PDA

View Full Version : Downtown Brooklyn Development



Pages : [1] 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Archit_K
February 20th, 2005, 08:23 PM
Downtown Brooklyn
http://www.pacificislandtravel.com/north_america/eastern_usa/newyork/nyc_bl_downtown.html

This area is made up of Brooklyn Heights, Atlantic Avenue and Fort Greene, and stretches from the water to the Brooklyn Academy of Music, quickly moving from warehouses to brownstones to the staid buildings found in most any civic center. Getting there, if you choose to walk, could turn out to be the most exciting part of your trip.

Downtown Brooklyn and Fulton Mall
The eastern end of Montague is known as "Bank Row" – downtown Brooklyn's business center – and leads on to what is in effect the borough's Civic Center, with the end of the residential Heights signaled by the tall Art Deco buildings of Court Street. Across the road the sober Greek-style Borough Hall is topped with a cupolaed belfry; further east are the massive State Supreme Court and Romanesque post office, next to which stands a bronze statue of Henry Ward Beecher. There's little to linger for, but your tired feet should know that this is where to find the large Borough Hall subway station.
Beyond the civic grandeur Fulton Street leads east, the principal shopping street for the borough as a whole. There are some good bargains to be found here, but all in all the streets – lined with fast-food franchises – can be a little depressing. What you will find here is Gage & Tollner, one of Brooklyn's most famous restaurants, which serves seafood and steaks in a setting determinedly left unchanged. However, the food doesn't come cheap. Another neighborhood landmark, and one more affordable, is Junior's on the corner of Flatbush and DeKalb avenues; the cheesecake is justly famous and their other dishes aren't far behind.

Just south of Fulton Mall, Adams Street turns into Boerum Place, and at the corner of Schermerhorn you'll see a subway entrance that actually leads to the New York Transit Museum, housed in an unused station that hasn't seen a train for over forty years.

Archit_K
February 20th, 2005, 08:26 PM
The Toy Factory Lofts Condominium: An Affordable Luxury Condo in the Heart of Downtown Brooklyn.

Located at 176 Johnson Street in the vibrantly active neighborhood of Downtown Brooklyn
www.thetoyfactorylofts.com

At last, Luxury meets Affordability in Brooklyn’s most innovative condo, The Toy Factory Lofts. Located at 176 Johnson Street in the rising star neighborhood of Downtown Brooklyn, here is a condominium that successfully combines the highest standards of design with convenience, comfort and value.

With great open spaces, high ceilings, wall-to-wall windows, hardwood floors and a wealth of exceptional amenities, The Toy Factory Lofts offer unparalleled opportunities for living and investing in Brooklyn.

This unique condo brings in beautiful natural light and is accessible to public transportation, the BQE, the Manhattan Bridge and major business districts in Brooklyn and Manhattan.

History: The Toy Factory Lofts Condominium: Framed in History, Developed for Today’s Discriminating Tastes.

The Toy Factory Lofts are located in the building that was once home to Tudor Metal Products, where the popular Depression-era toy Budget Bank was invented by Elmer Sas in 1929. Two decades later, this is where Elmer’s son Norman created Electric Football, one of the country’s most beloved post World War II games. From the 1950’s through the 1980’s, Electric Football became more sophisticated and lifelike. In 1958, Electric Football introduced its first 3D plastic players and in the 1960’s, Tudor became an official NFL licensee. But by the late 1980’s, video games replaced the hands-on board and the company was purchased by Miggle Toys.

This sturdy brick building that housed the old toy factory has been home to generations of entrepreneurial triumphs. Now in its next life, award-winning Scarano & Associates Architects has transformed it into 56 loft units with details that are well thought-out, stylish and intelligent.

Kolbster
February 21st, 2005, 12:20 AM
Ha, i passed that building yesterday

Gulcrapek
February 21st, 2005, 12:27 AM
I remember about two years ago that building was kinda run down. I said at the time it could make a nice loft building but I doubt people would want to live right next to the projects. I guess they don't mind that much...

Kolbster
February 21st, 2005, 12:34 AM
Well, i think people are just pretty excited to be going into the new up and coming Downtown....You know, living near the projects didnt stop people from squabbling up residences near lincoln Center...but these projects have a different mentality though...pretty tough those are.

