will be a tremendous success in the community partnering with local institutions, mentors and neighborhood business."

Through HDC, the City provides access to low cost financing for the development of low- and middle-income housing. HDC financing gives developers the opportunity to create new affordable housing units throughout New York City.

Archit_K
February 24th, 2005, 05:00 PM
That building was featured in the Akon Video "Locked Up". Wow it's funny to think that at school here they refer Vincent A. Stabile, a freshmen dormitory on campus as a prison. The prison looks similar like Vincent A. Stabile. LOL

Archit_K
February 28th, 2005, 10:02 PM
Atlantic Terminal
Floors:14
Height 287ft
Architect: Cesar pelli and Swanke Hayden Connell
Year: 2003-2005
Location: 2 hanson Place
Style: Postmodern

Atlantic Terminal Office Building in Downtown Brooklyn

Brooklyn's Progress
July 2003

The Atlantic Terminal Office Building,a 10-story, 400,000 square foot office building constructed above a four-story, 375,000 square foot retail shopping center will offer a vast array of appealing shopping and dining experiences at a convenient location above the largest public transportation hub in Brooklyn and the third largest in New York City.

Underneath the office and retail center are renovated Long Island Railroad and subway stations. The land is being leased from the Metropolitan Transportation Authority and the Long Island Railroad Company (LIRR).

The Bank of New York will make its new home at the Atlantic Terminal Office Building, leasing 320,000 square feet of office space on eight floors. Fifteen hundred Bank employees will commence working in the new building in May 2004. Another two floors containing 80,000 square feet of office space are available for lease. In September 2002, the New York City Industrial Development Agency approved $114 million in Liberty Bonds for the permanent financing of the office building.

“The Atlantic Terminal office building will make an important contribution to the continuing revitalization of Downtown Brooklyn,” said Bruce C. Ratner, president and CEO of Forest City Ratner Companies. “As the new home of the Bank of New York, it will be a major catalyst in generating hundreds of jobs and bringing scores of workers to the heart of Downtown Brooklyn.”

When completed, the construction of The Atlantic Terminal Office Building will have employed close to 1,000 construction workers; when fully occupied, it is estimated that more than 1,700 employees will work in the building. The 375,000 square foot retail complex is anchored by a 194,000-square-foot Target discount department store. Also included are two restaurants, Red Lobster and Outback Steakhouse. The retail portion of Atlantic Terminal will generate some 1,000 new positions as well as $16 million in new sales tax revenues annually.

The architectural firm of Swanke Hayden Connell designed the Atlantic Terminal Office Building. A horizontal band of glass at the fifth floor sky lobby “lifts” the office tower above the retail base, designed by Hardy Holzman Pfeiffer.

The developer of the Atlantic Terminal Office Building, Forest City Ratner Companies (FCRC), is an affiliate of Cleveland-based Forest City Enterprises and is the largest publicly traded development company and a major mixed-used property owner and developer in the United States. Noteworthy FCRC projects include the Hilton Times Square Hotel, Entertainment, and Retail Development; the Embassy Suites Hotel in Battery Park City; and a joint venture formed with The New York Times Company to develop and own the new New York Times Headquarters Building in midtown Manhattan.

Pictures I took during the Spring of 2004.

Derek2k3
March 3rd, 2005, 12:26 AM
Atlantic Terminal Mall Tower
139 Flatbush Avenue
Swanke Hayden & Connell Architects
Dev-Forest City Ratner (FC Hanson Office Associates)
14 stories 271/284/295 feet
Mixed Use: 786,251
Commercial Office:411,000 sq. ft. /470,000 SF
Retail: 375,000 Sq. Ft.
Completed 2002-June 2004

http://www.fcrc.com/images%5Cprojects%5Catlanticterminal.jpg
http://www.fcrc.com/project_main1.asp?id=15&cc=1&rid=15

http://www.shca.com/images/content/archive/Atlantic-01.jpg

Swanke Hayden & Connell Architects

http://www.shca.com/portfolio/default.asp?svcId=1&sctId=410&thumb=Atlantic-03.jpg&credit=&projType=Architecture

Atlantic Terminal
Brooklyn, New York

This 10-story, 295 ft high 400, 000 sq ft. office tower crowns a four-story, 375, 000sq. ft retail shopping center, which in turn, sits atop the largest public transportation hub in Brooklyn. The multi-use structure has quickly become a prominent destination in one of New York City’s largest urban renewal areas. In designing the tower SHCA had to accommodate the transit system underneath and integrate the structure into the surrounding residential neighborhood without competing with the adjacent Williamsburg Bank Tower--a landmark of downtown Brooklyn. SHCA created a façade that employs masonry as well as metal windows and terra-cotta rain-screen panels to harmonize with its neighbors. A horizontal glass band “lifts” the offices visually above the upgraded retail base. To address the transit issues, SHCA designed a new ground floor lobby within the retail base with four shuttle elevators bringing visitors to the fifth-floor sky-lobby.



Atlantic Terminal Office Building in Downtown Brooklyn

http://www.ibrooklyn.com/site/newsevents/brooklynprogressonline/72003/article/242

Brooklyn's Progress
July 2003

The Atlantic Terminal Office Building,a 10-story, 400,000 square foot office building constructed above a four-story, 375,000 square foot retail shopping center will offer a vast array of appealing shopping and dining experiences at a convenient location above the largest public transportation hub in Brooklyn and the third largest in New York City.

Underneath the office and retail center are renovated Long Island Railroad and subway stations. The land is being leased from the Metropolitan Transportation Authority and the Long Island Railroad Company (LIRR).

The Bank of New York will make its new home at the Atlantic Terminal Office Building, leasing 320,000 square feet of office space on eight floors. Fifteen hundred Bank employees will commence working in the new building in May 2004. Another two floors containing 80,000 square feet of office space are available for lease. In September 2002, the New York City Industrial Development Agency approved $114 million in Liberty Bonds for the permanent financing of the office building.

“The Atlantic Terminal office building will make an important contribution to the continuing revitalization of Downtown Brooklyn,” said Bruce C. Ratner, president and CEO of Forest City Ratner Companies. “As the new home of the Bank of New York, it will be a major catalyst in generating hundreds of jobs and bringing scores of workers to the heart of Downtown Brooklyn.”

When completed, the construction of The Atlantic Terminal Office Building will have employed close to 1,000 construction workers; when fully occupied, it is estimated that more than 1,700 employees will work in the building. The 375,000 square foot retail complex is anchored by a 194,000-square-foot Target discount department store. Also included are two restaurants, Red Lobster and Outback Steakhouse. The retail portion of Atlantic Terminal will generate some 1,000 new positions as well as $16 million in new sales tax revenues annually.

The architectural firm of Swanke Hayden Connell designed the Atlantic Terminal Office Building. A horizontal band of glass at the fifth floor sky lobby “lifts” the office tower above the retail base, designed by Hardy Holzman Pfeiffer.

The developer of the Atlantic Terminal Office Building, Forest City Ratner Companies (FCRC), is an affiliate of Cleveland-based Forest City Enterprises and is the largest publicly traded development company and a major mixed-used property owner and developer in the United States. Noteworthy FCRC projects include the Hilton Times Square Hotel, Entertainment, and Retail Development; the Embassy Suites Hotel in Battery Park City; and a joint venture formed with The New York Times Company to develop and own the new New York Times Headquarters Building in midtown Manhattan.

NewYorkYankee
March 3rd, 2005, 06:38 AM
I like that last one!

Archit_K
March 3rd, 2005, 01:19 PM
Sexy renderings, but ugly building.

NoyokA
March 3rd, 2005, 02:10 PM
Atlantic Mall is entirely very suburban. It'll look decent only when more urban developments follow as planned.

Derek2k3
March 3rd, 2005, 10:24 PM
Project #14

729 Fulton Street
Dev-Abdul Jawad
GHS Architects
4 stories 48 feet
Residential
5,986 Sq. Ft. 3 units
Under Construction 2005

this is as basic as it gets.

Derek2k3
March 3rd, 2005, 10:47 PM
Project #15

The Greens Condos
35 South Elliot Place
4 stories 40 feet
Wuest and DiFara and Associates/Armando Porto Architect
Dev-Soli Raanan
Residential Condominium
5 units 6,875 Sq. Ft.
Completed 2002-2004

http://www.corcoran.com/property/nd/photo/south_elliot_lg.jpg

Virtual tour.
http://www.digit-tec.com/vr-tours/corcoran/35southelliot-dup/2ndbedroom.htm

http://www.corcoran.com/property/nd/index.asp?where=manh&p=1

35 South Elliot
Brooklyn,NY11217

Overview
Newly constructed to landmark specifications with attention to detail. This 5 unit building sits on one of the prime tree lined blocks of the historic Fort Greene neighborhood. All of the units offer low monthly carrying costs, individually controlled central heat and air-conditioning, recessed lighting, stainless steel appliances, designer tiles on kitchen countertops and bathroom walls, hardwood floors, excellent natural light and storage spaces. The larger units also feature working fireplaces with granite mantels. Just steps form beautiful Fort Greene Park, BAM, shopping and dining. A, C, G, B, D, Q, M, N, R, 2,3,4,5 subway lines and the Long Island Railroad all within walking distance.
Fort Greene, with its tree lined blocks of turn-of-the-century townhouses and it’s wealth of cultural institutions, is one of the city’s most dynamic and beautiful neighborhoods. The areas main attraction is also its namesake. Fort Greene Park was designed by Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux of Central Park fame. It opened in 1847 on the sight of Fort Putnam where Revolutionary War General Nathanial Greene defended Washington’s army against the British. The thirty acre park is home to tennis courts and playgrounds, and is host to events such as concerts, poetry readings, and other civic gatherings. Fort Greene has been home to artists and writers from Walt Whitman to Spike Lee as well as Professionals and families of all backgrounds and races. This rich mix has made it one of Brooklyn’s hottest neighborhoods and a great place to call home.

How dare they try and imitate (poorly) a brownstone.

Derek2k3
March 3rd, 2005, 10:53 PM
Project #16

364 Myrtle Avenue
4 stories 60 feet
Scarano & Associates Architects
Dev-Nadau Ben-Eliezer
Mixed-Use
3 units 8,109 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2006

I think the previous building burned down. Sixty feet will be quite prominent on Myrtle.

ltjbukem73
March 3rd, 2005, 10:55 PM
wait, these will be full floor almost 2000 sq ft units?
are these rental or sales?

Derek2k3
March 3rd, 2005, 11:37 PM
I noticed that too. The ground floor is probably retail but strange fenestration for 1 unit of residential per floor still.

Derek2k3
March 11th, 2005, 05:06 PM
Atlantic Terminal Mall Tower
139 Flatbush Avenue
Swanke Hayden & Connell Architects
Dev-Forest City Ratner (FC Hanson Office Associates)
14 stories 271/284/295 feet
Mixed Use: 786,251
Commercial Office:411,000 sq. ft. /470,000 SF
Retail: 375,000 Sq. Ft.
Completed 2002-June 2004



http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/40686560.jpg
Photo Credit: Forest City Enterprises

Full size here:
http://www.forestcity.net/press_property_off.html

alex ballard
March 11th, 2005, 06:12 PM
I remember when Ft Greene was dirty and the projects we're horrifing. How are the projects now? Is this neighborhood gentrifing too?

Derek2k3
March 12th, 2005, 09:52 AM
They're not too bad, there are far worse in Brooklyn. Many of the occupants seem like hard working people. Too bad they're ugly and so many of them.

Gulcrapek
March 12th, 2005, 01:16 PM
The Ingersoll Houses are getting a makeover though. You've probably seen the thing on Scarano's site. Only problem is the new design is tacky pomo.

Derek2k3
April 5th, 2005, 01:59 AM
Prison Ship Martyrs Monument

http://www.fortgreenepark.org/pages/prisonship.htm

The Monument for the Prison Ship Martyrs that stands today in the heart of Fort Greene Park is actually the third incarnation of this sacred memorial. The story of the horrid Prison Ships that were anchored in Wallabout Bay -- and the ghastly conditions suffered by American men, woman & children POWs imprisoned on them during the Revolutionary War -- is one of the most disturbing chapters in American History.

Long after the war was over, bones of the POWs would regularly wash up along the shores of Brooklyn and Long Island. These bones were collected by Brooklynites with the hopes of creating a permanent resting place for the remains of the brave Prison Ship Martyrs. The first monument was erected in the early 1800s by the Tammany Society of New York. It was located near the Brooklyn Navy Yard waterfront in what is now called Vinegar Hill.

By the mid-1800s, the original monument was in a state of disrepair and neglect. By 1873 a large stone crypt was constructed in the heart of what is now Fort Greene Park (then called Washington Park), and the bones were re-interred in the crypt. A small monument was erected on the hill above the crypt.

By the close of the 19th century, funds were finally raised for a grander more fitting monument for the Prison Ship Martyrs. The prestigeous architectural firm of McKim. Meade and White was commissioned to design the large 148 ft. tower which stands today in the park. It was univeiled in 1908 with a grand ribbon-cutting ceremony presided over by President Taft. The monument originally housed a staircase and elevator to the top observation deck, which featured a lighted urn and beacon of light which could be seen for miles. The elevator was operational until the 1930s when it, and the monument, fell into disrepair due to a shortage of public funds, neglect and lack of community interest. The elevator was eventually removed by the city in the early 1970s.

