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Derek2k3
February 17th, 2005, 11:28 PM
There's a thread on the neighborhood here
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=2906

Project #1
53 Bridge Street
Scarano & Associates Architects
Dev-Kay Bridge Properties /53 Bridge, LLC
12 stories 162 feet 6 story addition
130,740 Sq. Ft.
Residential Condominiums
Under Construction 2004-2006

http://mehandeseng.com/images/53_bridge.jpg

http://mehandeseng.com/projects.htm

53 Bridge Street
Brooklyn , New York
Architect: Scarano and Associates Architects
Square Foot: 150,000
Owner: Kay Bridge Properties

Derek2k3
February 17th, 2005, 11:49 PM
Project #2

Beacon Tower
85 Adams Street
23 stories 314 feet
Cetra/Ruddy Incorporated
Dev-Boymelgreen Developers
Residential Condominium
77 units 115,424 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2004-Summer 2006

http://www.africa-israel.com/eng/imagesEng/D10H/US_images/USadams85193.jpg

http://www.africa-israel.com/eng/US_011.asp

Project Name: 85 Adams Street

Location/Neighborhood: Brooklyn/DUMBO

Address: 85 Adams Street

Project Objective: Located almost directly beneath the Manhattan Bridge , this ideal corner assemblage will soon become the site of a new 10-story luxury residential development. Surrounded by improved neighborhood buildings, this is one of the last available redevelopment sites in DUMBO. The project is a parcel of three lots, located three blocks from the waterfront redevelopment, the Empire Stores, and several other A.I. & Boymelgreen projects. It is an excellent opportunity to revitalize the community and provide additional housing in the area.

Total Buildout sf: 100,000

Use: Residential

New Construction sf: 100,000

Parking: 1 level below grade

Residential sf: 100,000

Transportation: Direct driving access exists from the Manhattan and Brooklyn bridges with additional access via the Brooklyn Queens Expressway. Ferry transportation between DUMBO and Manhattan is a three-minute walk from the development site. Five (5) subway lines are conveniently located within walking distance, to include the A,C,F,2, and 3 trains.

Approximate Completion: 3/2005



http://www.nytimes.com/2005/02/17/g...gewanted=1&8dpc

Condos Break Sound Barrier
By MOTOKO RICH

Published: February 17, 2005

THE challenge to the developers of Beacon Towers, a high-rise going up just steps from the Manhattan Bridge in Brooklyn, was apparent one morning last week as Denis R. Milsom, an expert in noise control, strained to be heard above the din of a subway train rumbling over the bridge. "Clearly, if they want to sell this as a luxury building," he said in the construction office a block from the site, "having this kind of noise pass by every two or three minutes would be objectionable."

The developer, Leviev Boymelgreen, is marketing Beacon Tower as an oasis of "Zenlike calm," despite a location that evokes not an oasis but that scene in "Annie Hall" in which a young Alvy Singer sits at a rattling kitchen table beneath the Coney Island roller coaster.

When Mr. Milsom, a partner in Shen Milsom & Wilke, measured the noise at the site, it came in at 96 decibels - about the same as a crowded bar with a D.J. spinning hip-hop discs. To mitigate the din, and to help sell the condos, some of which will cost more than $2 million, Mr. Milsom recommended sound-muffling windows from a company that makes them for airport terminals. The architects, Cetra/Ruddy, meanwhile altered the blueprints, converting the original squat eight stories into a slender 23-story tower, so that many of its 79 units will simply try to rise above the noise.

As developers in hectic real estate markets like New York, Boston, Chicago and San Francisco run out of land, new condominiums and rental apartments are going up in some earsplitting places: near bridges, freeway ramps, rail lines and bus terminals. Also multiplying are specialized soundproofing windows and creative designs to limit the exposure of residents to the racket. "Because development opportunities for new construction are so hard to come by, the sites you tend to come by have some challenge," said Sara Mirski, the director of development at Boymelgreen.

In San Francisco, Charles Salter, an acoustical engineer, said his firm was handling about four times as many projects involving sound problems in residential developments as it did five years ago. He regularly recommends that developers install laminated glass and extra layers of gypsum board in the walls to insulate condos from outside noise.

In Chicago, Brian Homans, the president of Shiner & Associates, acoustics consultants, said so many suburbanites are clamoring to move downtown that developers are seizing orphan properties abutting elevated subway lines and commuter rail depots. "A majority of our jobs focus on noise from trains," Mr. Homans said.

He recommended triple-glazed windows for a 37-story tower known as the Residences at RiverBend, because its west facade overlooks the nexus of several elevated subway and commuter train lines. The original developer, Bejco Development Corporation, now defunct, rejected the suggestion as too costly, said Carl Moskus, the building's architect, but the design helped reduce noise: a five-foot-wide hallway along the west facade provides a kind of buffer between residents and trains.

Stephen Pokorny, 60, a lawyer who bought a condo on the 29th floor, said he rarely hears them. Having moved into the city to cut short a 29-mile commute from the suburbs, he added, "I was not overly critical about the noise."

Indeed, city dwellers must accept a certain level of noise, and many take fire engines, police sirens and honking horns as a given. But when developers choose unusually loud sites next to train tracks or freeway ramps, some buyers can expect a break. "The general principle is that if you don't properly mitigate the noise problem, you will have to offer your apartments at a discount," said Jay Schippers, the head of the development division of the Corcoran Group in Brooklyn. But, he added, "if a developer properly solves the sound problem, then there will be no discount."

On noisy sites, one of the biggest challenges is figuring out how to get fresh air into apartments without opening the windows. At 301 Mission Street in San Francisco, a 60-story condo tower rising next to a bus terminal, a window wall will have two panes, one slightly thicker than the conventional quarter-inch, with half an inch between them to block the sound of buses. Special vents will bring in air through tiny holes in the mullions that anchor the windows to the building, said Glenn Rescalvo, one of its architects.

Some developers make noise control part of the pitch. When the sales office opens next month for the Beacon Tower condo in the Dumbo neighborhood (for Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass) in Brooklyn, buyers will be able to inspect a sample window: two half-inch-thick panes sandwiching eight inches of sound-deadening air. They will also be able to experience the difference between the noise with standard windows and the custom windows, by clamping on headsets and listening to a recording.

Mr. Milsom, the acoustics consultant, said the custom windows would reduce decibels to 40 inside from 96 outside, below the New York City zoning code maximum of 45 decibels, equivalent to a quiet conversation.

Eliot Locitzer, the construction manager, said the cost of installing the soundproofing windows was roughly double the cost for conventional windows. Mr. Schippers, who will be marketing the building at Corcoran, said there would be no discount on the prices, which will start around $400,000 for one-bedrooms, in part because of the views of Manhattan, but also because "there is no longer a noise problem."

Other developers prefer to sidestep the issue entirely. Brochures promoting the Arches, a new condo in a converted church in Cobble Hill, Brooklyn, did not mention the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway around the corner. Lester Petracca, the owner of Triangle Equities, the lead developer of the Arches, said he did not see the point of advertising that fact. "People come and look at the surrounding area and look at whatever positives or negatives are there and decide whether they want to live there or not," he said.

The building has double-glazed windows, which are required by the New York State energy code for all new developments. Francis Lu, 31, a software developer who moved in this month, said they block out the traffic noise.

Homeowners in noisy neighborhoods are also beginning to seek help from the experts. Mr. Salter, in San Francisco, recently heard from the owner of an 1889 Victorian besieged by garbage trucks and other urban noisemakers in the expensive Pacific Heights neighborhood. Mr. Salter advised the owner, Dr. Roger Wu, a child psychiatrist, to install laminated glass windows, three-eighths of an inch thick, which will require rebuilding the historic window frames at a cost of more than $3,000 each. "Call me in about six months and ask me how it works," Dr. Wu said.

Noise pollution can be compounded when space-hungry developers build condos atop commercial property like hotels and restaurants. To insulate residents from experimental electronic music the developer of a condo above Dance Theater Workshop of New York on West 19th Street put down 10 inches of concrete between the third floor rehearsal studio and the condos, instead of the usual seven and a half inches, said Ed Rawlings, the project's architect. To further deaden the sound, he said, four layers of gypsum board and shock absorbers were suspended from the concrete slab into the rehearsal studio.

Amie Deutch, who lives in a unit just above the studio with her husband and 21-month-old son, said, "On a rare occasion, if they're rehearsing a dance routine where everybody jumps at the same time, you get a little bit of a vibration."

She added, "Otherwise, it's the most soundproof apartment I've ever lived in, in the city."

Derek2k3
February 18th, 2005, 12:01 AM
Project # 3

The Nexus
84 Front Street
11 stories 120 feet
Meltzer Mandl Architects of Manhattan
Dev-Boymelgreen Developers
Residential Condominium
44 units 72,302 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2004-Late 2005

http://www.africa-israel.com/eng/imagesEng/D10H/US_images/US004a_193x.jpg
(Rendering of the previous design)

http://www.africa-israel.com/eng/US_004.asp

Project Name: 84 Front Street

Location/Neighborhood: Brooklyn/DUMBO

Address: 84 Front Street

Project Objective: 100,000 sf of new residential development will revitalize this former warehouse site. 11 stories of luxury condominium living, dramatic views of the Manhattan Bridge and East River and an innovative design are a few notable project highlight. The design team created a unique fa c ade, which makes use of color, light and the building's moveable exterior components to energize the building at the street level. Hand selected glazing and modern architectural forms will contribute widely to neighborhood upgrades and building improvements currently underway in DUMBO.

Total Buildout sf: 100,000
Use: Residential

New Construction sf: 100,000

Parking: 1 level below grade

Residential sf: 100,000

No. of Units: 44

BDRMS per Unit: Mix of 1, 2 and 3 BDRMS

Transportation: Direct driving access from the Manhattan and Brooklyn bridges with additional access via the Brooklyn Queens Expressway. Ferry transportation between DUMBO and Manhattan is a three-minute walk from the development site. Five (5) subway lines are conveniently located within walking distance, to include the A,C,F,2, and 3 trains.

Approximate Completion: 12/2004



http://nypost.com/realestate/39411.htm

BROOKLYN'S NEW NEXUS

By ADAM BONISLAWSKI

January 29, 2005 -- DUMBO, with its cobblestone streets and aged warehouses, has a rich past. Architect Marvin Meltzer didn't see any reason to dwell on it, though.

In designing the neighborhood's latest luxury development, The Nexus, Meltzer set out to create something decidedly modern. "I think it called for an architectural vocabulary that says, 'This is a new construction,'" he says.

With an eye-grabbing glazed brick-and-metal-paneled facade, the building at 84 Front St. should get the message across.

"A warehouse with an edge," is what Elan Padeh, president and CEO of The Developers Group, a consulting company involved with the project, calls it.

It's not the "edge," though, that's likely to attract buyers.

Nexus units will feature Brazilian-walnut hardwood floors and bathrooms with mosaic stone tiles. The condo building will have a garage, a health club and a landscaped garden. A waterfall cascading through the lobby will add something of an exclamation point.

All of which further emphasizes that, though it might once have been a gritty artists' neighborhood between the bridges, DUMBO has become a prime site for high-toned residences.

Wall Streeter Costa Tsoutsoplides is looking to buy a one-bedroom condo in DUMBO. He placed a bid on a unit at 54 Front St., but withdrew it after realizing that the apartment would sit directly above a commercial space. He's now considering The Nexus, which will open in fall of 2005.

"I want a condo, not a co-op, and obviously there's a discount in DUMBO," Tsoutsoplides says. He also mentions the availability of parking as a lure.

With 56 units, the Nexus will offer one, two- and three-bedroom apartments, ranging from around 600 square feet to 2,000 square feet. Prices will begin in the high $400,000s and go up to $1.6 million for 12th-floor penthouses.

"My only second thoughts are about the real-estate market," Tsoutsoplides says. "We've had such huge increases. I think the market will probably be flat over the next few years. There are a lot of new buildings going up."

He goes on to say something that surely no developer anywhere ever wants to hear: "I'm still considering renting."



http://www.newyorkmetro.com/nymetro/realestate/advertorial/10910/

FACELIFT FOR DUMBO

The Brooklyn neighborhood of DUMBO is best known for its austere century-old concrete loft buildings - which is why Marvin H. Meltzer of Meltzer/Mandl Architects designed something completely different for his new building in DUMBO, The Nexus, at 84 Front Street.

When it is complete in 2005, The Nexus will be the largest residential building ever built from the ground up in DUMBO. It will, in fact, be similar in size to many of the nearby converted loft buildings.

“We tried to design something that fits in with its older neighbors but is also attractive and contemporary,” says Meltzer.

Rather than concrete, The Nexus’ facade is composed of metal panels and brick in tan and green. Behind the facade, there are 56 apartments, an on-site garage, a 1,500SF landscaped common garden and a health club. Buyers can also purchase private rooftop terraces for gardening, sunbathing and picnicking. Apartment prices range from $500,000 to $1.7 million.

Archit_K
February 18th, 2005, 12:04 AM
110 York St.

Scarano's Firm

Project Manager/Designer: David Blaustein
Completion Date: January 2005
Location: Dumbo

http://www.scaranoarchitects.com/contentManaged/

The first time you stand on the roof of this one hundred year old building with its skyline views of New York City, the Manhattan Bridge on one side, and a busy expressway on the other, you realize the potential of this site.

The design for such a powerful location, which thousands of people come across daily, presented an exciting challenge.

The strategy we adopted was to create a structure that no one can ignore.

The leading concept was to sustain contextual elements on the site, and in contrast, to take these elements and embed them in innovative architecture.

The Manhattan Bridge is the most visibly striking element of the site, running parallel to it only 20 feet away. For this reason, we designed an exposed steel truss system for the skeleton to intensify the dialogue between the structures.

The design embodies a strong sense of dynamics. The structural axis is separated from the building exterior finish, providing a sense of movement, which is enhanced by the flying roof, sharp angles, and horizontal texture on the surface.

In addition to its visual impact, the Scarano & Associates Architect's office addition serves as an instructional laboratory for structure and design.
It illustrates over one hundred steel joint conditions, multiple curtain-wall applications of varying complexity, a variety of materials, and methods of intervention with historic structures.

The entire staff is involved in the construction process from procurements to crane placement and site safety.
All materials and systems are presented to the staff prior to installation and then applied in the field. It is the ultimate; hands-on' learn-design-build experience.

To view renderings please go to their website.

Derek2k3
February 18th, 2005, 01:37 AM
Also has a kickass light show at night. There's a thread on the building here also.
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=5170

Project #4

110 York Street
6 stories 84 feet (2 story addition)
Scarano & Associate Architects
Commercial Office
5,000 Sq. Ft. Addition
Completed 2003-October 2004


http://swiss-architects.com/db/imgportr/s/scaranoarchitects_x2.2.jpg

http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m3601/is_10_51/ai_n6261125

Architects office expansion reaches for the sky
Real Estate Weekly, Oct 20, 2004

Save a personal copy of this article and quickly find it again with Furl.net. Get started now. (It's free.)
Scarano & Associates, the architecture firm responsible for the design of thousands of apartment buildings and offices throughout Brooklyn and Manhattan is now taking care of its own design needs with a two-story glass and steel "sheltering roof" office addition, plus a 1,700-square-foot open air roof deck, on top of its existing fifth floor offices at 110 York Street in Vinegar Hill, Brooklyn.

"With a staff that has grown from 25 to 75 architects and design professionals within two years, we desperately needed to expand our offices," says Robert Scarano, founder and principal of the firm. "Moving for the fifth time in a decade seemed inevitable at first, but we managed to rind a much better solution that would showcase our most innovative work and, at the same time, give us the space we needed."

Designed by Mr. Scarano with David Balustein, and built by Mile Square Construction with Anthony Gennaro, Coronis Structural Systems and AA Omvraki Mechanical Engineers, the composition of the distinctly angled extension is glass and steel with natural wood panels and corrugated aluminum facade. Encompassing 5,000 square feet on two separate floors, Scarano & Associates' new office will have its own dedicated elevator to travel from the current fifth office to the rooftop extension. The interiors will inc

"There is a dramatic contrast between the ultra modern rooftop and the red brick masonry of the base building, which was built as a warehouse over 100 years ago," adds Mr. Scarano.

"The near transparency of the extension gives it a fluidity that enhances the architectural context. From the street, you can see the bridge through the rooftop extension, as if it were part of the structure. It's an architectural statement that is already being referred to as Brooklyn's Newest Landmark."

In addition to the aesthetic value of the structure, Scarano & Associates used many sustainable design features and such innovative architectural techniques as elevated shading roof panels, low-E multiple glazing reflective membranes and LED lighting.

"Our current office was recently described as a 'rabbit's warren' in a magazine article, which was funny to see in print, but also reinforced how tight we are as a group.

"With another 15 architects scheduled to come on board before the end of the year, the completion of this project couldn't come too soon. These are truly exciting times for our firm."

The architects plan to celebrate the completion of their new offices, which took approximately 15 months to design and build, with an industry gala at the end of October for colleagues and clients.

COPYRIGHT 2004 Hagedorn Publication
COPYRIGHT 2004 Gale Group

Archit_K
February 18th, 2005, 03:23 AM
What does DUMBO stand for?

Derek2k3
February 18th, 2005, 03:23 PM
Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass


From the Architect's Newspaper

http://www.archpaper.com/eavesdrop/eavesdrop_021605.html

We’ve lost track of Jean Nouvel’s on-again, off-again meatpacking district project for developer Stephen Touhey. But it sounds like the French architect’s failed 1999 design for a nine-story hotel in Dumbo may be getting its second act as apartments. As of press time, both Nouvel’s office and developer Two Trees Management were keeping mum. However, we’re told that the repurposed structure will largely keep to the original plan, which calls for it to be dramatically cantilevered over the East River.



Here's the unbuilt hotel proposal.

Project # 5

River Hotel
Main Street Pier, Brooklyn Waterfront
9 stories 100 feet
Ateliers Jean Nouvel
Dev-Two Trees Management Co.
Commercial Hotel
250 Rooms 350,000 Sq.Ft.
Unbuilt



http://www.jeannouvel.fr

The Mirror of Manhattan

In fairy tales the wicked witch keeps the princess from seeing herself in a mirror to prevent her from discovering her beauty. Admiring one's own image, being certain of one's splendor, is such a pleasure that it has been elevated to the rank of a sin. Here is an irresistible occasion to hold up Narcissus's mirror to Manhattan and say: look at yourself; delight in yourself! The Fulton River Café was already a shard of the mirror. The river hotel will amplify the effect tenfold!

Panoramic views will stretch to the maximum, with sheets of glass so wide and so clear that people will wonder if they even exist. Images will stretch and duplicate in these planes of reflecting glass, creating a play between the real and the virtual.

The rooms are conceived as spacious balconies overlooking the Brooklyn Bridge and the downtown skyline, or, on the other side, the Manhattan and Williamsburg bridges. The power of these views derives from the bridges in the foreground, which contrast against a precious accumulation of background silhouettes: the Statue of Liberty, the skyline from South Street Seaport to the Empire State Building. Other rooms exploit vertiginous views upward toward the Manhattan Bridge, exploiting its fantastic dimensions. The River Hotel is in essence a bridge between two bridges: a place for looking at the city's bridges as if from the deck of a ship. It obeys the strict logic of New York's piers and respects the orthogonal urban grid running down to the water. It stretches its facade to the utmost, cantilevering over the river as if to reach the other side – as if it feels it belongs more to Manhattan than to Brooklyn.

The west deck of the hotel's lobby features a bay window over a hundred meters long for a view to the opposite shore. The health club extends under Manhattan Bridge, extending its floors behind a wall of glass twenty meters high at the water's edge. Even the movie theater takes advantage of the scenery: during intermission the screen lifts to reveal the Manhattan skyline and the bridges. And all along the piers, shops will accompany the riverside promenade.

In this way you will discover at the foot of the Brooklyn Bridge a little piece of Brooklyn that, by dint of looking at Manhattan, has become Manhattan.

Jean Nouvel


- Status: Unbuilt
- Location: Main Street Pier, Brooklyn, New York
- Dates: May 1999
- Gross Floor Area: 35 000 m2, 350 000sq.ft
- Type of Commission: Private
- Program: 250 room hotel 150 000 sq ft, retail 75 000 sq ft, cinema 90 000 sq ft
- Construction Cost: 88 000 000 €, 80 000 000 $
- Client: Two Trees Management Co., David Walentas

Architectural Team
- Project Manager: Brigitte Metra
- Assitant Architects: David Fagart, Nicolas Baehr, Jane Landrey, Kirsi Marjamaki, Eric Nespoulos, Aldrick Beckmann, Joon Paik
- Local Architect: Beyer Blinder Belle, John H.Beyer

Consultant Team
- Engineers: Ove Arup and Partners
- Cinema Consultant: JSS Advisors, LLC
- Models: Jean-Louis Courtois, Etienne Follenfant
- Site Pictures: Philippe Ruault




http://travel2.nytimes.com/mem/travel/article-page.html?res=9B05E3DC1139F930A25755C0A96F958260&n=Top%2fFeatures%2fTravel%2fDestinations%2fUnited% 20States%2fNew%20York%2fNew%20York%20City
ART / ARHITECTURE; A Bridge Between a City and Its Self-Image

By HERBERT MUSCHAMP

Published: June 13, 1999

JEAN NOUVEL'S new design for a hotel and cineplex on the Brooklyn waterfront strikes me as one of the most imaginatively conceived pieces of architecture New York has seen in a long time. I've been groping for ideas to explain why. What makes a building contemporary? An impossible question to answer, but perhaps not a fruitless one to ask.

These days, architecture is not governed by a fixed set of guidelines, as it was, for instance, during the years of the modern movement. Buildings by Frank Gehry, Rem Koolhaas, Peter Eisenman, Steven Holl, Tod Williams and Billie Tsien, Daniel Libeskind, Philippe Starck, Rafael Vinoly, Zaha Hadid, Eric Moss and Thom Mayne are each highly distinctive in appearance and atmosphere, yet in common they can quicken your awareness of the present and its untapped possibilities. Where does that power come from?


Four thoughts. Walter Pater said that critics should ask: ''In whom did the stir, the genius, the sentiment of the period find itself?'' That's a start. Iris Murdoch, in ''Metaphysics as a Guide to Morals,'' offered a more rigorous definition. ''Serious art,'' she wrote, ''is a continuous working of meaning in the light of the discovery of some truth.''

John Summerson, writing in 1947, also emphasized the idea that contemporary art depends on a process of continuous working and on the value of discovery: ''The most a critic can do is to sort out those aging ideas that get encrusted around past creative achievements and clog the proper working of the imagination in changing times.'' And if you can accept that architecture is a public art, indeed the most conspicuously public art of all, then I think that a statement by Arthur Danto also helps illuminate the meaning and and value of Mr. Nouvel's new design: ''Public art is the public transfigured. It is us, in the medium of artistic transformation.''

Actually, I can't improve on Mr. Danto's idea as a depiction of Mr. Nouvel's design. It's a bridgelike building for a city poised between being and becoming. It shows a city in transition from manufacturing to information as an economic base. It is playful, disciplined, sociable and pushy. It refracts into crystalline form New York's exquisite and infuriating narcissism, a town enthralled by its cinematic panoramas and animated by the yearning of its citizens to star in them. And the project has aroused local opposition that is a form of narcissism in itself. The opponents seem to be fighting their own reflection in a mirror.

The River Hotel is part of a plan to redevelop a 72-acre, former industrial area on the East River called Dumbo (Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass). The plan, which is seriously flawed, includes masses of retail shops, a redesign of the small, disheveled Fulton Landing Park, a small marina and parking garages. It also proposes housing a museum in the upper floors of Empire Stores, a handsome set of landmark brick warehouses that border the eastern edge of the park.

The Brooklyn Bridge Park Coalition, which opposes the plan, is right to demand that it be reconceived. The hotel itself is another matter. It deserves support.

Designed to resemble a pier, the hotel complex is in two main sections. A slim, four-story bar building is cantilevered from atop a square, five-story box. The bar projects 134 feet out over the East River and rises to a height of 100 feet, stopping just short of the Manhattan Bridge roadway. A glass bridge connects the hotel to a health club and spa across the street.

Mr. Nouvel has chosen a spare, industrial vocabulary. The facades are a simple grid pattern of gray metal fitted with floor-to-ceiling windows of white glass, so called because of its high degree of transparency. Because the hotel roof and its underside would be visible to bridge and water traffic, Mr. Nouvel has treated these surfaces as if they, too, were facades.

On the roof, instead of mechanical equipment, there are rectangular skylights and landscaped patios for the top floor. Three levels of public rooms, enclosed by seamless glass walls, are suspended beneath the building in a reverse ziggurat formation. On the lower of these floors a dance floor-size square of glass allows views of the river beneath.

The private rooms are minimally furnished and stylish. The east wall of each room is lined with mirror, doubling the skyline views. (Pray for soft lighting.) For the roof of the building, Mr. Nouvel has designed a tilted louver of reflective glass mirror that would cast reflections through skylights into the top floor rooms.

No museum has yet been named to occupy the old brick warehouses, and perhaps the proposal to put one there is redundant. The fact is that Mr. Nouvel has designed his cineplex as if it were a museum of contemporary art. And why shouldn't it be, if films are our leading popular art form?

The 16-screen cineplex is housed in a low, rectangular structure from which the projecting pier form is cantilevered. Mr. Nouvel has a thing about technological gimmicks (like the photosensitive irises installed in the facade of the Arab World Institute in Paris; alas, they occasionally break down). For the cineplex, he has installed windows behind the screens. These would be raised and lowered between performances, allowing stunning views of that other great collective art form: the Manhattan skyline. He has also proposed mounting screens on the exterior of the building, which could be used for artists' projects.

Dumbo's developer, David Walentas, the client, calls the design Main Street Pier. The architect himself calls it a bridge between two bridges. To my eye, the imagery looks nautical, as if the defunct Brooklyn Navy Yard nearby had gone into the business of floating hotels. There are open and enclosed promenades, reminiscent of those on the great trans-Atlantic liners. In the public corridors, surfboard-shape light wells are enclosed by shiplike railings.

In fact, the project should be seen as a step toward the time when New York is once again a great water city, with water taxis, ferries, piers, parks and other public amenities as well as new industrial uses enlarging the maritime dimension of New York.

Murdoch's idea helps illuminate this design. Mr. Nouvel has rethought the character of the city's waterfront at a time of change. If you look down on that site now (and it happens that I see part of Fulton Landing Park from my kitchen window), it is hard to believe that this is the ideal location for a luxury hotel. But you don't have to think ahead too far to glimpse a very different picture, of a time when water traffic will help to reshape the city's urban contours, just as the Brooklyn Bridge did years ago.

Will this project be built? Snowball's chance in hell, they say. But the ideas this particular snowball represents are not going to melt away. Mr. Nouvel has considered both the city's psychological and physical context. With its mirrors, its views, its white glass reflections, the building is a portrait of New York's narcissism at architectural scale. It brings to mind the famous Saul Steinberg drawing of New York's self-absorbed view of the world. Like that drawing, it counters self-absorption with self-awareness. It is a reflection on the city's narcissism, not a mindless indulgence in it. ''The stir, the genius, the sentiment of the period'' don't come more persuasively than this.