Archit_K
February 21st, 2005, 03:27 AM
Developer: 125 Court Street, LLC
Architect: Ismael Leyva Architects
Structural Engineering: Rosenwasser/Grossman Consulting Engineers P.C.
MEP Engineering: Robert Ettinger Associates
Height: 128ft.
Floors: 11
Construction end: 2005
http://www.emporis.com/en/cd/cm/?id=122877


This high-rise building is still under construction [topped out]. Ismael Leyva Architects website is still under construction too http://www.ilarch.com/

Gulcrapek
February 21st, 2005, 01:10 PM
I like CourtHouse, it's more than a simple brick building and I'm very fond of the ground floor treatment. The previous design by BBB was pretty bland (but what can we expect from them?).

Derek2k3
February 21st, 2005, 06:52 PM
Project # 1

Toy Factory Lofts
176 Johnson Street
8 stories 98 feet
Scarano & Associate Architects
Residential Condominiums
56 units 64,000 Sq.ft.
Completed 2004


http://www.scaranoarchitects.com/

176 Johnson Street is an 8 story, 64,000 square foot industrial building, which is being converted into a 56-family residential condominium. It is one of the first factory buildings in the downtown Brooklyn area that was rezoned by the Board of Standards and Appeals as part of a new master plan for the Brooklyn downtown redevelopment.

In an attempt to preserve the continuous feeling of the currently uninterrupted 8300 square foot floors, with their large windows and elegant flared columns, and, in addition, in trying to avoid long corridors lined with doors, a layout was developed in which the columns are accentuated, acting as dramatic buffers between the public hall and intimate entranceways into apartments, broken off diagonally from hallway circulation. Full-height views around the columns enhance the dynamic sense of these entrance ways, while the main corridor ceiling is lowered to accommodate the tightly designed, highly efficient, mechanical core. Bathrooms and kitchens are also organized around a tight core, effectively reducing plumbing and mechanical costs and creating a continuous open main space that is rich with light and air.

The apartments, ranging between 800 - 1,200 square feet, are flexible in their layout so that they can easily be converted into one, and even two bedroom apartments though sold as lofts.

This building combines all the luxuries of fine city living, with private parking and storage rooms in the cellar accessed by a newly constructed ramp, and a commercial first floor, including a gym and other retail spaces. An elevator opens at the roof into a glass-enclosed 'sky-lobby" and a landscaped roof deck. With the up and coming development efforts in this neighborhood 176 Johnson Street will quickly stand out as one of the most successful residential ventures in the area.

Archit_K
February 21st, 2005, 11:05 PM
I like CourtHouse, it's more than a simple brick building and I'm very fond of the ground floor treatment. The previous design by BBB was pretty bland (but what can we expect from them?).
Hey, Gulcrapek can you post the previous design by BBB Architects?

Derek2k3
February 22nd, 2005, 04:36 PM
Projects #2

Bridge View Tower
189-197 Bridge Street
18 stories 216 feet
H2 Consulting
Dev-Bridge View Tower, LLC
Residential
59 units 90,063 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2004-2006

Gulcrapek
February 22nd, 2005, 05:20 PM
Never heard of that one, thanks.

Archit: I forgot where it is, I think it was somewhere on the NYC rezoning pages though...

Kolbster
February 22nd, 2005, 08:17 PM
Bridge View Tower
197 Bridge Street
18 stories 216 feet
Zakrzewski + Hyde Architects
Dev-Bridge View Tower, LLC
Residential
59 units 90,063 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2004-2006


Where is bridge street...in relevence to like Atlantic Ave, or the Bridge

ltjbukem73
February 22nd, 2005, 08:58 PM
if you pull off the BQE at the tillary st exit, bear right, make a right onto front st, which is where 57 front and the bridgefront condos are, go about 4 blocks, then make a right onto bridge st and that's where the bridge st condos are.

it's parallel to atlantic, about 15 blocks north in dumbo.

Derek2k3
February 22nd, 2005, 09:15 PM
Projects #3 & 4

Court House Tower I
211-233 Atlantic Avenue/125 Court Street
11 stories 128 feet
Ismael Leyva Architects
Developer-Two Trees Management
Residential Condominums
321 units 495,638 Sq. Ft.(Combined)
Under Construction Spring 2003-Early 2005


Court House Tower II
211-233 Atlantic Avenue/125 Court Street
11 stories 128 feet
Ismael Leyva Architects
Developer-Two Trees Management
Residential Condominums
321 units 495,638 Sq. Ft.(Combined)
Under Construction Spring 2003-Early 2005


www.courthouseapts.com

Gotham Gazette
http://www.gothamgazette.com/community/33/news/964

Long-Awaited CourtHouse Apartments Open for Rental
by Brooklyn Eagle
November 24, 2004
Brooklyn Eagle


‘Everybody Gets a Free Y Membership’

BROOKLYN HEIGHTS — Two Trees Management’s much-heralded CourtHouse apartments opened for leasing last Friday, November 12, as reported in the Daily Eagle.