They are planning to add lighting and open up the observation deck on top along with renovating the entire park.
http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/41669222.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/41669223.jpg


Links:
http://www.fortgreenepark.org
http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~promaine/martyrs/
http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~promaine/martyrs/martyrs-all.html
[url]http://Do a google search!

Gulcrapek
April 5th, 2005, 03:54 PM
That's a cool plan, just don't know how many more people it will attract... but even if revenue is not the point, it'll be another marvelous place to go/see.

ltjbukem73
April 5th, 2005, 04:39 PM
they are located on adelphi between dekalb and willoughby..

http://ltjbukem.blogspot.com/2005/04/greene-scene-condos.html

Derek2k3
April 18th, 2005, 09:56 PM
Is this the tallest residential building in Brooklyn?

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42260465.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42260494.jpg
Atlantic Yards will dwarf it.

Gulcrapek
April 18th, 2005, 10:17 PM
I think so, or the taller of the Bay Ridge couple.

It's the tallest housing project.

Kolbster
April 18th, 2005, 11:12 PM
The tallest, hmmm i think as of now yes.

Derek2k3
April 29th, 2005, 05:21 PM
Project #17

30-32 Carlton Avenue
7 stories
Hyun Kyung (Agnes Im) of Scarano & Associates Architects
Residential
8 units 9,367 Sq. Ft.
Proposed March 2006

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42726678.jpg




Interesting design, if a little monolithic..

Scarano & Associates Architects
http://scaranoarchitects.com/

"Creating a solid surface by using aluminum louvers as screens achieves an effect through which the eye reads the building as a geometric shape; a stone box divided by a cross shape filled in by louvers. Subtle detail variances, such as the louvers wrapping around the building or the offset window in the dormers, give this otherwise symmetric building the much needed asymmetry it deserves."

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42785016.jpg

http://www.mapquest.com/maps/map.adp?formtype=address&searchtype=address&country=US&addtohistory=&1ahXX=&address=30-32+Carlton+Avenue&city=brooklyn&state=ny&zipcode=
Map

Derek2k3
April 29th, 2005, 05:29 PM
Project #18

235 Cumberland Street
4 stories 38 feet
Benjamin Ellis
Dev-Eve Havlicek
Residential
4 units 8,870 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42727399.jpg

http://www.mapquest.com/maps/map.adp?formtype=address&searchtype=address&country=US&addtohistory=&1ahXX=&address=235+Cumberland+Street&city=brooklyn&state=ny&zipcode=
Map

Derek2k3
May 1st, 2005, 12:31 PM
Project #1

The GreeneHouse Condos
383 Carlton Avenue/43 Greene Avenue
12 stories 128 feet
Meltzer Mandl Architects
Dev-David Weiss of Carlton Adelphi LLC
Residential Condominiums
27 units 67,919 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2003-Early 2005

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42798928.jpg

$1G a square foot
Ft. Greene condos hit record high
By Jess Wisloski
The Brooklyn Papers

http://www.brooklynpapers.com/html/issues/_vol28/28_16/28_16nets2.html

Brooklyn’s real estate boom has reached a new plateau — the $1,000-a-square-foot condominium apartment.

But according to an executive brokering sales at the building that is setting the new market high, what is surprising is not that wealthy New Yorkers are willing to fork over all that moolah to live here — a walkup on Columbia Heights along the Brooklyn Heights promenade fetched $9 million this year and another on that skyline-view stretch is on the market for $20 million — it’s where this new peak is cresting.

No, it’s not the waterside loft-ridden DUMBO, where recent open houses held by The Developers Group and Leviev Boymelgreen Developers had buyers waiting for a peek at an offsite model home in overnight queues around the block. Nor is it in the tree-lined brownstone colonies of Park Slope or Brooklyn Heights.

Instead, it is leafy, hilly Fort Greene.

Known for the Brooklyn Academy of Music, a slew of French restaurants and a burgeoning African-influenced strip of stores and restaurants along Fulton Street, the once crime-ridden and still edgy neighborhood, settled around a landmark park, features quaint architectural variety, a thriving art scene and a rich ethnic mix of residents.

Jerry Minsky, senior vice president with Corcoran Properties, said the Greene House condominiums, at 383 Carlton St. at Greene Avenue, started listing units on Nov. 30, and since then, 22 of the 27 units have sold, the majority at more than $1,000 a square foot. The three penthouse units sold for more than $1.2 million each.

Paul Palazzo, an executive member of the Fort Greene Association, said he and several residents of Carlton Street organized demonstrations outside of the building during weekend open houses.

The association asked the Department of Buildings to audit the design for the 11-story Greene House, which towers over its walkup brick and brownstone neighbors.

While the Buildings Department audit, completed early last year, did provide a kind of community-level review of architect Marvin Metzler’s design, Palazzo said that in the end it mainly served to address minor aesthetic and safety issues.

“There were some things that did come up in the audit that [the architects] needed to verify and change,” he said. “Their response was to make it go higher.” The Greene House sits literally just outside the Fort Greene Historic District, which bars such a tall building, so its views will never be hampered by future developments.

“The historic districts were drawn very poorly in the 1978 designation,” said Palazzo, who chastised Greene House developers David Weiss and Jonathan Jacobs — who made their name with developments in TriBeCa and the East Village — for being “incredibly belligerent and not responsive to any requests from the community.”

Minksy said, however, it was their responsiveness — to buyers, at least — that was able to lure such high prices in Brooklyn.

“They did understand this process, and they did understand because they’d been in the East Village before they’d been here,” he said. “I’ll admit it’s not cheap, but you’re getting something, you’re actually getting something for your money. They will sit down, literally for hours. to design the unit with [buyers]. They really don’t have that Brooklyn kind of mentality.

“It was a slightly foreign concept, but these developers were ahead of their game,” said Minsky, the exclusive agent for the condominiums.

A stalwart of the “brownstone generation” that bought up Downtown Brooklyn neighborhoods more than 20 years ago, Minksy — who lives in Fort Greene — said he hedged when first offered the listing.

Calling it “originally conceived of as a slightly ambiguous project for this area,” he said he was eventually reassured after meeting the developers.

“What first seemed to be a little anxiety-producing for me — because I’m on the brownstone end — has turned out to be a very pleasant experience,” he said, adding he came very close to buying one of the unit’s himself.

Each of the 27 new units, which are situated three per floor, feature 10-foot ceilings, central air conditioning and heat, new appliances and, says Minsky, “phenomenal” views of the neighborhood, the park and the distant harbor.

The glassed-in entrance will have a “very lounge-like feel,” and the building will have a 24-hour gym. The south-, east- and west-facing views make for sunny one- two- and three- bedroom apartments for the new owners, who Minsky said were “experienced, high-end Manhattan people who understand visible signs of growth in the area [and] they don’t feel like they’re compromising what they would have a few years ago.”

Palazzo called those same gorgeous views the reason the neighboring buildings would depreciate in value.

“When the historic district was designated, the boundaries were done very poorly,” he reiterated. “As a result there are three houses that were in the historic district that have basically degraded because of that building.”

Though he said the Fort Greene Association would remain vigilant with respect to future developments, and noted that a demonstration last weekend showed the neighbors’ “unified stance,” they had no plans to abdicate their welcoming-committee responsibilities, either.

“We are going to welcome the people in the building into the community, because it is now in the community. We don’t like the fact that the building — the edifice of it — is not sympathetic to the community; we hope that the people in the building are,” he said.

Chris Havens, marketing manager of Two Tress, the DUMBO-based development company of David and Jed Walentas, said that occasionally some of the company’s more established DUMBO properties, “on some special new units,” sell for $1,000 per square foot.

Developers Group Executive Vice President Highlyann Krasnow said that four weeks ago, it listed penthouse and ninth four units in DUMBO for over $1,000 a foot. She said she expects the trend to increase.

Minsky said the Greene House condo has raised the bar for standards of design and construction, adding that he has had “so many Brooklyn developers call me on the sly to see how they did it.”

“You’re not going to be able to put together a sloppy building after this one,” said the broker. “These are very, very sophisticated apartments.”


Check out discussionon browstoner about the architectural character the building; some interesting opinions.
http://brownstoner.com/brownstoner/archives/2005/04/greene_house_co_1.html

Derek2k3
May 6th, 2005, 11:22 AM
Project # 19

Fort Greene Town House
22 Fort Greene Place
3/4 stories 40 feet
Christoff:Finio architecture
Dev-Miro and Weiss
Residential Town House
1 unit 3,044 Sq. Ft.
Completed 2003

http://www.christofffinio.com/images/miro_model01.jpg

Christoff:Finio architecture
Fort Greene House

http://www.christofffinio.com/cfarch_nocheck_nav.html

The foundation of our proposal is a new layer of urban infrastructure that would reinvent the New York City skyline: a “farm” of wind turbines that would gradually spread across the rooftops of the city, standing as the silent witnesses to our loss and as the symbolic divestment of our dependence on foreign oil. The turbines’ rotating arms would shape a public space of memory far beyond the confines of the World Trade Center site, generating physical and emotional energy from the same wind that keeps planes aloft, carries clouds of debris, fuels fires, and sustains life.

We propose that the New York City Zoning Resolution be amended to require all residential and commercial buildings over a certain gross area to generate a percentage of their own electrical consumption using rooftop wind turbines that harness the power of prevailing winds. The percentage would be determined as a factor of the building’s size and use. For practical reasons, these requirements would be phased in over the course of several years.



Upscale, Downscale
Michael Weschler for The New York Times
By RAUL A. BARRENECHE
Published: May 5, 2005

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/05/05/garden/05fort.html

THE four-story town house that Darcy Miro and Lars Weiss built on a weedy lot in Fort Greene, Brooklyn, contains no fancy finishes - no mahogany floors or plaster moldings. On the contrary, there are hardly any finishes at all, barely even drywall, among the exposed joists, electrical conduits and ventilation ducts.

These rooms are determinedly dressed down and studiously casual, with a low-grade flooring normally covered by carpets or tile, and stairs made of humble pine nailed in place, like those contractors put up for temporary use.

By omitting the polish, Ms. Miro, an artist and jewelry designer, and Mr. Weiss, an indie music producer, were able to build their 4,200-square-foot home with two studios for $550,000, or about $130 a square foot (not including the cost of the land). By contrast, a four-story town house a block away is currently listed at $2.2 million.

The result is a mix of the rough-edged and refined, with coarse brick walls offset by floral wallpaper based on a Dagobert Peche design from 1922, and industrial metal railings gliding by a bedroom with a 1920's Italian dresser and a whimsical Finnish chandelier. It's as if a do-it-yourself Brooklyn hipster had set up house with a TriBeCa furniture dealer. In fact, the house is not unlike Ms. Miro's metal jewelry, which has an industrial, careworn beauty.....
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/05/05/garden/05fort.html

http://www.christofffinio.com/images/miro_front01_v.jpg
the front façade (photo: Jean-Francois Jussaud)

Links:
http://www.mapquest.com/maps/map.adp?formtype=address&searchtype=address&country=US&addtohistory=&1ahXX=&address=22+Fort+Greene+Place&city=brooklyn&state=ny&zipcode=
Map

http://brownstoner.com/brownstoner/archives/2005/05/diy_townhouse_i.html#trackbacks
Brownstoner
DIY Townhouse in Fort Greene

http://www.aiany.org/designawards/2004/architecture/375.htm

Derek2k3
May 6th, 2005, 11:40 AM
Project #20

208 Vanderbilt Avenue
4 stories 40 feet
David Hotson Architect
Dev-James Casebere
Residential
42 units (error?) 3,922 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2004-2005

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/43026953/medium.jpg

http://www.mapquest.com/maps/map.adp?formtype=address&searchtype=address&country=US&addtohistory=&1ahXX=&address=208+Vanderbilt+Avenue&city=brooklyn&state=ny&zipcode=
Map

Derek2k3
May 6th, 2005, 05:49 PM
Demolition begins.


Project #10

Navy Yard Brig Site
Between Flushing and Park Avenues and Clermont and Vanderbilt Streets
Mixed Use
~400 apartments, as well as commercial and community space
Proposed

As It Faces Demolition, a Look Back at the Navy Yard's Former Brig
by JENNIFER BLEYER
April 11, 2005
New York Times

http://gothamgazette.com/community/33/news/1444

For 11 years, the spooky old jail has been empty. Its barbed wire has rusted. Its cellblocks were lighted at night to keep trespassers at bay. Of the neighbors who noticed, most were pleased that last week, preparatory work for its demolition had quietly begun.

Still, the song of the Navy brig is sung by the few who remember its past, which began in 1941, when the number of sailors ballooned and new barracks and a recruiting center were built on Flushing Avenue outside the Navy Yard. During and after World War II, the building was used as a Navy prison, and busy it was.

The sailors were wild and woolly fellows who built and fixed ships in the yard by day and drank in the saloons on Myrtle Avenue by night. Ed Carter, a longtime resident and retired social worker, remembers how sailors from the South made Brooklyn youngsters laugh with their twangy hollers of "howdy" and invited them to parties and dances.

"When the guys got drunk and fought in the bars, the military police would come and throw them in the brig," Mr. Carter said. More than a place for real criminals, it was a place where the whiskey-soaked slept it off until the morning.