In this, it differs from the vanity that has trickled into architectural preservation circles in recent years. That threatens to turn an otherwise estimable movement into one of those aging ideas that get encrusted around past creative achievement and clog the proper workings of the imagination in changing times. The preservation movement has been a dominant influence on New York architecture for two decades, and its achievements are overwhelmingly constructive. But it has also come to include a sanctimonious Sacred Cow mentality. Perhaps the time has come to measure its environmental impact on the quality of New York's architecture.

Who doesn't love the kind of vanitythat we experience when we check out our reflections in fancy shop windows and see images of ourselves and the city overlaid atop pouty mannequins?This is one of the great urban pleasures. Mr. Nouvel's building will offer many similar moments throughout.

There's another kind of narcissistic outlook that is not so benign. According to this view, the public realm exists only to reflect popular prejudices, not to challenge or expose them. This strain has played a major role in New York's resistance to change. It has led to a confusion between architecture and architectural history, and in recent years this confusion has covered the city's architectural aspirations like a blanket of dust.

Mr. Nouvel's design and the opposition raised against it are both immensely narcissistic. The difference is that Mr. Nouvel knows what he is about. He has reworked meaning in light of the discovery of an important truth about the city today. That's what makes him a serious artist and his design an important work of art.


Renderings by Arte-Factory. More images there:
http://www.arte-factory.com/

BrooklynRider
February 18th, 2005, 04:04 PM
Gosh, I hated that hotel. BAD, bad, bad design.

Kolbster
February 19th, 2005, 01:35 PM
It's an um, interesting hotel....

AJphx
February 20th, 2005, 03:55 AM
well I like it. Nouvel has done a great job. The airy and open corridors, the glass curtain wall windows, the usual wonderful use of light, and the ship-like deck on the outside are all beautiful.

Kolbster
February 20th, 2005, 10:00 AM
You do have a point, i do like the inside, but the outside i'm not that big a fun of

NoyokA
February 20th, 2005, 10:23 AM
Gosh, I hated that hotel. BAD, bad, bad design.

Initially I was glad Giuliani killed this project, but since then its grown on me. Im sure it would come to be a fixture of DUMBO bringing to the neighborhood more artists and much more than yuppies.

Derek2k3
February 20th, 2005, 12:29 PM
Project # 6

NYC 2012 Voleyball & Handball Arena
85 Jay Street
Rafael Vinoly Architects
Dev-NYC 2012
Sports and Recreation
13,563 sq feet (can't be right)
Unbuilt

http://www.rvapc.com/Authoring/.%5CImages%5CProjects%5C249%5C249_tmp563.jpg

http://www.rvapc.com/ht/HTProject.aspx?Base=Projects&projID=249
More renderings at the web site.

New York Olympic Sports Arena
Brooklyn, New York, 2000
Sports and Recreation
Unbuilt
13,563 sq feet

New York is the United States' candidate city currently vying to host the 2012 Summer Olympic Games. In preparing its proposal, the New York City Olympic committee, known as NYC 2012, selected RVA to design a new, multi-purpose volleyball and handball arena on a site in Brooklyn, next to the Manhattan Bridge and just three blocks from the East River.

The site’s only adverse characteristic is a gentle north-south slope complicating the design of the building’s main entrance – located on its western boundary to take advantage of existing mass transit connections, local traffic patterns, and a planned commuter ferry route (contingent on New York’s selection as Olympic host city). RVA’s proposal provides a simple solution: an elevated plinth with a public plaza signals the entrance to the arena while serving as the facility’s main civic space. The interior of the building features a sliding seating system easily configured to suit either volleyball or handball matches. The arena is covered by a translucent fabric tensile roof, which extends to the west to cover part of the entrance plaza. The roof glows at night, revealing the activities within.

On either side of the main volume of the building, two narrow masses – running along the northern and southern boundaries of the site and conforming in scale to the surrounding neighborhood – contain VIP rooms, press boxes, warm-up areas, a café, food stands, the athletes entrance, and the vertical circulation cores of the complex.

After the conclusion of the Games, the facility would be turned over to the community. The easily reconfigurable seating would allow it to accommodate a wide variety of functions, including concerts and trade shows as well as ice hockey, basketball, tennis, indoor soccer, and boxing events.


The Jehova Witness project will go up on this site, which I'll post later.

Archit_K
February 20th, 2005, 08:36 PM
Porject #4

Archit_K
February 20th, 2005, 08:54 PM
Poject #7

This could be one of Gruzen Samtons new projcet.
http://www.gruzensamton.com/

Derek2k3
February 20th, 2005, 11:33 PM
ok
Project #7

J Condo
100 Jay Street
31/33 stories 337 feet
Gruzen Samton Architects
Dev-Hudson Companies Incorporated
Residential Condominiums
260/267 units 407,129 Sq. Ft.
Proposed 2005-2006

http://www.hudsoninc.com/apt4sale/jcondo/images/jcondo.jpg

From Hudson Companies Incorporated

http://www.hudsoninc.com/apt4sale/jcondo/index.htm

Rising 33 stories with terrific panoramic views, J Condo will be a luxury residential condominium with ground floor retail space and a parking garage. As the tallest building in Dumbo, J Condo will add an easily recognizable icon to the Brooklyn skyline with its dramatic curved, sail-like façade of floor to ceiling windows viewable from the Manhattan Bridge, East River and Manhattan.

J Condo will offer 267 studio to three-bedroom apartments with luxury finishes, services and views not previously available in a new condominium building in Dumbo or downtown Brooklyn.

Residential Amenities will include:

* a 24-hour attended lobby, 2,000 square foot fitness center,
* bike room
* children’s play room, media room, resident storage
* sun terrace
* on-premises garage.

Finishes will include:

* washer and dryer hookups in every apartment
* stone master bath with soaking tub and separate shower
* granite kitchen countertops and designer wood cabinets
* generous closets including walk-in and linen closets,
* stainless steel appliances, and
* garbage disposals.

Many units will have private terraces or balconies and all will have triple glazed casement windows and state-of-the-art water cooled heat pump units providing maximum flexibility for heating and cooling .

Construction of J Condo is anticipated to begin in late Fall 2004. Condominium units will offered for sale subject to a plan to be reviewed and accepted for filing by the New York State Attorney General’s office. Units are not available for sale at this time.

A thread on the project is here. This was also the site of the Light Bridges proposal.
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=3195

http://www.metropolismag.com/images/images_0501/shp/d.jpg
Light Bridges, SHOP Architects

Kolbster
February 21st, 2005, 12:30 AM
I really did like that light bridge's proposal...it's much more unique, the other building is more...common

Kolbster
February 21st, 2005, 12:32 AM
So tell me more about this hand ball and Voleball stadium proposed in Dumbo

Archit_K
February 21st, 2005, 02:22 AM
Project #7

That is it. I can't wait for this to be completed. What a pretty rendering.

Derek2k3
February 21st, 2005, 03:14 AM
Project #8

Bridgefront
67/65-71 Front Street/42-44 Main Street
10 stories 120 feet
Elena Kalman Architect
Dev-Boymelgreen Developers
Residential Condominium
21 units 37,160 Sq. Ft.
Completed Early 2003

http://www.kalmandesign.com/exteriorbridge.jpg
Elena Kalman Architect
http://www.kalmandesign.com


http://www.corcoran.com/property/nd/index.asp?where=manh&p=1

Overview
Bridgefront, a luxury loft condominium, is located in the heart of DUMBO (Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass). This historic waterfront community has spectacular views of lower Manhattan, the East River and both the Manhattan and Brooklyn Bridges. It is a rapidly changing and vibrant neighborhood and boasts new and hip restaurants, shopping and living conveniences. Bridgefront is accessible by subway on the A and C train stopping at High Street, the F train to York Street or the 2 and 3 trains at Clark Street. There is also the New York Water Taxi that stops at Fulton Landing and travels across the East River into Manhattan. DUMBO is within walking distance to Brooklyn Heights and Downtown Brooklyn.

Amenities
This new state of the art construction luxury condominium building boasts 24-hour full service concierge, a fully equipped health club with a sauna and party room, private terraces and balconies, common roof terrace and an art gallery lobby showcasing DUMBO artists. All the units have 11’ ceiling heights, solid mahogany window sills, double glazed oversized out swinging windows, generous closets and high speed internet. The bathrooms are equipped with deep multi-jet Jacuzzi tub, custom sink and vanity and marble flooring. Kitchens include Sub Zero refrigerators, Wolf Range stainless steel ovens, Asko dishwashers, custom cherry wood cabinets and Pietra Serna countertops.



REAL ESTATE DESK
POSTINGS: Bridgefront in Brooklyn; Condos Selling In Dumbo

Published: September 21, 2003, Sunday

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9804E0DC123AF932A1575AC0A9659C8B 63

Construction is still under way on Bridgefront, a 10-story condominium at 42 Main Street in the Dumbo area of Brooklyn, but 18 of its 21 loft-style apartments have been sold in the two months since sales began.

The residences, including three penthouses, are offered with six different interior layouts and have 1,010 to 1,700 square feet of space, as well as private terraces. Sales prices range from $600,000 to $1.15 million, according to Boymelgreen Developers of Brooklyn, the developer of the $10.5 million project.

Haysha Deitsch, the project manager, said he attributed the rapid pace of sales to the building's design and the neighborhood, whose name is an acronym for Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass. ''Dumbo,'' he said, ''is Dumbo.''

Bridgefront is clad in glass and a stuccolike material and has a facade with a rounded corner at Main and Front Streets. The architect is Elena Kalman of Stamford, Conn.

In two weeks residents will begin moving into the building, which will have such amenities as a health club, meditation garden and roof deck. Completion is expected next month.

Bridgefront marks Boymelgreen's entry into Dumbo, but the company already has started a second residential project in the neighborhood and has plans for two more, as well as a commerical development. ''This is the first and a taste of what is to come,'' Mr. Deitsch said.

Published: 09 - 21 - 2003 , Late Edition - Final , Section 11 , Column 4 , Page 1

Kolbster
February 21st, 2005, 08:18 AM
You know they have a star bucks in the bottom of that building

NoyokA
February 21st, 2005, 10:21 AM
Although generally not a fan of post-modernism I do lavish in some of its details and classical throw-backs, this is a good building that fits right into its context.

Derek2k3
February 21st, 2005, 07:33 PM
Project #9

The Bridges/The Bridge Street Condominium
79 Bridge Street
6 stories 70 feet (2 story addition)
Scarano & Associate Architects
Kay Bridge Properties/Howard Klaus Partnership
Residential Condominiums
37 units 51,141 Sq. Ft.
Completed 2003

The Bridges

http://www.thedevelopersgroup.com/buildings/building.aspx?buildingid=1001&

79 Bridge St Brooklyn, NY 11201
The Bridges Condominiums are the first luxury loft condo project to come to Vinegar Hill Brooklyn, a neighboring community to stylish Dumbo. This charming neighborhood features delightful restaurants, cobblestone streets and quaint brownstones. The Bridges has some of the most original architecture in all of Brooklyn, with its majestic open-air courtyards and breathtaking views of lower to mid-town Manhattan from its large roof-deck. Come see this beautiful loft condo building today.

Amenities
Open-air interior courtyard
Individual balconies
Wrought-iron railings
Hardwood floors
Stainless steel appliances
Marble counter tops
Marble baths
Maple kitchen cabinets
Exposed brick
Insulated windows
Roof Deck


http://www.scaranoarchitects.com/multifamily1.html

This converted factory building houses 37 loft-style-apartments, commercial gallery spaces, and enclosed parking on six floors. These features are contained within 40.000 square feet, making this a diverse and truly mixed-use development.

By stretching the conceptual boundaries of the up and coming DUMBO Community three blocks east, this two story addition of a creation of this vacant factory building provided a platform for buyers to obtain loft-style living at a modest prices. Dubbed the “poor man’s lofts”, this building sold out all units in four weeks.

The juxtaposition of new and old marks a crossroads in development in the area. The addition to the building marries old and new; new interior and exterior bearing walls, supported by the existing brick walls made the project economically feasible.

This alteration constructed in strict conformance with the New York City Quality Housing Program. Afforded the residents many amenities not found in other buildings.

A distinctive development, which provides both environmental sensitivity through adaptive reuse and energy conservation through creative insulation and ventilation systems, makes this project a success to everyone associated with it.

Kolbster
February 21st, 2005, 10:23 PM
How many "projects are there?

BrooklynRider
February 21st, 2005, 11:56 PM
I don't see how anyone can view #7 as anything but a wall. I'm guessing we all enjoy the height, as it will add to the skyline. However, it is just too much mass. I'd prefer two taller, slender towers rising from that base. I think this is just incredibly bad planning and a form of structure that imposes itself on a neighborhood, rather than integrating itself. Horrible.

Derek2k3
February 22nd, 2005, 02:49 PM
There's a thread on the neighborhood here

Project #1
53 Bridge Street
Scarano & Associates Architects
Dev-Kay Bridge Properties /53 Bridge, LLC
12 stories 162 feet 6 story addition
130,740 Sq. Ft.
Residential Condominiums
Under Construction 2004-2006

http://mehandeseng.com/images/53_bridge.jpg

http://mehandeseng.com/projects.htm

53 Bridge Street
Brooklyn , New York
Architect: Scarano and Associates Architects
Square Foot: 150,000
Owner: Kay Bridge Properties

Some photos of the construction. The first pic has the site of 100 Jay (Project #7) in the foreground.

Derek2k3
February 22nd, 2005, 03:30 PM
How many "projects are there?
Not quite sure yet.

Project #10

133 Water Street
12 stories 120 feet
Scarano & Associate Architects
Dev-Jack Guttman Partners
Residential Condominium
52 units 85,477 Sq. Ft.
5.000 Sq. Ft. of Retail & Community Space
Under Consruction 2003-2006


Scarano & Associate Architects

http://www.scaranoarchitects.com

The Gair family developed many of the adjacent properties and these buildings lend their aesthetic qualities to the new structure. And while some of the new developments ignore this richly diverse community by placing Manhattan-style buildings next to these neighboring icons, this new building blends old with new, allowing both to be recognized and appreciated for what they are.

Exterior surfaces reveal the varied nature of the interior layouts by using glass window wall systems on the upper level units, most of which have double height ceilings. Turning the mass on a 45 degree angle to the street grid allowed for unique and varied vistas for many units. Triple glazing and acoustically super-insulated exterior walls mask the din of noise emanating from the adjacent Manhattan bridge roadway and transit lines.

With commercial spaces at the 1st floor and parking in the cellar, the residential portion on the floors above responds to the New York City Quality Housing Program, mandated by the local residential district.

Large units of 1000 square feet for a two bedroom apartment represent a trend that the buyers now demand. Modern amenities include deluxe five piece fixtures in the master bathroom, his and her walk in closets and state of the art kitchen appliances with European cabinetry.


Globe St.

http://www.globest.com/news/120_120/newyork/126684-1.html

Residential Tower To Rise in Dumbo
By Barbara Jarvie
Last updated: Tuesday, September 21, 2004 04:07pm

BROOKLYN, NY-To add more residences to the “hot” Dumbo section of this borough, Scarano & Associates Architects completed the design of 133 Water St., a 12-story mixed-use condominium tower. It will be the first new building to be constructed in 100 years at the base of the Manhattan Bridge.

Over the past few years, Dumbo has become one of New York City's most sought after residential neighborhoods. This initiative started when the Clock Tower Building was converted into luxury apartments in 1998.
Plans for 133 Water St. include underground parking, first-floor commercial spaces and 52 residential units consisting primarily of one- and two-bedroom apartments, with some studios and three-bedroom units. Developed as a full-service luxury building, the condominium will feature such amenities as a fitness room, roof deck with recreational space and washer-dryer hook-ups. Units above the second floor will have balconies or terraces. The project also calls for triple-glazed glass curtain walls, as well as high-grade acoustically insulated exterior walls to mask street noises. Development costs were not available.
Designed by Scarano’s Charles Diehl, the street frontage of the building will be composed of concrete. The glass portion of the site, primarily comprising the top eight floors, turns the mass of the structure at an angle to match the bridge.
“We paid close attention to the architectural styles of the area,” points out Robert Scarano, the firm’s founder and principal. “We didn’t believe Manhattan-style modernism would be appropriate here, but rather a design that could celebrate the historic qualities of the neighborhood, while taking advantage of potentially remarkable vistas.”
Construction developed by the Guttman family is just under way with completion scheduled for early 2006. The interiors are being designed by Andres Escobar and the marketing will be through the Developers Group.
Two blocks away from the Water Street project in Vinegar Hill, Scarano & Associates recently completed the design of a second residential project. The architects proposed a four-story glass and steel addition, two separate entry lobbies, center courtyard and 83-space below ground parking lot. The Scarano architects responsible for the design are Richard T. Honovic and Robyn Squires.
Founded in 1985 by Robert Scarano Jr., the firm is responsible for an average of 200 projects annually. Although the firm focuses much of its work in Brooklyn and Manhattan, the firm designed a convention center in Medellin, Columbia.
The company is also converting two interconnecting, 1920's commercial buildings at 57 Front Street to 33 one- and two-bedroom rental apartments.

Derek2k3
February 22nd, 2005, 03:58 PM
Project #11

10 Jay Street
Ehrenkrantz Eckstut & Kuhn Architects
16 stories (7 story addition)
Proposed

http://63.240.68.115/FirmFiles/8/images/10-Jay-Street-3D-full.jpg

10 Jay Street
Ehrenkrantz Eckstut & Kuhn Architects
http://www.eekarchitects.com/indprjdoc_eek.cfm?Action=ProjectDoc&webprojcatid=219&projectid=62888&categoryname=Historic%20Preservation%20%26%20Adapt ive%20Reuse

Location: Brooklyn, New York
This building's new design is proposed to become an integral part of redeveloping a waterfront loft district as well as Brooklyn’s new waterfront park. At the moment, the building detracts from its current urban setting and will, if it remains, be an obstacle (visual and functional) to the wonderful plans underway for the Brooklyn waterfront park. Here is one of those rare opportunities where private redevelopment can be directed to enhance ongoing public policy and current public construction projects, and to do so within a very short timetable.

A thread on the building is here:
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=4878

NYatKnight: "It looks like a water cooler."
lol


Another design, by Karl Fischer

http://www.kfarchitect.com/portfolio/residential/multifamily/multi-31.jpg

Kolbster
February 22nd, 2005, 08:15 PM
The proposed Karl Fisher one looks nice....which one is going to be built?

Derek2k3
February 25th, 2005, 12:16 AM
Project #2

Beacon Tower
85 Adams Street
23 stories 314 feet
Cetra/Ruddy Incorporated
Dev-Boymelgreen Developers
Residential Condominium
77 units 115,424 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2004-Summer 2006


http://www.corcoran.com/property/nd/photo/beacontower1.jpg
Corcoran Group

http://www.corcoran.com/property/nd/index.asp?CGM=Y

85 Adams Street
Brooklyn,NY11201

Overview
COMING SOON
Find peace, sanctuary and true urban sophistication at 85 Adams Street in Dumbo. Discover Beacon Tower- the tallest residential building in DUMBO- where the emphasis is on you, your comfort, your desire for community and calm.

1, 2 and 3 bedroom units available ranging from 779 to 1784 square feet. The apartments will be loaded with high quality fixtures and equipment which create a spa-like atmosphere. Windows will be dual glazed with heavy laminated glass and a special sound-absorbing acoustic liner for superior noise attenuation. Other amenities will include rift oak cabinets, stone composite countertops, Bosch stainless steel appliances, Kohler sinks and faucets, built-in washer/dryers, Zuma bathtubs (20” depth) and many many more!!! A beautiful courtyard and garden creates a refreshing transition from street life to home life.

This twenty-three story tower is located in New York’s hippest and most charming residential neighborhood. Minutes from Manhattan. Close to NY Water Taxi and many subways!

Amenities

COMING SOON
• Doorman
• DSL/Cable/Satellite ready
• Dual glazed windows with heavy laminated glass and a special sound absorbing acoustic liner for superior noise attenuation
• 10’6” ceilings
• Rift oak cabinets
• Stone composite countertops
• Bosch electric oven/gas cooktop and dishwasher all in stainless steel
• Jenn-Air stainless steel refrigerator
• Kohler sinks and faucets
• Glass mosaic tile walls in the bathroom
• Built-in washer/dryers
• Zuma bathtubs (20” depth)
• Courtyard and garden w/ teahouse
• Many Many More!!!!

Derek2k3
February 25th, 2005, 12:27 AM
Project #12

RiverFront
57 Front Street
7 stories 84 feet(Conversion)
Elena Kalman Architect
Dev-Boymelgreen Developers
Residential Condominiums
33 units 51,781 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2004-2005

http://www.57front.com/index_r2_c3.gif
http://www.57front.com/


57 Front Street
Brooklyn,NY11201

http://www.corcoran.com/property/nd/index.asp?CGM=Y

Overview
Newly refurbished loft-style development in prime DUMBO! Amenities include stainless steel Bosch & sub-zero appliances, honed soapstone countertops, Kohler bathroom fixtures, whirlpool bath tubs and maple flooring. Doorman building with a fitness center and on-site laundry. Close to A, C and F trains and the New York Water taxi, minutes from Manhattan!

• Stainless steel Bosch & sub-zero appliances
• Honed soapstone countertops
• Kohler bathroom fixtures
• Whirlpool bath tubs
• Maple flooring.

Archit_K
February 25th, 2005, 01:24 AM
Wow, alot going on in DUMBO.

Derek2k3
February 25th, 2005, 01:40 AM
Yup, some projects (like this one) are actually located in a small adjacent neighborhood called Vinegar HIll.

Project #13

Commodore’s Court
85 Hudson Avenue
5 stories 50 feet
K & K Engineering
Dev-The Constellation Group
Residential Condominiums
9 units 12,957 Sq. Ft.
Completed Late 2004

http://www.corcoran.com/property/nd/photo/85hudson.jpg

85 Hudson Avenue
Brooklyn,NY11201

Overview
Located in historic and charming Vinegar Hill is a newly constructed condominium with special emphases to detail. You enter this building through a soaring glass enclosed atrium, where you take the elevator to nine distinctive apartments. The apartments consist of duplexes, simplexes and a penthouse. All of the apartments offer low monthly carrying costs, individually controlled central air and heat, recessed lighting, stainless steel appliances, granite countertops, designer limestone tiles and finishes in the bathrooms, hardwood floors, storage units, and private outdoor space. The penthouse apartment offers the elevator opening into your unit, a gas fireplace, Jacuzzi tub and four separate out door areas; all with spectacular skyline, bridge and water views. The building also has a common roof deck. The F subway line is within a short walking distance, water taxi directly to Wall Street and minutes to the boutiques and restaurants of DUMBO

The Commodore’s Court Condominium brings a new level of style to the Brooklyn marketplace. This elevator building features:
# Central Air and Heat
# Private Outdoor Space For Every Apartment
# Glass Enclosed Atrium Lobby
# Double Paned Wood Framed Windows
# Number 1 Hard wood Oak Floors
# Stainless Steel Appliances
# Beautiful Limestone Tile Bathrooms Featuring Vessel Style Sinks
# Custom Kitchens With Granite
# Counter Tops Pre-Wired For Internet
# -wired For Cable TV
# Common Roof Deck
# Private Storage Rooms
# Intercom

Archit_K
February 25th, 2005, 02:15 AM
Poject #13

For a minute I was disappointed thinking Commodore’s Court was 2-Dimensional verses 3-Dimensional. Nice angle shot you took of the building Ondel.

Kolbster
February 25th, 2005, 11:49 AM
wow, bravo Dumbo, im very excited to see the vast change in the sky line!

Derek2k3
February 25th, 2005, 02:58 PM
Projects #14-17

Watchtower Residence Hall I
85 Jay Street
20 stories 222 feet
Beyer Blinder Belle
Dev-The Watchtower Bible and Tract Society of New York
Proposed 2006

Watchtower Residence Hall II
85 Jay Street
18 stories 195 feet
Beyer Blinder Belle
Dev-The Watchtower Bible and Tract Society of New York
Proposed 2006

Watchtower Residence Hall III
85 Jay Street
9 stories
Beyer Blinder Belle
Dev-The Watchtower Bible and Tract Society of New York
Proposed 2006

Watchtower Residence Hall IV
85 Jay Street
9 stories
Beyer Blinder Belle
Dev-The Watchtower Bible and Tract Society of New York
Proposed 2006

http://www.85jaystreet.org/planned/images/4corners.jpg
http://www.85jaystreet.org/planned/

What Will Be Built?
The current plans for the space include a dormitory of 20 stories holding 1000 apartments and a 1100 car underground parking garage. The building will be capped by 14, 16, 18 and 20 story towers and extend from lot line to lot line. All together the building will house more then 1,500 potential tenants, a number that equals half of the estimated current residents of the DUMBO area. Plans for the structure include
NO RETAIL SPACE at ground level.


Jehovah's Witnesses
get DUMBO plan OK

http://www.nydailynews.com/boroughs/story/258281p-221230c.html

BY HUGH SON
DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER

The controversial Jehovah's Witnesses residential complex in DUMBO all but got the green light yesterday when a key City Council committee voted in favor of a scaled-back version of the project.

Major changes to the 85 Jay St. complex include two of the four planned apartment towers being reduced by a total of 130 feet in height.

"We achieved what we agree is an acceptable compromise," said Councilman Tony Avella (D-Queens), chairman of the Council's Zoning and Franchises Committee.

Avella had "no doubt" the project would be approved at a final Council vote on Dec. 13.

Jehovah's Witnesses spokesman Richard Devine said the project would brighten a "dark and inhospitable" section of DUMBO. Construction is scheduled to start in 2006.

"This will bring a lot of life and activity to an area that really could use it," Devine said.

The four residential towers - the highest of which will be 20 stories - will house about 1,600 people in 888 studio and one-bedroom apartments. That is a significant addition to the estimated 2,000 who live in DUMBO now.

The 800,000-square-foot complex also will include a three-story auditorium, a dining hall and an 1,100-spot underground parking garage.

The two neighborhood groups that have opposed the plan because of its large scale - and who helped to reduce its size - reacted differently to the news.

The improvements are "nothing to sneeze at," said Nicholas Evans-Cato of the Vinegar Hill Association.

But Nancy Webster of the DUMBO Neighborhood Association expressed disappointment that the buildings weren't scaled back further.

"What the Witnesses are building is basically a development that works for them, not the rest of the neighborhood," she said.

Webster also lamented that the project will not include street-level retail shops along Jay St. because the religious group refuses to act as a commercial landlord.

She and other residents have no choice but to adjust to a new presence in DUMBO, Webster admitted.

"We'll try to be good neighbors," she said.

Originally published on December 3, 2004

Derek2k3
February 25th, 2005, 06:20 PM
Project #18

40 Main Street
4 stories 67 feet(1 story addition)
Simino Architects
Mixed Use
Completed 2002?

The Japanese restaurant "Miso" is at the base. Artticle here:
http://www.go-brooklyn.com/html/issues/_vol27/27_16/miso.html

Derek2k3
February 25th, 2005, 06:33 PM
Project #19

Fulton Ferry Landmark Condominiums
4 Water Street
6 stories 76 feet
Oaklander, Coogan & Vitto
Dev-4 Water LLC
Residential Condominiums
13 units 24,142 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction Summer 2004-2005

You can register to Brooklyn Eagle and read article here:
http://www.brooklyneagle.com/archive/brooklyn_space.php?id=2663

Derek2k3
February 25th, 2005, 06:57 PM
Project #20

37 Bridge Street
10 stories 110 feet
Scarano & Associate Architects
Dev-Howard Klause
Residential Condominiums
60 units 103,077 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2004-2006

Additon to a circa-1916 building that housed the Kirkland Soap Factory and new construction on the adjacent lot I suppose.