The CourtHouse, built on the site of a former parking lot, is a recent Two Trees project offering 320-brand new units conveniently located at 125 Court St. The building, on the corner of Court Street and Atlantic Avenue in Downtown Brooklyn, also includes the upcoming Brooklyn Central YMCA facilities and parking facilities.

A leasing office (also at 125 Court St.) is accepting applications for the no-fee one- and two-bedroom apartments and studios. There are 42 layout variations throughout the building, which is set for completion in February of 2005, according to the website.

Toby Klein, recognized last week for her efforts with Two Trees Management Co., commented to the Eagle, “I am happy to say that they don’t cut quality in building rentals. The have the same construction standards as they do in their luxury buildings.”

Two model apartments are ready for viewing, according to a leasing office representative. “Everyone gets a free YMCA membership,” Klein added.

Also under construction at the site is the new headquarters for Brooklyn’s oldest Y. Brooklyn Central Y was originally housed on Hanson Place, where it functioned with pool and athletic facilities for the first half of the 20th Century. When the building was sold, Brooklyn Central Y occupied several different rented sites around Downtown Brooklyn, but never had a real headquarters. That changes this spring, when the new Dodge Y branch will open with a six-lane pool and full gymnasium facility. The Dodge Family Foundation put up a portion of the funds that were required to build the $12 million facility. The board and community leadership of Brooklyn Central Y continues to raise money for completion of the new facility, set to open in sometime in the spring of 2005.

The Brooklyn Central Y will own its facility, but the remainder of the building will be rental units managed by Two Trees.

The units are a mix of studios and one- and two-bedroom apartments. They range in size from 465-472 square feet for a studio; 602-728 square feet for a one-bedroom; and 853-1,068 for a two-bedroom. According to the website, all units have nine-foot ceilings, oversized windows, red oak floors, Shaker maple wood cabinets, stainless steel appliances, including dishwashers, and granite counters.

In addition to the onsite parking and access to the new YMCA, other building amenities include 24-hour doorman service and security, laundry facilities on every floor and common outdoor space.

Pre-construction prices are in the $1,400-$3,600 range.

There are also other pre-construction benefits, according to Klein, like one-month free rent with a one-year lease, or three months free rent with a two-year lease. More information is available at www.courthouseapts.com.


The last attatchment is the Beyer Blinder Belle design Kris.

Derek2k3
February 22nd, 2005, 09:21 PM
Project #5

49 Duffield Street
4 stories 50 feet
Scarano & Associates Architects
Dev-Martin Handler Partners
Residential Condominium
7 units 9,000 Sq. Ft.
Proposed

Scarano & Associates Architects

http://www.scaranoarchitects.com/

A modest twenty five foot lot with a new seven apartment building is nested between homes on an existing block which has not seen new development in over thirty years. With a mandate to use the provisions of the Quality Housing program for R-6B zoning district, the building can maximize its potential yet maintain a high quality and be in context with its neighbors.

A variety of apartment styles and types including flats, duplexes and lofts were incorporated into the design to provide for a wider array of unit types than what is typically found in these settings.

To give the feeling of large interior spaces, both the building footprint and zoning envelope were maximized. The loft-style apartments with fifteen feet ceilings in the living areas also contain a flexible loft space that has a multitude of uses based on the buyers? preferred lifestyle. Most apartments have large outdoor spaces in the form of balconies or roof terraces.

Flaunting a modern design that uses traditional materials, the building?s presence adds a tasteful twist to the streetscape. But its greatest contribution is in completing the missing link in the street wall.

Kolbster
February 22nd, 2005, 10:31 PM
if you pull off the BQE at the tillary st exit, bear right, make a right onto front st, which is where 57 front and the bridgefront condos are, go about 4 blocks, then make a right onto bridge st and that's where the bridge st condos are.

it's parallel to atlantic, about 15 blocks north in dumbo.


O wow, good look. When is construction going to happen?