A neighbor of Mr. Carter's, Joe Vollaro, said on the first floor there was a commissary and mess hall, where sailors nudged workers to encourage them to slip an extra hamburger onto their tray.

After the Navy left the building in 1966, the brig became a detention center for the United States Immigration and Naturalization Service. In 1984, despite strenuous local opposition, it became a minimum-security prison for the city, which was seeking to relieve overcrowding at Rikers Island. In 1994, it was closed.

Since 2003, the city's Department of Housing Preservation and Development and a community task force have worked to plan to demolish the brig and replace it with a complex of about 400 units of mixed-income housing, along with stores and community space.

Memories of Navy high jinks aside, most local residents think the redevelopment of the site, after its anticipated 18-month demolition, could not come a day too soon.

"A small percentage think it's a shame the building can't be renovated because it has historical value," said Louise Greene, a brig neighbor for 35 years and a member of the task force. "Normally, I am all for saving things. But I think in this case, it can go."

Posted by: Joshua Brustein


http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/43036124.jpg http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/43036126.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/43036132.jpg

Derek2k3
June 7th, 2005, 12:37 PM
Project #21

470 Vanderbilt Avenue
11 stories 150 feet (Residential Conversion)
Karl Fischer Architect
Dev-Vanderbilt Holdings LLC (The Carlyle Group)
Residential
800 units 850,000 Sq. Ft. (Total)
Proposed 2007

470 Vanderbilt Avenue Lot I
~24 stories
Karl Fischer Architect
Dev-Vanderbilt Holdings LLC
Residential
800 units 850,000 Sq. Ft. (Total)
Proposed 2007

470 Vanderbilt Avenue Lot II
~15 stories
Karl Fischer Architect
Dev-Vanderbilt Holdings LLC
Residential
800 units 850,000 Sq. Ft. (Total)
Proposed 2007

470 Vanderbilt Avenue Lot III
~5 stories
Karl Fischer Architect
Dev-Vanderbilt Holdings LLC
Residential
800 units 850,000 Sq. Ft. (Total)
Proposed 2007



http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44467252.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44467253.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44467254/original.jpg
Site in blue. Atlantic Yards in red.

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44467255.jpg
The existing telecomm carrier hotel to be converted

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44467250.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44467251.jpg


http://www.mapquest.com/maps/map.adp?formtype=address&searchtype=address&country=US&addtohistory=&1ahXX=&address=470+Vanderbilt+Avenue&city=brooklyn&state=ny&zipcode=
Map

http://www.470vanderbilt.com/

Kolbster
June 10th, 2005, 08:46 AM
Project #21

470 Vanderbilt Avenue
11 stories 150 feet (Residential Conversion)
Karl Fischer Architect
Dev-Vanderbilt Holdings LLC (The Carlyle Group)
Residential
800 units 850,000 Sq. Ft. (Total)
Proposed 2007

470 Vanderbilt Avenue Lot I
~24 stories
Karl Fischer Architect
Dev-Vanderbilt Holdings LLC
Residential
800 units 850,000 Sq. Ft. (Total)
Proposed 2007

470 Vanderbilt Avenue Lot II
~15 stories
Karl Fischer Architect
Dev-Vanderbilt Holdings LLC
Residential
800 units 850,000 Sq. Ft. (Total)
Proposed 2007

470 Vanderbilt Avenue Lot III
~5 stories
Karl Fischer Architect
Dev-Vanderbilt Holdings LLC
Residential
800 units 850,000 Sq. Ft. (Total)
Proposed 2007



http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44467252.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44467253.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44467254/original.jpg



Very nice, not only will it have a nice impact on the skyline, but it looks like a nice project, very appealing to the eye.

billyblancoNYC
June 10th, 2005, 10:15 AM
Do you know if these were proposed before or after Ratnerville? Ratner will change this area so much for the better...

Derek2k3
June 10th, 2005, 01:54 PM
Most likely after.

DEVELOPNY
June 10th, 2005, 06:38 PM
This project is on the back burners for a while!!

Derek2k3
October 15th, 2005, 10:46 PM
Project #22

The St. Felix Street Firehouse Condos
31 St. Felix Street
4 stories 45 feet (2 story addition)
Sheffmaker Architecture
Dev-Jorge Concepcion
Residential Condominiums + Commercial Space in base
3 units 6,298 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2004-2005


Douglas Elliman
http://www.elliman.com/Listing.aspx?ListingID=715294&SearchType=newestsale

http://www.elliman.com/ListingImages/images/de/715294.10517055.jpg

31 St Felix Street
Fort Greene, cross streets: Dekalb & Fulton
WEB #: 715294

$1,100,000
Maint/CC: $331
Taxes: $556
Percent Down: 10%

Description

*New Development* The first showing will be on 9/11/05 please schedule your appointments today. From old to New * The St. Felix Street Firehouse Condo's * This turn of the century Firehouse has a fresh face as Brooklyn's newest addition to the ever rising condo market. With keeping the original detail, while adding an overcoat of the 21st century. These grand spaces built out to two bedroom and two baths can easily be converted to a third or back to it's original open plan. The open chef style Poggenpohl kitchen comes complete with high gloss white lacquered cabinetry and custom concrete counters. Each apartment has it's own double sized Jacuzzi bathtub with views. From the custom oak floors to the twelve foot high ceilings this is Brooklyn's most unique and revered architectural residential accomplishment. The Firehouse Condos are just two blocks from subway transportation and only 15 minutes from Midtown.



Harbor View Realty
http://harborviewrealty.com/sales.html

ST Felix Street

BROKERS WELCOME:Firehouse converted into thriving artistic condos, with 11' ceilings, oversized windows, elegant oak floors, CAC. State-of-the-Art Poggenphol Kitchen with extra deep sink from Franke, oven from Miele, dishwasher cooktop and ventilation from Bosh, subzero from Wolf. Magnificent Bathroom "Toto Innovation" with whirpool tub, enclosed shower.

» Converted Firehouse
» Professional Condo with garage
» Three, 2 BR, 2 Bth loft condos
» Poggenpohl kitchens
» Jacuzzi
» Large terraces

Asking Price: $895,000 Maintenance:
Property Type : Condo Style: Contemporary
Bedrooms: 2.0 Baths: 2
Kitchen: EIK Stories:
Families: Square Feet : 1062
Amenities: Garden & terrace
Agent Name : Danielle Mosse Phone : 718-855-1591 x76
WEB#: 5571



From ltjbukem's set speed blog:
http://ltjbukem.blogspot.com/2005/07/new-modern-condo-lofts-on-st.html

Wednesday, July 20, 2005

New modern condo lofts on St. Felix in Ft. Greene. Check out the harborviewrealty.com site for more info. 3 residential units and a commercial space on the street. I may be mistaken, but from the pics on the site, it looks like they may have Poggenpohl kitchens (or at least some quality knockoffs). Anybody know? The three units are priced at $1.075MM, $1.3MM and $1.5MM.


http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/50777011.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/50777014.jpg

ablarc
October 15th, 2005, 10:54 PM
Neat-o.

What's left of the firehouse besides the facade? Is the rest all new construction?

krulltime
May 19th, 2006, 01:15 PM
Project #21

470 Vanderbilt Avenue
11 stories 150 feet (Residential Conversion)
Karl Fischer Architect
Dev-Vanderbilt Holdings LLC (The Carlyle Group)
Residential
800 units 850,000 Sq. Ft. (Total)
Proposed 2007

470 Vanderbilt Avenue Lot I
~24 stories
Karl Fischer Architect
Dev-Vanderbilt Holdings LLC
Residential
800 units 850,000 Sq. Ft. (Total)
Proposed 2007

470 Vanderbilt Avenue Lot II
~15 stories
Karl Fischer Architect
Dev-Vanderbilt Holdings LLC
Residential
800 units 850,000 Sq. Ft. (Total)
Proposed 2007

470 Vanderbilt Avenue Lot III
~5 stories
Karl Fischer Architect
Dev-Vanderbilt Holdings LLC
Residential
800 units 850,000 Sq. Ft. (Total)
Proposed 2007



http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44467252.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44467253.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44467254/original.jpg
Site in blue. Atlantic Yards in red.

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44467255.jpg
The existing telecomm carrier hotel to be converted

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44467250.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44467251.jpg


http://www.mapquest.com/maps/map.adp?formtype=address&searchtype=address&country=US&addtohistory=&1ahXX=&address=470+Vanderbilt+Avenue&city=brooklyn&state=ny&zipcode=
Map

http://www.470vanderbilt.com/


So what is going on with these buildings? Is it cancel or undersonctruction? Anybody knows?

Derek2k3
May 23rd, 2006, 12:34 AM
I don't think anything. There's a few small buildings going up nearby though...nothing special of course.

Kris
May 26th, 2006, 02:30 PM
05/19/2006
Look, Up In the Sky, It’s a Bird, It’s a Plane, No...It’s Another Towering Condo
By Stephen Witt

http://images.zwire.com/local/z/zwire2384/zwire/images/37759906675944x7_newdevelop_J728.jpg
An art rendering of Brooklyn’s version of the Flatiron Building now going up at 230 Ashland Place and Fulton Street.

Call it the Flatiron Building of Brooklyn.

And while some may complain that the 28-story, 288-foot building going up at the corner of Fulton Street and Ashland Place has its faults, the bottom line is activists and elected officials can huff and puff, but no one can blow it down.

The Manhattan-based developer, The Clarett Group, last week revealed their plans for the site, which will ultimately have 108 market-rate condominiums and retail space on the ground floor.

The revelation for 230 Ashland Place came during a courtesy call from the developer at last week’s Community Board 2 Land Use Committee meeting.

The project is as-of-right, meaning it doesn’t require any zoning change to proceed.

The lot is triangular and the building was designed to fit the site, not unlike the Flatiron Building, explained Dan Kaplan of the FXFowle Architectural firm, who designed the building.

Kaplan further explained that while the building size is taller than the surrounding “brownstone fabric,” it will utilize lighter colors to match the surrounding buildings.

This includes the glass tower having limestone-looking concrete bands around each floor, he said.

Kaplan said the building site will be 40 feet off Ashland Place, which allows for two rows of trees and public space complete with amenities such as benches.

Canopies will jut out from over the retail space, he said.

The project will not have any on-site parking, which could tax the already scramble for parking in the area.

Construction has already begun on the project and the completion date is expected in summer 2007.

The Clarett Group bought the property in 2005 for a reported $12 million. The site once housed the low-rise buildings at 655 through 671 Fulton Street between Ashland Place and Rockwell Place.

Then in early 2006, the developer demolished the buildings, creating the large triangular lot.

The block also houses the Brooklyn Academy of Music’s (BAM) Harvey Theatre Building at 651 Fulton Street and the building at 647 Fulton Street from which BCAT (Brooklyn Cable Access Television) operates.

The City of New York owns those two buildings and leases them back to the cultural non-profits for $1 a year.

When the properties were first bought, City Councilmember Letitia James and other local activists were worried about the project in regard to several issues, and the concern remains.

“I do not support this project because one, there’s no affordable housing, two, there is no parking, and three there are no benefits to the community,” said James.

James noted that the building may be as-of-right, but the Clarett Group also gets as-of-right subsidies to build the project.

James said she did meet with the developer and they agreed to utilize minority and women-owned businesses wherever possible, but that’s not good enough.

“All we can do is raise our voices of protest to put pressure on them to set aside units for local residents and to make provisions for parking,” she said.

www.fortgreenecourier.com


http://www.curbed.com/archives/2006/05/26/flatiron_building_of_brooklyn_rising_near_bam.php

antinimby
May 26th, 2006, 07:17 PM
http://images.zwire.com/local/z/zwire2384/zwire/images/37759906675944x7_newdevelop_J728.jpg
Cool. I like. :)

sfenn1117
May 26th, 2006, 08:56 PM
And while some may complain that the 28-story, 288-foot building going up at the corner of Fulton Street and Ashland Place has its faults, the bottom line is activists and elected officials can huff and puff, but no one can blow it down.

DOB permits put it at 360 feet and 108 units.

MidtownGuy
May 27th, 2006, 12:28 AM
Wow, I lived at 201 for a while, and this will really change that corner (for the better).

triangular shape... interesting:)

"two rows of trees and public space complete with amenities such as benches.
Canopies will jut out from over the retail space, he said.
The project will not have any on-site parking." :)

"limestone-looking concrete bands" ...:( hmmm...that could be cheeezey.

BrooklynRider
May 30th, 2006, 04:06 PM
Looks like a tall Morton Square. Brooklyn is growing up.

BrooklynRider
August 2nd, 2006, 09:34 AM
BAM Goes the Neighborhood
While Atlantic Yards grabs the headlines, an art attack quietly transforms downtown Brooklyn

by Adrienne Day
August 1st, 2006 2:24 PM

Laurie Cumbo first stumbled into the BAM battle at a public meeting in October 2002, held to address the Brooklyn Academy of Music's plans for a new "mixed-use cultural district" in Fort Greene, on the edge of Downtown Brooklyn. Cumbo had heard that BAM's Local Development Corporation planned to lure various arts organizations into their proposed district with offers of subsidies. She was interested in what this venerable performing-arts institution might offer her fledgling museum, the Museum of Contemporary Diasporan Arts (MOCADA).