Kolbster
February 26th, 2005, 01:46 AM
Anyone know exactly when J-Condo and 85 Adams is going to be built? I was just wondering

Gulcrapek
February 26th, 2005, 01:56 AM
85 Adams is u/c. Don't know about 100 Jay.

Kolbster
February 26th, 2005, 02:09 AM
we are such losers. ITs like 2:02 in the mornisklng, and im here checking the forum...gyaaaad

Archit_K
February 26th, 2005, 02:16 AM
Anyone know exactly when J-Condo and 85 Adams is going to be built? I was just wondering
Its really hard to say when "exactly" a project is going to be completed. Most projects get delayed but far as most ppl know it J-Condo is going to be compeleted sometime in 2006 and 85 Adams St. summer of 2006. You should get some sleep.

Gulcrapek
February 26th, 2005, 10:49 PM
53 Bridge is completely visible from Manhattan now. It'll be interesting when the facade goes on.

Derek2k3
February 27th, 2005, 03:22 PM
Cool, I'm not getting my hopes up on the facade though.

Project # 21

65 Washington
61-65 Washington Street
13 stories 120 feet
Stephen B Jacobs Group
Dev-Two Trees Management
Residential Rental
54 units 62,857 Sq. Ft.
Completed October 2001


http://www.sbjgroup.com

FOR DUMBO IN BROOKLYN, TWO NEW BUILDINGS

http://www.sbjgroup.com/news_nytimes_3_01.html

Two high-end residential buildings, one under construction, the other in the pipeline, are accelerating the changes. under way in Dumbo, the Brooklyn waterfront neighborhood whose name is an acronym for Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass.

"Rome was not built in a day but it's all happening now," said David C. Walentas, a developer who owns large chunks of Dumbo and has been pursuing visions of a revitalized community there for more than 20 years. He is putting up a 54-unit, 12-story rental building at 65 Washington Street. "A year ago," he said, "there was no retail in the neighborhood. Now we have a Korean market, a chocolatier, antiques shops, art galleries."

Designed by Stephen B. Jacobs, an architect, and Andi Pepper, his partner and wife, the building will offer apartments with luxury touches, including open granite and stainless steel kitchens. Though rents have yet to be set, Mr. Walentas estimated they would range from about $1,100 for studios to $3,500 for three-bedrooms. Though he has done conversions of both condominiums and rentals in Dumbo, he decided to make his first newly constructed venture a rental, he said, because "we own virtually everything in the neighborood and we want to retain control."

One site he does not control is at the intersection of Jay, York and Front Streets adjacent to the Manhattan Bridge, where Jeffrey M. Brown Associates has combined forces with Cara Development in a proposal for a mixed-use building.

Their building, to be called Light Bridges at 100 Jay Street, will set 153 condominiums in two towers atop a base of commercial space. The towers, designed by SHoP / Sharples Holden Pasquarelli, will be connected by glass corridors that will offer seethrough views of the waterfront and the Manhattan skyline. The project would require a zoning change, from light industrial to residential, which the developers are in the process of seeking.

"Right now Dumbo has the ingredients for a warm, cozy and eclectic environment," Mr. Brown said. "We want to design a building to magnify that."
NADINE BROZAN

Kolbster
February 27th, 2005, 10:11 PM
I thought this building was completed already

Gulcrapek
February 27th, 2005, 10:25 PM
54 units 62,857 Sq. Ft.
Completed October 2001


It was ;)

Archit_K
February 28th, 2005, 01:53 AM
Project #21

65 Washington turned out good.

BrooklynRider
February 28th, 2005, 11:31 AM
I'm dreading the Watchtower Residential buildings. They put up cheap, crappy looking buildings and aesthetics are the absolute lowest priority.

Kolbster
February 28th, 2005, 11:48 AM
I'm dreading the Watchtower Residential buildings. They put up cheap, crappy looking buildings and aesthetics are the absolute lowest priority.

I wouldnt go that far. The Jehova's buildings in thier rendering doesn't look too bad, and the ones that they have put up in the past are a mix; like the ones in brooklyn heights....some are nice and others are so so, but none that are super ugly

NoyokA
February 28th, 2005, 01:08 PM
I heard that the Jehovah Witnesses are moving operations and evangelists out of Brooklyn and to an upstate compund and would be selling their Brooklyn properties. Im curious as to why they are building dorms under these circumstances.

NewYorkYankee
February 28th, 2005, 01:20 PM
That sucks, its a loss for the city. :(

NoyokA
February 28th, 2005, 01:33 PM
That sucks, its a loss for the city. :(

I think it’s a boon to the city. The properties will be sold and converted into residential and retail space that was previously non-existent. I don’t believe an organization should control any part of a city; it goes against the diversity that keeps a city in working order.

BrooklynRider
February 28th, 2005, 02:50 PM
No, actually they are only moving the publishing facilities out of Brooklyn. The new residential towers are going to sit atop a huge visitors center. Brooklyn is the world-wide operational heart of that sect. They're not going anywhere.

They are only selling one building on Joralemon Street and I would guess it is because it is so far outside of the compound they have created. Plus, with the BBPDC releasing the plans for the park last week, you can see that that area is going to be transformed (but no without major community infighting).

Kolbster
February 28th, 2005, 09:27 PM
Yes, actually New york, esp. brooklyn (in and around the heights) is the international head quarters/ epicenter of Jehovahs.

Derek2k3
February 28th, 2005, 10:34 PM
Also has a kickass light show at night. There's a thread on the building here also.
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=5170

Project #4

110 York Street
6 stories 84 feet (2 story addition)
Scarano & Associate Architects
Commercial Office
5,000 Sq. Ft. Addition
Completed 2003-October 2004


http://swiss-architects.com/db/imgportr/s/scaranoarchitects_x2.2.jpg


http://www.newyorkmetro.com/nymetro/news/people/columns/intelligencer/11277/index.html

Intelligencer
Dumbo’s Bright Elephant
A young architect builds an improbable answer to the Empire State Building.

By Tom Vanderbilt

http://newyorkmetro.com/nymetro/news/people/columns/intelligencer/dumbo050228_250.jpg
(Photo credit: Courtesy of Dedy Blaustein)

A curious landmark has risen in Brooklyn. With its quasi-trapezoidal profile, soaring white trusses, and close-enough-to-collect-tolls proximity to the Manhattan Bridge, the building has become a major architectural presence in the borough, leaving Dumbo residents and passing drivers to wonder what it is.

“I spent quite a few hours walking around trying to figure it out,” says Jonah Zuckerman, a furniture designer in Dumbo. “It seemed somehow significant, but I was surprised by how many people knew nothing about it.” He had his own pet theory: “I got it into my head that it was [avant-garde artist and architect] Vito Acconci’s studio. It somehow reminded me of his work.”

And then there are the lights. On any given night, the building’s trusses are swathed in purples and reds and greens. “When that started happening, there seemed to be a dialogue between it and the Empire State Building,” says architect Elaine Didyk, a Boerum Hill resident who surveyed the building’s progress on trips into Manhattan. “One weekend, this thing was undulating through the full spectrum of its color potential. It was really on. I thought, They’re making a statement; they’re locating Brooklyn.”

The “Jetsons” building, as it has been dubbed, is the work of Dedy Blaustein, a 32-year-old architect with Scarano & Associates, which occupies the space. Blaustein had just graduated from Pratt when he presented his ideas for the 5,200-square-foot rooftop addition to his boss, Robert Scarano. His inspiration was right outside the window: “We’re not the main thing here,” he says, gesturing toward the bridge. “That is the main thing here. It’s so dynamic. I had to do something crazy.”

And since the building wasn’t landmarked, “something crazy” didn’t raise eyebrows in the permit process: “As long as you’re in compliance with the approved height and floor area,” says Blaustein, “nobody says you can’t do a building that’s a different shape.”

Blaustein says that tourists stop by, film scouts call, truck drivers honk, and cabbies offer upturned thumbs. (So far, no rubbernecking accidents have been attributed to the design.) But not everyone is impressed. “To call it a train wreck would be almost accurate,” says one Dumbo architect. Blaustein responds: “I didn’t design it for people to like it, I designed it for people not to be able to ignore it.”

As for the lights, Blaustein employs a Color Kinetics LED system. “I’m the only one who knows how to operate it.” He has thousands of color combinations, and effects that put a Pink Floyd laser light show to shame. His only mandate is to be “funkier” than the Empire State Building, but sometimes he forgets to change the colors.

“That’s so Brooklyn,” says Didyk. “A guy at his desktop who’s like, ‘I forgot to change the lights today.’ Meanwhile, people are driving by and wondering, What does the green mean?”


Any opinions? I think it would be more prominent if it were taller. It's kind of in an obscure location or maybe I'd have to drive over the Manhattan Br. to appreciate it more.

Derek2k3
February 28th, 2005, 11:24 PM
Project # 22

38 Water Street
38-62 Water Street
16 stories 178 feet
Beyer Blinder Belle
Dev-Two Trees Management
Residential Condominiums
200 units
On Hold

http://www.nytimes.com/2004/10/24/nyregion/thecity/24wale.html

The Views Are Just Fine, for Now
By JAKE MOONEY

Published: October 24, 2004

In the Dumbo section of Brooklyn, some residents are still tasting their victory of two weeks ago, when the prominent developer David Walentas of Two Trees Management scrapped his plan to build a 16-story apartment tower at the foot of the Brooklyn Bridge.

Neighborhood leaders say their work isn't finished, though, because Mr. Walentas could still construct a tall industrial building there without having to secure city permission. He had been in the middle of asking the City Council to rezone 38 Water Street, currently the site of the one-story St. Ann's Warehouse art space, for residential use.

But two weeks ago, as reported in The Daily News and in local papers, he abruptly canceled the whole thing after mounting pressure from vocal opponents, who told the Council's Land Use Committee that the tower was inappropriate because it would block the neighborhood's views of the Brooklyn Bridge, and views from the bridge's pedestrian walkway. Without knowing what Mr. Walentas's next step might be - repeated phone calls to his office were not returned - residents are doing what they can to preserve their views.

"We're just trying a variety of angles so that we don't have to fight this battle again, so that the view from the bridge and the approach to the bridge are preserved," said Nancy Bowe, president of the Brooklyn Heights Association.

She said neighborhood groups were exploring the possibility of seeking a zoning change of their own to restrict the height of buildings at the site, a proposal that would have to first make its way through the city's rigorous land-use review process. In the meantime, area residents said their ideal use for the property would be similar to what Mr. Walentas proposed - just not as tall. "We would like to see residential, with some street-level retail there," said Nancy Webster, president of the Dumbo Neighborhood Association. Councilman David Yassky, who represents the area and who opposed the project in its final stages, agreed.

"I think an eight-story building that would not rise above the Brooklyn Bridge would be a terrific use of that site," he said. "It's certainly better to have an eight-story building than an empty lot, or a one-story warehouse."


Sounds like people were just trying to protect their own views again to me but since the design was retro garbage I could care less. Why must every development in Brooklyn be in context with what's already there?

Kolbster
March 1st, 2005, 10:45 AM
The second rendering doesn't look to bad...atleast the bridge is still visible. I think it would be best to build a shopping center near there or the second rendering, or both of them combined

Gulcrapek
March 1st, 2005, 01:59 PM
Good move on halting it. Anything by BBB should immediately arouse suspicion, and it turns out that suspicion of bland design is confirmed here.

Kolbster
March 1st, 2005, 07:00 PM
although the design is bland, i think it would fit into the neighborhood; filled with converted and some still operating whare houses...but it would block the bridge. What im wondering is why not exand the empire stores that are being developed across the way to this site as well.

Derek2k3
March 1st, 2005, 10:30 PM
Article on Vinegar Hill from the Village Voice

http://www.villagevoice.com/nyclife/0449,adkison,59179,15.html

Close-Up on Vinegar Hill
by Danial Adkison
December 10th, 2004 1:40 PM

A visitor to Vinegar Hill might wonder, while gazing down a postcard-perfect Belgian-block lane, where was the vinegar made? Surely, in one of these old buildings there must have been vats of that pungent pickling liquid, maybe even a vinegar pipeline, though it's hard to imagine now. But the neighborhood's evocative name has nothing to do with acetic acid.

In 1801, speculator John Jackson named his newly acquired chunk of Brooklyn waterfront Vinegar Hill after a 1798 battle of the Irish rebellion—and even that hill probably wasn't named after vinegar as we know it, but a type of berry. He hoped to draw sentimental Gaelic immigrants to his new neighborhood. It worked so well that the area also become known as Irish Town, and brothels, bars, and gambling salons sprung up to cater to its blue-collar denizens.

The neighborhood once claimed several large factories. ConEd built the behemoth Hudson Avenue Generating Station in 1951. The U.S. government decommissioned the Navy Yard in 1966, and artists and families arrived in the '70s and '80s, refurbishing the sagging century-old Greek-revival and Italianate buildings.

Today, the eight-square-block oxbow of row houses and lush dooryards is a throwback to mid-1800s Brooklyn charm—blocked by the towering, monolithic Farragut Houses; hemmed by the Navy Yard; and sheltered by the power plant, with its smokestacks and acres of transformers. DUMBO to the immediate south offers the most open access to Vinegar Hill's historic district.

And DUMBO's exploding real estate market is spreading uphill. The noise from saws, shovels, and hammers jars the quiet streets and alleyways of Vinegar Hill as cookie-cutter red-brick-and-steel buildings go up and warehouses are gutted for future lofts. The neighborhood association, as active as any in the city, is fighting to keep this nook precious, but Vinegar Hill, like its cousin Red Hook, has only retained its quiet urban-village atmosphere thanks to its obscurity. Just like the Hook, which Ikea and a hundred other developers are set to sink their own hooks into, Vinegar Hill is an endangered species.


A vestige of Vinegar Hill's industrial behemoths
photo: Holly Northrop/hnorthrop.com
Boundaries: The Navy Yard to the north, the East River to the west, Bridge Street to the south, and Sands Street to the east.

Transportation: The York Street stop on the F train is about a 10-minute walk from most parts of Vinegar Hill. The B61 bus serves Navy, York, and Gold streets. On-street parking is available.

Main Drags: Front Street connects the neighborhood with DUMBO and runs the breadth of Vinegar Hill. Hudson Avenue runs perpendicular to Front and skirts the Navy Yard. York and Bridge streets host minuscule commercial zones.

Prices to Rent and Buy: "Vinegar Hill is a hard neighborhood to gauge because there isn't a lot of turnover," says Caleb Taggart, an agent for Douglas Elliman Real Estate. "But when things do become available there, they're highly sought after."

Townhouses in the historic district start at $1 million, according to Taggart. A 1,067-square-foot studio in the new loft building at 50 Bridge Street is priced at $480,000, while an 1,845-square-foot unit with terraces in the same building is going for $1.5 million, according to the Developers Group website.

A two-plus-bedroom luxury apartment in a historic-district brownstone just rented for $3,000, said Taggart, and Craigslist has been advertising two Vinegar Hill rentals since late November: a two-bedroom unit in the newly developed 260 Water Street building for $2,200, and a one-bedroom at Water and Hudson for $1,350 per month.

What to Check Out: The Vinegar Hill Historic District comprises century-old brownstones in three separate groups: along Front Street, at the corner of Gold and Water streets, and along Hudson Avenue between Front and Plymouth streets. The bright-yellow Dorje Ling Buddhist Center at Front and Gold streets looks a little like a car dealership bedecked with prayer flags, testifying to the quirkiness of the area, and the center occasionally opens its doors to the public. The former navy commandant's house also merits a look. The white, gated mansion at the cul-de-sac of Little and Evans streets boasts a sweeping view of the city—but it's now a private residence, owned since 1997 by a Rockefeller University neurobiology professor.

Hangouts, Parks & Restaurants: Vinegar Hill lacks services. A tiny Fine Food supermarket, Chinese restaurant, and a deli sit opposite the Farragut Houses on York Avenue. Lano's Family Café on Bridge Street has typical diner fare, while its neighbor Los Papi's Restaurant serves up Spanish standards. The attractive storefronts of Hudson Avenue are screaming for a funky little café. But residents take advantage of DUMBO's burgeoning service industry—Superfine, Grimaldi's, Pedro's, and the DUMBO General Store are 10 minutes away by foot. Same goes for parks. The jewels of Brooklyn's waterfront, Empire–Fulton Ferry State Park and Brooklyn Bridge Park, lie just a short stroll down Plymouth Street.

Politicians: City Councilman David Yassky, State Assemblymember Joan L. Millman, State Senator Martin Connor, and U.S. representatives Nydia Velásquez, Edolphus Towns, and Major Owens, all Democrats.

Crime Statistics: The 84th precinct covers Vinegar Hill, DUMBO, and Downtown Brooklyn. As of November 28, the police report zero murders this year, down from one last year; five rapes, up from three this time last year; 193 robberies, down from 276; 131 felonious assault, down from 143; 159 burglaries, down from 165.

Derek2k3
March 1st, 2005, 10:50 PM
Project # 23

99 Gold Street
89-107 Gold Street/240-248 Gold Street
6 stories 70 feet (Conversion)
Scarano & Associate Architects
Dev-Kay Gold Properties LLC
Residential Condominiums
71 units 109,200 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2004-2005

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/50267537.jpg

http://www.scaranoarchitects.com/

99 Gold Street is a renewal pioneer within the area's industrial landscape. An upscale loft conversion is the latest trend in stylish city living, which redefines the 19th-century concrete and block building, originally designed to house and supply New York's souvenir market. Following that industry's decline and decades of misuse and neglect, vast quality-of-life improvements are assured by this adaptive reuse.

Given the value of its location, breathtaking views of both Brooklyn and Manhattan and its close proximity to public transportation, the building is being converted into 88 sleek, spacious 1 and 2 bedroom loft-style apartments with cutting edge design and state of the art finishes. All apartments, ranging from 600 sq ft studios and 2000 sq ft penthouses, have high ceilings, floor to ceiling windows and large balconies.

As a result of this project and others that will soon follow, the area has been transformed into the ideal neighborhood for successful artists and professionals with a taste for urban living, and it provides another link in connecting Brooklyn's downtown neighborhoods.

Derek2k3
March 2nd, 2005, 09:19 PM
Project # 24

35-45 Front Street
10 stories
Residential
90 units 88,000 Sq. Ft.
Boymelgreen Developers
Proposed

http://www.africa-israel.com/eng/US_010.asp

Project Name: 35 - 45 Front Street (Nova Clutch)

Location/Neighborhood: Brooklyn/DUMBO

Address: 35 - 45 Front Street


Project Objective: This project is ideally situated at one of the primary gateways to the "up and coming" DUMBO neighborhood. The location presents an excellent opportunity for both design and community building. Two blocks from the Hudson River , the development site is an assemblage of three separate parcels. A new luxury residential condominium project is planned and will include the full menu of signature A.I. & Boymelgreen amenities. A retail and parking component will also be included.

Total Buildout sf: 88,000

Use: Residential

New Construction sf: 88,000

Residential sf: 88,000

Transportation: Direct driving access exists from the Manhattan and Brooklyn bridges with additional access via the Brooklyn Queens Expressway. Ferry transportation between DUMBO and Manhattan is a three-minute walk from the development site. Five (5) subway lines are conveniently located within walking distance, to include the A,C,F,2, and 3 trains.

Approximate Completion: 12/2005


Project #25

183 Water Street
183-187 Water Street/56 Jay Street
Scarano & Associate Architects
Residential
Proposed


Project#26

206 Front Street
7 stories 70 feet
Karl Fischer Architect
Dev-G.L. Realty
Residential Condominiums
33 units 46,000 Sq. Ft.
Proposed 2005-2006

Just a few more projects left. I'll also try and conjure up make a map to make the locations of these buildings clear.

Kolbster
March 3rd, 2005, 06:17 PM
Thats pretty admirable....26 projects...wow

Derek2k3
March 3rd, 2005, 09:11 PM
Project #27

Empire Stores Redevelopment
Water Street between Dock and Main Streets
Walker Group
Dev-Boymelgreen Developers
Mixed use (restaurants, retail shops, art galleries and performance spaces)
400,000 Sq.Ft.
Proposed 2007


http://www.wgcni.com/portfolio/urban/_6_EMPIRE_STORES.jpg

http://www.theempirestores.com

The Empire Stores offer both commerce and culture;
showcasing local retail and dining traditions with the latest
in international trends, ideas, and lifestyle.

Overlooking and engaging Brooklyn Bridge Park.
Establishing a 24-hour bustling destination.
Creating the greatest special event venue in New York.
Serving one of the fastest growing neighborhoods in the city
Defining the historic character of the district.
Creating a center for local arts and culture.

The dramatic history and scale of this bold landmark
structure sets it apart from every other retail and mixed-use
development in New York City. This is not a shopping mall.

Seven contiguous monumental buildings.
Constructed over sixteen years, from 1869 to 1885.
Original structures are in superb condition, featuring historic
materials and details.
Listed on the National Register of Historical Places
Designated as a New York City Landmark.


http://www.africa-israel.com/eng/US_007.asp

Project Name: Empire Stores

Location/Neighborhood: Brooklyn/DUMBO

Project Objective: Majestically located on the waterfront between the Brooklyn and Manhattan bridges and clearly visible from Manhattan , the Empire Stores is a series of seven, three and four-story warehouses totaling approximately 400,000 sf. A.I. & Boymelgreen won the right to redevelop the existing buildings from the Brooklyn Bridge Development Corporation, a subsidiary of the State and City Economic Development Corporations. Empire Stores will include extensive space for retail , office, art galleries, cultural spaces, and a special public event space. The Empire Stores will become a major shopping destination in downtown Brooklyn and a hot spot for nightlife and dining.

Total Buildout sf: 400,000

Use: Commercial/Retail

Renovation sf: 400,000 (landmark buildings)

Transportation: Direct driving access exists from the Manhattan and Brooklyn bridges with additional access via the Brooklyn Queens Expressway. Ferry transportation between DUMBO and Manhattan is a three-minute walk from the development site. Five (5) subway lines are conveniently located within walking distance, to include the A,C,F,2, and 3 trains.

Approximate Completion: 12/2006


Brooklyn Waterfront Landmark to Be Remade
by GLENN COLLINS
December 3, 2003
New York Times

http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=4027&page=2&highlight=dumbo+empire

It is called the Empire Stores, and for more than 50 years the cavernous, forbidding warehouse has been abandoned, a magnificent ruin between the Brooklyn and Manhattan Bridges along the East River.

A signature of the Brooklyn skyline for at least 130 years that has transfixed residents and, to an extent, defined the waterfront, it has nonetheless resisted all efforts of developers, public officials and community stewards to reclaim it.

Now, Empire State Development Corporation, owner of the warehouse, has, through a subsidiary, signed an agreement with Boymelgreen Developers to transform it into a $100 million gateway to Brooklyn from the East River.

According to this plan, the echoing spaces, cobwebs and rusting iron shutters of the 400,000-square-foot structure, a city and state landmark in the neighborhood known as Dumbo, are to yield to a Chelsea Market-ish conglomeration of restaurants, retail shops, art galleries and performance spaces. Its opening is scheduled for 2007.

The proposal has been met by skepticism from another builder, and watchfulness from the community, but the development corporation has expressed only jubilation. "We are taking back the waterfront, and this building, with two bridges as bookends, is a Brooklyn showcase," said Charles A. Gargano, chairman of the development corporation and of its state-and-city-run subsidiary, the Brooklyn Bridge Park Development Corporation, which will lease the property to Boymelgreen for 39 years.

Mr. Gargano said that 63 firms expressed interest in the renovation, but in the end three submitted bids. "Boymelgreen had the most to offer, in terms of the proposal and the maintenance that will be involved," which, he said, amounted to "several million a year."

The Brooklyn-based Boymelgreen is hardly an unknown, with 20 projects under development in the five boroughs, which represent an investment of more than $1.5 billion, including 23 Wall Street and 15 Broad Street in Manhattan.

Both Gov. George E. Pataki and Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg have issued huzzahs. "Not only will these wonderful buildings be restored, they will be the prototype for supporting a park with community-friendly economic development," Governor Pataki said.

And Mayor Bloomberg gushed: "The mix of office, retail, restaurant and gallery space in this historic structure will really make the waterfront park a destination, and enhance the growing Dumbo neighborhood."

But the deal has been questioned by David C. Walentas, the developer who, years ago, launched the real-estate transformation of Dumbo — the acronym means Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass — and whose control of millions of square feet of mixed-use space there has won him the sobriquet Mr. Dumbo.

"I would be delighted if someone would do this, and quickly, because it would make my neighborhood more valuable," Mr. Walentas said of the development. "But it will sit there. And nothing will happen."

Mr. Walentas, who was one of three developers vying for the Empire Stores revivification, contended that Boymelgreen had overbid for the right to develop the project. "My offer was substantially less," Mr. Walentas said, explaining that high rents at Empire Stores were unrealistic.

However, James F. Moogan, president of the Brooklyn Bridge Park Development Corporation, defended the deal. "This is a realistic bid, and we have realistic expectations," he said, adding that Boymelgreen made a nonrefundable $1 million payment on signing the agreement. "That shows us they believe it's viable. This proposal underwent substantial financial analysis by city and state agencies."

T. William Kim, the Empire Stores project developer for Boymelgreen, said that "this is one of our priorities, and there is no question that it will be completed." He said Boymelgreen, in partnership with an Israeli businessman, Lev Leviev, will put $40 million into the project and finance the rest of the $100 million with its customary investment partners.

Empire Stores sits on landfill deposited in the late 18th century and early 19th century, which extended the reach of the Village of Brooklyn, the future borough's first civic settlement.

A report written by the architectural firm Beyer Blinder Belle, said that the first warehouse buildings at the site, called the Empire Stores (as in storehouses) even then, date back to the 1850's. By 1869 or so, larger private warehouses built by a merchant, James Nesmith, and his son Henry already hugged the shoreline. The finishing touches came in 1886, three years after the Brooklyn Bridge was completed.

Once a storehouse for spices and green coffee beans, the monolithic warehouse is actually composed of seven structures, and has load-bearing, two-foot-thick walls of brick masonry and interior walls of fieldstone. It was framed with massive first-growth lumber from America's primordial pine forest.

In the 1880's, Herman Melville, toiling on Wall Street in the New York Customs House, would have seen the warehouse complex right across the harbor. But he never could have predicted that it would become Brooklyn's 21st-century counterpart of Moby Dick. The Empire Stores remained the great white whale of New York architectural preservation, since, as an industrial building, it flew below the radar of history.

The warehouse declined with the pre-eminence of trucking and railway transportation, and was mostly abandoned in the 1950's. After brief ownership by Con Edison, Empire Stores was taken over by the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation in 1978.

During the Lindsay administration there were proposals to transform it into a wholesale meat market. During the Koch administration, there were plans for a festival marketplace akin to the South Street Seaport, not to mention a lawsuit by Mr. Walentas against the city. Another development proposal was made in 1991, but went unheeded. In 1999 Mr. Walentas announced a plan to make the Empire Stores a centerpiece of a $300 million cultural and retail complex, but this galvanized community groups into opposing what they said was overdevelopment.