Archit_K
February 23rd, 2005, 03:27 AM
Originally Posted by Gulcrapek
Archit: I forgot where it is, I think it was somewhere on the NYC rezoning pages though...
Yeah don't worry. Derek2k3 posted the previous design by BBB Architects.

Derek2k3
February 24th, 2005, 05:30 PM
Project #6

Fifteen Metrotech (Nine MetroTech Center South)
15 MetoTech Center/115-159 Myrtle Avenue
19 stories 325ft
Cesar Pelli & Associates/Swanke Hayden Connell
Dev-Forest City Ratner
Commercial Office
607,815 Sq. Ft.
Completed November 20, 2001-Summer 2003

http://www.wirednewyork.com/images/import/9metrotech_south_rendering.jpg
Rendering before the additional floors and square footage.

http://www.fcrc.com/project_main2.asp?id=36&cc=2&rid=36
Fifteen Metrotech

Name : Fifteen Metrotech
Location: Fifteen Metrotech, Brooklyn, New York 11201
RSF : 646,693 square feet
Parking : 400 below grade
Current Status : Operating
Opening : Summer 2003
Features : Forest City Ratner Companies is proud to announce the development of 9 MetroTech South, the last development site at MetroTech Center. It will house Empire Blue Cross and Blue Shield. MetroTech Center is a 16 acre urban corporate campus located in downtown Brooklyn, just minutes from Manhattan. As the most active developer in New York City, FCRC has set the standard for high-tech design and construction. FCRC understands the needs of sophisticated users and has the experience to construct buildings that suit unique tenant requirements. As the most sophisticated high-tech space in the metropolitan area, MetroTech houses the vital systems that support emergency services, financial and brokerage operations, education and a host of other functions that need the operational reliability and dependability only MetroTech can offer.

As with other buildings at MetroTech Center, 9 MetroTech South will incorporate the latest in state of the art tenant infrastructure to suit the needs of today's tenants. Forest City Ratner Companies has designed the building with the versatility and capability to meet the demands of the financial services industry. The floor plates will range in size from 35,000 sf to 48,000 sf with several of the floors designed to support the use as a data center, switching station, or server farm.


http://www.wirednewyork.com/brooklyn/9metrotech_south/default.htm
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=3391

Archit_K
February 24th, 2005, 06:11 PM
Floors: 22
Height: 265 ft
Architect: Robert A.M. Stern
Year: 2004
Status: 2005 completed

Location: Boerum Place and Adams Street
The Brooklyn Law School Dormitory is the Brooklyn Law School's solution to student housing problems. The height and number of floors was being debated by a Quaker meeting hall across the street, but the building has apparently risen to its full intended height.

- Will have 360-400 beds.
- The site is in a special zoning district which limits the height to 120 feet. However, the school successfully argued that the new housing was absolutely necessary and the project went through at a taller height.
- Style is postmodern.


Gulcrapek website: view pics and renderinghttp://www.geocities.com/brooklyn_rise/blsd.html

Check out this already started thread:http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=5189&highlight=brooklyn+law+school

Gulcrapek
February 24th, 2005, 06:31 PM
Hehe, I wrote the SSP text..

Archit_K
February 24th, 2005, 08:45 PM
Here are two pictures I took a while ago.

Derek2k3
February 26th, 2005, 03:50 PM
Project #7

Feil Hall/Brooklyn Law School Dormitory
58 Boerum Place/205 State Street
22 stories 231 feet
Robert AM Stern Architects/SLCE Architects
Dev-Brooklyn Law School
Residential Dormitory
210 units 242,752 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction Fall 2002-Summer 2005

http://www.acmedigital.com/bklaw.jpg
Ernest Burden III
Acme Digital

http://www.brooklaw.edu/feilhall/gallery/large/drawingnew.jpg

http://www.brooklaw.edu/feilhall/

New Student Residence
Feil Hall

Feil Hall, Brooklyn Law School’s magnificent new student residence, will open in the summer of 2005. Located in Brooklyn Heights just three blocks from the law school’s main building, Feil Hall will provide spacious, affordable and convenient campus living for approximately 360 students.

Feil Hall’s 239 furnished apartments will include a mixture of studios and one-, two-, three- and four-bedroom units. Each student will have his or her own private bedroom. All apartments have full kitchens and one or two private bathrooms. Many have panoramic views of Brooklyn, New York Harbor, and Manhattan.