The cultural district was originally envisioned as an area larger than Manhattan's Lincoln Center that would cut a 10-by-three-block zigzag through Downtown Brooklyn and the heart of Fort Greene. BAM and the BAM LDC are formally separate entities, but the LDC is chaired by Harvey Lichtenstein, who was BAM's executive director for 32 years before founding the LDC in 1998. In 2001, he secured a $50 million matching grant from ex-mayor Giuliani. But initial meetings between Lichtenstein and Bloomberg's deputy mayor, Dan Doctoroff, were held behind closed doors. According to community activist Patti Hagan, "[Residents] thought that the BAM LDC was just one of these government entities that was remaking Fort Greene without any input from the people who live there— basically white people coming in and saying to a black community, 'We know what's best for you.' "

Compared to Ratner's controversial Atlantic Yards project, the BAM LDC plan seems like small potatoes. BAM has already made four relatively recent additions—the Mark Morris Dance Center, the Harvey Lichtenstein Theater, BAM Rose Cinemas, and BAMcafé—without triggering too much consternation. But some residents fear that yet more BAM might be the cultural analogue to Ratner's stadium plan, the equivalent of clear-cutting an old-growth forest and planting monocultured rows in its place.

Over the next decade, on four sites covering about 10 city blocks, the BAM LDC wants to build several large developments that will, if realized, drastically alter the landscape of Fort Greene and abutting parts of Downtown Brooklyn. Ground has already been broken for the Theater for a New Audience, designed by architects Frank Gehry and Hugh Hardy, on the so-called South Site. A new visual and performing-arts library is in the preliminary stages next door, complete with a Lincoln Center–style fountain. The North Site promises a mix of cultural outlets, public space and retail amenities, and 350 units of mixed-income housing. The East Site is obliquely described in LDC promotional literature as "being developed to house a cultural base of up to 60,000 square feet, as well as up to 150 units of housing." On a fourth plot, the West Site, the BAM LDC is negotiating over the property with existing owners and entertaining the option of more housing.

Sharon Zukin, professor of sociology at Brooklyn College, says in her 1995 book The Cultures of Cities that "cultural institutions have a long history of raising property values . . . and high art has become more like for-profit culture industries in many ways." Although MOCADA is just one small part of a much larger strategy to develop Downtown Brooklyn, it signals a change in the perception of cultural institutions as engines of economic development. Most developers now recognize that concert halls, not just stadiums, bring in the money.

After decades of benign neglect, Downtown Brooklyn has suddenly become the focus of commercial and residential developments. The fact that these mega-projects—Ratner's downtown commercial-platz Metrotech, Atlantic Yards, the LDC plan, and the recently unveiled plans for a 60-story hotel/condo tower on Flatbush—didn't evolve autonomously over many years underscores a relatively new symbiotic relationship between the for- and non-profit sectors.

Fresh from NYU's master's program in visual-arts administration, Laurie Cumbo had dedicated her museum to contemporary artworks by people of African descent. In December 1999, MOCADA opened its doors in Bedford-Stuyvesant. 300 people showed up for the inaugural event, a big success for a little museum. After a grant from New York City's department of cultural affairs, Cumbo struggled to raise more money. "The city gives exorbitant amounts of money to institutions like the Met," she says. "Very little is left for smaller ones." BAM provided not only financial support, but advice on how to construct MOCADA's new headquarters.

Late in June 2004, the LDC announced its renovation of an abandoned medical testing facility at 80 Hanson Place, a few blocks southeast of the main BAM building, to provide office space for arts nonprofits. The LDC dubbed the building "80 Arts" and offered a reduced rent of $16 to $18 a square foot, several dollars less than comparable office space in the area, according to several current 80 Arts tenants. Cumbo applied and was offered 1,800 square feet of ground level space.

MOCADA officially reopened its doors in Fort Greene on May 18, 2006. Its mission: to raise the visibility of black artists for the express purpose of engaging, educating, and empowering the community. But herein lies a subtle irony. Faced with an uncertain future, MOCADA had to move from Bed-Stuy to Fort Greene—a wealthier, whiter neighborhood—in order to survive. Symbolically, MOCADA abandoned its constituents and merged with the titanic forces of urban development and with BAM, the apex of the well-to-do avant-garde. In Cumbo's attempt to reach a larger audience, she is inadvertently contributing to the transformation of the neighborhood, which in turn is forcing out poorer, mostly black residents.

Depending on who you ask, the BAM LDC's district means very different things. For Cumbo, it's a way to provide exposure to artists of African descent. For Borough President Marty Markowitz, an ardent supporter of the plan, it's a chance to make Brooklyn a respected cultural capital. For Bruce Ratner, who leases part of the East Site and sits on BAM's board of directors, it could help rehabilitate his image as a power-hungry landgrabber. For the LDC, it's an opportunity to raise the prestige of the BAM brand as a hip alternative to Lincoln Center and to promote its image as an institution with real ties to the community.

Not everyone buys into the LDC's vision. Some see it as legacy building for Lichtenstein. Others gripe about stiff ticket prices and programming that caters to an elite Manhattan crowd. "It's like a private club, BAM," says the administrator of a local arts group for young people who wishes to remain anonymous. "There would be no need for [nonprofits like ours] if BAM had taken note that there were children in Fort Greene. These are children that have no clue what goes on in those buildings over there."

Reverend Clinton Miller, president of the opposition group Concerned Citizens Committee (or CCC) says, "We don't want to see pure top-down development, as with the Yards. . . . Regarding the cultural district, we want a triangular relationship between community, government, and developers."

Jeanne Lutfy, president of the BAM LDC, defends the plan, saying, "We're facilitating new growth and development in the underutilized parcels of land; it's about the arts, about longevity and stability, so that they can focus on what they do and do it well." Her explanation evokes a message used by Robert Moses to seize property via eminent domain to develop for the "greater good"—or, at least, the greater good of people with cars and money. "Who doesn't want parks?" he asked. Half a century later, the question could be, "Who doesn't want culture?"

Of course, there's a crucial difference between power brokers like Moses and Ratner, and the BAM LDC: The latter is not grabbing land by eminent domain but building largely on parking lots. Instead of clearing a poor residential neighborhood in the name of urban renewal—a method infamously used by Moses to establish Lincoln Center in Manhattan's then seedy Upper West Side—the BAM plan promises many good things to Fort Greene's residents. "We didn't want to close any streets, make any zoning changes, or change the fabric of the existing community," says Lutfy. She describes new art spaces, as well as affordable housing for artists and locals; gussied-up public space for art, performance, markets, and events; and lots of jobs.

80 Arts, a red-brick eight-story structure, bursts out of the asphalt like a fist through a pane of glass. Despite neoclassical flourishes, the structure radiates a slightly misplaced modernity, even in this rapidly gentrifying neighborhood. Located on the corner of Hanson Place and South Portland Street, and housing a variety of arts nonprofits, it is the crown jewel of the BAM LDC's plan. "This was an idea that Harvey had while he was slaving away at BAM, putting it on the map," says LDC president Lutfy. "Wouldn't it be nice if there could be this wonderful context around the building?"

Lutfy describes the proposed cultural district as a vibrant, "24-7" environment anchored by world-class monuments to the arts. Judging by an early computer-generated mock-up, the Gehry/Hardy-designed Theater for a New Audience building resembles a square shot glass tipped over on its side. Offset by the regal Williamsburgh Savings Bank, the tallest building in Brooklyn—soon to be transformed into luxury condominiums—and the beaux arts BAM building, TFANA resembles something discrete and alien, a launchpad for a lunar colony, perhaps.

Mindy Fullilove, a Columbia University professor who has studied the long-term consequences of urban renewal for African Americans, compares the process to fixing an old suit. Several generations ago, she says, "If you burned a hole in your suit, you'd bring it to the tailor for invisible reweaving, and then your suit was perfect again. People that care about the neighborhood are doing invisible reweaving, not gouging it." BAM's buildings are pretty dramatically out of scale with the existing neighborhood. And residents like Reverend Miller are disappointed that promises of affordable housing are fading into the future.

But without the LDC, could institutions like MOCADA make it in an arts-funding-starved world? Across the street from 80 Arts is Brooklyn councilmember Letitia James's office, ground zero in the battle over Brooklyn. "I totally support MOCADA," she says. "It's the only one of its kind. And the African American community doesn't have enough organizations that reflect the rich history of this country." James credits her office with putting pressure on the LDC to diversify 80 Arts to include more African American– and women-run nonprofits. "Now [the building] reflects the diversity of Downtown Brooklyn." Of the larger BAM plan she says, "It could be beautiful, but you seriously have to ask yourself why."

Reverend Miller says that "MOCADA is a fair representation of our community." But having work that depicts the African diaspora is of limited value, he points out. "The diaspora won't be able to live there."

NoyokA
August 2nd, 2006, 12:13 PM
Cool. I like. :)

From the looks of it, it'll look almost exactly like:

http://www.emporis.com/en/wm/bu/?id=170709

I lived right near this building and pictures don't really do it justice, this Brooklyn Building should be a very fine addition to the cityscape.

Derek2k3
February 8th, 2007, 06:09 PM
Missed the bus so took some pics of my fave neighborhood, Fort Greene.

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/123/384074765_3bdf875599_o.jpg
This is actually Clinton Hill from Pratt's architecture building.

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/179/384074761_15be48fa25_o.jpg
Taken back in December. Ft. Greene is home to both Brooklyn's tallest building and tallest residential tower.
http://farm1.static.flickr.com/151/384074763_07f405a059_o.jpg

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/184/384074764_f9a3905e12_o.jpg
Downtown Brooklyn's nearly graceless skyline.

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/167/384076496_d91c185597_o.jpg
Walking down Fulton. Interesting since streets intersect it at various angles.
http://farm1.static.flickr.com/163/384076492_38a7b851cd_o.jpg

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/125/384076499_7f88ca20a1_o.jpg

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/176/384076503_9319d7fcc6_o.jpg

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/150/384076505_cf4afbb56d_o.jpg
The avenue starts to get more seedy as it apporaches Downtown.

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/130/384075221_584b67caa3_o.jpg
St. Felix Street.

BrooklynRider
February 8th, 2007, 06:12 PM
Derek-

There's an alternative career for you in photography. I always enjoy your shots. Always a different angle.

Cheers-

Derek2k3
February 8th, 2007, 06:30 PM
http://farm1.static.flickr.com/143/384075223_670eafcdd2_o.jpg
Looking down St. Felix Street towards the hospital. What I love most about this nabe is its diversity. Ft. Greene is like a tiny city in itself. With skyscrapers, brownstones, cultural instituions, universities, hospitals, 2 malls, a transit hub, a great park, projects, and a soon to come basketball arena.

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/145/384075224_f8d81b5883_o.jpg
That new addition on St. Felix Street I posted about earlier. Looks kind of goofy.

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/156/384076507_f195cac3c7_o.jpg

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/160/384075228_30113bee74_o.jpg

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/136/384077203_90111dd958_o.jpg

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/172/384077201_a0f0af478f_o.jpg
Why are liquor store signs always so large in Brooklyn?

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/168/384075232_a01c7e3310_o.jpg
This lot is the North site. Three 20-35 story buildings are planned here designed by WORKac (http://www.work.ac/). Another parking lot across the street is BAM's east site. It's owned by Ratner and a 160,000 square-foot building with subsidized residential units and cultural components are planned.

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/168/384076018_423748e49e_o.jpg
This is Bam's West Site. Last I read, 350 units of mixed-income housing are planned. From a model I saw seems like it will be taller than Forte...about 40 stories.

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/158/384074758_9bbf9f0ea7_o.jpg
This picture is from today. It's one story taller here than some of the pictures.

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/129/384075231_e3bf86712d_o.jpg
Curtain wall looks good for a Brooklyn project.

sfenn1117
February 8th, 2007, 07:39 PM
Nice pics. Any concrete plans for the parking lots near the Forte?

posterboy
February 8th, 2007, 09:05 PM
great pictures derek. that first shot of the backyards off lafayette is almost exactly what i see when i look out of my bedroom window. i love this neighborhood.

Derek2k3
February 8th, 2007, 11:39 PM
http://farm1.static.flickr.com/140/384077215_d8ae4085d1_o.jpg

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/132/384077208_27268fe16c_o.jpg

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/133/384077217_4b63f4348e_o.jpg

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/149/384077105_0e1085ae29_o.jpg

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/183/384077108_862b2e19d5_o.jpg

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/154/384074759_12e8212c1b_o.jpg
The silver building is suppose to be where 80 DeKalb will rise. (400 foot Ratner tower by Kondylis.) 80 Dekalb is nearly a full block building so maybe just that white corner building will be developed(?)

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/164/384076021_ef555131c4_o.jpg

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/135/384076023_ea352d201c_o.jpg
I like this building, it just needs some love. I bet it will come down soon though.

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/136/384076029_0b433c35c3_o.jpg
Ft. Greene dissolves into the mess of Dtwn. Bk.

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/98/384076026_534632d70e_o.jpg

krulltime
February 9th, 2007, 09:07 AM
Great photos Derek2k3! Fort Green is a very interesting neighborhood in Brooklyn. I am still in surprice that the Forte tower is actually getting built. :) Good sign of more new things to come. I just can't believe that the new BAM stuff hasn't happened already. Who knows how long that will take.

Derek2k3
February 9th, 2007, 05:21 PM
Thank you guys for the compliments.