These days, the Empire Stores, on Water Street between Dock and Main Streets, endures in Stygian darkness behind its iron shutters. The buildings still yield the perfume of spices and coffee-bean remnants still crunch underfoot; a flashlight reveals disintegrating floors and onetime workers' graffiti on the walls.

The warehouse was declared a landmark inside and out by both the state and the city in the 1970's. "We want to keep as much of the historic interior as possible," said Jay Valgora, the design principal for Boymelgreen's restoration architect, WalkerGroup, part of the WPP advertising holding company.

It is the largest preservation redevelopment attempted by WalkerGroup, which has developed projects in New York, Tokyo, and Bilbao and Salamanca, Spain. Mr. Valgora's design calls for a ground-floor grand arcade on the side overlooking the Manhattan skyline and the Brooklyn Bridge; a terrace and esplanade would allow access to cafes and retail stores, a mix somewhat like that at Chelsea Market, the successful arcade in Manhattan created from a former Nabisco cookie factory.

He would also construct several glass-and-steel atriums coexisting with the old walls, creating courtyards spanned with glass bridges. Unlike the South Street Seaport, Mr. Valgora said, the space would "not be an evocation of Ye Olde New York." Instead, he said, "we're hoping for destination retail stores, such as unique Brooklyn design and furniture companies."

Above the warehouse, atop a new public park on the roof, would be a curving sculptural structure that would be lit at night. "We hope," Mr. Valgora said, "it can become another symbol for Brooklyn."

All of Mr. Valgora's architectural additions must be approved by the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation. And beyond that, the project must undergo an environmental impact study.

The mixed-use proposal for the warehouse is part of a community-generated master plan from 2000, guiding the economic development of Brooklyn Bridge Park, a 67-acre stretch of waterfront between Atlantic Avenue and Jay Street that would be turned into a riverside promenade with recreational and cultural amenities and limited commercial development.

The plan will thus be closely scrutinized by the community. Residents have opposed traffic-clogged streets and other threats they saw in more grandiose proposals. Mr. Moogan, president of the development corporation, said that Community Board 2 had been briefed on the Boymelgreen plan. He said, "We are committed to sustained public involvement," through the development corporation's 25-member citizen's advisory council.

Marianna Koval, executive director of the Brooklyn Bridge Park Coalition, an alliance of some 60 community groups, said that the Empire Stores was "the jewel in the crown of this park." Having seen elements of the Boymelgreen plan, she said the coalition would monitor the development, but "is cautiously optimistic."

Others in the neighborhood are more openly enthusiastic. "I would welcome other restaurants," said Buzzy O'Keeffe, who became a pioneer in the transformation of the Brooklyn waterfront after fighting for 12 years to be able to open the River Cafe in 1977. "My basic feeling is that any improvement down here is good for the area."


This is a section of the warehouses not being developed...atleast commercially.

Gulcrapek
March 3rd, 2005, 09:31 PM
^That one there I think is the Tobacco Warehouse, Empire Stores are more north. I think.

Kolbster
March 3rd, 2005, 09:55 PM
[QUOTE=Derek2k3]Project #27

Empire Stores Redevelopment
Water Street between Dock and Main Streets
Walker Group
Dev-Boymelgreen Developers
Mixed use (restaurants, retail shops, art galleries and performance spaces)
400,000 Sq.Ft.
Proposed 2007



It's actually approved; it is just currently is the process of design and acquiring stores

Kolbster
March 3rd, 2005, 09:55 PM
^That one there I think is the Tobacco Warehouse, Empire Stores are more north. I think.


Nope, those are the Empire stores

Derek2k3
March 3rd, 2005, 10:07 PM
Well the photos I posted are in a separate gutted warehouse, right next to the redevelopment project. I just thought it was all the same complex.

billyblancoNYC
March 4th, 2005, 01:29 AM
Well the photos I posted are in a separate gutted warehouse, right next to the redevelopment project. I just thought it was all the same complex.

You're right, these are the Empire Stores to be. It's across from Jacques Torres and next to the Villa building.

The tobacco warehouse, I think, will be left open as is.

http://www.bbpc.net/TobaccoWarehouse.html

Kolbster
March 4th, 2005, 08:42 AM
Nope, those are the Empire stores
Yup, as i said before

NoyokA
March 4th, 2005, 09:40 AM
Yes! Ive seen factories turned to shopping venues so many times in other cities, they are always successful and I think they’re terrific.

Derek2k3
March 4th, 2005, 04:09 PM
Project # 28

91 Hudson Avenue
91-93 Hudson Avenue
3 stories 34 feet
T. F. Cusanelli Architecture & Planning
Dev-Vinegar Hill Group LLC
Residential Condominiums
3 units 6,112 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2004-2005

Scarano designed this superior unbuilt design.

Scarano & Associate Architects

http://www.scaranoarchitects.com/multifamily2.html

91 Hudson Street is a design for new 2-family residences in the recently gentrified Vinegar Hill section of Brooklyn, Totaling at 5,000 square feet in area. This irregular shaped site help to create the solution you see.

This playful and colorful design echoes the eclectic nature of the area, once an industrial park, which has evolved from proximity to the shipping-oriented East River. Today, the area has become a desirable residential neighborhood for the same reasons.

The complex shapes of this building and its vibrant colors intensify the dramatic effect, which is made possible through the use of applied stucco, and the triangular lot shape. The apartments are duplexes with multi-level studio apartments at the ground level, and all have exterior recreation areas. The definition of “open space”, or “yard”, was expanded to create alternating enclosed and open areas – intimate gardens intertwined with diverse interiors, which are flexible and dynamic.

Derek2k3
March 4th, 2005, 04:15 PM
Last project for now...

Project #29

9-17 Evans Street
3 stories 31 feet
T. F. Cusanelli Architecture & Planning
Dev-Vinegar Hill Group LLC
Residential Condominiums
3 units 6,112 Sq. Ft. (x5 buildings)
Completed 2003-2005

Just like the last project, Scarano designed something interesting and basura was built instead.

Scarano & Associate Architects

http://www.scaranoarchitects.com/multifamily2.html

New Residential Development in the low density Navy Yard / Vinegar Hill section of Brooklyn redefines the boundaries of residential town homes by using modern materials in an old way.

With a total area of 30,000 square feet, eight, two family homes with, private parking for each house was proposed for the site. The design attempts to depart from the wood clap board homes in the area introducing curved metal roofing with brick and aluminum cladding, echoing the industrial nature of the area.

The emergence of the adjoining neighborhood of DUMBO has caused many people to consider this area their home. As the residents continue to pour in, many believe that Vinegar Hill possesses a quaint character not found in other more developed sections of Brooklyn. Narrow cobble stone streets, which wind around the Brooklyn Navy Yard and historic structures still remaining, create the charm that one finds in much less densely populated cities around the country.

Evans Street projects get its charm from its scale and use of modern materials.

Derek2k3
March 5th, 2005, 07:34 PM
You can e-mail me if you'd like a larger version of the file or an Exel spreadsheet of all the projects.

Project #1

53 Bridge Street
Scarano & Associates Architects
Dev-Kay Bridge Properties /53 Bridge, LLC
12 stories 162 feet 6 story addition
130,740 Sq. Ft.
Residential Condominiums
Under Construction 2004-2006

Project #2

Beacon Tower
85 Adams Street
23 stories 314 feet
Cetra/Ruddy Incorporated
Dev-Boymelgreen Developers
Residential Condominium
77 units 115,424 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2004-Summer 2006

Project # 3

The Nexus
84 Front Street
11 stories 120 feet
Meltzer Mandl Architects of Manhattan
Dev-Boymelgreen Developers
Residential Condominium
44 units 72,302 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2004-Late 2005

Project #4

110 York Street
6 stories 84 feet (2 story addition)
Scarano & Associate Architects
Commercial Office
5,000 Sq. Ft. Addition
Completed 2003-October 2004

Project # 5

River Hotel
Main Street Pier, Brooklyn Waterfront
9 stories 100 feet
Ateliers Jean Nouvel
Dev-Two Trees Management Co.
Commercial Hotel
250 Rooms 350,000 Sq.Ft.
Proposed as Residential

Project # 6

NYC 2012 Voleyball & Handball Arena
85 Jay Street
Rafael Vinoly Architects
Dev-NYC 2012
Sports and Recreation
13,563 sq feet (can't be right)
Unbuilt

Project #7

J Condo
100 Jay Street
31/33 stories 337 feet
Gruzen Samton Architects
Dev-Hudson Companies Incorporated
Residential Condominiums
260/267 units 407,129 Sq. Ft.
Proposed 2005-2006

Project #8

Bridgefront
67/65-71 Front Street/42-44 Main Street
10 stories 120 feet
Elena Kalman Architect
Dev-Boymelgreen Developers
Residential Condominium
21 units 37,160 Sq. Ft.
Completed Early 2003

Project #9

The Bridges/The Bridge Street Condominium
79 Bridge Street
6 stories 70 feet (2 story addition)
Scarano & Associate Architects
Kay Bridge Properties/Howard Klaus Partnership
Residential Condominiums
37 units 51,141 Sq. Ft.
Completed 2003


Project #10

133 Water Street
12 stories 120 feet
Scarano & Associate Architects
Dev-Jack Guttman Partners
Residential Condominium
52 units 85,477 Sq. Ft.
5.000 Sq. Ft. of Retail & Community Space
Under Consruction 2003-2006

Project #11

10 Jay Street
Ehrenkrantz Eckstut & Kuhn Architects
16 stories (7 story addition)
Proposed

Project #12

RiverFront
57 Front Street
7 stories 84 feet(Conversion)
Elena Kalman Architect
Dev-Boymelgreen Developers
Residential Condominiums
33 units 51,781 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2004-2005

Project #13

Commodore’s Court
85 Hudson Avenue
5 stories 50 feet
K & K Engineering
Dev-The Constellation Group
Residential Condominiums
9 units 12,957 Sq. Ft.
Completed Late 2004

Projects #14-17

Watchtower Residence Hall I
85 Jay Street
20 stories 222 feet
Beyer Blinder Belle
Dev-The Watchtower Bible and Tract Society of New York
Proposed 2006

Watchtower Residence Hall II
85 Jay Street
18 stories 195 feet
Beyer Blinder Belle
Dev-The Watchtower Bible and Tract Society of New York
Proposed 2006

Watchtower Residence Hall III
85 Jay Street
9 stories
Beyer Blinder Belle
Dev-The Watchtower Bible and Tract Society of New York
Proposed 2006

Watchtower Residence Hall IV
85 Jay Street
9 stories
Beyer Blinder Belle
Dev-The Watchtower Bible and Tract Society of New York
Proposed 2006

Project #18

40 Main Street
4 stories 67 feet(1 story addition)
Simino Architects
Mixed Use
Completed 2002?

Project #19

Fulton Ferry Landmark Condominiums
4 Water Street
6 stories 76 feet
Oaklander, Coogan & Vitto
Dev-4 Water LLC
Residential Condominiums
13 units 24,142 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction Summer 2004-2005

Project #20

37 Bridge Street
10 stories 110 feet
Scarano & Associate Architects
Dev-Howard Klause
Residential Condominiums
60 units 103,077 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2004-2006

Project # 21

65 Washington
61-65 Washington Street
13 stories 120 feet
Stephen B Jacobs Group
Dev-Two Trees Management
Residential Rental
54 units 62,857 Sq. Ft.
Completed October 2001

Project # 22

38 Water Street
38-62 Water Street
16 stories 178 feet
Beyer Blinder Belle
Dev-Two Trees Management
Residential Condominiums
200 units
On Hold

Project # 23

99 Gold Street
89-107 Gold Street/240-248 Gold Street
6 stories 70 feet (Conversion)
Scarano & Associate Architects
Dev-Kay Gold Properties LLC
Residential Condominiums
71 units 109,200 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2004-2005

Project # 24

35-45 Front Street
10 stories
Residential
90 units 88,000 Sq. Ft.
Boymelgreen Developers
Proposed

Project #25

183 Water Street
183-187 Water Street/56 Jay Street
Scarano & Associate Architects
Residential
Proposed

Project#26

206 Front Street
7 stories 70 feet
Karl Fischer Architect
Dev-G.L. Realty
Residential Condominiums
33 units 46,000 Sq. Ft.
Proposed 2005-2006

Project #27

Empire Stores Redevelopment
Water Street between Dock and Main Streets
Walker Group
Dev-Boymelgreen Developers
Mixed use (restaurants, retail shops, art galleries and performance spaces)
400,000 Sq.Ft.
Proposed 2007

Project # 28

91 Hudson Avenue
91-93 Hudson Avenue
3 stories 34 feet
T. F. Cusanelli Architecture & Planning
Dev-Vinegar Hill Group LLC
Residential Condominiums
3 units 6,112 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2004-2005

Project #29

9-17 Evans Street
3 stories 31 feet
T. F. Cusanelli Architecture & Planning
Dev-Vinegar Hill Group LLC
Residential Condominiums
3 units 6,112 Sq. Ft. (x5 buildings)
Completed 2003-2005

Archit_K
March 5th, 2005, 08:34 PM
Wow, nice work! Did you make this map yourself?

Kolbster
March 5th, 2005, 08:55 PM
Wow

Derek2k3
March 6th, 2005, 01:01 AM
Wow, nice work! Did you make this map yourself?

Not the actual map. I was going to but thought that this isn't for design or something.

ltjbukem73
March 6th, 2005, 08:12 PM
Today was the second round of sales at the nexus condos...

take a look at some of the pictures:

http://ltjbukem.blogspot.com/2005/03/nexus-condominium-mania.html
http://nexuscondos.blogspot.com/

Derek2k3
March 8th, 2005, 12:17 PM
Crazy how people stayed out all night.

Article from Curbed:
http://www.curbed.com/archives/2005/03/07/camping_out_at_the_nexus_we_got_eggs_thrown_at_us. php

Also made some corrections on the map:

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/40579805.jpg

Derek2k3
March 11th, 2005, 12:33 PM
Project #1
53 Bridge Street
Scarano & Associates Architects
Dev-Kay Bridge Properties /53 Bridge, LLC
12 stories 162 feet 6 story addition
130,740 Sq. Ft.
Residential Condominiums
Under Construction 2004-2006

http://mehandeseng.com/images/53_bridge.jpg

http://mehandeseng.com/projects.htm

53 Bridge Street
Brooklyn , New York
Architect: Scarano and Associates Architects
Square Foot: 150,000
Owner: Kay Bridge Properties


http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/40680350.jpg

Derek2k3
March 11th, 2005, 12:56 PM
Some random photos around DUMBO-Vinegar Hill-Fulton Ferry

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/40680913.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/40680820.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/40680822.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/40680823.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/40680826.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/40680833.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/40680836.jpg
now who's down under the Manhattan Bride overpass...

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/40680800.jpg

Derek2k3
April 15th, 2005, 02:08 AM
Project #2

Beacon Tower
85 Adams Street
23 stories 314 feet
Cetra/Ruddy Incorporated
Dev-Boymelgreen Developers
Residential Condominium
77 units 115,424 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2004-Summer 2006
Website launched

http://www.85adams.com/

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42087085.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42087086.jpg
Entrance

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42087084.jpg
Lobby

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42087081.jpg
Garden

An ad from the NYPost:

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42087079/original.jpg

Derek2k3
April 15th, 2005, 02:13 AM
Project # 3

The Nexus
84 Front Street
11 stories 120 feet
Meltzer Mandl Architects of Manhattan
Dev-Boymelgreen Developers
Residential Condominium
44 units 72,302 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2004-Late 2005

An ad from the NYPost

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42087200.jpg

Derek2k3
April 17th, 2005, 11:02 AM
Is DUMBO Too Hot to Handle?
by Linda Collins (linda@brooklyneagle.net), published online 04-15-2005

32 Units Sell in 4 Hours at Unfinished Beacon Tower

DUMBO — With recent reports of people camping out overnight and selling their places in line at another DUMBO condominium, it may not come as a surprise that 32 units sold in under four hours for a condominium at 85 Adams St., corner of York Street in DUMBO.

Named Beacon Tower, and currently DUMBO’s tallest building at 23 stories, it had its grand opening party for brokers last Thursday, and 200 people came...

Register and read the full article from the Brooklyn Eagle here:
http://www.brooklyneagle.com/categories/category.php?category_id=5&id=3989

Kolbster
April 22nd, 2005, 05:56 PM
The foundation on the tower is well under way...has been for a long time, if you want to see it, just look down at the site when your on the BQE...the left (Brooklyn Bound side).

It's gonna look good boyz

Derek2k3
April 29th, 2005, 11:53 PM
Project # 23

99 Gold Street
89-107 Gold Street/240-248 Gold Street
6 stories 70 feet (Conversion)
Scarano & Associate Architects
Dev-Kay Gold Properties LLC
Residential Condominiums
71 units 109,200 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2004-2005

http://mehandeseng.com/images/gold_street.jpg

Looks like a sexy facade.
http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42737540.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42737542.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42737544.jpg

Kolbster
April 30th, 2005, 10:49 AM
I must say, i like the slanted windows, looks hot from the inside, but i dont know about the outside.



hmmm, this is right down the block from the the farroget houses

Derek2k3
May 1st, 2005, 05:37 PM
Project # 3

The Nexus
84 Front Street
11 stories 120 feet
Meltzer Mandl Architects of Manhattan
Dev-Boymelgreen Developers
Residential Condominium
44 units 72,302 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2004-Late 2005


It's almost or is topped out. While I was there, a sudden windstorm, lasting about 15 minutes, hit and blew lots of debris around, along with a
sheet of plywood that fell on some poor guy. You can see the guy in the lower left-hand corner leaning on the wall. He had a really nasty bruise and the ambulance took him away eventually.

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42811269.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42811259.jpg

Curbed
BREAKING: Plywood Takes Flight in Dumbo

http://curbed.com/

If it's a windy afternoon in development hotbed Dumbo, it's probably safe to say there's flying debris about. A special Curbed correspondent reports:

so we just watched a sheet of plywood blow off 70 washington. we called 311 to report it, and then were transfered to 911—they said they had gotten a call that someone was hit by it. scary. DO NOT WALK OUTSIDE IN DUMBO WITHOUT A HELMET. or a frapuccino.

Derek2k3
May 5th, 2005, 11:46 AM
Project #1
53 Bridge Street
Scarano & Associates Architects
Dev-Kay Bridge Properties /53 Bridge, LLC
12 stories 162 feet 6 story addition
130,740 Sq. Ft.
Residential Condominiums
Under Construction 2004-2006

http://mehandeseng.com/images/53_bridge.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42989365.jpg


Project #2

Beacon Tower
85 Adams Street
23 stories 314 feet
Cetra/Ruddy Incorporated
Dev-Boymelgreen Developers
Residential Condominium
77 units 115,424 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2004-Summer 2006

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42989366.jpg


Project #8

Bridgefront
67/65-71 Front Street/42-44 Main Street
10 stories 120 feet
Elena Kalman Architect
Dev-Boymelgreen Developers
Residential Condominium
21 units 37,160 Sq. Ft.
Completed Early 2003

http://www.kalmandesign.com/exteriorbridge.jpg
Elena Kalman Architect
http://www.kalmandesign.com

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42989367.jpg


Project #12

RiverFront
57 Front Street
7 stories 84 feet(Conversion)
Elena Kalman Architect
Dev-Boymelgreen Developers
Residential Condominiums
33 units 51,781 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2004-2005

http://www.57front.com/index_r2_c3.gif
http://www.57front.com/

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42989371.jpg


Project #19

Fulton Ferry Landmark Condominiums
4 Water Street
6 stories 76 feet
Oaklander, Coogan & Vitto
Dev-4 Water LLC
Residential Condominiums
13 units 24,142 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction Summer 2004-2005

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42989372.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42989373.jpg


Project # 24

35-45 Front Street
10 stories
Residential
90 units 88,000 Sq. Ft.
Boymelgreen Developers
Proposed

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42989370.jpg

Derek2k3
May 5th, 2005, 06:45 PM
CB2 OKs DUMBO districts
By Jess Wisloski
The Brooklyn Papers

http://www.brooklynpapers.com/html/issues/_vol28/28_18/28_18nets4.html

While DUMBO residents and office workers acclimate themselves to the constant clang of construction coming from several new high-rise building projects, the local community board’s support of a historic district proposal could slow the pace of high-rise development in the future.

The Community Board 2 Land Use committee on March 16 voted 11-0, with one abstention, to support the DUMBO historic district proposal following a presentation by residents. On April 13, the full board approved the committee’s recommendation to draft a letter in support of the historic district designation and architectural protections.

Though DUMBO has already received recognition as a national and state historic district, explained CB2 district manager Robert Perris, the city law is the most important for preservation.

“The local landmarks law is where landmarks really get their teeth,” said Perris. “You can be on the national landmark laws and still get torn down.”

Most of the industrial buildings in DUMBO were built in the late-19th century, during and shortly after the Civil War, when the neighborhood, situated on a transportation hub across from the shortest span between Manhattan and Brooklyn, became home to a great deal of manufacturing companies.

The district, as proposed, would include 25 city blocks, and 95 buildings, including 1 Main St., an 1888 manufacturing building known for its clock tower, that was converted in 1999 by developer David Walentas to high-end condominiums, and 68 Jay St., which, built in 1915 is now home to a bar, a luncheonette, a furniture gallery and an importer on its ground floor.

Other preservation-worthy features in the area include Belgian block sidewalks and freight train rails that began to be removed piecemeal by utility companies in the mid-1980s.

“We worked tremendously hard putting together the presentation for CB2,” said DUMBO activist Christy Nyberg, who, with the help of the Historic Districts Council, presented an application to the city proposing DUMBO be designated an historic district.

“It seems like a natural for supporting it,” she said, and mentioned that efforts to promote the idea include holding an art auction, and a letter and postcard campaign to garner support for the district.

“We asked that [the community board] provide a lot of support to [Landmarks] Commissioner [Robert] Tierney. From our plate, we need to just keep moving ahead in pursuing the LPC,” Nyberg said.

Diane Jackier, a spokeswoman for the Landmarks Preservation Commission, said the “commission has received a request for evaluation and it’s evaluating the district,” which it had been reviewing for “a couple of months.” Evaluation is not time-limited, she said, and the proposal has not been scheduled for public review in the near future.

But the presentation at CB2 highlighted how landmark status would serve to “protect the neighborhood, temper growth and promote appropriate, contextual rezoning,” said Jackier, suggesting the DUMBO Neighborhood Association (DNA), which has asked the Department of City Planning to rezone the neighborhood to protect its eight- to 10-story character, to no avail so far, has taken another tack on capping the high-rise phenomenon.

Michelle Whetten, who recently became president of the DNA, was unavailable for comment by press time, but former president Nancy Webster said both landmarking and a full re-evaluation of zoning were needed.

“I think they go hand in hand,” said Webster. “Obviously, the end goal, the big goal, is to preserve the character of DUMBO and there are two ways that you do it. Landmarking obviously goes to ensure that historic buildings aren’t torn down in a way that they lose their character.”

Perris pointed out the big problem facing DUMBO right now is that projects are getting approved on a piecemeal basis to build higher than zoning allows.

“Variance by variance the neighborhood is really changing,” said the CB2 district manager, possibly referring to new construction on either side of the Manhattan Bridge overpass, at 85 Adams St., which will rise to 30 stories when completed, or a building approved for 100 Jay St., planned for 31 stories.

“One of the reasons the Department of City Planning gives for why they can’t rezone the neighborhood, is that it’s a state and local historic district but not a local landmark district,” said Perris. “[City historic designation will] make that consistent, and slow down the changes going on in DUMBO without getting into the issue of zoning change.”


BID OK’d, too

Also passed unanimously by CB2 was an application to create a business improvement district (BID) in DUMBO.

The DUMBO BID would encompass a larger area than the historic district, roughly bounded by the East River to the north, York Street to the south, Gold and Bridge streets to the east and Old Fulton Street to the west.

A BID is funded by a special assessment to property owners and provides supplemental services like sanitation and security.

Jed Walentas, a spokesman for Two Trees Management, which converted many of the residential and commercial buildings in the area, and will be paying a generous portion of the BID fees, said he was glad for CB2’s approval.

“We’ve been a supporter and proponent of the BID, and we’re happy about that,” Walentas said.

Derek2k3
May 6th, 2005, 10:44 AM
Project #30

70 Washington Street
27-37 York Street/66-76 Front Street
15 stories 156 feet (Conversion/Addition of 2 stories)
Beyer Blinder Belle Architects
Dev-70 Wash LLC (Two Trees Management Co.)
Residential Condominiums
259 units 388,000 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction August 2004-December 2005

http://www.dumbo-newyork.com/images/70_washington.jpg

70 Washington Street

http://www.dumbo-newyork.com/index.cfm?objectid=99BD93DD-3048-7098-AF99FE39C9903EE2

Due to the incredible success of our most recent sold out condominium project at the Sweeney Building, we will be converting over 360,000 Square Feet into 259 condominiums at 70 Washington Street. Construction started August 2004 and sales will begin in the spring of 2005.

Like The Sweeney Building's oversized loft apartments, which average nearly 1,800 square feet and offer spectacular views of the Brooklyn Bridge, Lower Manhattan and New York Harbor. The new Lofts at 70 Washington will feature high ceilings, oversized windows, individually controlled heating and air conditioning, powder rooms, and separate laundry rooms with a full-size Maytag washer/dryer. The plans for the interior of each apartment will include spacious open chefs kitchens featuring all stainless steel appliances: Sub Zero refrigerators, Bosch dishwashers, Viking gas cook tops, Thermador electric ovens, Franke sinks and Broan hoods. The elegant master bathrooms will feature whirlpool tubs, double vanities in a large marble sink top, marble mosaic floors and oversized walk-in showers. The apartments will offer solid strip oak select flooring, custom solid-core birch doors, architectural chrome hardware, solid millwork and track lighting.

All owners will have free access to a roof deck and a fitness center. 70 Washington will also feature a brand new beautifully designed lobby, 24-hour concierge, state of the art telecommunications and satellite capabilities. Some units will offer private outdoor space.

All of these amenities plus easy access to transportation, one stop to Manhattan, reasonable parking options, and proximity to high quality restaurants and shops in a thriving artistic neighborhood make Dumbo an ideal place to live.