Designed by acclaimed architect Robert A. M. Stern, Dean of the Yale School of Architecture, the hall was named in recognition of the generosity of the Feil Family Foundation. The top floor will be home to the Jeffrey D. Forchelli Conference Center, which will be the site of academic symposia and other law school events. The ground floor will feature Geraldo’s, a cyber café.


No comment on the name.

Derek2k3
February 26th, 2005, 04:12 PM
Project # 8

LIU Athletic, Recreation & Wellness Center
Dekalb Avenue
5 stories
Arquitectonica
Dev-Long Island University
Recreational
110,000 Sq. ft.
Under Construction 2004-October 2005

http://www.brooklyn.liunet.edu/bbut11/arwcphotos/wellness_center_big.gif
http://www.arquitectonica.com/

http://www.brooklyn.liunet.edu/bbut11/arwcphotos/122104-2.jpg

http://www.brooklyn.liunet.edu/bbut11/arwcphotos/photos.htm

LIU'S ATHLETIC, RECREATION AND WELLNESS CENTER

The largest building project in the Campus’ 78-year history, the $40 million, 100,000 square-foot complex will provide state-of-the-art athletic facilities for students and other members of the Campus community. It will feature tennis courts, a running track, a broad array of workout equipment and a 25-yard swimming pool in addition to a 3,000 seat arena, where the school’s NCAA Division I teams will compete.

Additionally, the center will house resources and programs to promote the health of community residents. Cardiac rehabilitation, orthopedic therapy and asthma education services are planned, as well as the installation of specialized equipment, such as a separate therapy pool equipped with a hydraulic floor. The new facility also will provide an important venue for civic events. Ground was broken for the center last spring and construction is rapidly progressing. Its grand opening is scheduled for the first night of the NCAA Division I basketball season in October 2005.

MonCapitan2002
February 26th, 2005, 04:41 PM
Project #7

Feil Hall/Brooklyn Law School Dormitory
58 Boerum Place/205 State Street
22 stories 231 feet
Robert AM Stern Architects/SLCE Architects
Dev-Brooklyn Law School
Residential Dormitory
210 units 242,752 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction Fall 2002-Summer 2005

http://www.acmedigital.com/bklaw.jpg
Ernest Burden III
Acme Digital

http://www.brooklaw.edu/feilhall/gallery/large/drawingnew.jpg

http://www.brooklaw.edu/feilhall/

New Student Residence
Feil Hall
I think the building came out rather nicely from the pictures shown later in the thread.

Derek2k3
February 27th, 2005, 03:54 AM
Project #9

117-119 Court Street
183 State Street
10 stories 120 feet
Ernst & Associates Architects
Dev-JPKJ Realty, LLC
Residential Condominiums
7 units 22,500 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction Late 2003-2005

http://www.emporis.com/en/wm/bu/?id=223207


http://www.nypost.com/realestate/19941.htm

"Court Street has always been a stable and diverse commercial strip that's just gotten better. It was never funky and terrible, like Smith Street used to be," says Austin.

John McFadden, the owner of Staubitz Market, an 87-year-old Cobble Hill butcher shop, is thrilled he bought his building when he acquired the business.

"The rents have gone up so much, if you didn't own your own building, I'd probably think about whether it'd be worth staying," McFadden says.

William Ross, Brooklyn executive director of sales for Halstead Property, estimates that due to strong interest and limited availability, retail rents will go up 15 percent to 20 percent in the coming year. He expects residential rentals to go up around 15 percent as well, with home sales jumping 10 percent to 12 percent.

Adding to the condo pool is 119 Court, a work in progress, with nine separate three-bedrooms. Prices haven't been determined, but a model should be ready in January.

If the apartments go for $700 a square foot, as expected, prices for the units would range from $1.4 million to $1.75 million.

Archit_K
February 27th, 2005, 11:14 AM
Project #8

Kudos to Arquitectonica.

Derek2k3
February 27th, 2005, 01:36 PM
Project #10

The Smith/Atlantic Court
295 Atlantic Avenue/75-91 Smith Street
13 stories 140 feet
Meltzer/Mandl Architects
Dev-Boymelgreen Developers
Mixed-Use
134 units 152,000 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2004-Early 2006

http://www.africa-israel.com/eng/imagesEng/D10H/US_images/US003a_193x.jpg
(Previous design)
http://www.africa-israel.com/eng/US_003.asp


http://www.dagherengineering.com/projects/project_09.php

Atlantic Court is a new mixed-use building on Atlantic Avenue in Brooklyn, New York. It will consist of a 67 room hotel, retail, restaurants, community and office spaces in 60,000 square feet on the lower four stories. A nine story residential tower on top of the four-story building will house 48 apartments of a total of 62,000 square foot. And lastly, 34,000 square feet is allotted to a two level underground garage.
Dagher Engineering is providing design engineering services through all phases of development and construction for Mechanical /HVAC, Electrical, Fire Alarm, Fire Protection, and Plumbing systems.