Nice pics. Any concrete plans for the parking lots near the Forte?

Yup, I added some text to some those images. Construction should've started already but delayed for some reason. Also these building could've been taller but councilwoman Leticia James fought for a 400' height limit on new towers east of Flatbush. In fact she really wanted a 25 story cap.

sfenn1117
February 9th, 2007, 07:06 PM
Once the library, Gehry building, the buildings on the parking lots, and of course Atlantic Yards are built, that area is going to be great. The Forte is turning out nicely.

That 400 foot height limit is a big shame. Flatbush Ave is just going to be a wall of 400 foot towers with little variation. It's still great to see so many towers rise in such a small area....but it's a shame we can't build an icon for the borough, a landmark to be seen coming off the bridges.

Do you know anything about the SOM tower on Flatbush Ave?

http://a810-bisweb.nyc.gov/bisweb/JobDetailsServlet?allisn=0001333058&requestid=1

ablarc
February 9th, 2007, 07:44 PM
That sure is a nicely-proportioned high-rise under construction. Improves every view it's a part of. Makes you wish Leticia and the NIMBYs would just shut the **** up.

Ignoramuses.

ryan
February 9th, 2007, 07:48 PM
Nice pics Derek. I'm happy to see so much development on this side of Ft. Greene (even if Forte is so very underwhelming) - just so long as the low-rise vibe on the Clinton Hill side is preserved.

antinimby
February 9th, 2007, 10:50 PM
but it's a shame we can't build an icon for the borough, a landmark to be seen coming off the bridges.Don't you know?

They're telling us that the Williamsburg Savings is and forever will be our one icon.

No if's, and's or but's about it.

"Here's your icon, young man, and ya better like it, too!" (in a Brooklyn accent of course)

Silly me, when I think of the skyline of Brooklyn, I don't really ever think of the WS.

It's just something I don't think of too much.

So much for being iconic...

ablarc
February 10th, 2007, 09:27 AM
Brooklyn: forever determined to play second fiddle.

Eugenious
February 12th, 2007, 10:07 AM
Brooklyn: forever determined to play second fiddle.

Brooklyn is the most populous borough, as Manhattan becomes increasingly out of reach of even upper-middle class you will see a huge migration to Brooklyn. It's not there yet but give another 15 years and you will see it, Bushwick will be a middle class neighborhood again :)

scatman
February 12th, 2007, 06:19 PM
It's not there yet but give another 15 years and you will see it, Bushwick will be a middle class neighborhood again :)
Wrong! That process will be quicker!

LadyJay114
February 14th, 2007, 01:17 AM
375 Myrtle Avenue
150 Cleremont Avenue
6 stories 59 feet
Danois Architects
Dev-BRP Development/Myrtle Clermont LLC
Residential Condominiums
29 units 52,227 Sq. Ft.
Proposed 2005-Early 2006


http://www.brpdev.com/images_photos2/375_large8.jpg

Plans are here:
http://www.brpdev.com/property375.htm#


375 Myrtle Avenue / 150 Clermont Avenue

Coming in 2006…

375 Myrtle Avenue / 150 Clermont Avenue is a new 6 story concrete and brick face building located at the corner of Myrtle Avenue and Clermont Avenue, in Fort Greene, Brooklyn. This new development by BRP Development will replace the existing underutilization of the corner with 29 one- and two-bedroom apartments, approximately 7,000 SF of office and retail space, 1,800 SF of commercial storage spots, and 9 below-grade parking spaces.

The design, by Danois Architects, continues the street wall of Myrtle Avenue at a scale that is consistent with buildings found along the avenue. In an attempt to delicately intertwine the residential fabric of the neighborhood with the commercial strip, the wall of Myrtle Avenue conspicuously wraps around the corner, locating the residential and the office entrances along Clermont Avenue.

The apartments, will feature ample room sizes, provisions for washers and dryers, and plenty of closet space. Each two-bedroom apartment features two full bathrooms.Occupants will enjoy the amenities offered by an on-site exercise room, and outdoor recreation space.

Register to Brooklyn Eagle to read article:
http://www.brooklyneagle.com/categories/category.php?category_id=5&id=3508
Neighbors Look Forward to Proposed Myrtle Ave Development
by Linda Collins (linda@brooklyneagle.net), published online 01-05-2005

funny to read that.... the delivery date was definitely an estimate. they're still working on the foundation.

LadyJay114
February 14th, 2007, 01:21 AM
Brooklyn is the most populous borough, as Manhattan becomes increasingly out of reach of even upper-middle class you will see a huge migration to Brooklyn. It's not there yet but give another 15 years and you will see it, Bushwick will be a middle class neighborhood again :)

That's right. City planners have already pegged Brooklyn for the arrival of priced out Manhattanites (honestly, it already has). I live in Brighton Beach and I can't count how many new construction buildings have spruced up. If you taking the B/Q trains to Coney, just look around during the ride.

antinimby
February 14th, 2007, 05:51 AM
150 Clermont definitely looks like a very nice development.

A very good looking design and groundfloor retail space.

All that plus it's building over what was a surface lot and a derelict walkup.

ablarc
February 14th, 2007, 06:34 AM
Brooklyn is the most populous borough, as Manhattan becomes increasingly out of reach of even upper-middle class you will see a huge migration to Brooklyn. It's not there yet but give another 15 years and you will see it, Bushwick will be a middle class neighborhood again :)
Most populous now, middle class shortly, second fiddle ...

Nothing sez you can't play second fiddle if you're middle class.

I just wish Brooklyn looked forward at least as much as it looks back. From a development standpoint, too many of the folks who live there are luddites; without change in the building stock and urban fabric, Brooklyn will end up like Venice: the past overwhelming the future.

A pretty, middle-class bedroom community: is that its long-term fate ?

I wish it something better.

Derek2k3
March 30th, 2007, 10:36 PM
Forte' today.

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/168/440323403_c0b8bb3b01_o.jpg

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/190/440323399_db7c7ab49c_o.jpg

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/190/440323409_9b6d4f22f2_o.jpg

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/160/440323415_cbb2099142_o.jpg

NoyokA
March 30th, 2007, 11:54 PM
I don't want to sound like a NIMBY but this building really is out of place.

Punzie
March 31st, 2007, 12:04 AM
I'm around there often and yeah, it does look out of place, but why do we sound like NIMBYs saying it?

lofter1
March 31st, 2007, 02:25 AM
Give it 10 years -- it will be but one among many, no?

ramvid01
March 31st, 2007, 10:35 AM
I don't think its that alone. Maybe from those angles, but is it not in the shadow of WSB?

Derek2k3
March 31st, 2007, 11:16 AM
Given the transportation infrastructure provided in the area, this project is appropriate. Infrastructure should be the primary means of basing whether a tower is appropriate or not. Why should all high-rises be confined to high-rise districts? High-rise districts were once low-rise too, no?

There are atleast 4 towers in the immediate area slated to rise to this height, and taller ones will go up on the opposite side of Flatbush. This is not a very charming section Fort Greene either, parking lots are common and the avenues are somewhat run-down.

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/177/440782367_061c845c96_o.jpg

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/175/440782369_578e5a9132_o.jpg

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/172/440782375_6bfb519308_o.jpg

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/182/440782385_ad15f263ee_o.jpg

ablarc
March 31st, 2007, 11:33 AM
I don't want to sound like a NIMBY but this building really is out of place.


Give it 10 years -- it will be but one among many, no?


Given the transportation infrastructure provided in the area, this project is appropriate. Infrastructure should be the primary means of basing whether a tower is appropriate or not. Why should all high-rises be confined to high-rise districts? High-rise districts were once low-rise too, no?

There are atleast 4 towers in the immediate area slated to rise to this height, and taller ones will go up on the opposite side of Flatbush. This is not a very charming section Fort Greene either, parking lots are common and the avenues are somewhat run-down.

Yeah... it's really the low-rise buildings that are out of place.

Ragtag and dispensable.

This is a great place to build up.

pianoman11686
April 1st, 2007, 03:17 PM
Given the transportation infrastructure provided in the area, this project is appropriate. Infrastructure should be the primary means of basing whether a tower is appropriate or not. Why should all high-rises be confined to high-rise districts? High-rise districts were once low-rise too, no?

Right on, Derek. In fact, the planners who drafted the first NYC Zoning Law based their height/density limits in certain districts on just that.

antinimby
April 1st, 2007, 06:13 PM
Lol. I just got into a whole debate with a few guys over at ssp on this very topic (almost got banned because of it). :D

Anyway, I agree with Derek's assessment.

Punzie
April 2nd, 2007, 03:01 AM
The layout of the streets make for a very poor high-rise area. The grid is cramped and irregular; most streets are too narrow; some streets are just plain random.

Flatbush, Fulton, Atlantic, Lafayette, 3rd, 4th, etc. etc. etc. all meet to form a tarantula traffic web. The BQE and its exit and entrance ramps can't take it.

The traffic and air pollution that would ensue if the area became high-rise...

A name change to "Fort Soote" comes to mind.

And for those who cite "the planners who drafted the first NYC Zoning Law": how do you know that if they were alive today, they would give Fort Greene the high-rise seal of approval?

Derek2k3
April 2nd, 2007, 12:43 PM
Sucks if you drive then. There will be no parking provided at this project. These towers will be built on parking lots, further deterring people to drive. I think you'd have more cars on the road if these 100 units were scattered in walk-ups throughout the neighborhood and Bed-stuy. You can catch atleast 10 trains and numerous buses in the immediate vicinity, why anyone would drive is beyond me..

Lastly, this was suppose to be a high density area but because of the Depression the WSB is the lone tower.

krulltime
April 2nd, 2007, 04:42 PM
Great photos Derek2k3. I can't wait to see a new skyline developing in Fort Green.

pianoman11686
April 2nd, 2007, 08:42 PM
The layout of the streets make for a very poor high-rise area. The grid is cramped and irregular; most streets are too narrow; some streets are just plain random.

The same could be said for the Financial District, south of Chambers Street; Central Boston & London, and a host of other older cities.


And for those who cite "the planners who drafted the first NYC Zoning Law": how do you know that if they were alive today, they would give Fort Greene the high-rise seal of approval?

I can't know that for a fact, as these people lived and worked 90 years ago. They might see things a little differently today. Notwithstanding, that is how they would have treated Fort Greene.

An excerpt might help:


While the location of the rail and water terminal facilities fixes the location of industry of the heavier type, the passenger transportation system is the chief factor in determining the location of business centers and sub-centers. [...] The system at present in operation or under construction will necessarily determine the general lines of city growth and development for many years to come...but the great bulk of the population of the city will continue to be housed within a five-cent fare and a 40-minute ride of the chief business center.

A time zone transit map was carefully worked out showing the time from every part of the city to the city hall and to 14th street. [...] This time zone map was in constant acquisition to assist the judgment of the commission in its determination of the appropriate use and appropriating intensity of use of particular areas.

The above comes from an article in the National Municipal Review, May 3, 1917. Titled "The Building Zone Plan of New York City," it was written by Robert H. Whitten, secretary of both the Committee on the City Plan, and of the Board of Estimate and Apportionment of New York City.

scatman
April 17th, 2007, 02:58 PM
.....and to think that that tower was my old party spot, the late, great 667 Lounge.....oh well!!!!!!

urbanaturalist
April 17th, 2007, 04:44 PM
I was visiting Fort Greene and Dowtown Brooklyn last summer. Its a good looking building. I don't think its to out of place, but I don't live there either....so.

MidtownGuy
April 17th, 2007, 04:57 PM
and to think that that tower was my old party spot, the late, great 667 Lounge.....oh well!!!!!!

Welcome Scatman. I remember the 667 Lounge, as I used to live around the corner on Ashland Place for years. I used to love that neighborhood with all my heart.

investordude
April 20th, 2007, 12:27 PM
AvalonBay is apparently building a 2009 luxury rental at 42 stories: http://www.brooklynpaper.com/stories/30/16/30_16avalonbay.html

No renderings yet.

NoyokA
April 20th, 2007, 01:51 PM
AvalonBay is apparently building a 2009 luxury rental at 42 stories: http://www.brooklynpaper.com/stories/30/16/30_16avalonbay.html

No renderings yet.

It'll be brick and reflective glass.

antinimby
April 20th, 2007, 05:13 PM
...and come with its own above ground parking garage.

Here's a preview of things to come (another one of their projects in New Rochelle, NY):

http://i73.photobucket.com/albums/i210/Scruffy69/DSC03467.jpg

http://i73.photobucket.com/albums/i210/Scruffy69/DSC03457.jpg

Scruffy (http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/showpost.php?p=2755644&postcount=109) @ ssp

investordude
April 21st, 2007, 02:55 AM
There is no aboveground lots at the Manhattan Avalon Chrystie Place. It's a fair question about their parking plans - but if this is being built as of right, and its not over a tunnel or low water table, I don't see why they wouldn't put the parking lot underground and avoid height restrictions and floor-area-ratio problems.

Punzie
April 25th, 2007, 04:39 AM
Originally Posted by Rapunzel http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/images/buttons/viewpost.gif (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=157168#post157168)
The layout of the streets make for a very poor high-rise area. The grid is cramped and irregular; most streets are too narrow; some streets are just plain random.

The same could be said for the Financial District, south of Chambers Street; Central Boston & London, and a host of other older cities.