If you would like to be notified about our upcoming condo project please fill out and submit the form below.


http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/43025333.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/43025335.jpg

Links:
http://www.mapquest.com/maps/map.adp?formtype=address&searchtype=address&country=US&addtohistory=&1ahXX=&address=70+Washington+Street&city=brooklyn&state=ny&zipcode=
Map

http://www.emporis.com/en/wm/bu/?id=199277

http://www.brooklyneagle.com/categories/category.php?category_id=5&id=4033
DUMBO Conversion Has 1,900 Applying for 259 Apartments
by Linda Collins (linda@brooklyneagle.net), published online 04-28-2005

Two Trees Management Co. reports that it already has a waiting list of 1,900 people interested in units at 70 Washington Street in DUMBO, a former commercial building that is undergoing conversion by the firm.

http://www.nytimes.com/2004/06/29/arts/29DUMB.html?ex=1246248000&en=641fa9148936cc15&ei=5090&partner=rssuserland
The Doorman Cometh
By JESSE McKINLEY
Published: June 29, 2004

http://gothamgazette.com/community/33/news/479
Made in New York
May 23, 2004
NY Times
By TOM VANDERBILT

Derek2k3
May 10th, 2005, 02:52 AM
Project # 23

99 Gold Street
89-107 Gold Street/240-248 Gold Street
6 stories 70 feet (Conversion)
Scarano & Associate Architects
Dev-Kay Gold Properties LLC
Residential Condominiums
71 units 109,200 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2004-2005
http://www.99goldstreet.com/pics/building1_375x306.jpg

Website Launched

http://www.99goldstreet.com

A Gold-en Opportunity . . . Luxury Rentals in historic Vinegar Hill
99 Gold Street, the new luxury rental building in Brooklyn, offers a compelling combination of features to beckon you home - historical relevance and modern expression, the serenity of a small-scale village and the energy of city bustle, loft-style living and a cozy environment. And in a market where condominiums abound, 99 Gold offers a golden opportunity with 88 rental units in historic Vinegar Hill. The property itself captures the neighborhood's Old World magic while incorporating imaginative design and inventive amenities. 99 Gold excels when it comes to giving residents access to the beauty of the surrounding area. The building maximizes magnificent views of the East River and Manhattan. A sixth floor was added to create inspired penthouse units whose spacious private terraces deliver spectacular light and breathtaking panoramic views of Manhattan's skyline.

NoyokA
May 10th, 2005, 11:15 AM
New York Daily News:
New bldg. counts on feng shui
BY DEBORAH KOLBEN
DAILY NEWS WRITER
Tuesday, May 10th, 2005

The bedrooms must be far from the front door to make residents feel protected. The doors must open freely so inhabitants can easily move ahead in their lives.

Sounds like advice from a guru, right?

Well, it is - and developers of a luxury tower rising in DUMBO have turned to the ancient Chinese tradition of feng shui to fill the high-end apartments with "good energy."

Of course, those who live in the 23-story tower might have trouble finding inner peace because it's going up just feet from the Manhattan Bridge and the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway.

Feng shui or not, some Brooklynites say they can't imagine finding peace living so close to traffic.

"We're window people," said Brooklyn Heights resident Paul Taylor, 39, who was walking with his wife past the construction site at 85 Adams St. "We like to open up the window and hear the birds."

A construction crew demolished an old neighborhood watering hole with tinted windows and Frank Sinatra memorabilia and is now laying the foundation for the new tower.

Beacon Tower is scheduled for completion next year. It will have valet parking, a 24-hour doorman and a landscaped roof garden.

Even though it's just a hole in the ground, buyers have already snatched up 30 of the 79 units. Prices range from $630,000 for a one-bedroom to $2.4 million for a penthouse with a sprawling terrace.

Popular in interior decorating circles, feng shui promises health, money and even love based on the placement of a couch or wall.

"We want to make this building as friendly and comfortable and tranquil as we can," said feng shui guru Benjamin Huntington, who was hired by the Beacon Tower developers.

He advised the use of stone kitchen countertops for "a sense of grounding ... to represent the Earth."

"Make sure all the doors open freely," Huntington said. "If you struggle to open doors in your home, you will struggle to open doors in your life."

But it will take more than ancient philosophy to keep trains and trucks from rattling residents nerves.

Because sound levels at the site spiked higher than double the accepted city level, the developers are putting in special sound-absorbing 10-inch-thick acoustic windows.

"Regular windows would be no good," said Corcoran broker Justin Whitney. "You would hear the train and traffic, but with these you hear nothing."

Not everybody could appreciate the beauty of feng shui living. DSL deliveryman Ira Kaplan had only one concern about the new building:

"We have enough traffic down here to begin with. How are we going to make deliveries?"

http://www.nydailynews.com/ips_rich_content/3-bklyntower.JPG

Gulcrapek
May 10th, 2005, 07:10 PM
Feng shui = marketing bullshit. But I'm sure you all knew that.

Does anyone have pictures of what used to be at the site? I think I have a chunk of its facade in my room.

Kolbster
May 10th, 2005, 08:50 PM
Feng shui = marketing bullshit. But I'm sure you all knew that.

Does anyone have pictures of what used to be at the site? I think I have a chunk of its facade in my room.

Feng Shui is huge in china and Japan. The Jin Mao tower, after it's completion called in a monk and the guy said that the main entrance had bad fung Shui, so now they don't use it; you can only enter the building through the side entrance....That's Fung Shui to an extreem though. This is the first time i've heard of it being use in the US, and for a residential tower....hmmm. I think they are trying to attract buyers and sort of jack up the price.

billyblancoNYC
May 14th, 2005, 12:23 AM
Ever see the Penn and Teller Bullshit show on Showtime? They did an entire show about the "science" of Feng Shui. All the assholes they had on did different shit and some did nothing. Some recommended the exact opposite of the others. What a farce.

Kolbster
May 14th, 2005, 11:10 AM
Wow, when was the show?

billyblancoNYC
May 15th, 2005, 02:41 AM
Wow, when was the show?

I really couldn't tell you. Tivo makes showtimes hard to gauge sometimes. I would say it's Sun nights, but who knows.

Nice...

http://www.sho.com/site/ptbs/topics.do?topic=fs

Sun @ 10pm.

Kolbster
May 15th, 2005, 10:33 AM
I really couldn't tell you. Tivo makes showtimes hard to gauge sometimes. I would say it's Sun nights, but who knows.

Nice...

http://www.sho.com/site/ptbs/topics.do?topic=fs

Sun @ 10pm.

haha, i love the opening word; the first thing you see on the page in big red letters "BULL SHIT!", it's exactly what i was thinking

Gulcrapek
May 22nd, 2005, 06:42 PM
5/22/05





99 Gold Street

http://img209.echo.cx/img209/6240/99gold9co.th.jpg (http://img209.echo.cx/my.php?image=99gold9co.jpg)


http://img209.echo.cx/img209/4558/99gold25pb.th.jpg (http://img209.echo.cx/my.php?image=99gold25pb.jpg)



53 Bridge Street, distance... hasn't been moving too fast

http://img233.echo.cx/img233/1693/53bridge4ik.th.jpg (http://img233.echo.cx/my.php?image=53bridge4ik.jpg)



85 Adams Street - steel up

http://img209.echo.cx/img209/7622/85adams9oq.th.jpg (http://img209.echo.cx/my.php?image=85adams9oq.jpg)


_____________

Also, 99 Gold's website is nice:

http://www.99goldstreet.com

Gulcrapek
May 23rd, 2005, 08:08 PM
206 Front Street
7 floors
33 units
Architect: Karl Fischer


http://www.corcoran.com/property/nd/photo/206front.jpg

http://www.corcoran.com/property/nd/index.asp?CGM=Y

Gulcrapek
May 24th, 2005, 06:25 PM
100 Jay Street (The J Condo) - Stuff is finally happening at the site of this 33 storey building.

http://img208.echo.cx/img208/2061/100jay1wr.th.jpg (http://img208.echo.cx/my.php?image=100jay1wr.jpg)

Long site

http://img208.echo.cx/img208/5935/100j29kt.th.jpg (http://img208.echo.cx/my.php?image=100j29kt.jpg)

ltjbukem73
May 29th, 2005, 06:38 PM
check out the link below for a tour of the 70 washington condos in DUMBO.

http://ltjbukem.blogspot.com

Gulcrapek
June 1st, 2005, 07:11 PM
The Nexus/84 Front Street is now topped out.

Derek2k3
June 2nd, 2005, 07:04 AM
Bridge No. 50
7 stories (Conversion)
50/44-52 Bridge Street/202-214 Plymouth Street
Residential Condominium
58 units
Completed

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44206566.jpg


The Developers Group
Bridge No. 50
50 Bridge Street Brooklyn, NY 11201

http://www.thedevelopersgroup.com/buildings/building.aspx?buildingid=1011&

Fifty-eight true loft condominiums located in D.U.M.B.O, Brooklyn. Conversion of a warehouse into spacious open loft units, complete with 10"-16" ceiling heights with Brooklyn and NYC skyline views. All apartments have been left open with no demising walls ensuring the feeling of large open spaces flooded with natural sunlight.

Amenities & Features

* Part –time security
* Common Roof-deck with NYC Skyline views
* Storage Spaces
* Laundry Room
* Bicycle Storage Room
* Baby Carriage Storage Room
* Parking


http://www.mapquest.com/maps/map.adp?country=US&countryid=250&addtohistory=&address=50%20Bridge%20Street&city=&state=&zipcode=11201&submit=Get+Map
Map

Derek2k3
June 2nd, 2005, 07:19 AM
http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44206720.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44206692.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44206722.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44206721.jpg

Derek2k3
June 11th, 2005, 05:02 PM
Project #30

70 Washington Street
27-37 York Street/66-76 Front Street
15 stories 156 feet (Conversion/Addition of 2 stories)
Beyer Blinder Belle Architects
Dev-70 Wash LLC (Two Trees Management Co.)
Residential Condominiums
259 units 388,000 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction August 2004-December 2005

http://www.dumbo-newyork.com/images/70_washington.jpg

Brooklyn Eagle
Cabanas in DUMBO: New Way to Use Roof Space, Offer Spectacular Views
by Linda Collins (linda@brooklyneagle.net), published online 06-09-2005

http://www.brooklyneagle.com/categories/category.php?category_id=5&id=4272

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/44652188.jpg

Derek2k3
July 6th, 2005, 08:01 PM
Project #11

10 Jay Street
Ehrenkrantz Eckstut & Kuhn Architects
16 stories (7 story addition)
Proposed

http://63.240.68.115/FirmFiles/8/images/10-Jay-Street-3D-full.jpg

10 Jay Street
Ehrenkrantz Eckstut & Kuhn Architects
http://www.eekarchitects.com/indprjdoc_eek.cfm?Action=ProjectDoc&webprojcatid=219&projectid=62888&categoryname=Historic%20Preservation%20%26%20Adapt ive%20Reuse

Location: Brooklyn, New York
This building's new design is proposed to become an integral part of redeveloping a waterfront loft district as well as Brooklyn’s new waterfront park. At the moment, the building detracts from its current urban setting and will, if it remains, be an obstacle (visual and functional) to the wonderful plans underway for the Brooklyn waterfront park. Here is one of those rare opportunities where private redevelopment can be directed to enhance ongoing public policy and current public construction projects, and to do so within a very short timetable.

A thread on the building is here:
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=4878

Brooklyn Daily Eagle
Report Sets Stage for Park Environmental Study
by Dennis Holt (Holt@brooklyneagle.net), published online 06-30-2005

http://www.brooklyneagle.com/categories/category.php?category_id=27&id=4405

...And this newspaper has learned that there is another site within park property that may influence the housing development. There is a building at 10 Jay Street about 120 feet tall zoned for manufacturing. It is reported that the owner, Joseph Stanvach, wants to have his building rezoned and apparently wants to build a 30-story residence. The proposed height is being resisted by the DUMBO Neighborhood Association and the city....

Gulcrapek
July 8th, 2005, 02:30 AM
85 Adams Street a few months ago, irrelevant now but for the guest.

http://img276.imageshack.us/img276/9256/85adkitty6zf.th.jpg (http://img276.imageshack.us/my.php?image=85adkitty6zf.jpg)

Gulcrapek
August 2nd, 2005, 11:23 PM
Clarett's project in DUMBO is being designed by Fox&Fowle, according to their site. Construction begins later in the year.

Gulcrapek
August 9th, 2005, 02:03 PM
Beacon Tower (85 Adams) 8/05

http://img320.imageshack.us/img320/5315/beacon2sp.th.jpg (http://img320.imageshack.us/my.php?image=beacon2sp.jpg)

Kolbster
August 9th, 2005, 05:53 PM
The beacon tower seems to be coming along nicely

Concrete Fountain
September 4th, 2005, 01:44 PM
Any other new developments coming in 2005 / 2006? I know about J condo and the latest New Deal newsletter has a project called Vesta Vinegar Hill (206-210 Front Street) on their list. But is that all?

Gulcrapek
September 4th, 2005, 02:08 PM
The Highbridge Tower or whatever's on a previous page here next to the M bridge, and the Jehovah's Witnesses buildings. Also 133 Water Street.

NoyokA
September 29th, 2005, 12:33 PM
http://www.jcondo.com/home.htm

I hate the water tower on this one as well as the brick base.

Gulcrapek
September 30th, 2005, 11:59 AM
I don't mind the water tower but the base is inexcusable. They're probably betting nobody will pay attention to it given its place below the bridge. Gruzen Samton used to be on my nice list, not so much anymore.

BTW, 85 Adams Street has about 10 floors of facade up. It looks very prefab and fake, but it's not terrible.

Derek2k3
October 4th, 2005, 12:56 PM
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showpost.php?p=42875&postcount=16


Project #7

J Condo
100 Jay Street
31/33 stories 337 feet
Gruzen Samton Architects
Dev-Hudson Companies Incorporated
Residential Condominiums
260/267 units 407,129 Sq. Ft.
Proposed 2005-2006

http://www.hudsoninc.com/apt4sale/jcondo/images/jcondo.jpg

New York Magazine - September 26, 2005
Real Estate Showcase
IT'S A JOY

http://newyorkmetro.com/nymetro/realestate/advertorial/14507/

J Condominium is a new 33-story luxury tower that will soar above DUMBO, Brooklyn’s hot waterfront neighborhood. Just steps from the river, this dramatic newcomer rivals its neighbors with sweeping views, sprawling spaces and unparalleled extras.

“We offer a level of finishes and amenities with a distinctive profile never before seen in Brooklyn,” says Kim Nash, J Condo’s project manager. “J Condo will be a landmark on the Brooklyn skyline for years to come.”

Designed by award-winning architecture firm Gruzen Samton, LLP, J Condo features large, curved glass walls recalling the great sailing-ship era in New York Harbor. From windows, balconies and set-back terraces, you’ll take in the Manhattan and Brooklyn bridges, the Manhattan skyline and downtown Brooklyn. Interior finishes, selected by designer Andres Escobar, include hardwood floors, marble baths and Grohe fixtures. There are 267 apartments (studios to 3BRs), priced from the low $300,000s to over $2 million.

TRICIA HAYES COLE | 718.625.5600 | CORCORAN GROUP MARKETING


http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/50266849.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/50267094.jpg http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/50267095.jpg
http://www.jcondo.com

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/50266851.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/50266850.jpg
9-2-05

Derek2k3
October 4th, 2005, 01:10 PM
Project # 23

99 Gold Street
89-107 Gold Street/240-248 Gold Street
6 stories 70 feet (Conversion)
Scarano & Associate Architects
Dev-Kay Gold Properties LLC
Residential Condominiums
71 units 109,200 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2004-2005

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/50267537.jpg

http://www.scaranoarchitects.com/

99 Gold Street is a renewal pioneer within the area's industrial landscape. An upscale loft conversion is the latest trend in stylish city living, which redefines the 19th-century concrete and block building, originally designed to house and supply New York's souvenir market. Following that industry's decline and decades of misuse and neglect, vast quality-of-life improvements are assured by this adaptive reuse.

Given the value of its location, breathtaking views of both Brooklyn and Manhattan and its close proximity to public transportation, the building is being converted into 88 sleek, spacious 1 and 2 bedroom loft-style apartments with cutting edge design and state of the art finishes. All apartments, ranging from 600 sq ft studios and 2000 sq ft penthouses, have high ceilings, floor to ceiling windows and large balconies.

As a result of this project and others that will soon follow, the area has been transformed into the ideal neighborhood for successful artists and professionals with a taste for urban living, and it provides another link in connecting Brooklyn's downtown neighborhoods.
http://www.99goldstreet.com/

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/50266848.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/50266847.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/50266846.jpg
9-2-05

lofter1
October 4th, 2005, 02:31 PM
Thsoe balconies are fairly pointless: teeny weenie, barely room for two.

Good for cig break -- not much else.

I wonder if their purpose is that they serve as a "fire-exit" code requirement?

Derek2k3
October 5th, 2005, 02:02 PM
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showpost.php?p=42736&postcount=2


Project #2

Beacon Tower
85 Adams Street
23 stories 314 feet
Cetra/Ruddy Incorporated
Dev-Boymelgreen Developers
Residential Condominium
77 units 115,424 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2004-Summer 2006

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/50314677.jpg
http://85adams.com/

BEACON OF BEAUTY
Real Estate Showcase-Brooklyn Properties

http://newyorkmetro.com/nymetro/realestate/advertorial/12059/

If the Beacon Tower’s stunning 360-degree views don’t sell you, the post-modern Dumbo location and cool finishes are sure to. All this and more will await all comers to the 23-story tower now rising at 85 Adams Street, three blocks from the waterfront.

“We’re the tallest building in Dumbo, we’re on a hill and the windows are very large, so the views will be that much greater,” says Jay Schippers, senior vice-president of development with Corcoran in Brooklyn. “There’s great night life, you’re a block from the shops on Front Street, the subways are close by - what more could you ask?”

Corcoran is asking $530,000 and up for its 1, 2 and 3BRs, and $2.4 million for the penthouse. The spa-sleek apartments will have Rift oak cabinets, stone composite countertops, Bosch appliances, Kohler sinks and faucets, and Zuma bathtubs. A Zenlike courtyard garden (with teahouse) will bring a sense of sanctuary to this happening corner of Brooklyn.

JAY SCHIPPERS | CORCORAN DEVELOPMENT DIVISION | 718.210.2103


Condo craze
New York Post - 09/22/2005
author: ELIZABETH WINE

http://www.corcoran.com/aboutus/index.aspx?page=Article&pub_id=2992

THE condos are coming! In the next few years, New York City will be condominiums. Good news for the city, which is perennially short of housing. But will a glut mean lower prices on those new condos? Experts say don’t bet on it.

According to estimates from appraisal firm Miller Samuel, there should be 3,000 new condo units coming on the market this year and another 3,000 units in 2006. Miller Samuel’s Jonathan Miller says he suspects the figure will be even higher in 2007, but as you look further into the future, the estimates become more speculative.

Manhattan currently has a total of 100,000 condo units, and the figure is about 125,000 when you factor in all five boroughs, according to estimates from Miller Samuel.

Data from the Corcoran Group shows the number of new condo units in Brooklyn jumping from 987 this year to 20,250 in 2007. Prudential Douglas Elliman is currently tracking about 200 planned condo building projects throughout the five boroughs that are slated between now and the end of 2007.

According to building-permit data from the U.S. Census Bureau, through July of this year, plans have been filed to build 75 buildings with 5,755 residential units. That is roughly double the pace of development last year.

Those numbers do not tell the complete story. The Census Bureau figures include all residential-building permits, whether the buildings will be condominiums or low-income housing projects. Opened projects must be filed with regulators, but projects that are merely in the planning stage do not, and are not tracked.

According to anecdotal evidence, the early developments are selling briskly.

Beacon Tower, a new development in Brooklyn’s DUMBO neighborhood, garnered offers on 30 of the first block of 34 units put up for sale within the first four hours of opening. The first of the building’s 78 total units went on sale in April, some two years before completion.

The penthouse at Beacon Tower sold for $2.4 million, a whopping $1,345 per square foot. The average condo in DUMBO costs around $800,000, according to Debra Greco, director of operations at the Corcoran Group.

But what’s to say the folks who plunked down that cold cash might not feel foolish if the prices are a bit lower in two years?

The laws of supply and demand ought to mean that more condos means lower prices. And critics have warned for some time that the current real-estate market is a bubble that’s due to burst. If interest rates rise, those concerns will be magnified.

Plus, the number of foreigners buying apartments has risen in the last year, as the weak dollar made it shopping season in the United States. But, if the dollar continues on its recent road to recovery against the Euro, U.S. real estate will not be as attractive.

Then there is the fact that there are only so many people who actually want to live in the city — many of the foreign newcomers have been eyeing investment properties.

If the impetus to invest evaporates, will the demand drop?

Even with all the worrying factors, experts say no.

Jonathan Miller of Miller Samuel, says the influx of new con-dos should only act to cool the city’s white-hot price climbs.

“The logic works that new developments should temper the appreciation. Supply is coming on, and if the demand sees where it is, you’ll see single-digit [percentage price] gains, instead of double-digit gains. The supply is key: It’ll put the breaks on the runaway appreciation we’ve seen in recent months.”

Not surprisingly, brokers say there’s always more demand for housing in the city.

Pam Liebman, CEO of the Corcoran Group, dismisses the notion that all the new building could keep prices down, saying New York City’s supply is still extremely limited.

“So many foreigners are coming to buy here, empty nesters looking for a pied-à-terre in the city, and young families are moving in. There is extraordinary demand,” Liebman says.

Dottie Herman, CEO of Prudential Douglas Elliman, says even two years out, with a big crop of new con-dos on the market, demand for real estate will likely still be strong.

She cites baby boomers returning to the city for second homes, as well as increasing numbers of young families staying in New York City who might have left for the suburbs in the past.

“People want to be in New York City. I don’t think [a slowdown] will happen anytime soon,” she says.

Miller says there is a key difference in this round of development and the wave in the 1980s: New properties are more spread around the island.

The last time around, most of the new development in New York City went to the Upper East Side and Upper West Side, as well as Green-wich Village. Today, the development pattern is much more diversified, reaching the Financial District, the West 40s and uptown.

But even if prices stay high, life should get easier for buyers. The days when new properties sell in just a matter of hours may be fading.

Liebman admits that “more inventory could slow down absorption rates,” but added that as long as developers make savvy moves, prices should stay strong.

“As long as the developers are building the right product for the neighborhood, they’ll do all right,” Liebman says.

But Liebman stresses that builders need to do their homework and understand the market to make appropriate properties for their target audience.

For example, Liebman notes the Orion building on West 42nd Street, which comes with super-luxe finishes, is still only going for around $1,000 a square foot, not $2,000 a square foot.

“If the developer was looking for that in the West 40s, they’re not going to get it,” she says. “They can build the exact same product on the Upper West Side and get much higher numbers.”


http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/50314344.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/50314343.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/50314342.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/50314341.jpg
Ditto regarding Gulcrapek's comment about the facade.

lofter1
October 5th, 2005, 02:25 PM
BEACON OF BEAUTY

If the Beacon Tower’s stunning 360-degree views don’t sell you, the post-modern Dumbo location and cool finishes are sure to.
These marketing folks who write this sludge are ridiculous:

"post-modern location" !!!!

What the f does that mean??

Plus the 360-degree view is probably shortlived as we have the J Street tower going up on the other side of the bridge, there is a one story building just across the street to the south and a parking lot on the other side of the bridge ramps. So enjoy the views while you can!

krulltime
October 5th, 2005, 06:04 PM
This was posted earlier by Gulcrapek


Gold Street Residential Tower
~23 floors
Architect: Karl Fischer

www.kfarchitect.com (http://www.kfarchitect.com) > news > upcoming projects > Gold Street

http://i.pbase.com/v3/55/435155/1/50180837.GoldStreet.JPG

Not sure really where it is, but I assume is in Dumbo... Gold Street runs mostly on Dumbo.

BrooklynRider
October 5th, 2005, 06:07 PM
I don't know why, but I thought it might wind up south of the BQE. Perhaps on that crappy little community center owned by the Diocese of Brooklyn. They're strapped for cash and that is a prime locale.

lofter1
October 5th, 2005, 07:51 PM
In the picture below you can see Gold St. at the far right, and if I'm seeing it right (which I admit is questionable) there looks to be some empty space on Gold between York / Front just beyond the parking lot.

And here's a map of the area: http://www.mapquest.com/maps/map.adp?searchtype=address&country=US&addtohistory=&location=lkdh55DD77BhusFKlzEAQjbrxX9NuXtBjMr0G1el1 UI6zEK4n%2fufSZ44qFvniHcUjBaL10In1XbP5OXdsXm57umt% 2bNKHF9HYgq3M8SFtTPhE1uh5txzPx0dijiczYQp2C0%2fPKKz Sfjc%3d

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/50314677.jpg

lofter1
October 5th, 2005, 07:54 PM
Hmmm ...

Can't figure out why that mapquest link showed up like that ^

ltjbukem73
October 10th, 2005, 04:44 PM
http://ltjbukem.blogspot.com/2005/10/alternative-marketing-strategies-for.html

Derek2k3
October 22nd, 2005, 11:08 PM
Project#26

206 Front Street
7 stories 70 feet
Karl Fischer Architect
Dev-G.L. Realty
Residential Condominiums
33 units 46,000 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2005-2006


http://www.corcoran.com/property/nd/photo/206front.jpg

Corcoran:
206 Front Street
Brooklyn,NY11201

http://www.corcoran.com/property/nd/detail_fr_overview.asp?ndevid=129

Overview
COMING SOON
Front Street is a seven story new construction building with interior designed loft style apartments located in the heart of Vinegar Hill/DUMBO. Front Street will have private underground parking, private gardens and terraces, common roof deck, high-end finishes, stainless steel appliances, interior designed lobby and apartments with rotating walls, and a gym.



http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/51122972.jpg http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/51122970.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/51122971.jpg
9-2-2005

lofter1
October 22nd, 2005, 11:29 PM
Front Street ... apartments with rotating walls...

What won't they think of next?

BrooklynRider
October 22nd, 2005, 11:42 PM
I think a lot of these copy writers rely too heavily on their thesaurus - often getting it wrong in a bad and amusing way.

ablarc
October 23rd, 2005, 09:15 AM
Rotating walls: Parker Meridien Hotel has them.

lofter1
October 23rd, 2005, 09:26 AM
So ... they lead you into the hidden inner sanctum, or what?

ablarc
October 23rd, 2005, 10:04 AM
TV's mounted on wall; wall rotates depending on whether you want to watch TV from bedroom or sitting room.

lofter1
November 2nd, 2005, 08:46 PM
http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/50314677.jpg

I walked by this yesterday and sad to say the materials are fairly cheap looking. The brick panels are uniform and the metal panels are a bad dark grey and look like siding. Worst of all the entire facade that has gone up so far on the side facing towards Manhattan appears to be solid brick (at least that's the way it is on the portion that has gone up so far.). Hoping for some windows on the upper floors.

This entire area is one big construction zone from just north of the Manhattan Bridge all the way to the Brooklyn Bridge.

czsz
November 2nd, 2005, 09:12 PM
The developer would have to be out of his mind not to create bridge/Manhattan views.

lofter1
November 2nd, 2005, 09:56 PM
It could be that it will just be solid brick until it clears the lowrise building to the west ... we'll have to wait and see.

Risktkr
November 2nd, 2005, 11:07 PM
I passed by the sales office the other day and they told me that the prices are now "negotiable". All the other new construction is bringing competition so they are have to be more reasonable with the prices.

Is it just me or does it seem like the manhatten bridge noise is louder on the east side? 85 Adams is on the west side of the bridge. I wonder if J Condo has taken the same lengths to remediate the noise with their window solution... they are not marketing their solution as much as 85 Adams is...

lofter1
November 2nd, 2005, 11:55 PM
Walking around yesterday it seemed that the noise level on the street at mid-afternoon was pretty damned loud, especially when a train was coming across the bridge. If they don't do major noise abatement then those buildings will be hell to live in.

ltjbukem73
November 3rd, 2005, 09:03 AM
risktkr, were you talking about 85 adams when you said the prices are now negotiable?

BrooklynRider
November 3rd, 2005, 11:46 AM
The noise on the Manhattan Bridge is deafening and relentless - on both sides. I would imagine the future developments are only going to make it louder and more bothersome as the echo down these streets increases.

lofter1
November 3rd, 2005, 06:12 PM
High rises on both sides of the bridge will make a horrendous echo effect.

Time to buy stock in Sharper Image (where all the new residents will go to buy "sound machines" to mask the noise).

Risktkr
November 3rd, 2005, 10:13 PM
risktkr, were you talking about 85 adams when you said the prices are now negotiable?

Yes, 85 Adams (Beacon Tower)... since J Condo started their sales, 85 Adams hasn't seen as much movement. Although they've made approx. 6amendments to their offering plan, the sales person told me the prices I was shown reflected prices around the 3rd/4th amendment. Right now a one bedroom starts at 620K... but I'm guessing "negotiable" isn't defined by more than a 5K to 10K drop...

Risktkr
November 3rd, 2005, 10:27 PM
High rises on both sides of the bridge will make a horrendous echo effect.

Time to buy stock in Sharper Image (where all the new residents will go to buy "sound machines" to mask the noise).

Very true, but I must say that both buildings did take measures to help remediate the noise... 85 Adams is installing double glazed windows with acoustic liner and J Condo is installing triple glazed windows. Hopefully the noise won't be an issue within the units... we'll see...

lofter1
November 3rd, 2005, 11:43 PM
Buyer beware ...

NewYorkYankee
November 5th, 2005, 05:12 PM
My friends parents just purchased her a unit in the J Condo. Where is it located? Also, is this building (Beacon Tower) the one that I read a while ago saying it had great views of Propesct Park or it that another?

Risktkr
November 6th, 2005, 12:43 AM
My friends parents just purchased her a unit in the J Condo. Where is it located? Also, is this building (Beacon Tower) the one that I read a while ago saying it had great views of Propesct Park or it that another?

J Condo is on 100 Jay st (1 block from the F train York station). The Beacon Tower, on 85 Adams st, is on the opposite side of the mnhtn bridge... not sure about the views, but considering it will be a 23 story highrise I wouldn't doubt it.

Derek2k3
January 1st, 2006, 09:59 PM
Project #2

Beacon Tower
85 Adams Street
23 stories 314 feet
Cetra/Ruddy Incorporated
Dev-Boymelgreen Developers
Residential Condominium
77 units 115,424 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2004-Summer 2006"

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/50314677.jpg

http://archrecord.construction.com/resources/images/0502edit3.jpg

The chart shows noise levels on the east facade, closest to the elevated subway, and the south facade, facing the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway. The most striking feature on the chart is the spot of deep blue on the east facade and at the sixth floor. This represents sound from trains and traffic, which radiates spherically, with the strongest impact on floors three through nine.

Read article here:

Architectural Record
The Art and Science of Peace and Quiet
Architects and engineers follow a variety of high and low paths in an effort to keep external noise out of buildings and improve desired sound within.
By Sara Hart (http://archrecord.construction.com/features/green/archives/0502edit-2.asp)

Derek2k3
January 7th, 2006, 02:43 AM
There's a thread on the neighborhood here
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=2906

Project #1
53 Bridge Street
Scarano & Associates Architects
Dev-Kay Bridge Properties /53 Bridge, LLC
12 stories 162 feet 6 story addition
130,740 Sq. Ft.
Commercial
Under Construction 2004-2006

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/54504456.jpg
Scarano & Associates Architects
http://www.scaranoarchitects.com/

Brooklyn Eagle
6-Story Extension Rises Above Vinegar Hill Commercial Building
by Linda Collins, published online 01-06-2006 (http://www.brooklyneagle.com/categories/category.php?category_id=5&id=4664)

Risktkr
January 14th, 2006, 10:53 PM
Brooklyn Eagle (http://www.brooklyneagle.com/categories/category.php?category_id=5&id=4664)
6-Story Extension Rises Above Vinegar Hill Commercial Building
by Linda Collins, published online 01-06-2006 (http://www.brooklyneagle.com/categories/category.php?category_id=5&id=4664)

Interesting. I thought this was going to be a residential building. Let's see how it ends up getting used.

Derek2k3
January 26th, 2006, 10:21 PM
Project #12

RiverFront
57 Front Street
7 stories 84 feet(Conversion)
Elena Kalman Architect
Dev-Boymelgreen Developers
Residential Condominiums
33 units 51,781 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2004-2005

http://www.57front.com/index_r2_c3.gif
http://www.57front.com/


57 Front Street
Brooklyn,NY11201

http://www.corcoran.com/property/nd/index.asp?CGM=Y

Overview
Newly refurbished loft-style development in prime DUMBO! Amenities include stainless steel Bosch & sub-zero appliances, honed soapstone countertops, Kohler bathroom fixtures, whirlpool bath tubs and maple flooring. Doorman building with a fitness center and on-site laundry. Close to A, C and F trains and the New York Water taxi, minutes from Manhattan!

• Stainless steel Bosch & sub-zero appliances
• Honed soapstone countertops
• Kohler bathroom fixtures
• Whirlpool bath tubs
• Maple flooring.

The New York Times
Rivals Rumble in Dumbo
By WILLIAM NEUMAN
Published: January 22, 2006

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/01/22/realestate/22deal.html

Derek2k3
February 21st, 2006, 12:53 PM
Beacon Tower (http://www.flickr.com/photos/plemeljr/102371765/in/pool-curbed/)

Catchsteelhead
March 1st, 2006, 08:27 AM
Does anyone have any information on what is going on with this development?

www.99goldstreet.com (http://www.99goldstreet.com)

They have not updated their site in months, and occupancy was supposed to begin in early '06. I cannot even find anything on a sales office.

Any updates would be appreciated...

BrooklynRider
March 22nd, 2006, 02:04 PM
The kangaroo crane is up at the J Condo.

Risktkr
March 23rd, 2006, 11:50 PM
The kangaroo crane is up at the J Condo.

Pardon me for not being construction savvy, but what does the kangaroo crane being up imply?

lofter1
March 24th, 2006, 12:21 AM
"Kangaroo Crane" is a new term to me, too.

Some info ... (the "tower crane" link has even more):

The shaft
August 20, 2005

http://ask.metafilter.com/mefi/22874

I live across the street from a construction site. The other day I noticed that there is an opening (a shaft, if you will) for the placement of the crane. What happens to this opening when the building is complete?

Every tall building has what's called a "service core", which includes elevator shafts, stairwells, plumbing, electrical, data/voice, HVAC, and other things, all of which are installed after the building's structure is complete. The "kangaroo crane" or tower crane (http://science.howstuffworks.com/tower-crane4.htm) can be located in this service core or -- more likely -- along the outer edge of the structure, where it's easier to dismantle.

The service core can be a path for fire to spread, so usually there is a firewall between it and the occupied space. Surprisingly, even though it seems to be a big hole in the building, when stiffened with firewalls and vertical structural elements, the service core can be the strongest part of the building (http://www.architectureweek.com/2002/0612/building_1-1.html).

posted by dhartung (http://www.metafilter.com/user/654) at 4:05 PM (http://ask.metafilter.com/mefi/22874#365920) PST on August 20

Dagrecco82
March 26th, 2006, 12:34 PM
The Beacon as of 03/25/2006
http://img366.imageshack.us/img366/5696/img0502medium2yq.jpg

Risktkr
March 26th, 2006, 03:17 PM
Thanks for the explaination Lofter. I passed there the other day and there's certainly visible progress on the site.

BrooklynRider
March 27th, 2006, 10:08 AM
There's actually three cranes up now all within a 2 block radius: Beacon Tower, J Condo and the site a block toward the river (same street as Beacon Tower). It's exciting to see new construction activity on Brooklyn. We have had so many conversions that have done little to alter the skyline, except adding more lights to the nightime sky.

Risktkr
March 27th, 2006, 09:42 PM
There's actually three cranes up now all within a 2 block radius: Beacon Tower, J Condo and the site a block toward the river (same street as Beacon Tower). It's exciting to see new construction activity on Brooklyn. We have had so many conversions that have done little to alter the skyline, except adding more lights to the nightime sky.

The third development you mentioned is 133 Water street (Project #10). It appeared to be delayed for a while. I'm glad to see things are progressing there as well now.

BrooklynRider
March 27th, 2006, 10:02 PM
I walked over the bridge tonight. I was surprised that steel is already up at 133 Water Street. Of course, there is no basement there - just a slab - so erecting steel wasn't very complicated. Also, Beacon Tower is just hideous - certainly one of the ugliest buildings to go up in years.

Derek2k3
April 2nd, 2006, 12:12 AM
Photo of the J Condo (http://www.flickr.com/photos/plemeljr/116782921/in/pool-curbed/)

MidtownGuy
April 2nd, 2006, 12:29 AM
Beacon tower looks as crappy as the projects 10 minutes from it.
What a disgusting eyesore. I could build a nicer looking tower with Lincoln Logs.

Derek2k3
April 8th, 2006, 11:47 PM
Sorry these pics are kinda old...


Project #1
53 Bridge Street
Scarano & Associates Architects
Dev-Kay Bridge Properties /53 Bridge, LLC
12 stories 162 feet 6 story addition
130,740 Sq. Ft.
Residential Condominiums
Under Construction 2004-2006

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/54504456.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/58373692.jpg



Project #2
Beacon Tower
85 Adams Street
23 stories 314 feet
Cetra/Ruddy Incorporated
Dev-Boymelgreen Developers
Residential Condominium
77 units 115,424 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2004-Summer 2006

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/50314677.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/58373691.jpg
Beacon Tower (http://www.85adams.com/)



Project # 3
The Nexus
84 Front Street
11 stories 120 feet
Meltzer Mandl Architects of Manhattan
Dev-Boymelgreen Developers
Residential Condominium
44 units 72,302 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2004-Late 2005

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/58373791.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/58373693.jpg
The Nexus @ 84 Front Street (http://www.thedevelopersgroup.com/buildings/building.aspx?buildingid=1020&)



Project #7
J Condo
100 Jay Street
31 stories 337 feet (DOB)
Gruzen Samton Architects
Dev-Hudson Companies Incorporated/100 Jay Street LLC
Residential Condominiums
260 units 407,129 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction Summer 2005-2007

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/50266849.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/58372436.jpg
J Condo (http://www.jcondo.com/)



Project #8
Bridgefront
67/65-71 Front Street/42-44 Main Street
10 stories 120 feet
Elena Kalman Architect
Dev-Boymelgreen Developers
Residential Condominium
21 units 37,160 Sq. Ft.
Completed Early 2003

http://www.kalmandesign.com/exteriorbridge.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/58373694/large.jpg

lofter1
April 9th, 2006, 02:05 AM
That last one is a nightmare -- cheap looking windows, dinky fire-escape type balconies (without the charm of the fire escape ladders), pseudo-Egytian collumns (way too insubstantial) --

3 years after completion and not one damn tree on top.

CHEESE

Architects should be fined for BS renderings.

czsz
April 9th, 2006, 01:39 PM
PoMo + faux-industrial chic = blegh

ablarc
April 9th, 2006, 01:51 PM
Scrape off the faux-Egyptian columns and it's not so bad. DUMBO sure seems to be thriving.

Fabrizio
April 9th, 2006, 03:50 PM
If you squint your eyes and stand back fom the monitor it looks like Mittle-Europe 1930´s. Maybe Vienna. How´s the strudel at Starbucks?

(Our man Mussolini would´ve had muscular nudes posing on top of those columns).

ablarc
April 9th, 2006, 09:48 PM
Our man Mussolini would´ve had muscular nudes posing on top of those columns.
...and Stern would have had Disney characters.

lofter1
April 9th, 2006, 10:38 PM
...and Stern would have had Disney characters.
Apropos, too, for DUMBO ...

Any thoughts on what would have been the Brooklyn-appropriate characters to perch up there?

ablarc
April 9th, 2006, 11:08 PM
^ Well, let's see...there are seven faux-Egyptian columns, so it must be...

lofter1
April 10th, 2006, 12:33 AM
you don't mean ...

http://www.yellow-springs.k12.oh.us/ys-mls/_borders/Steve%20Martin%20King%20Tut.jpg

Derek2k3
April 14th, 2006, 11:33 PM
J Condo Construction Gallery (http://www.flickr.com/photos/plemeljr/sets/72057594089431042/)

Risktkr
April 26th, 2006, 10:47 PM
The developers group finally has some information on the 99 Gold st condo. No word on completion date yet however...

http://www.thedevelopersgroup.com/buildings/building.aspx?buildingid=1058&

BrooklynRider
April 28th, 2006, 10:25 AM
J Condo is going up VERY fast. With good weather, they put a one floor a day. It is now above the lower roadway of the Manhattan Bridge. This building seems even closer to the bridge than Beacon Tower. If anyone ever walked across the bridge, you know the experience is marred by the deafening sound of the four train tracks being in almost constant use. It is hard to imagine living next to that noise.

BrooklynRider
May 17th, 2006, 11:41 AM
The third development you mentioned is 133 Water street (Project #10). It appeared to be delayed for a while. I'm glad to see things are progressing there as well now.

This going up very quickly. The building is using prefab-concrete slabs for each floor. Never saw a rendering, but it does appear to be an odd shape.

Derek2k3
August 10th, 2006, 12:42 PM
New York Times
Dumbo
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/08/06/nyregion/thecity/06stac.html

Now You Paint ’Em, Now You Don’t
By JAKE MOONEY
Published: August 6, 2006

Sweat darkened the brim of Nicholas Evans-Cato’s straw hat last week as he brushed oil paint onto a six-foot-wide canvas, all the while perched on the tar-paper roof of an old factory building in Dumbo, Brooklyn. It was scorching hot up there, but Mr. Evans-Cato had no time to waste.

In front of him was a half-finished painting of the Brooklyn waterfront, a panorama that includes the Williamsburg Bridge, several new condominium buildings and a quintet of towering brick smokestacks from the Consolidated Edison Hudson Avenue Generating Station on the edge of Vinegar Hill. The problem for Mr. Evans-Cato, who has been working on the painting for more than two months, is that the view is about to change.

In the next week or so, said the plant’s manager, Gus Sanoulis, workers will begin dismantling three of the five stacks. Only two are needed now because the plant is using fewer boilers to generate steam. The job will take about four months but will begin to alter the view immediately.

“I guess all I can say is I’m trying to paint better, faster,” said Mr. Evans-Cato, 33. “It’s a matter of not second-guessing myself as often as I usually would.

“They’re like musical notes on a staff,” he said of the 350-foot-tall stacks, erected three-quarters of a century ago. “If I lose them it disrupts the whole composition.”

Pointing to the canvas, he explained: “I’m using these stacks to tell me about these windows. The dark of these lines against the sky helps me calibrate the other darks. When they’re gone, there will be that much less to define the arc of the sky.”

The smokestacks Mr. Evans-Cato values have long been regarded as difficult neighbors by many who lived near them.

Don Condrill, 84, who grew up on the corner of Sands and Navy Streets, near the Brooklyn Navy Yard, remembered how neighborhood women used to scramble to take their laundry off the lines when the stacks were venting black dust.

“They’d yell out, ‘Soot’s coming down! Soot’s coming down!’ ” Mr. Condrill, who now lives in Centreville, Va., and is a friend of Mr. Evans-Cato’s, said by phone. “They wouldn’t have any sentimentality about losing those stacks.”

Mr. Evans-Cato, who said change had always been a part of New York, isn’t out to save the smokestacks. But he has a show in October and had expected to work on his Dumbo painting until then.

“I’d never want to stop the clock,” he said. “It’d just be nice if I could slow it down just a little bit.” JAKE MOONEY

http://static.flickr.com/77/211840398_951319e58b.jpg

ny1624
September 6th, 2006, 07:47 PM
Beacon Tower
The exterior is finished, and I see dented metal work, and chipped brick work.
Isn't there engineer and construction quality control?
If there careless with the exterior, what is going on inside?

antinimby
November 20th, 2006, 07:58 PM
In land of Walentas, Mom & Pop are still king


http://brooklynpapers.com/html/issues/columns/brooklynangle/_vol29/29_45dumbodrug.jpg
Developer David Walentas says he
would like to see a mom and pop
drug store at the corner of Front and
Washington.


That damn Starbucks still burns at David Walentas. The Starbucks is on the corner of Main Street and Front Street, in the heart of DUMBO.

DUMBO, as in Walentasville.

Walentas controls close to 75 percent of this former industrial neighborhood that he started buying up piece-by-piece decades ago — but he doesn’t own the new condo building that rented its ground floor to the caffiend from Seattle.

“I hate that Starbucks,” Walentas told me just the other day, even though the joint has been open for more than a year.

“We already have the DUMBO General Store [which sells a similarly expensive, but far-superior, brew, in a quirky, uncorporate way] and the Coffee Box [another caffeine dealer two blocks away],” Walentas said of his tenants. “We don’t need that Starbucks.”

Like the summertime weather (“it’s not the heat, it’s the humidity”), Walentas’s problem with Starbucks could be boiled down to this: “It’s not the competition, it’s the ubiquity.” And David Walentas doesn’t like chain stores.

And that’s why he’s inviting — begging, actually — a suitably entrepreneurial Mom-and-Pop to come to DUMBO and open a pharmacy. Despite DUMBO’s nearly 10,000 residents and workers, the closest place to get a prescription filled is in Brooklyn Heights.

“Duane Reade would love to come in here, but we won’t have them,” Walentas said. “They’d pay whatever we ask, but we don’t need another place that sells Cokes and chips. We need a real pharmacy where they know you.”


http://brooklynpapers.com/html/issues/columns/brooklynangle/_vol29/29_45walentas.jpg
David Walentas

Love him or hate him, you at least have to appreciate Walentas for vision. He’s been criticized for owning too much of DUMBO, and running the neighborhood in a manner that suggests that he, well, runs the neighborhood, but other developers are only interested in getting a high-paying tenant for a single ground-floor retail space in a single building — and not caring if there’s two of the exact same stores within three blocks.

“Most landlords own a building, they don’t own a neighborhood,” he said. “I’m not a do-gooder. I want to increase the value of the entire neighborhood, not just one space.”

As such, he’ll take far-below-market rate for the vacant space, knowing fully well that the better the mix of stores — a mix that currently includes the upscale Jacques Torres chocolate shop and Almondine bakery, an old-style hardware store, and a wonderfully blue-collar pizzeria and bagel store — the more money he’ll get for his condos and the better the neighborhood will retain its value.

And who needs another bank?

“Chase wanted to open in one of my buildings,” Walentas said. “I said, ‘We already have a bank [Sovereign], so why do we need another?”

It’s too early to say whether Mom-and-Pop will answer Walentas’s call. Even with a reduced rent, it’s still not easy for sole proprietors to branch out.

“Opening your own business is a real struggle every day,” said Robert Pollina, who opened Pollina Pharmacy in Dyker Heights two years ago after doing duty at an Eckerd drugstore.

Like Walentas, Pollina appreciates the neighborhood feel of a local pharmacy, but thinks Walentas is fooling himself if he thinks he can land a Mom and Pop store.

“Three or four years ago, I went down to DUMBO and talked about opening a drugstore,” he said. “And some people I know in Park Slope looked, too. But it’s too hard to make it work. To get your opening merchandise you have to spend $100,000.

The shelving alone for a 1,000-square-foot store is $18,000 and the computer system was $10,000. For Eckerd, that’s a drop in the bucket.”

But Walentas said he’s not giving up. “I’m not bringing Duane Reade down here,” he said.

http://brooklynpapers.com/html/cyclones/images/bp_logo_little.gif (http://brooklynpapers.com/html/issues/columns/brooklynangle/_vol29/29_45bklynangle.html)

TREPYE
January 1st, 2007, 01:29 PM
The beacon tower has been lit up rather nicely. Nice little addition to the Brooklyn side.

DarrylStrawberry
January 27th, 2007, 10:22 AM
They are installing cladding on the "cage" at the top of the beacon tower...It only makes me wish jcondo would do something to hide that awful mess on top of what is an otherwise nice looking building.

BrooklynRider
February 3rd, 2007, 09:21 PM
I gotta agree with you there.

antinimby
June 28th, 2007, 10:11 PM
Two Trees tries tower — again — on Water St.


http://www.brooklynpaper.com/assets/photos/30/26/30_26_oldwaterstplan_z.jpg
(New Plan)


By Harry Cheadle
for The Brooklyn Paper
June 30 - July 7, 2007 (http://www.brooklynpaper.com/stories/30/26/30_26watersttower.html)

Developer David Walentas has proposed to add another castle to his DUMBO fiefdom: a $200-million, 400-apartment, commercial and middle school project on Water Street, between Water and Front streets — the same location where a similar Walentas proposal was defeated in 2004.

To avoid such a fate, Walentas’s Two Trees Management — the principal landlord in the booming neighborhood down under the Manhattan Bridge overpass — has set aside 80 of the units as below-market-rate housing and reconfigured the building so that it obstructs fewer views of the Brooklyn Bridge.

The blocked views were one reason several community groups objected to the earlier version. The 300-student middle school is also new to the proposal.

The company needs a city rezoning from manufacturing to residential before it can build.

Anticipating controversy, Two Trees has already begun a mass-mailing campaign in DUMBO and Brooklyn Heights, sending out a glossy, full-color pamphlet asking for support — much in the style of developer Bruce Ratner, who courted support for Atlantic Yards by sending out hundreds of thousands of such pamphlets.

The Two Trees mailer includes a pre-paid postcard petition in support of the project.

The petition is addressed to Councilman David Yassky. The Brooklyn Heights Democrat, who was criticized by some groups for not opposing the 2004 project fast enough, said this week that DUMBO does need a middle school, but not another gigantic development.

He called the mailings “a page from the Forest City Ratner playbook.”

It’s unclear whether Two Trees will pay for the school portion of the project or if the company expects the city to pick up the tab. But Yassky says it makes a big difference.

“If all they’re saying is, we’ll offer the space to the Board of Education so they can buy it, well, the Board of Education can buy space in a lot of places,” he said.

Two Trees officials said the details still need to be worked out, but company heir Jed Walentas is optimistic.

“From a public policy standpoint, I anticipate widespread support,” he said, noting that the community had been “clamoring for decades” for a middle school — even though DUMBO has only recently begun attracting families.

He also touted the company’s commitment to meet eco-friendly construction standards.

But Walentas admitted that “not everyone in the world will like” the 18-story building.

“For example, the Brooklyn Heights Association has opposed everything we’ve ever built.”

Perhaps, but the BHA did not want to take a formal position on the latest design until Two Trees had formally presented its proposal to the Association after this issue went to press.

But Association Executive Director Judy Stanton did see the need for a middle school.

“We’ve become much more of a public school neighborhood than we were,” she said, pointing to the full-capacity PS 8 elementary school on Hicks Street on the DUMBO end of Brooklyn Heights. “Graduating fifth-graders do not have adequate choices.”

Others agreed, but didn’t think a giant mixed-use building was the answer.

“We do need a middle school, but this need … should not be used to leverage an out-of-scale development,” said Karen Johnson, president of the DUMBO Neighborhood Association. “We are against the height and density and will … oppose this.”


http://www.brooklynpaper.com/assets/photos/30/26/30_26_walentasbuilding_z.jpg
(Previous 2004 plan)

©2007 The Brooklyn Paper

sfenn1117
June 29th, 2007, 12:04 AM
I think the new design is an improvement, I like the building better oriented that way and it looks more like an old industrial building (the stated goal). Walentas is smart including that school, otherwise this would have no chance.

BrooklynRider
June 29th, 2007, 12:38 AM
Walentas is both smart and sensitive to the community. He is one of the best developers in Brooklyn. I walk the Brooklyn Bridge four or five times a week. I think this building would be perfect on that lot and it does not in anyway impact the bridge. If we want to complain about blocking the bridge, let's tak about Verizon on the west side of the bridge.

I give the design two thumbs up.

Watch for all the new people in 70 Washington (who've been there less that 18 months) to start talking about the character of THEIR neighbohood. DUMBO is a bit of a joke. This an ideal spot to build.

MidtownGuy
June 30th, 2007, 11:20 PM
Yes, the new plan is quite handsome. :)

Darmok
July 17th, 2007, 09:19 PM
The photos are mislabeled (it was a mistake on the caption on Brooklyn Papers online). The 2004 plan had 16 stories along Water Street, while the new plan has 17 stories on a parcel between Water and Front Streets, in the space formerly occupied by Nova Clutch. The space above St Ann's Warehouse is slated to be 8 stories.

Fahzee
July 24th, 2007, 12:44 PM
Today, the landmarks preservation committee will vote to Calender the dumbo historic district.


http://dumbonyc.com/

antinimby
August 9th, 2007, 03:35 AM
The latest on David Walentas' Water St. proposal from the Brownstoner (http://brownstoner.com/brownstoner/archives/2007/08/yassky_and_wale.php) blog:


Yassky and Walentas Square Off over Dock Street

Councilman David Yassky was one of the many people who opposed Two Trees Management's 2004 proposal for its Dock Street site in Dumbo on the grounds that it cramped the Brooklyn Bridge's style.

Well, as previously reported, it's 2007 and Two Trees is in the middle of a p.r. campaign trying to sell its kinder, gentler plan for the Dock Street project but Yassky's still not buying.

On Sunday, The Times ran a letter from him urging residents not to let the developer's promises to build a much-needed middle school into the mixed-use site sway them.

Why? He was already addressing the school issue himself. "I have spoken with the Department of Education, and am forming a task force comprising neighborhood residents and P.S. 8 parents to evaluate the qualities the middle school should have," he wrote.

"Based on that evaluation, we will consider available locations and create an appropriate middle school for the area.”

In an email forward to the blog DumboNYC, the councilman boiled down his position on the project to a single sentence: "My position was and remains that a building at a location this close to the Brooklyn Bridge should be no taller than 8 stories or 80 feet."

Never one to take a little political opposition lying down, Dumbo's largest land owner retaliated yesterday with a flyer it distributed around the neighborhood providing residents with a ready-made petition.

"Dear Council Member Yassky," the petition begins. "The families of DUMBO, Vinegar Hill and Brooklyn Heights need a new middle school in our area. Please support the Dock Street DUMBO project that will create environmentally sensitive and affordable housing, additional shopping opportunities and parking in our community."

Walentas' petition:

http://brownstoner.com/brownstoner/archives/dockstreet1.jpg
http://brownstoner.com/brownstoner/archives/dockstreet3.jpg

Derek2k3
August 13th, 2007, 01:35 PM
What view of the bridge is this building blocking that is so important?


NY Post
http://www.nypost.com/seven/08132007/news/regionalnews/rumble_over_jumbo_dumbo_apartment_complex_regional news_rich_calder.htm


RUMBLE OVER JUMBO DUMBO APARTMENT COMPLEX
By RICH CALDER

August 13, 2007 -- Political and community opposition is mounting against a prominent DUMBO developer's latest attempt to build an apartment tower next to the Brooklyn Bridge - although it's part of a plan to bring the fast-growing neighborhood a much-needed middle school.

Councilman David Yassky (D-Brooklyn), who was instrumental in getting a 16-story apartment complex proposed by developer David Walentas scrapped three years ago, is now taking on the latest vision of the so-called "Father of DUMBO" for the former industrial area between the Manhattan and Brooklyn bridge overpasses.