Surely, Pianoman, you can present your "case" with better examples than these.:eek:


Re:
Boston Gridlock (http://www.boston.com/news/globe/editorial_opinion/oped/articles/2006/12/27/making_gridlock_a_priority/)

Re: WNY Topics:
NYC Congestion Charge (http://wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=6044)

London's Congestion Charge Two Years On (http://wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=5836)

pianoman11686
April 26th, 2007, 08:57 PM
I don't know what you're talking about, Rapunzel. I included those examples to demonstrate that just because an area has a cramped and irregular grid doesn't mean it can't work as a highrise district. The corollary of that is: just because an area has wide avenues and a standardized grid doesn't mean it won't be congested (e.g. Midtown).

The point being made was that Fort Greene has the necessary transportation infrastructure to justify high-density use. In a city as large and as dense as New York, roadway congestion from automobiles will be inevitable, which is why congestion charges are being contemplated. Meanwhile, people have the option of ditching their cars and using mass transit, which is what a majority of people will probably end up doing here.

ablarc
November 20th, 2007, 06:58 AM
Given the transportation infrastructure provided in the area, this project is appropriate. Infrastructure should be the primary means of basing whether a tower is appropriate or not. Why should all high-rises be confined to high-rise districts? High-rise districts were once low-rise too, no?


Right on, Derek. In fact, the planners who drafted the first NYC Zoning Law based their height/density limits in certain districts on just that.


The layout of the streets make for a very poor high-rise area. The grid is cramped and irregular; most streets are too narrow; some streets are just plain random.

Flatbush, Fulton, Atlantic, Lafayette, 3rd, 4th, etc. etc. etc. all meet to form a tarantula traffic web. The BQE and its exit and entrance ramps can't take it.

The traffic and air pollution that would ensue if the area became high-rise...

A name change to "Fort Soote" comes to mind.


The same could be said for the Financial District, south of Chambers Street; Central Boston & London, and a host of other older cities.


Surely, Pianoman, you can present your "case" with better examples than these.:eek:


I don't know what you're talking about, Rapunzel. I included those examples to demonstrate that just because an area has a cramped and irregular grid doesn't mean it can't work as a highrise district. The corollary of that is: just because an area has wide avenues and a standardized grid doesn't mean it won't be congested (e.g. Midtown).

The point being made was that Fort Greene has the necessary transportation infrastructure to justify high-density use. In a city as large and as dense as New York, roadway congestion from automobiles will be inevitable, which is why congestion charges are being contemplated. Meanwhile, people have the option of ditching their cars and using mass transit, which is what a majority of people will probably end up doing here.
Derek and pianoman are right.

ablarc
November 20th, 2007, 07:40 PM
If you use not-so-good examples when trying to prove a point, then you haven't proven your point.
Pianoman's examples are sterling: the best possible examples. Lower Manhattan is New York, Boston is a textbook case of the principle he claims for it, and London is mile upon mile of proof for the truth of his assertion.

You can add the entirety of Paris and every single city in Europe that doesn't have a grid plan --without a single exception.

There. Satisfied now?

Casting doubt about the truth of something by innuendo or raised eyebrow is not a valid forensic device. You need to provide some examples in turn to support your point of view, though I don't blame you for not trying; it would be a fruitless task ;).


Do you any solid, top-notch examples? Believe it or not, I'd like to learn of them.
All his examples are top-notch, and you're free to learn from them; so are the ones I provided. Take the opportunity to learn; don't just talk about having the intention. Pianoman is dead right.

Your attitude betrays a suburban bias and misconception about cars and congestion. Congestion is a near-universl urban condition and is self-limiting. When you run out of space to drive, people take public transport. As long as you plan auto traffic to be uncongested, you can't blame folks for driving --and you'll never get an urban condition.

I bet you drive most places you go.

Fort Greene has urban potential --as long as it's not subjected to suburban theories and nostrums. That's precisely the mistake made everywhere in the U.S. for over fifty years after the War by the likes of Robert Moses; it wrecked most American cities nearly completely; they're only now starting to recover.


There had better be something pretty darned good about a place if people have to give up their cars. Manhattan is worth it. Is Fort Greene worth it?
It will if you let it. It won't if you subject it to the tender mercies of suburban planning theories such as the one you enunciated. You're still fighting Ebenezer Howard's battles, but times have changed. No dark, satanic mills, no choking coal dust, no dysentery, no cholera, no health consequences of density. The nation's densest urban census tract on Park Avenue is also one of the richest.

Get with it. Look around you. Or maybe just read.

Sorry to be hard on you, but Punzie, when it comes to cities you don't seem to know squat. :)






Pianoman, on the other hand ...

(and Derek) ...

pianoman11686
November 22nd, 2007, 04:36 PM
First off: Wow! Talk about a blast from the past. Didn't expect this old thread would come back to haunt me...;)


If you use not-so-good examples when trying to prove a point, then you haven't proven your point.

Do you any solid, top-notch examples? Believe it or not, I'd like to learn of them.

I stand by what I said about 6 months ago, the most important of which was this:


In a city as large and as dense as New York, roadway congestion from automobiles will be inevitable

Your citation of articles about congestion in New York, Boston, and London doesn't disprove a thing. We expect congestion. But, as ablarc says, it's self-limiting. At some point, owning a car and trying to drive it in an urban environment just won't be worth it. I know this: I own a car right now, because I live far enough away from school in an area that is underserved by mass transit. When I move back to the New York area next year, I plan on selling the car, and using mass transit to get to work.


Absolutely- just about everybody agrees with this.:)

Hint: usually, if a corollary to an original argument is true, then the original argument is also true.


A curiosity question: do you think that this area of Brooklyn will need congestion charges in the future?

I don't know - I don't have numbers on how many people commute to Brooklyn by car. We know that hundreds of thousands commute to Manhattan by car, when they have several other options. That's why congestion charges are being contemplated there, although I must admit I haven't followed the news on that in several months and from what I can tell, it's still far off from happening.


Sure, people have the option of ditching their cars -- but will they? The convenience of a car -- once having gotten used to it, people have such a hard time giving it up. (Like I have to tell you!)

There had better be something pretty darned good about a place if people have to give up their cars. Manhattan is worth it. Is Fort Greene worth it?

Like I said, I have a car now, and I appreciate the convenience, given that without it, I'd have to rely on an assortment of cabs, university shuttles, and rides from friends to move around where I live. But I wouldn't even dream of bringing the car with me New York, with the exception of a select few suburban neighborhoods in outlying parts of Queens, the Bronx, and Staten Island.

I highly recommend you do some primary research on this subject (of the sort from which I furnished that quote ~15 posts ago). I'm fairly confident you'd come to the same conclusion about Fort Greene that I have, once you learn the criteria and methodology that planners use(d) to determine where the densest areas of the city should be located.

pianoman11686
December 2nd, 2007, 01:26 PM
What was the point of that post?

antinimby
December 13th, 2007, 08:23 AM
Good for you, Punzie. http://wirednewyork.com/forum/images/icons/icon14.gif

Just by doing that, you are already on your way to doing your part to stem the insidious Global Warming.

NewYorkDoc
December 13th, 2007, 03:58 PM
Not to be a bummer, but will her part make any difference? Since the majority of Americans would rather die than give up the private auto.

ablarc
December 13th, 2007, 05:54 PM
After the car is given up, the suburban way of seeing things can be next.

antinimby
December 14th, 2007, 01:48 PM
Not to be a bummer, but will her part make any difference?Yes it does. If everyone does just a little, it all adds up.

For instance, a penny doesn't sound like much but if I were to get a penny from everyone in this country, then I would be a millionaire.

Tectonic
December 19th, 2007, 11:13 AM
Forte 12-18

They just don't make Flatirons like they used to...

https://community.emporis.com/images/6/2007/12/578909.jpg (https://community.emporis.com/images/6/2007/12/578909.jpg)

https://community.emporis.com/images/6/2007/12/578910.jpg (https://community.emporis.com/images/6/2007/12/578910.jpg)

https://community.emporis.com/images/6/2007/12/578914.jpg (https://community.emporis.com/images/6/2007/12/578914.jpg)

https://community.emporis.com/images/6/2007/12/578916.jpg (https://community.emporis.com/images/6/2007/12/578916.jpg)

https://community.emporis.com/images/6/2007/12/578911.jpg (https://community.emporis.com/images/6/2007/12/578911.jpg)

https://community.emporis.com/images/6/2007/12/578927.jpg

https://community.emporis.com/images/6/2007/12/578912.jpg (https://community.emporis.com/images/6/2007/12/578912.jpg)

BrooklynLove
December 19th, 2007, 10:22 PM
not a masterpiece, but i can live with the forte. it's the first of the new generation of highrise buildings slated to arrive over the years among the BAM district and AY. a respectable start, and i think that we'll see the builds get better and better as the area can justify larger and larger spends from developers/investors.

Tectonic
December 19th, 2007, 10:42 PM
I agree but the southwestern side is so disappointing.

BrooklynLove
December 20th, 2007, 07:56 AM
for sure. what is really strange to me about this building, and maybe someone has an explanation, is that they don't appear to have provided for a dedicated loading dock entrance - the most logical place seemingly would have been at the base of the southwest side, but it's just a concrete face. where do they plan to load trash, move-ins/outs, etc?

Tectonic
December 20th, 2007, 08:13 AM
Hmm good point I didn't notice that. Strange.

ramvid01
December 20th, 2007, 03:38 PM
The Southwestern side is a disappointment, but aside from the setback on one side of the building I think it came out ok. And it seems that there is some retail space at the base? If so thtats great.

zinka
December 21st, 2007, 10:53 PM
BrooklynLove: There is a service entrance at the northeast corner of the building (on Ashland Place, next to the now-white wall of the Harvey). I believe they could not have legally placed one on Fulton Street because of street-wall continuity requirements in the zoning law, but I am not sure about that.

Eugenious
December 23rd, 2007, 10:24 AM
This looks very Eastern European like Krakow or East Germany circa 1995. I guess it's better then the ghettos.

https://community.emporis.com/images/6/2007/12/578927.jpg

lofter1
December 23rd, 2007, 05:47 PM
It desperately needs some better bigger ones close by to hide it :(

20 years ago I almost bought a brownstone about 3 blocks from this site. Then there was that little problem with the "correction" of the stock market.

Best thing that ever happened to me.

BrooklynLove
December 23rd, 2007, 06:30 PM
It desperately needs some better bigger ones close by to hide it :(

20 years ago I almost bought a brownstone about 3 blocks from this site. Then there was that little problem with the "correction" of the stock market.

Best thing that ever happened to me.

really? you would've made out extremely well if you held it for 20 years. i'd approximate that you'd be looking at something over 10 times appreciation.

lofter1
December 23rd, 2007, 06:50 PM
The problem was that there were some very lean years in the early 90s --

Not sure I could have held onto a place in Ft. Greene through that entire period. My partners in the sale had rougher times than I. If we'd had to sell at that time -- when everything was in the dumps -- I woundn't have made out so well.

Holding onto my RS place in downtown Manhattan and investing elsewhere has proven to be a much better situation :cool:

BrooklynLove
December 26th, 2007, 03:41 PM
not bad. but check this guy out: http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601103&sid=amaPpyEjpo0Q&refer=us. $400 million profit over 2 years. eh. ;)

Liahe
March 8th, 2008, 05:15 PM
I'm looking for a condo in the Fort Greene/Clinton Hills Bed stuy area, for early next year. Anybody know of anything in developments in the making?

ltjbukem73
March 16th, 2008, 12:05 AM
keep your eyes peeled on www.onehansonplace.com if you want to know about developments...

ltjbukem73
March 27th, 2008, 10:15 PM
cumberland greene condos:

http://www.onehansonplace.com/2008/03/cumberland-greene-condo-update.html

brianac
August 20th, 2008, 05:32 PM
New Glassy Tower to Join Fort Greene Mini-City

by Dana Rubinstein (http://www.observer.com/2008/author/dana-rubinstein) | August 20, 2008 | Tags:

http://www.observer.com/files/imagecache/vertical/files/80DeKalb.JPG

The apparently inexorable rise of a skyscraper city on the edge of Fort Greene continues apace, with developer Bruce Ratner's announcement on Wednesday that Forest City Ratner had secured financing for its first residential tower in Brooklyn, the Costas Kondylis-designed, 34-story 80 DeKalb Avenue.

The glass building will join the Forte Condo (at Ashland Place and Fulton Street), and the soon-to-be-built Danspace project across the street to form a small mini-city on the edge of Fort Greene, bordering Downtown Brooklyn -- but a taste of the 16-skyscraper-and-arena Atlantic Yards complex to come.
The tower will house 292 market-rate rentals and 73 affordable rentals, "making it the first 80/20 development in Brooklyn financed with bonds issued by the New York State Housing Finance Agency," according to the release.

"The New York State Housing Finance Agency selected 80 DeKalb to receive $109.5 million in tax-exempt bonds and $27.5 million in taxable bonds. The lending institutions involved in the transaction were Wachovia Bank, N.A., and Helaba (both co-agents providing the credit enhancement to the $137 million in bonds issued by HFA), as well as the National Electrical Benefit Fund, which provided a $10 million mezzanine loan and $20 million of credit enhancement."