And like the last battle, the big issue is over the project blocking views of the iconic Brooklyn Bridge.

Walentas' proposed $200 million, 400-apartment, middle school and retail project is to be built on prime real estate the developer owns along Water, Dock and Front streets. It would range from 7- to 16-stories high.

"DUMBO and Brooklyn Heights do need a middle school, but it should not be used as an excuse for an inappropriate building," said Yassky, who is forming a task force to find an alternate site for a school.

rich.calder@nypost.com

antinimby
August 13th, 2007, 05:29 PM
We all know it ain't about the views of the bridge, it's just an excuse to block the increase in more residents in the neighborhood.

If the bridge wasn't there, they'd be coming up with some other reason against it.

BrooklynRider
November 24th, 2007, 11:17 PM
Two Trees tries tower — again — on Water St.


http://www.brooklynpaper.com/assets/photos/30/26/30_26_oldwaterstplan_z.jpg


By Harry Cheadle
for The Brooklyn Paper
June 30 - July 7, 2007 (http://www.brooklynpaper.com/stories/30/26/30_26watersttower.html)

Developer David Walentas has proposed to add another castle to his DUMBO fiefdom: a $200-million, 400-apartment, commercial and middle school project on Water Street, between Water and Front streets — the same location where a similar Walentas proposal was defeated in 2004...

There was a group of DUMBO residents with placards trying to get people to sign a petition against this building. They had renderings that looked NOTHING like this and really misrepresented the building. I was asked to sign the petition. I told them I thought the building was perfectly appropriate for the area, in context with the neighborhood, and affected nothing except the views of a building full of residents who live here for less than a year.

I noted that it was selfish that they would block a new school and the reworked design to basically protect the views of million dollar condos. I'm not sure what reactions they had received earlier, but I kid you not when I say they were in a state of stunned silence.

I also thought it was pretty obvious that they had little support in the community when they had to take their petition to the bridge pedestrian walkway and ask tourists to sign the petition.

Rather pathetic.

Dynamicdezzy
November 26th, 2007, 04:00 PM
wow, that's pretty sad....

BrooklynLove
November 26th, 2007, 04:05 PM
i recall reading in one of the recent reports re brooklyn bridge park expansion progress that the project depended somewhat on parking garage space slated to go in this new walentas building, and that the opposition could put a wrench in things if successful, so it seems that the implications go even further than the immediate neighborhood.

Fahzee
December 12th, 2007, 10:10 AM
Landmarks will officially vote on the Dumbo Historic District next Tuesday, December 18th.

BrooklynLove
December 13th, 2007, 07:25 AM
Landmarks will officially vote on the Dumbo Historic District next Tuesday, December 18th.

will they be reaching a decision on the upzoning of in-district non-historical buildings and perimeter buildings at that time as well?

antinimby
December 13th, 2007, 08:18 AM
Landmarks doesn't make decisions on upzoning. The Department of City Planning does.

BrooklynLove
December 14th, 2007, 03:46 PM
ok, well are the 2 agencies then reaching their respective decisions in tandem? it seemed as if the 2 issues were linked when dumbo landmarking was discussed in front of the commisssion a few months back.

Fahzee
December 18th, 2007, 04:52 PM
Landmarked!

DarrylStrawberry
January 20th, 2008, 10:52 AM
Someone recently added what looks like a glass walled enclosure on top of the Clocktower building.

I'll try to post a photo of it.

DarrylStrawberry
January 20th, 2008, 12:18 PM
Here it is.

I think the building used to have a flagpole on top.

BrooklynLove
January 23rd, 2008, 08:43 PM
this building is right on the waterfront, east side of jay street. how this could pass given the building's max FAR and location inside the dumbo historic district is beyond my comprehension

http://dumbonyc.com/2008/01/23/10-jay-ext/

BrooklynLove
January 23rd, 2008, 09:11 PM
^ by the way, just noticed the older rendering linked earlier in this thread. now THAT is a fugly design. man.

http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showpost.php?p=56262&postcount=109

DarrylStrawberry
February 3rd, 2008, 01:06 PM
fugly indeed.

Monumental
February 10th, 2008, 08:34 PM
That is one uuuugly building.

I visited Empire State Fulton Ferry Park (or whatever its called) for the first time the other day and its a beautiful little park with some spectacular views.

I was hoping someone might have some news as to what the city is planning to do with those beautiful civil war era warehouses that bound the park, Fron street I think.

In their "ruined" state I think they're great (or at least the smaller of the two is) they should take steps to make it more accessible to the public, I thought maybe a garden in the open space would be nice. I dont know; I'm just afraid they'll come down or something or simply rot away.

Does the city have any plans to develop them to make them more useful, maybe some light retail or perhaps food (while preserving the historic character) ?

Even the big metal shudders on the arched windows are beautiful, I'd hate to see anything happen to these buildings.

ASchwarz
February 11th, 2008, 12:28 AM
Yes, the Empire Stores will be rebuilt as a marketplace, but there are delays attributed to financing issues.

Clarknt67
April 29th, 2008, 01:27 PM
85 Jay project had been so quiet lately, I was wondering if it had been canceled.

FROM BROWNSTONER:

http://www.brownstoner.com/watchtower.jpg

Jehovah's Witnesses Volunteers Try Their Hands At City Park

The Watchtower Bible Tract Society, one of the Jehovah's Witnesses' legal entities, is nearing the design phase for Bridge Park 2 in Dumbo, a two-acre, city-owned park the Society agreed to restore in exchange for favorable zoning at 85 Jay Street. Back in 2004, the city approved a zoning variance for the Society to build on its large parking lot an 800,000-square-foot building with a 1,600-seat cafeteria, 2,500-seat assembly hall, 1,100-space public parking garage and 1,000 apartments. Of course that was before the Society began divesting its Brooklyn properties, so far selling nearly 300 apartments in four buildings and 360 Furman Street (now One Brooklyn Bridge Park) for a total of $195.1 million, according to city property records. Another 263 apartments in six buildings are on the market, including the Hotel Bossert, which one broker predicted would sell for at least $100 million.

Tucker Reed, head of the Dumbo Business Improvement District, was at a "listening session" held last week to solicit ideas for the new park. He said the Parks Department and Society have taken this long to reach an agreement on park construction. The Parks Department is used to getting a check from developers; the Jehovah's Witnesses do everything possible in-house through their world-wide network of volunteers. "We're an all-volunteer organization and we function on funds that are voluntarily donated by people, and so we want to make the best use of our resources," said Watchtower spokesman Richard Devine. Volunteers would do everything from designing to constructing the park, he said, sometimes flying in "from all over the country" if someone local doesn't have the expertise for the job. And since they believe in the Doctrine of Cleanliness, at least we know it will look perfect.

The proposed renovations in the original agreement included rehabilitation of a baseball field with artificial turf, an existing playground, seating area, landscaping and reopening the comfort station. "I think the community is looking at this to be a more active park than the Brooklyn Bridge Park, which is more walking and sitting and beautiful scenery," said Devine.

So does that mean the Watchtower Society is going to get started on its massive four-tower building? "We're not going to move forward in the near future but I wouldn't say we're never going to build," said Devine. Brooklyn Heights will still be the Jehovah's Witnesses' world headquarters as the hub of its editorial and administrative staff, he said. But, as has been well-reported, the Society moved its printing and shipping operations upstate and overseas, along with many of its support services (The headquarters is nearly a self-sustaining society. Volunteers support each other by proving everything from cleaning, cooking, laundry, window washing, electrical work and drape making). Devine said after they sold 360 Furman, they stopped making their own ink for the millions of publications and bibles they print in several languages. "We are consolidating quite a bit. In fact, the rezoning of 85 Jay really gave us the confidence to go ahead and move forward with consolidation," he said.

The only thing is, if 85 Jay Street is built as planned, with nearly double the apartments sold or on the market, the Society would be expanding its operations in the Heights, not consolidating, unless it sells off nearly all of its remaining residential properties. But alas, that's all we get for now from Devine, who must also believe in the Doctrine of Suspense. As usual, never a dull moment over at the Watchtower!

http://www.brownstoner.com/brownstoner/archives/2008/04/witnesses_volun.php

NYC4Life
September 11th, 2008, 08:33 PM
Brooklyn Eagle

Street Renovation Called Urgent At DUMBO Group’s Meeting

Plans for Greenway Also Discussed

http://www.brooklyneagle.com/inc/miniaturka.php?plik=091008190811.jpg&szerokosc=200


DUMBO — With the backdrop of a newly reopened Manhattan Bridge archway, and with the person responsible for that achievement receiving an award, the Dumbo Improvement District held its annual meeting Tuesday evening, Sept. 9, at the stunning new Galapagos Art Space.

On Monday, city Transportation Commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan officially reopened the 46-foot-wide archway, which had been closed and which had divided two parts of DUMBO for 17 years. It will be completely renovated and re-lighted. Also, the original cobblestones will be dug up and put back into place for pedestrian use only.

As can be seen in the photograph accompanying this report, the archway was intended for use and designed elegantly. It was not designed to be just a tunnel, and it won’t be that again. The archway has also been called the Water Street tunnel because that is the street closest to it.

(All the DUMBO streets were there long before both the Manhattan and Brooklyn bridges were built.)

The reopened archway figures prominently in a proposed “greenway,” or bicycling and walking path, from the F train station on York Street to an eastern part of Brooklyn Bridge Park near Adams and Plymouth streets.
The greenway would go up Jay Street, turn left onto Front Street, go up Anchorage Street to the archway and then right on Adams Street to the park. This is not part of the overall park plan and would therefore have to be funded by the city.

One of the early accomplishments of new Dumbo Improvement District (DID) Executive Director Kate Kerrigan is an agreement by the city to completely overhaul two main DUMBO streets that were in horrible condition — Washington Street from York to Plymouth, and Water Street from Fulton to Adams. The work will include the rehabilitation of sewers and water mains, both of them very old and inadequate, and the installation of Belgian block roadbeds.

Street conditions have been an open sore in a community that has seen vast and swift change. In a recent survey, 86 percent of area residents and business owners cite street conditions as a major concern.
(Also joining in the chorus are Manhattan-based taxi drivers who have had to become familiar with a new area of Brooklyn. As one put it to this correspondent, “This ain’t the River Cafe.”)

But the good news about two streets is outweighed by the existing bad news: Nearly 500,000 square feet of historic streetscapes are in danger of being lost if they are not rehabilitated in the immediate future.

The actual business part of the annual meeting was a no-nonsense affair with an informative treasurer’s report (alas, not as humorous as comedian Robert Benchley’s famous treasurer report). (The annual operating budget for the DID is about $550,000.)
The DID has instituted the “Magic Feather Awards.” This year’s recipients were Robert Elmes of the Galapagos Art Space, Sanjay Mody of the Dumbo Neighborhood Association, Jan Larsen of Jan Larsen Art; and two public officials — David Burney, commissioner of the city Department of Design and Construction, and the aforementioned Sadik-Kahn.

NYC4Life
October 2nd, 2008, 06:02 PM
NY Post

DOWN UNDER

LOW-KEY DUMBO IS ACTUALLY BROOKLYN'S HIGH-WATER MARK


http://www.nypost.com/seven/10022008/photos/re047a.jpg

When you think of Brooklyn's toniest residential areas, you might imagine brownstones set back on tree-lined streets, charming corner bistros, fancy food shops and strollers galore.

But the priciest Brooklyn neighborhood is more industrial buildings than brownstones, more artists' spaces than amenities, more skinny jeans than sweater sets (though you might get run over by a Maclaren pram).

We're not talking about Williamsburg, all you "Gossip Girl" fans. We're speaking of DUMBO (Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass), a slice of waterfront wedged between the Brooklyn and Manhattan bridges.

In the last decade, DUMBO has grown from a haven for starving artists into Brooklyn's most expensive neighborhood - where the average price per square foot in the second quarter of 2008 was $917, according to the Real Estate Board of New York (REBNY). (Compare that to Brooklyn Heights at $834 and Park Slope at $801.)
Craig Burd moved to DUMBO in 1998 as the neighborhood began its ascent. At the time, there was no grocery store, no drugstore, no dry cleaners, nothing.

http://www.nypost.com/seven/10022008/photos/re046b.jpg

"You had to go to Brooklyn Heights to do anything," says Burd. "Where the park is now was a truck yard with junkyard dogs that barked at, like, 3 a.m."

But the area's dearth of services did nothing to shake Burd's belief in its upward trajectory. He was confident that it was only a matter of time before the neighborhood, largely owned by developers David and Jed Walentas, was abuzz with people and things to do.

Burd's gamble was a good one. The Walentas father-and-son team, who run Two Trees Management, have since transformed the area.

http://www.nypost.com/seven/10022008/photos/re046a.jpg

Five years after Burd spent $260,000 on that first 1,260-square-foot apartment at 1 Main St., he turned around and sold it for $895,000. The next apartment he purchased, down the street in 30 Main St., cost $520,000; four years later, he sold it for $885,000. Now he lives in 70 Washington St. with his pregnant wife and 3-year-old son, in a two-bedroom condo that he bought for $1.295 million in 2006. All of these are Two Trees buildings.

Burd's real-estate success has helped both his bank account and his career. When he moved to DUMBO, he was a self-described blue-collar worker. His good fortune allowed him to start a video-production company, which he co-owns.

So how high has DUMBO risen? According to REBNY, the price per square foot climbed 25 percent over second quarter of 2007. The pricing is partially driven by the fact that DUMBO is a neighborhood with no walkup co-ops; instead it is filled with luxury condo conversions. But the sales figures still impress.

And the area could climb even higher. According to Asher Abehsera, president of developer Two Trees' leasing department, his company just turned down an offer of $20 million for the 6,500-square-foot 1 Main clocktower penthouse, sight unseen.

Rents in the neighborhood aren't cheap, either. According to Abehsera, they range from about $2,800 for the least expensive one-bedroom apartment up to $8,000 for the most expensive three-bedroom.

DUMBO's draw is manifold. Visiting the area is like stepping back in time.

Sections of obsolete train track, which once carted raw materials from the water inland, push up through narrow cobblestone streets. Looming brick warehouses give way to views of the Brooklyn Bridge. And, whether you're at DUMBO's waterfront parks or just peering out a window, Manhattan plays backdrop to it all - stretched out just beyond the water, so close and yet totally removed.

It's that proximity, plus an abundance of space, that have made the area something of an event mecca, with weddings, art fairs and concerts. Next Friday, DUMBO will play host to the New York City Wine & Food Festival's Rachael Ray-hosted Burger Bash.

"DUMBO has an incredibly important role in the borough's broader real estate picture," says Joe Chan, president of the Downtown Brooklyn Partnership and a former DUMBO resident. "It's got amazing cachet both as a residential community and as a center for the arts that draws a lot of people to the borough who would not be inclined to come otherwise."
Lee Brian Schrager, founding director of the New York City Wine & Food Festival, initially balked at the idea of hosting Burger Bash in Brooklyn.

"I said, 'I'm not going to go all the way out there,' " he admits.

But after months of searching for a suitable venue, he visited DUMBO.

"I kicked myself. This was the exact venue I'd been looking for," he says of the Tobacco Warehouse, a 25,000-square-foot outdoor event space that was formerly a tobacco customs inspection center. "It was minutes away [from Manhattan]; it overlooked the city and the water."

As happening as DUMBO is, it can also be completely unassuming. Its restaurants and boutiques don't scream out to be noticed, but instead sit on nearly vacant blocks patiently awaiting those in the know. And though DUMBO has gourmet-food shops and a mom-and-pop drugstore, there isn't a Key Food or Duane Reade in sight.

"Sure, a big grocery store would be nice, but we function very well with FreshDirect," says Anthony Katagas, a filmmaker who's lived in DUMBO with his wife and three children for nearly three years. "And I couldn't imagine what it would be like if there were a Whole Foods and all those trucks would have to go wheeling down those streets every day."

Despite DUMBO's relative lack of amenities compared to, say, nearby Brooklyn Heights, the area has become a destination for families.

"One of my favorite things about the neighborhood is the kids and young parents," Katagas says. "It's so densely populated with little people . . . you're lucky not to get hit by a stroller."

But DUMBO, with its industrial aesthetic and low-key lifestyle, didn't evolve naturally. It was carefully planned.

David Walentas began investing in the neighborhood in the '70s; he opened 1 Main, the area's first major residential conversion, in 1998. Since then, Two Trees has slowly continued to convert historic buildings into residences, ever careful to preserve their character.

And unlike many developers, the Walentas family is extremely picky about tenants, preferring to give preferential rent to mom-and-pop shops and local chefs than to fill spaces with big-box stores and chain restaurants.

It isn't uncommon for them to give a local storefront to a working artist (rent-free) until a suitable tentant shows up.

"[Two Trees] essentially curated the destination-based retail," Chan says.

"They handpicked a great set of retail tenants that would draw people to the area. They basically gave away free rent to get the tenants to serve the neighborhood." [See sidebar on right.]

Although most of DUMBO is already developed, there are a few projects under way. The Walentas family is awaiting rezoning (which is expected to take a year) to embark on the Dock Street Project - a mixed use, 80/20 affordable building with plans for 350 rentals above a 300-student middle school, which the developer would give to the city.

Another developer, Bobby Jacobs, is converting 37 Bridge St., a former soap manufacturing plant, into 48 condos. And GDC Properties is about to begin construction on 220 Water St., an industrial building that's being converted into 134 rentals.

Up in the air is the fate of Empire Stores, seven linked brick warehouses owned by the state.

"We see ground-floor retail and artisan space and a sculpture garden on the roof," says Jed Walentas, about how Two Trees would approach the project if chosen as the developer. "It's way too big and dark for residential."

Either way, Walentas believes that as New York City's waterfront develops and spots such as the South Street Seaport, Governors Island and Red Hook link up, DUMBO will continue to grow.

"If you only have one spot, there's no place to take a boat to," says Walentas. "But eventually all these little pockets of waterfront prosperity will begin to interact together."

Clarknt67
December 7th, 2008, 01:35 PM
Here's a little more on the aforementioned Dock Street Project. It's meeting with some pushback, http://savethebrooklynbridge.org/ has collected 8,500 signatures opposing it.

http://dockstreetdumbo.com/

It's an 18 story mixed-use residential building at Dock Street, just next the the Brooklyn Bridge. It violates the zoning and Walentas is asking for a variance. To sweeten the deal, he's promising a 300-seat public school.

http://savethebrooklynbridge.org/images/renderings/rendering4.jpg

http://savethebrooklynbridge.org/images/renderings/rendering3.jpg

Generally, I'm pretty pro-development (and love height). But this seems like an unnecessary crowding of Roebling's gorgeous bridge. And I'm not sure there's a convincing argument for building this, aside from making the Walentas family another kajillion dollars.

The school, which is likely needed, will have to accept students from all over the district and likely the city. So it will do little to ease the over-crowding particular to that area's local schools. I think the school problem should be solved another way.

I'll admit, part of my reservation is this: why mar up the skyline to accommodate a bunch of parents who bought cheap, because, it was a an urban wasteland 15 years ago. And now are frustrated there are no schools. Um, huh? you knew that going in. I encourage you to solve your problem, but not at the expense of the neighborhood's aesthetic.

I also have reservation about Walentas, specifically, because, look at the hideous addition he put on 110 Livingston and the ugly pre-fabricated POS that is the Courthouse apartments at Atlantic and Court. I don't trust them not to build a cheap, ugly building on that beautiful historic site.

NYC4Life
December 8th, 2008, 02:36 AM
Talk about blocking some great views :rolleyes:

BrooklynLove
December 8th, 2008, 12:50 PM
The people fighting this are primarily residents who will lose views. They sit at the bridge all day getting tourists to sign their petition while pedaling deceptive renderings.

Clarknt67
December 8th, 2008, 12:56 PM
The people fighting this are primarily residents who will lose views. They sit at the bridge all day getting tourists to sign their petition while pedaling deceptive renderings.

I'm curious what is, in anyone's mind, the compelling reason to rewrite the laws to allow Walentas to build higher than the area is zoned?

As things are, there's a nice stair-stepping of architectural elevation, that nicely spotlights the Bridge. And zoning laws were put in place to preserve that.

Let Walentas build there, as the zoning laws permit, 6, 8 stories, whatever it is. I don't see any compelling reason to vary the zoning laws.

What a bad precedent to set. A big mistake was made allowing Verizon to build the tower on the Manhattan side of the Bridge. Let's not repeat it. And lets not open the door that every developer that offers the community a little candy, gets to rewrite the laws.

There's lots of places to build as high as they like, just 3/4 of a mile northwest.

And perhaps many opponents are interested in preserving their own views. By contrast, on local blogs like Brownstoner, it seems most proponents are speaking from the equally selfish vested motive of having kids in the area that need a middle school.

ASchwarz
December 11th, 2008, 12:05 AM
The rendering they use is deceptive, and there are no views to preserve.

The current zoning is ridiculous and should be changed. It has no relevance to the surrounding neighborhood, which is the densest in Brooklyn.

And new schools are a million times more important than condo views.

brianac
December 13th, 2008, 05:17 AM
December 12, 2008

How Does Dock Street Stack Up? (http://www.brownstoner.com/brownstoner/archives/2008/12/how_does_dock_s.php)

http://www.brownstoner.com/brownstoner/archives/Dock-Street-Height-Comparison-Small.jpg (http://www.brownstoner.com/Dumbo-Comparative-Heights-Large.jpg)
With the public hearing on Two Trees' proposal for the mixed-used Dock Street Development just five days away, the two sides are marshaling their forces and, it looks like, preparing their materials. (The Brooklyn Paper has an article (http://www.brooklynpaper.com/stories/31/49/31_49_sp_dock_st.html) this morning laying out the arguments on either side.) This comparison of the project to the Brooklyn Bridge and other major buildings in the neighborhood (prepared by Bleyer Binder Belle) landed in our inbox late last night. The cropped version is shown above but to get the full effect you need to click (http://www.brownstoner.com/Dumbo-Comparative-Heights-Large.jpg) on the image to see the expanded version (http://www.brownstoner.com/Dumbo-Comparative-Heights-Large.jpg). Hosted by Community Board 2, the hearing takes place on December 17 at the LIU Health Sciences Center, Room 107, at 6 p.m

The Next Step for Dock Street (http://www.brownstoner.com/brownstoner/archives/2008/12/the_next_step_f.php) [Brownstoner] GMAP (http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&hl=en&geocode=&q=31+Prospect+Park+West,+Brooklyn&sll=37.0625,-95.677068&sspn=92.297741,98.964844&ie=UTF8&z=16&iwloc=addr)
DOE: It's Time to Examine Dock Street (http://www.brownstoner.com/brownstoner/archives/2008/07/doe_time_to_exa.php) [Brownstoner]
Two Trees Plans Mixed Use Building Next to Bridge (http://www.brownstoner.com/brownstoner/archives/2007/06/38_water_rising.php) [Brownstoner]
Dock Street Plans (Marina and All) Go 3D (http://www.brownstoner.com/brownstoner/archives/2007/08/dock_street_pla.php) [Brownstoner]
Dock Street Protesters: 20% There on Signatures (http://www.brownstoner.com/brownstoner/archives/2007/12/dock_street_pro.php) [Brownstoner]

http://www.brownstoner.com/brownstoner/archives/2008/12/how_does_dock_s.php

BrooklynLove
December 13th, 2008, 08:15 AM
Walentas' timing on this push is perfect - no way this gets bounced during a down economy.

brianac
December 18th, 2008, 02:30 PM
December 18, 2008 (http://www.brooklynpaper.com/sections/31/51/)

Vote is ‘docked’! Big crowd delays CB2 vote on Walentas tower

By Sarah Portlock
The Brooklyn Paper

http://www.brooklynpaper.com/assets/photos/31/51/31_51_newdockstrendering01_z.jpgBeyer Blinder Belle
This is the current rendering of the Dock Street project. The 18-story tower is set further back from the Brooklyn Bridge than an earlier version of the project.


http://www.brooklynpaper.com/assets/photos/30/19/30_19novaclutch_z.jpgThe Brooklyn Paper / Gregory P. Mango
Buying and demolishing this building directly under the Brooklyn Bridge allowed the Dock Street project to be reconfigured. David and Jed Walentas’s proposal for an 18-story building next to the Brooklyn Bridge is so controversial that when all of the angry opponents and passionate supporters were finished speaking at the first public hearing on the project, members of the community board no longer had time to vote.

More than 80 opponents and supporters clashed over the residential development on Wednesday night, testifying at the four-hour Community Board 2 meeting at Long Island University.

Thirty-eight testified in support of the Walentases’ project and 49 spoke out against it.

The proposed 18-story residential building next to the Brooklyn Bridge on Dock Street in DUMBO (http://www.brooklynpaper.com/stories/31/49/31_49_sp_dock_st.html) comprises a 416-student public middle school, 325 rental residential units (65 of them at below-market rates), and 10,000 square feet of retail space.

The main arguments of project opponents centered on the building’s size, fears it would ruin views of the historic Brooklyn Bridge and bring too much traffic to the neighborhood, and that the middle school was a “public relations ploy” to “sweeten” a project that, opponents claim, is basically no different from an earlier, and much denser, version that was shot down amid community protests in 2004.

City officials had said earlier in the year that the school system does not need a middle school in DUMBO because there is capacity in other schools throughout the district. But in November, the schools officials changed their mind and included $43 million for the project in their next five-year capital budget. The money would fund the construction of interior classrooms, as the Walentases are only promising raw space, saving the city an estimated $50 million.

Still, that carrot didn’t mask what opponents feel is a stick: an overly large project next to a historic landmark.

“This project is not about our need for a middle school — that is the distraction,” said City Council candidate Ken Diamondstone, who opposes the project. “It is about a wealthy developer who wants to ignore and compromise our valuable icon.”

But supporters argued that the area desperately needs a middle school, affordable housing, and noted that Walentas could build a much taller hotel — without needing public approval — in the same spot.

“This is not Atlantic Yards,” said Councilwoman Letitia James (D-Fort Greene). “This is a project that I believe will go a long way in Downtown Brooklyn, and will preserve its nature.”

A local middle school principal, Allison Pell, added that a school should be a welcome addition to a neighborhood.

“When you have a school, it brings life to a community — there is artwork in the windows and kids on the street,” Pell said. “You would be crazy not to want to be involved with this project.”

The battle over Dock Street brought memories of the historic fight in 2004 over the earlier version of the project — one that even Jed Walentas — whose father, David, all but created the now-chic neighborhood down under the Manhattan Bridge overpass — now admits had serious flaws and put too much “bulk near the bridge.”

Since then, the Walentases acquired a small piece of adjacent land that allowed the project to be significantly reconfigured so that the 18-story wing is now set back further from this iconic span. Renderings put out by the developer show that the project’s scale is in line with other buildings in the former industrial warehouse zone.

The meeting is the first step in a seven-month public review process because in order to build his project, the area must be rezoned to residential from a manufacturing zone.

The community board vote is the first step in that process, but CB2 Chairman John Dew postponed the vote because of the late hour. It was not immediately clear when the count would take place.