Boring as that might seem, it's an achievement to get that sort of financing in this market, in which many of the Wall Street shops have stopped lending, and borrowers are forced to approach more traditional, and more conservative, balance sheet lenders (http://www.observer.com/2008/who-s-lending-whom-manhattan-and-why?page=0%2C1).

Full release below:

FOREST CITY RATNER COMPANIES CLOSES ON FINANCING FOR $200 MILLION DOWNTOWN BROOKLYN RESIDENTIAL BUILDING
Building Designed to be LEED-Certified and to Include Affordable and Market-Rate Apartments

BROOKLYN, NEW YORK – August 20, 2008—Forest City Ratner Companies (FCRC) announced today that it has closed on financing for a 335,000-square-foot building at 80 DeKalb Avenue in Downtown Brooklyn.

The Costas Kondylis-designed building is the first residential tower constructed by FCRC in Brooklyn. Situated on DeKalb Avenue between Hudson Avenue and Rockwell Place, and bordering the BAM Cultural District, the 34-story tower will include 73 affordable and 292 market-rate rental units, making it the first 80/20 development in Brooklyn financed with bonds issued by the New York State Housing Finance Agency.

Unlike most 80/20 developments, 80 DeKalb will remain affordable for 99 years. For the initial 35 years, 62 affordable units will be made available for households earning up to 50% of the area median income (AMI) and 11 units for households with incomes up to 40% of AMI. For the remaining years, all of the affordable units will be made available for households earning up to 90% of AMI.

“We’re very excited about 80 DeKalb,” said Bruce Ratner, Chairman and CEO of FCRC. “It is a magnificent building at a great location that will provide both affordable and market-rate homes. We believe, too, that this is positive development during a tough market and points to the ongoing attraction of Brooklyn as a place to live and work.”

Mr. Ratner noted as well that with 80 DeKalb, FCRC has closed on financing for three projects within the past year, totaling more than $1.5 billion in construction loans.

The New York State Housing Finance Agency selected 80 DeKalb to receive $109.5 million in tax-exempt bonds and $27.5 million in taxable bonds. The lending institutions involved in the transaction were Wachovia Bank, N.A., and Helaba (both co-agents providing the credit enhancement to the $137 million in bonds issued by HFA), as well as the National Electrical Benefit Fund, which provided a $10 million mezzanine loan and $20 million of credit enhancement.

As part of its ongoing commitment to strengthen minority- and women-owned (M/WBE) businesses, FCRC has already awarded 19% of the project’s contracts to M/WBE firms. In addition, FCRC projects that 30% of the construction workforce will be made up of minority workers and 10% of women workers. Like all FCRC developments, 80 DeKalb will be built entirely with union labor.

The building, designed to achieve LEED Certification, is expected to meet or exceed the sustainable design measures set forth by the U.S. Green Building Council. 80 DeKalb’s “green” features include improved indoor air quality through the use of low or no volatile organic compound (VOC) emitting materials, water reduction by means of low-flow fixtures and diverting waste from landfills by recycling over 75% of construction waste and using recycled materials with recycled content. Major construction on the building began Monday, July7th, 2008. It is expected to open for leasing during the summer of 2009.
About Forest City

Forest City Ratner Companies (FCRC) owns and operates 32 properties in the New York metropolitan area. FCRC is a wholly owned subsidiary of Forest City Enterprises, Inc., a $10.5 billion NYSE-listed national real estate company engaged in the ownership, development, management and acquisition of commercial and residential real estate and land throughout the United States.

http://www.observer.com/2008/real-estate/new-glassy-tower-join-fort-greene-mini-city

© 2008 Observer Media Group,

antinimby
August 20th, 2008, 08:30 PM
How do they squeeze 365 units (292 + 73) into a tower on such a narrow plot of land and only 34 stories tall?

BrooklynLove
August 20th, 2008, 10:08 PM
Looking more and more like we're getting the glass version. Fingers crossed.

sfenn1117
August 21st, 2008, 12:39 AM
How do they squeeze 365 units (292 + 73) into a tower on such a narrow plot of land and only 34 stories tall?

Narrow plot but still a full block-front. Compare to a 6th ave residential in the 20's. It's good looking enough too.

antinimby
August 21st, 2008, 02:36 AM
But that will depend on the kind of glass that they chose. Wavy and reflective glass will ruin everything.

Tectonic
August 21st, 2008, 11:27 PM
80 DeKalb on 08.20.08

https://community.emporis.com/images/6/2008/08/641436.jpg

https://community.emporis.com/images/6/2008/08/641437.jpg

Alternate1985
October 4th, 2008, 07:12 PM
facade will look like this


http://i285.photobucket.com/albums/ll80/NickMango/3312%20hudson%20ave/80Dpanels9-30-08008.jpg

http://i285.photobucket.com/albums/ll80/NickMango/3312%20hudson%20ave/80Dpanels9-30-08001.jpg

BrooklynRider
October 5th, 2008, 02:35 AM
Considering what Brooklyn's apartment housing stock looks like in the area, this isn't terrible.

Tectonic
October 5th, 2008, 07:28 AM
Looks like an Avalon.

Alternate1985
October 10th, 2008, 09:32 AM
I think it looks real good. I also think it's a pretty amazing feat doing it unitized. There isn't many 90 degree angles on the project.

BrooklynLove
October 12th, 2008, 07:09 PM
Boom crane went up this weekend.

NYC4Life
October 15th, 2008, 10:17 AM
October 2008 (http://ny.therealdeal.com/issues/103)

Seeing less green in Fort Greene

While brownstones hold their own, a handful of new condos in the neighborhood languish

http://s3.amazonaws.com/trd_three/images/51860/Seeing_lessgreeninFortGreen_articlebox.jpg (http://ny.therealdeal.com/assets/51860)

Craig Axelrod in front of the Verdi on Adelphi. He said he is confident about sales going forward, but added that in hindsight, he would have gone with a less flashy design.



By Gabby Warshawer

Two years ago, Time Out New York named a stretch of South Portland Avenue in Fort Greene the "best block" in New York, noting that its brownstones gave it a "Sesame Street" feel — and that it's nestled in a neighborhood known for a "commingling of cultures" where "there's plenty to do."

And now? While the brownstone market is basically holding its own amidst a sluggish sales climate, developers of a handful of new Fort Greene condos are seeing units languish on the market.

Three new Fort Greene condos, in particular, have seen slow sales over the past couple years: the Clermont on Myrtle Avenue, the Verdi on Adelphi, and the Forté, which is on Ashland Place.

According to sources who asked not to be identified, and a post last month on the Brooklyn real estate Web site Brownstoner.com, the 52-unit Clermont, on Clermont and Myrtle avenues, is now being transformed into
a rental.

The developers of the building did not return calls seeking comment.

Although the building went on sale early this year, StreetEasy records indicate that not one unit in the building sold. Prices in the Clermont were ranging from nearly $400,000 for a one-bedroom, one-bath to $866,000 for a three-bedroom penthouse.

About a block away, only three units in the 16-unit Verdi on Adelphi (which is located between Myrtle Avenue and the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway) are in contract, even though the building has been on sale for nearly two years. Prices on the unsold units were reduced by $25,000 to $50,000 early last month, and now range from $330,000 for a 533-square-foot one-bedroom to $649,000 for a 1,000-square-foot two-bedroom.

The broker who represents Verdi on Adelphi and one of its developers said the reason the building appears to be selling slowly is twofold. First, they said, the building was initially being sold via floor plans; second, marketing was scaled back until a few months ago, when the brokers had a model unit to show.

"We didn't have a sales office on site, and since the market has gotten much slower, people are only buying when they're ready to move," said Kara Kasper, a senior vice president with Corcoran who has been representing the building.

"If we could [go] back, we wouldn't have advertised so early," added Craig Axelrod, a principal of Emmy Building, the Verdi's developer. Axelrod noted that since adjusting prices, he's received three additional offers, and he is confident about sales going forward.

Axelrod also said that if he could turn back the clock, he would have gone with a less flashy design. Architect Gene Kaufman designed the Verdi on Adelphi, notable for a shimmering exterior finish capped by oval-shaped rooftop appendages.

"We're a little high end for this area," noted Axelrod. "If we had gone more bare bones, we could have had lower price points."

In another section of the neighborhood, just 35 units at the 108-unit Forté have sold since sales and marketing for the condo started in February 2007. Still, a representative for the Clarett Group, which developed the 30-story condo, said the company continues to have confidence in the neighborhood.

"I'm not going to lie to you; they're not flying off the shelves," said David Perry, Clarett's director of sales. "But people who are buying here are buying for the neighborhood and location."

Perry said that a round of price reductions on unsold units this summer
sparked buyer interest, and that Clarett inked eight deals for condos in the past couple of months.

"We don't think there's going to be another round of price reductions," said Perry, noting that the firm is exploring a rent-to-own program for the building that would act as a savings program for prospective buyers (see Buying a condo, one piece at a time (http://ny.therealdeal.com/articles/buying-a-condo-one-piece-at-a-time-3/)).

"We're not going to be a rental. We can hang out for another year if we need to," he added.

Another new condo in the neighborhood, the 74-unit Clermont Greene at 181 Clermont Avenue, is 20 percent sold since hitting the market this summer, a level of sales that its broker is pleased with given today's economic climate.

"Two years ago, we probably would have been sold out by now," said Christine Blackburn, a senior vice president with Prudential Douglas Elliman who is representing the building. "But it's taking people longer to make decisions and get financing."

Blackburn said she thinks sales have been off at other new condos in the neighborhood because of "problematic finishes, construction decisions and location."

A large part of Fort Greene's lure, said Blackburn, is living in a brownstone neighborhood near a park, and buildings like the Forté and the Verdi on Adelphi are not on pristine brownstone blocks.

"Our building is very modern, and it definitely doesn't look like a brownstone," said Blackburn. "But it's only six stories, and both sides face brownstone blocks. You're not hovering above the neighborhood on the 18th floor of a building.

"It's also different to exit your building and be on a brownstone block, not on Fulton Street."

Brownstones, of course, are what most people think of when they think of Fort Greene. A broker who's been selling them in the neighborhood for more than five years said that while they're still coveted and commanding high prices, there's more inventory on the market than there was a couple of years ago, and houses are taking longer to sell.

"Even in this tough economy, if you price a home right, it'll sell well," said Abdul Muid, a senior associate broker with Corcoran. "Buyers are not fools. No one's building these old homes anymore."

Muid said that brownstones in the neighborhood generally range in price from a hair below $400 a square foot to nearly $700 a square foot for a top-notch, "move-in condition" house on one of Fort Greene's most desirable blocks, such as Washington Park or South Cumberland Street.

A couple of years ago, said Muid, there would only be between three and five brownstones on the market at any given time, but in the past year or so, that number has increased dramatically; it's not unusual to see between 15 and 20 brownstones for sale in Fort Greene.

The increase in inventory means he's usually showing homes more before they go into contract, and most of his houses take between six and seven months to sell — about double the length of time they took to sell a couple years ago.

Muid said he's not surprised it's taking longer for some condos in the neighborhood to sell.

"People want the older brownstones. They want buildings with a lot of character, and that's what they're looking for in Fort Greene. These new developments can't create 19th-century detail."

The disparity between brownstone and condo sales in Fort Greene was highlighted in the second-quarter market report from HMS Associates, a Brooklyn appraisal firm.

HMS's report shows that while the average sales price for condos in the neighborhood dropped from $615,000 to $565,000 year over year, the average sales price in the neighborhood rose during the same period, thanks largely to sales of houses and co-ops.

"Fort Greene did surprisingly well in the second quarter overall, mostly because of two- to four-family home sales. And in that neighborhood, that usually means brownstones," said HMS's executive vice president, Sam Heskel. "The condo market is going to take a little longer to recover, and that's not just true for Fort Greene, but for all of Brooklyn."

Derek2k3
October 18th, 2008, 07:25 PM
"but added that in hindsight, he would have gone with a less flashy design"

I hope he means less ugly...serves him right for hiring Gene Kaufman. His portfolio is no secret.

BrooklynLove
October 19th, 2008, 08:21 AM
Actually could be a blessing for Ft Greene in the long run b/c this will make living there a bit more affordable for middle market professionals (e.g., recently out of college, first time buyers, etc) and will enhance the development of the neighborhood. FG has become too expensive too quickly in my opinion.

Derek2k3
February 1st, 2009, 09:05 PM
The bare side of Forte'

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3507/3245444799_3d95e8258a_o.jpg


http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3086/3245444805_bde37e76ec_o.jpg

Derek2k3
February 1st, 2009, 09:14 PM
Fort Greene Park.
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3464/3246293756_059b01db54_o.jpg


http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3419/3246293762_7d92771e42_o.jpg


There is talk of building on the LIU field at some point in the future.
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3408/3246293766_e8e548bf21_o.jpg


80 Dekalb rising.
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3110/3246293772_9d16890673_o.jpg

BrooklynLove
February 1st, 2009, 10:33 PM
The changes Fort Greene has been through in the relatively short duration of 20 years is pretty amazing. I'm looking forward to seeing what the next 20 bring.

zinka
February 4th, 2009, 10:10 PM
There is talk of building on the LIU field at some point in the future.



Any idea of the details? Height, purpose, etc?

Merry
February 20th, 2009, 10:29 PM
Closing in on Clermont Greene


Friday, February 20, 2009

http://curbed.com/uploads/2009_2_clermont.jpg


FORT GREENE—The 74-unit Clermont Greene (http://www.clermontgreene.com/main.php) building at 181 Clermont Avenue—a building we dare say we have never written about—is sure as heck coming along, based on the above exterior update. Reps for the building tell us, "The scaffolding came down last week. The façade is finished as is the interior. We are a couple of weeks from TCO and closings should begin in March. We are over 20% sold in part because of our Price Protection Program we instituted after the New Year. There are many programs like this out there now, and they are effective at giving buyers a level of comfort while the market settles. No one wants to be the fool that buys now and then watches as prices drop further." One-bedrooms currently start at $499K, and two-bedrooms are hanging in at $715K.

http://curbed.com/archives/2009/02/20/curbedwire_closing_in_on_clermont_greene.php

Tectonic
April 3rd, 2009, 02:31 AM
http://www.brooklynpaper.com/stories/32/13/32_13_mm_bam_housing.html

BAM! Housing project is out of the cultural district

By Mike McLaughlin
The Brooklyn Paper

http://www.brooklynpaper.com/assets/images/zoom8.png Enlarge this image (http://www.brooklynpaper.com/assets/photos/31/8/31_08_bamcultmap_z.jpg)
http://www.brooklynpaper.com/assets/photos/31/8/31_08_bamcultmap_i.jpg (http://www.brooklynpaper.com/assets/photos/31/8/31_08_bamcultmap_z.jpg)
When this map was made last year, only one of the projects was stalled. Now, they all are.



A major mixed-income apartment tower planned for the BAM Cultural District is off the table due to the convulsions of the real-estate market, The Brooklyn Paper has learned.


The 187-unit tower, which would contain 100 sub-market-rate rentals, was planned for the corner of Fulton Street and Ashland Place, but will not happen anytime soon — the latest troubles inside the Fort Greene enclave targeted to become the so-called Lincoln Center of Brooklyn.
“This is our most difficult project,” said Kate Dixon, director of planning and development for the Downtown Brooklyn Partnership, a quasi-governmental group overseeing development in the area. “The mixed-use developments are feeling the most from the current economic situation,” she said during a panel discussion on Monday night.


The city Department of Housing Preservation and Development confirmed that this joint construction effort with Studio MDA and the Gotham Group is on hold due to a “shaky market,” said a department spokesman.
The centerpiece to the whole artsy area is also off-track. Starchitect Enrique Norten’s design for a glass-walled complex adjacent to a grand public plaza is on a backburner because the Brooklyn Public Library, which planned an iconic performing arts library for the building, backed out of the $135-million project last year (http://www.brooklynpaper.com/stories/31/25/31_25_kiss_the_glass_library.html).
And the public plaza itself can’t be built until Norten’s building goes up because a parking lot, which is part of the Norten plan, would sit below it.
The renovations of the Strand Theater are also slightly behind schedule. The city-owned building was scheduled to be complete in 2010 (http://www.brooklynpaper.com/stories/31/8/31_08_new.html), but now, according to architect Thomas Leeser, construction will only begin this fall and take up to two years to finish.



©2009 The Brooklyn Paper

BrooklynLove
April 3rd, 2009, 07:33 AM
The is only surprising to those who have been living in a cave for the past year. People need to be patient - these plans will come to fruition eventually.

Derek2k3
May 23rd, 2009, 09:19 AM
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3600/3555903487_d4d15d48e7_o.jpg


http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3376/3555903489_91259e2e84_o.jpg


http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3363/3556715786_1da755ec5f_o.jpg


http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3585/3556715792_676b9a3906_o.jpg


http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3417/3555905785_51760ab4c8_b.jpg


http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3663/3555905791_cf0c2ce52c_b.jpg


http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3599/3556715794_7bb41f1c77_b.jpg

BrooklynLove
May 23rd, 2009, 07:19 PM
Once this spot is built out, Forte should be a bit easier on the eyes but right now she's not looking so hot.

BrooklynRider
May 29th, 2009, 09:50 PM
This is the plaza in front of Forte.

1.
http://i220.photobucket.com/albums/dd121/BrooklynRiderRob/th_DSCN0807.jpg (http://s220.photobucket.com/albums/dd121/BrooklynRiderRob/?action=view&current=DSCN0807.jpg)

2.
http://i220.photobucket.com/albums/dd121/BrooklynRiderRob/th_DSCN0808.jpg (http://s220.photobucket.com/albums/dd121/BrooklynRiderRob/?action=view&current=DSCN0808.jpg)

Gulcrapek
October 5th, 2011, 11:07 PM
80 DeKalb, 10/05/11

http://i.imgur.com/OmOiJ.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/VOLlB.jpg

Gulcrapek
October 6th, 2011, 12:01 AM
Also, Atlantic Terrace

http://i.imgur.com/SZWdg.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/dzpnO.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/1sFFu.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/CGx6y.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/KigCe.jpg

And the top of Atlantic Terminal because.... because.

http://i.imgur.com/JpD48.jpg

Gulcrapek
October 19th, 2011, 04:37 PM
80 Dekalb's narrow side

http://i.imgur.com/Ti4gkh.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/S4qbJh.jpg

Tectonic
October 21st, 2011, 01:22 AM
What about 29 Flatbush? That should be well above ground by now.

RoldanTTLB
October 21st, 2011, 10:10 AM
Founding. They seem to have had soil and drainage problems. The pad will be poured in the next month or so.

Merry
February 15th, 2013, 11:45 PM
200-Room Hotel Planned for BAM Cultural District

by Jessica Dailey

http://ny.curbed.com/uploads/rockwell_place--525x525-thumb.jpg (http://ny.curbed.com/uploads/rockwell_place--525x525.jpg)

The BAM Cultural District is getting another new tower, this time a hotel. The Post reports (http://www.nypost.com/p/news/local/brooklyn/hotel_for_bam_and_barclays_TdNAFOdxa1YVQTBLF0tBPP? utm_medium=rss&utm_content=Brooklyn) that at 200-room hotel will be rising at 95 Rockwell Place, not far from the 32-story apartment building (http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2012/11/28/two_trees_bringing_32story_apartment_tower_to_dobr o.php) planned by Two Trees. To design the hotel, developer Second Development Services tapped architect Thomas Leeser, who has created such stunners as the Museum of the Moving Image (http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2011/01/14/astorias_museum_of_the_moving_image_gets_revamped. php) and the 2012 London Olympic Park. The tower looks to rise about 30 stories (the Post article doesn't specify), with angular cutaway strips breaking up the facade. The building will have a basement performing space, rooftop bar, banquet hall, and a restaurant that overlooks an outside arts plaza. SDS expects to begin construction this fall and complete the building within two years.
http://ny.curbed.com/uploads/95-rockwell-place-for-sale.jpg
[Photo via Brownstoner (http://www.brownstoner.com/blog/2011/11/bam-area-building-on-rockwell-place-for-sale/)]

Currently, a five-story structure built in 1906 occupies the site, which is directly beside BAM's Theater for a New Audience (http://ny.curbed.com/tags/theater-for-a-new-audience). In 2011, the building was put up for sale (http://www.brownstoner.com/blog/2011/11/bam-area-building-on-rockwell-place-for-sale/) asking $9.25 million (http://www.cpexre.com/system/assets/properties/documents/295/original/95_Rockwell_Place_-_Setup.pdf?1334178662), and the advertisement (http://www.cpexre.com/system/assets/properties/documents/295/original/95_Rockwell_Place_-_Setup.pdf?1334178662) stated that there was an "opportunity for the owner to use the existing building." However, the building is not landmarked, so the developer would not be required to do so. The Post article didn't specify whether or not SDS would, but it doesn't look like they do in the renderings. No public records show that the building sold, but a Memorandum of Lease was issued (http://a836-acris.nyc.gov/Scripts/DocSearch.dll/Detail?Doc_ID=2012060701091001) to 95 Rockwell Place, LLC last summer. Property Shark notes that the property is currently under contract (http://www.propertyshark.com/mason/Property-Report/?propkey=181672). No permits have been filed with the Department of Buildings.

Hotel for BAM and Barclays (http://www.nypost.com/p/news/local/brooklyn/hotel_for_bam_and_barclays_TdNAFOdxa1YVQTBLF0tBPP? utm_medium=rss&utm_content=Brooklyn) [NYP]

http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2013/02/15/200room_hotel_planned_for_bam_cultural_district.ph p

Gulcrapek
April 9th, 2013, 08:12 PM
4/07/12

Theater for a New Audience

http://i.imgur.com/clssCDah.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/OVMFkF1h.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/bS06gIbh.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/2zinq9wh.jpg


Site for the TEN Arquitectos tower (I forgot the name)

http://i.imgur.com/HOzbU3xh.jpg

Gulcrapek
April 9th, 2013, 08:14 PM
4/07/12

BAM Fisher Building

http://i.imgur.com/PxShCZP.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/e6jH9rq.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/aDcbHXRh.jpg

Gulcrapek
April 9th, 2013, 08:25 PM
40/7/12

29 Flatbush

17133171341713517136171371713817139171401714117142

vanshnookenraggen
April 9th, 2013, 10:23 PM
RE: BAM Fisher Building

I see what they were trying to do there but it's just too much brick all around.

RoldanTTLB
April 10th, 2013, 11:17 AM
The TfaNA has some interesting similarities to the Silver Spring, eh, cultural center (civic building upon further research)? that was recently built. I like it.

http://www.costelloconstruction.com/images/home_slideshow/slideshow_index_10.jpg

Merry
April 12th, 2013, 10:35 PM
RE: BAM Fisher Building

I see what they were trying to do there but it's just too much brick all around.

Awful :eek:!

Merry
April 12th, 2013, 11:39 PM
Unveiled> Rockwell Place Hotel

Leeser Architecture adding a multifaceted tower to the Brooklyn Downtown Cultural District.

by Nicole Anderson

http://www.archpaper.com/uploads/image/rockwell_hotel_01.jpg
Courtesy Leeser Architecture

As its expansion of the BRIC Arts | Media | Bklyn and UrbanGlass complex nears completion, Leeser Architecture is embarking on its next project in the Brooklyn Downtown Cultural District. The Brooklyn-based firm has been tapped to design the new 200-room Rockwell Place Hotel next to The Theater for a New Audience. With the new Barclays Center only a block away and a flood of new arts and cultural venues cropping up in the area, the 30-story hotel will accommodate the growing number of visitors flocking to the borough.

When he conceptualized the design, Thomas Leeser said, he wanted it to be a “marker of how we see Brooklyn.”



http://www.archpaper.com/uploads/rockwell_hotel_03.jpg (http://www.archpaper.com/uploads/rockwell_hotel_03.jpg)

http://www.archpaper.com/uploads/rockwell_hotel_02.jpg (http://www.archpaper.com/uploads/rockwell_hotel_02.jpg)






For that reason, the building, made of white fritted glass and metal, will feature dramatic asymmetrical fractures in the facade that reinforce a notion of Brooklyn as “multi-faceted” and “modern,” according to Leeser. “It was very important that this building be, on one hand, very ‘contemporary slick,’ but also not perfect,” he said. “Because Brooklyn isn’t perfect.”

The hotel will rise approximately 300 feet and will include a rooftop bar with a small pool, a banquet hall, a ballroom, a performance space on the basement level, and a restaurant on the main floor and mezzanine that looks onto an outdoor arts plaza.

“We wanted to make a statement that Brooklyn is very cutting edge—it is not just the little sister of Manhattan anymore,” said Leeser.

http://www.archpaper.com/news/articles.asp?id=6595

Renato
April 13th, 2013, 03:06 AM
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3599/3556715794_7bb41f1c77_b.jpg

Is this a new building or a recladding?

Derek2k3
April 14th, 2013, 02:23 PM
Brand new, just looks cheap.

Merry
October 10th, 2014, 12:28 AM
This Curvy Fort Greene Building Will Contain a Medical Center

by Jeremiah Budin

http://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/5436de47f92ea169cf00299d/htc11.jpg

A genuinely interesting-looking building is coming to the Fort Greene/Downtown Brooklyn border (http://newyorkyimby.com/2014/10/revealed-620-fulton-street-hotel-workers-healthcare-center-and-office-building-in-downtown-brooklyn.html) and, astonishingly, it will contain zero apartments. The 12-story building at 620 Fulton Street is being developed by Health Center Inc. (http://www.crainsnewyork.com/article/20141009/REAL_ESTATE/141009833/fort-greene-shocker-new-tower-wont-be-apts) and will include a 65,000-square-foot health center, 20,000 square feet of retail, and 70,000 square feet of office space. (40,000 square feet of the office space has already been leased by an as-of-yet unnamed tenant.) The design, from architect Francis Cauffman, is born from the lot's triangular shape and features a "distinctive teardrop form and textured glass façade with frits and fins." The developers hope to break ground in the spring and have the building ready to open by fall of 2016.

http://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/5436de4af92ea169cf0029ae/htc3.jpg (http://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/5436de4bf92ea169cf0029b1/htc3.jpg) http://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/5436de48f92ea169cf0029a4/htc2.jpg (http://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/5436de49f92ea169cf0029a7/htc2.jpg)

http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2014/10/09/this_curvy_fort_greene_building_will_contain_a_med ical_center.php

Tectonic
December 13th, 2014, 10:20 AM
590 Fulton Street
https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7482/15826043867_c533f86fb3_b.jpg