©2008 The Brooklyn Paper

http://www.brooklynpaper.com/stories/31/51/31_51_sp_dock_street.html

BrooklynRider
December 19th, 2008, 11:34 PM
The opposition to this project are the people living in the buildings abutting this building site. The building in any of it previous incarnations would obstruct no one's views save those living in the million-dollar condos bordering the site now. The developer is putting a school into this building and they are saying they don't want one? That's the clearest indication that they are focused on their views - NOT the quality of life in the neighborhood.

BrooklynLove
December 20th, 2008, 10:04 AM
As long as Walentas keeps pressing I think this goes through. Opposition is even harder to justify given the state of the economy.

Derek2k3
January 18th, 2009, 10:21 AM
Walentas ‘Dock’ project sails ahead — though foes still say it would ruin Brooklyn Bridge (http://www.brooklynpaper.com/stories/32/2/32_2_sp_dock_st_win.html)

The Brooklyn Paper
By Sarah Portlock
January 15, 2009

BrooklynLove
January 18th, 2009, 10:31 AM
This headline dropped the "their" from between "ruin" and "Brooklyn". Every rendering being pushed by the ranters is completely overblown - all this does is take away from the force and credibility of their position - yet somehow they fail to realize this. Their campaign has been going downhill since it left the gate.

BrooklynRider
January 19th, 2009, 10:04 PM
The arguments are all about the building "destroying views". The reality is that the only views that might be destroyed are those in the condo unit. Pity.

The self-serving aspect of their campaign is further revealed in their continued opposition to the project, even if it includes a new public school. I can state with a certainty that these folks will be crying in a few years about overcrowding, if the new school doesn't get built.

I've encountered them twice and they really are a bunch of delusional people feeding passerby lies about the project in order to get petition signatures.

BrooklynLove
January 20th, 2009, 07:12 AM
It's nice to see that the review process is seeing through their smoke. I expect approval of this project to gain even more steam as it makes its way down the review chain - especially given the present state of economy. 2 Trees has timed this perfectly. One thing I would like to see come out of the review process however is that the city obligate 2 Trees to a time schedule for development (similar to the obligations placed on Ratner at Beekman Tower) otherwise I suspect that this project gets approved and then nothing happens for 5 years.

Another thought - specifically re the residents in 70 Washington who are fighting this building - better to save their political capital for fighting whatever developer who eventually buys the jehovah lot adjacent to their building - the writing is on the wall, it's just a matter of when.

brianac
April 2nd, 2009, 05:04 AM
April 1, 2009, 6:34 pm

Historian Opposes Tower Near Brooklyn Bridge

By Christine Haughney (http://wirednewyork.com/author/christine-haughney/)

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2009/04/01/nyregion/01bridge.480.jpgSuzanne DeChillo/The New York Times
At a rally on Wednesday, the historian and author David McCullough, center, urged a halt to the proposal to build an 18-story high-rise on Dock Street and Water Street beside the Brooklyn Bridge.

In the latest chapter of a hot dispute over the building of a proposed tower near the Brooklyn Bridge, the historian and Brooklyn Bridge expert David McCullough is voicing his opposition to the plan.

At a news conference on Wednesday, Mr. McCullough spoke to a crowd of more than 50 local advocates and politicians about why he opposed plans by the developer Two Trees Management to construct a tower called Dock Street Dumbo (http://www.dockstreetdumbo.com/), so close to the Brooklyn Bridge.

While Mr. McCullough lives in Maine, he used to live near the bridge, and also spent extensive amounts of time near the site of the bridge when researching the Battle of Brooklyn for his book “1776″ (http://www.amazon.com/1776-David-McCullough/dp/0743226720/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1238619970&sr=1-2) and the bridge itself for “The Great Bridge: The Epic Story of the Building of the Brooklyn Bridge.” (http://www.amazon.com/Great-Bridge-Story-Building-Brooklyn/dp/067145711X) He also worked with Ken Burns (http://www.pbs.org/kenburns/) on a documentary of the Brooklyn Bridge (http://www.pbs.org/kenburns/brooklynbridge/).

“It’s one of the most important structures in our country,” he said. The construction of the proposed tower is “upstaging what should not be upstaged. The magic of the bridge’s image is diminished. It’s wrecked.”
Mr. McCullough decided to get involved after he was contacted by local neighborhood groups. He said he unsuccessfully fought the construction of the Verizon building on the Manhattan side of the Brooklyn Bridge and successfully fought to keep Walt Disney from building a theme park near Manassas National Battlefield Park in Virginia.

But Jed Walentas, a principal in Two Trees Management (http://www.twotreesny.com/), issued a statement listing the many groups supporting the development.

“Dock Street has already earned the overwhelming support of Community Board No. 2, local clergy, the Dean of the Pratt School of Architecture, and numerous local residents and businesspeople.”

In 2004, Two Trees had proposed a smaller version of the project for that site, which borough president Marty Markowitz rejected. The developer then introduced a new plan that added a neighboring site and building a school in the proposal.

In February, Mr. Markowitz wrote in a letter city planning officials recommending the concept of the newly proposed project with major changes.

The Department of City Planning (http://www.nyc.gov/html/dcp/) is scheduled to vote on the project on April 22.

http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/04/01/historian-opposes-tower-near-brooklyn-bridge/

Copyright 2009 (http://www.nytimes.com/ref/membercenter/help/copyright.html) The New York Times Company (http://www.nytco.com/)

Tectonic
April 4th, 2009, 10:16 AM
The area looks bombed out to me, if they cared so much about what around the bridge why wasn't there a movement to clean up the area.

lofter1
April 4th, 2009, 12:00 PM
THere is ... the "bombed out" looking structures are the landmarked Civil War era warehouses, which only remain as exteriror brick walls.

ablarc
April 4th, 2009, 12:26 PM
It would block fewer views if it were taller and narrower.

ablarc
April 4th, 2009, 12:29 PM
... the "bombed out" looking structures are the landmarked Civil War era warehouses, which only remain as exteriror brick walls.
Fire? Arson?

Derek2k3
April 4th, 2009, 12:43 PM
It would block fewer views if it were taller and narrower.

Borough President Markowitz actually suggested to City Planning that the tower should become more slender and rise 25 stories instead of 18.

http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/02/26/support-and-suggestions-for-dock-street-dumbo/

Just_Dennis
May 22nd, 2009, 04:39 AM
The area looks bombed out to me, if they cared so much about what around the bridge why wasn't there a movement to clean up the area.

Well yeah it kind of looks like "bombed out". But in my opinion this exact look makes this area so unique! A friend of mine lives in the area and she explained to me how much this neighborhood changed in the last couple of years. It became more and more "chick". And I agree with her that "chick" is not what this area serves best. It's a very unique place full of old NY history - and at least I like it that way. Starting to build one of these towers there could just be the beginning of a whole bunch of it. And then we have the same thing like in so many other parts of Manhattan.

Darmok
May 27th, 2009, 06:25 PM
Sometimes the comments here are really amusing. Anyone who knows the area would recognize the building in the McCullough picture as the Tobacco Warehouse, which stands next to the Civil War era Empire Stores. It was a Tobacco inspection warehouse, and the Empire Stores were used for, among other things, Yuban coffee. You can google an excellent Berenice Abbott photo which depicts this area in 1936.

This building has been the stage for a variety of arts events in recent years - dance, art installations, NY Photo Fest (last week), as well as food events such as the Pigfest and the Burger Bash. There was a Polish-language production of MacBeth there last year. Bombed-out indeed!!!

There is no question that a 170' (195' with mechanicals) building 96 feet from the Bridge at its closest point is inappropriate for the two historic districts that it will abut (DUMBO and Fulton Ferry). And I do not have a view that will be blocked, and neither do the 10 others in my building who have testified at various stages of the ULURP. Don't believe the hype that the opposition is all from 70 Washington. Just because they were the petitioners does not mean that there aren't longer-term residents in BH and Fulton Ferry that are just as much against a building higher than the Bridge roadway. And we fought it in 2004 as well.

BrooklynRider
May 27th, 2009, 07:18 PM
Sometimes the comments here are really amusing. Anyone who knows the area...

Right, and some people use condescension and arrogance in an attempt to feebly argue lousy points. Anyone who's ever been to a war-torn country, would know that it DOES look like a bombed out building - whether it is used for the arts or not.

I'm all for the new development building, The historic significance of that neighborhood was largely overlooked until the guy wanting to put up this new building created the DUMBO neighborhood. He renovated it. He brought in retail at zero rent, when no one would go near it.

Perhaps you can explain exactly what views will be obstructed by the new building. That was the entire basis for the argument against it. It certainly can't be that "new development" doesn't belong in DUMBO, because there's more new development than historic buildings in the area. Perhaps all the people who displaced the artists in the community in the last ten years have a foggy memory. There is no long term precedent for DUMBO as a residential community that can be used as a basis for any argument against further development.

Aso, since you are a part of the NIMBY group, can you explain why the only image your group ever presented to the public was a grossly exaggerated massing block? The rendering of the actual project was available the whole time that the NIMBY group sought signatures for their petition using the blatantly misleading poster.

Can you also explain why the group set itself up on the Brooklyn Bridge itself and stopped tourists, including non-Americans, and tried to persuade to sign the petitions?

Finally, why didn't the group ever communicate to ANYone that the development included a new public school? NEVER EVER communicated it.

Where exactly do the kids in DUMBO go to school? How do they get there? Public transit? Parent's driving them and dropping them up? Backing up traffic in some one else's "historic neighborhood"? Or, does the group not have any children amongst them and couldn't give a damn?

Itotally acknowledge your statement anout not having your view of the bridge block and not living in 70 Washington. Do you live in a building that abuts the property? Are you going to lose a parking spot on the street that you've become accustomed to? How many of the people petitioning rent paking in that lot? Considering your argument about the distinct historic nature of the community, it only received designation in 2007.

The NIMBY group is acting out of self-serving, "me first" interests. I get it. I'd like resident only parking in my neighborhood. I don't know you, so this isn't personal. I just find the whole argument against the tower, this developer, and the willfull misleading of the public astonishing. How many times did Walentas come back with revised drawings taking into consideration the NIMBY group's interest? Don't answer, because the NIMBY's never even acknowledged it. Those changes weren't at no cost to him.

This guy is an exemplary developer and Brooklyn citizen. He's the founder of DUMBO and I think his vision of the neighborhood and development to create it are oddly the things the group has co-opted.



From Brooklyn Paper article dated December 22, 2007

DUMBO gets historic

By Dana Rubinstein
The Brooklyn Paper

DUMBO became Brooklyn’s 19th historic district on Tuesday — a designation that gives the city’s Landmarks Preservation Commission veto power on any major alternations to buildings or new construction in the former manufacturing stronghold that is rapidly becoming a residential enclave.

“DUMBO was essential to Brooklyn’s rise as a major manufacturing center, and was home to some of America’s most important industrial firms that produced everything from ale and paper boxes to soap and steel wool,” said Commission Chairman Robert Tierney.

The designation — which gives the Commission broad oversight over alterations of existing buildings, but also a final say over the design of new buildings — was effective as of Tuesday’s unanimous vote.

In the announcement, the city refers to the neighborhood as the “DUMBO Historic District,” despite the name’s late 20th-century origins.

Indeed, it was real-estate developer David Walentas who bought up whole chunks of what was then “Gairville” in the 1980s, and rebranded it “Down Under Brooklyn Bridge Overpass” with dreams of transforming it into Brooklyn’s SoHo.

Tucker Reed, executive director of the DUMBO Improvement District, said he hoped the designation indicated that the city would pay more attention to the neighborhood.

“We hope this finally means the city will start investing resources in fixing public infrastructure in DUMBO, like our historic Belgian block streets,” said Reed.

The historic district is bounded by John Street to the north, York Street to the south, Main Street to the west and Bridge Street to the east, and includes 91 buildings.

Almost all of the industrial buildings in the historic district date from between 1880 and 1920, the period during which manufacturing in Brooklyn came of age. Now, DUMBO is better known as home to the $1 million, one-bedroom condo, and, of course, its enduring views of the Manhattan and Brooklyn bridges.

Whether or not the historic district designation will prevent future buildings like the oft-maligned, monolithic Beacon Tower to rise in DUMBO remains to be seen.

“Would the Commission in all its wisdom approve a project like the Beacon?” asked Reed. “It’s unclear. But the designation does provide for another level of oversight for projects like that.”

BrooklynLove
May 27th, 2009, 07:55 PM
The anti-Dock people are an enormous embarrassment to the boro of Brooklyn. Thankfully it won't be long before these selfish imposing propagandists move on to something else.

ASchwarz
May 27th, 2009, 11:27 PM
There is no question that a 170' (195' with mechanicals) building 96 feet from the Bridge at its closest point is inappropriate for the two historic districts
that it will abut (DUMBO and Fulton Ferry).

Why?

Why is a tall building inappropriate in proximity to a bridge? When did we invent this strange rule? Only parking lots are allowed in proximity to bridges?

Do we need to tear down the many much taller buildings even closer to the Brooklyn Bridge? What about the other bridges in town? All tall buildings in close proximity to bridges need to be demolished? What exactly does this accomplish?

And you're statement is completely misleading. The site is NOT in either historic district. It's completely irrelevent.

If you had the zoning, you could build the Burj Dubai one inch from a historic district. It wouldn't matter. Something that is NEAR a historic district does not face historic review or any requirements that relate to historic district designation.


And I do not have a view that will be blocked, and neither do the 10 others in my building who have testified at various stages of the ULURP.

I think you aren't telling the truth. You must have some self interest in keeping the blight.

Why on earth would you waste time trying to preserve a parking lot, and trying to block children from having a neighborhood school? You're bored and hate your neighbors? You park your car in the lot?


Don't believe the hype that the opposition is all from 70 Washington. Just because they were the petitioners does not mean that there aren't longer-term residents in BH and Fulton Ferry that are just as much against a building higher than the Bridge roadway. And we fought it in 2004 as well.


What is the point of this nonsense? There are NIMBYs in more than one building, so we should give the anti-school, pro-parking lot crazies more credence?

Oh, and your building is higher than the roadway too (still not sure why that matters, especially in New York of all places).

How about you volunteer to demolish your "too tall" condo, and then maybe we can talk about height on the parking lot site...

Darmok
May 28th, 2009, 12:23 PM
Mr. Moderator, why is it that I am admonished for being condescending, and BrooklynLove can get away with his sniping? 1700+ posts shouldn't give you special rights. I'll respond to the questions that were posted in response to me later today.

BrooklynRider
May 28th, 2009, 12:40 PM
My comments to you were as a forum member and contributor to the thread. Any rules infractions or formal admonishments from me are communicated via PM.

I offered a response to your post. I think you've injected some good points into the thread and encourage you to stay engaged. I think that it is important to understand that in addition to some impulsive comments everywhere in this forum, many of us do understand the intricacies of neighborhoods and have been following developments and neighborhood news for years.

BrooklynLove has read your post and with it we are all reminded that the rules prohibit attacks on other forum members; however ideas and statements can be vigorously challenged.

We're all reading and posting in this thread because we are interested in the success (and in some cases responsible "growth") of the DUMBO neighborhood and Brooklyn as a whole.

PM me if you have other questions about this.

lofter1
May 28th, 2009, 01:35 PM
Any WNY poster with his (or her) worth might want to cherish those initial Moderator-given infractions.

My prior infractions are framed and sit on my destop (not).

While the infraction(s) might, at first receipt, be disturbing, the infraction often points to someone with a strong point of view and the ability to convey it. The infractions rarely accumulate to the level of the poster being "Banned" and are probably the strongest and surest way of reminding posters to keep things within bounds.

Lively debate is great and to be encouraged. Personal attacks not so much so.

More info on this project from those in the immediate vicinity, whether readers agree with the POV or not, is always interesting and often helpful to understand the plans and implications.

ZippyTheChimp
May 28th, 2009, 05:59 PM
I sort of accept the building (at least it's not the J building or 85 Adams), but my observation concerns something that's very common here.

Why should an assessment be based on the reason behind some other person's opinion?

Take the reverse. What if you formed a negative opinion of this building based on its appearance. Some time later, you discover that a group also opposes the building only for the the selfish reason that it blocks their view.

Do you suddenly change your mind and like the building?

BrooklynLove
May 28th, 2009, 08:06 PM
Mr. Moderator, why is it that I am admonished for being condescending, and BrooklynLove can get away with his sniping? 1700+ posts shouldn't give you special rights. I'll respond to the questions that were posted in response to me later today.

Darmok - if this is the same to you as 2004 then you need to step back.
The foundation of this recent campaign was built on shoving inaccurate renderings in people's faces and smearing Walentas for building in front of people who bought from him. Only recently has this become a 'save the bridge' campaign, and now it's just a political tool for the likes of Gioa who is too driven to miss out on a second bite at the ball he dropped when he let Avalon Bay roll over the very neighborhood he lived in at the time. So the net outcome here is tagging the people of DUMBO as selfish crybabies who care more about their overpriced views than the general betterment of the area, and serving ignorantly as a political platter for talkingheads who could care less what happens to this project. This went to the Council virtually untouched. Get it, and stop piling on the embarassment for innocent bystanders.

BrooklynRider
May 28th, 2009, 08:56 PM
Just to be clear: no infractions or commentary beyond the discourse in this thread has been made to Darmok. Darmok believed that he/she was being admonished and BrooklynLove given a free ride. It wasn't the case. The question was asked publicly and required a public answer.

BrooklynRider
May 28th, 2009, 09:08 PM
Why should an assessment be based on the reason behind some other person's opinion?

In this case, the argument against the building was being made by a group that misled the public during its petition gathering period. A rendering was available and the image they showed was not an accurate depiction of what was being proposed. The showed a grossly oversized box / place holder that was used to fuel fears (not unlike the AY opponents). They claimed that the building would destroy views of the bridge. The only views this building obstructs are those of 70 Washington Street and the buildings surrounding the site.

In addition, the argument was made about the historic nature of the neighborhood and it's impact on that history. The "neighborhood" was non-existent until the last ten years and they were living there because the man they opposed developed it and created homes they wanted to buy.

In all of its petition gathering, the petition gatherers never communicated to anyone that a school was being proposed. At the same time, this group complains that the city needs to address important infrastructure and community needs. They want transportation. They want roads fized. They want better education. They want parks. They just don't want anyone else moving into their neighborhood or obstructing their views. It's not like no one understands that this is an "I got mine; screw you" attitude that isn't exclusuvely found in DUMBO. Everyone wants to see the value of their property rise. In this case, the fight to preserve the million dollar views and parking lot were veiled under a non-existent threat to the view of a bridge.

In this case, I think it is fair to find out what is driving a person's opinion, especially when they begin an argument with "Any who knows the area would recognize..." Sometimes the bubble that's warping the perspective needs to be popped. Perhaps, I should have opened with"Anyone who knows the history and tactics of distortion and manipulation employed by the opposition group..."

I'm waiting to see how many DUMBO parents refuse to send their kids to the school that will be a part of this terrible, terrible building that is destroying their neighborhood.

ZippyTheChimp
May 28th, 2009, 10:40 PM
In this case, the argument against the building was being made by a group that misled the public during its petition gathering period. A rendering was available and the image they showed was not an accurate depiction of what was being proposed.Darmok stated that he doesn't think a building height higher than the bridge roadway is appropriate. That's his opinion. The proposed building would be higher than the roadway.


They claimed that the building would destroy views of the bridge.Darmok stated that his views would not be affected.


In addition, the argument was made about the historic nature of the neighborhood and it's impact on that history. The "neighborhood" was non-existent until the last ten years and they were living there because the man they opposed developed it and created homes they wanted to buy.The neighborhood is historic. I didn't realize that there was a minimum time period for landmark discovery. A very weak argument.


In this case, I think it is fair to find out what is driving a person's opinion, especially when they begin an argument with "Any who knows the area would recognize..." Sometimes the bubble that's warping the perspective needs to be popped.Would it be fair to assume that you are being driven by a relationship with Wallentas, who is just a developer who bought up property long ago and is trying to make a buck, not Moses of DUMBO?

You wouldn't like it, would you. And I suppose Darmok doesn't appreciate being grilled about lost parking spaces, or being called a liar just because Aschwarz "thinks" he is.

BrooklynRider
May 28th, 2009, 11:05 PM
Darmok stated that he doesn't think a building height higher than the bridge roadway is appropriate. That's his opinion. The proposed building would be higher than the roadway.

The revised design moved the tower away from the roadway.


The neighborhood is historic. I didn't realize that there was a minimum time period for landmark discovery. A very weak argument.

The site is a parking lot. There's nothing historic about it. Both Beacon Tower and J Condo were built at the periphery of this neighborhood and I can list all the entirely new buildings that have been added in the last ten years.



Would it be fair to assume that you are being driven by a relationship with Wallentas, who is just a developer who bought up property long ago and is trying to make a buck, not Moses of DUMBO?

Assumptions can be made. The fairness of them has to be evaluated against the evidence. I have no relationship with Wallentas beyond that of Brooklyn resident. For the sake of your argument, let's call him my best friend. DUMBO, as a residential neighborhood, would not exist without his foresight. He is certainly a shrewd business man. If you could show me anything that supports an argument that DUMBO existed as a residential neighborhood before his entry on the scene, my opinion would likely be influenced. I knew it before him and after him. And "him" is the marker for the difference in its characteristics.


... I suppose Darmok doesn't appreciate being grilled about lost parking spaces, or being called a liar just because Aschwarz "thinks" he is.

There's a lot of "grilling" on this site. I just responded to yours.

ZippyTheChimp
May 28th, 2009, 11:44 PM
The revised design moved the tower away from the roadway.Has nothing to do with the distorted rendering. The building height is higher than the BB


The site is a parking lot. There's nothing historic about it.The term Dormat used is "abut."He never said the site was within the landmarked district.


Both Beacon Tower and J Condo were built at the periphery of this neighborhoodTotally inappropriate.

Besides, we discus the appropriateness of buildings close to historic structures all the time. 10 Barclay is not a historic site, but a common complaint is that it's close to the Woolworth Building. You may not agree with it, but to dismiss the fact that historic context doesn't exist between a landmark district and the Brooklyn Bridge is ridiculous.


DUMBO, as a residential neighborhood, would not exist without his foresight.And Henry Hudson sailed up the the bay 400 years ago. So what?


There's a lot of "grilling" on this site. I just responded to yours.If you think my "grilling" was about you and Wallentas, you missed the point. Other than that, what "grilling" have I done?

But on the subject of Wallentas, he created the conditions that allowed rich people to buy property in the area, and now you're upset that some of them are acting just the way you would expect them to - protecting their investments.

BrooklynRider
May 29th, 2009, 01:25 AM
here's the rendering of the building..

http://i220.photobucket.com/albums/dd121/BrooklynRiderRob/31_51_newdockstrendering01_z.jpg

Wow! Look at that huge tower dwarf everything around it. It's a real monster. It must be what? 200ft? 300ft taller than 70 Washington? It looks incredibly inappropriate and is just another lazy-ass brick, exposed floor-plate junk pile.

It absolutely destroys the Brooklyn Bridge. It destroys the scenery. It will forever diminish the Bridge If only it we nicer, like those beautiful towers across the way in Brooklyn Heights or the Watch Tower residence tower.

Can someone with eyesight please look at that and explain what public view is being blocked by the building?

The NIMBY rendering can be found HERE. (http://dumbo-dna.org/) If someone wants to download it and post it, please do so.

lofter1
May 29th, 2009, 01:31 AM
... The site is a parking lot ...

No, not wholly.

The site includes old manufacturing buildings, one of which [" ... an old spice milling factory at 38 Water Street (http://www.stannswarehouse.org/history.php?year=1980-2001) in DUMBO ... ] currently houses the St. Ann's Warehouse (http://www.stannswarehouse.org/) performance space, where from the sidewalk out front (http://www.stannswarehouse.org/directions.php) one has a great view (http://www.stannswarehouse.org/plan_your_visit.php) of the Brooklyn Bridge.

scumonkey
May 29th, 2009, 02:03 AM
http://i211.photobucket.com/albums/bb276/scumonkey/DUMBO-Neighborhood-Alliancepdf---Ad.jpg

BrooklynRider
May 29th, 2009, 02:57 AM
...The site includes old manufacturing buildings, one of which [" ... an old spice milling factory at 38 Water Street (http://www.stannswarehouse.org/history.php?year=1980-2001) in DUMBO ... ] currently houses the St. Ann's Warehouse (http://www.stannswarehouse.org/) performance space, where from the sidewalk out front (http://www.stannswarehouse.org/directions.php) one has a great view (http://www.stannswarehouse.org/plan_your_visit.php) of the Brooklyn Bridge.

This is the site.

http://i220.photobucket.com/albums/dd121/BrooklynRiderRob/38watermap2.jpg

View from Front Street...

http://i220.photobucket.com/albums/dd121/BrooklynRiderRob/novajune22.jpg

View from Water Street...

http://i220.photobucket.com/albums/dd121/BrooklynRiderRob/stannsdumbo.jpg

(St. Ann's Warehouse)

I'm not seeing anything here of historical value that is threatened. As it exists as a theater space, St. Ann's Warehouse can easily move to another space.

ZippyTheChimp
May 29th, 2009, 06:16 AM
The proposed building isn't particularly interesting; as I stated earlier, it's OK.

I doubt the city is going to pass up the opportunity to have the site developed, so either a reasonable alternative will be offered, or the present proposal will probably be approved.

So the question to you BR, if the building were reduced to an "acceptable level," would that bother you? Do you think we'd be losing an architectural gem [sarcasm]?

BrooklynRider
May 29th, 2009, 06:26 PM
No, not at all, but I think the merits of the argument against it are unfounded. That is why the opponents have now switched their opposition against the height and instead focused their attack on the SCA.

I actually took a bit of a walking tour today of Brooklyn Heights, DUMBO, Fulton Landing, and Brooklyn Bridge Park.

I pictures of the site from every angle, pictures of the buildings existing, and pictures of the view of the bridge from just about every possible pedestrian angle that could possible be obstructed.

If the opposition made their objection simply on height, then it might be inarguable. They feel it is too tall. I don't. There's opposing views. They are clear and diametrically opposed.

Their arguments were based on positioning in relation to the bridge, the obstruction of views of the bridge (which they want preserved), and preservation of a historical context to the neighborhood. They all seem reasonable. They just don't apply to what is proposed, especially in relation to what exists right now on site and adjacent to the site, what will be replaced, and the impacts it will have on views of the bridge - specifically the span.

As I said, I have a ton of pictures from every angle. I have the pedestrian perspectives and photo's of teach of the places from which I took the photo. There's not a lot of hocus-pocus to it.

Stay tuned.

ZippyTheChimp
May 29th, 2009, 07:15 PM
No, not at all, but I think the merits of the argument against it are unfounded.So OK, you just want something built there. Do you really think the site will remain a parking lot?

You're focused on one group's opposition, but theirs isn't the universal negative view. I like the terraced arrangement that's viewed from the bridge walkway, and a low scaled building would reinforce it. Is that opinion corrupted because it also allows some people to maintain their views? I couldn't care less about them.

From late last year:
The battle over Dock Street brought memories of the historic fight in 2004 over the earlier version of the project — one that even Jed Walentas — whose father, David, all but created the now-chic neighborhood down under the Manhattan Bridge overpass — now admits had serious flaws and put too much “bulk near the bridge.”So Walentas improved the building as a result of neighborhood complaint.

I wonder how the debate would look now if we had the original design. My guess is exactly the same.