http://www.prweb.com/releases/2004/8/prweb150350.htm

Boymelgreen Developers name J/Brice Design International of Boston for boutique hotel in Brooklyn

Award-winning hotel interior design firm — J/Brice Design international of Boston — is gaining momentum with contracts from international real estate developers, REITS, and major hotel chains. Contract with Boymelgreen Developers is latest.

BOSTON, MA (PRWEB) August 18, 2004 -- Brooklyn, New York-based Boymelgreen Developers, LLC has selected J/Brice Design International, Inc. of Boston, MA for the interior design of the hotel at Atlantic Court on Atlantic Avenue and Smith Street in Brooklyn.

Founded in 1989 by Jeffrey Ornstein, J/Brice has become an award-winning industry bellwether and the largest firm of its kind in New England. Boymelgreen Developers, has charged the firm with creating the hotel interiors for the property, which will include 84 guestrooms on floors two through four, while floors 5-13 will be sold as one- and-two bedroom apartments, and luxury penthouse duplexes.

Explained Danny Kim, Boymelgreen development manager, "The 13-story building, slated to open in early 2006, features a masonry appearance designed to integrate the structure with its surrounding brownstone and brick environment." Architect is Meltzer Mandl Architects, PC of New York and Alisa Construction, Inc. a Boymelgreen operation, is managing construction.

In making the announcement Kim, stated, "J/Brice has made a name for itself as an international design firm. The firm is able to interpret the property owner’s vision in exciting and innovative ways that resonate with the market. Jeff’s success with the award-winning The Muse Hotel in Times Square and the Westminster Hotel in Livingston, New Jersey, that won first place in Lodging Hospitality’s 2004 design competition figured into our decision."

Boymelgreen Developers, LLC is an established real estate development company with operations located in New York City, Toronto and Miami with projects in the pipeline worth $6 billion. Boymelgreen, which is actively interested in furthering its involvement in the hospitality industry, was selected out of a field of eight competing companies to develop the $3.3 million Brooklyn site. In addition to the hotel and residences, the property will include retail operations, underground parking and a community facility. The area is already attracting new retail and restaurant operations and the new hotel is expected to increase momentum.

Combined Lobby & Restaurant
The Hotel interior will be contemporary chic with a subtle underpinning of the Art Deco era — ala the Chrysler Building — to reinforce the property’s relationship to New York through historical and architectural references.

Boymelgreen is introducing an innovation in public space configuration by eliminating physical, perceptual and functional boundaries between the lobby and its surrounding amenities. The combined public space will have numerous private areas ideal for individuals and intimate groups. A cyber café will be included in the scheme. Central to the concept is the availability of wait service throughout the public space for cocktails, beverages and dining.

"The integrated lobby-lounge offers more options, greater convenience and a higher-level of service. Guests will be able to carry on a quiet conversation or read while enjoying espresso or dining, yet they will be surrounded with the energy and excitement of a smart New York hotel," explains Ornstein.

All guestrooms will be completed with high-end furniture, fixtures and finishing details using luxurious materials, a range of textures and richly toned fabrics. J/Brice has, for example, specified unique custom wall units in exotic hardwoods to serve as closets and desks giving the property a fashionable Euro look. Plasma TVs complete the picture.

The design firm eliminated the conventional panoply of desk lamps, and light fixtures in favor of lighted wall surfaces and dramatically lit recessed niches. "The entire guestroom comes alive and the mood may be varied to suit every activity — from getting ready for a morning business meeting to an evening of romance," observes June Ericson, a senior J/Brice Design project director.

Since its founding in 1994, Boymelgreen has become a prominent force in Brooklyn’s revitalization. In addition to the new downtown hotel project, the developer has four commercial, retail and residential projects underway in the historic waterfront park district of Fulton Ferry, known as DUMBO (Down Under the Manhattan and Brooklyn Bridge Overpasses). While 80 percent of this 70-acre park will be open space, development of the commercial space is guided by the Master Plan calling for character, quality and sensitivity to Brooklyn’s historic roots. Other local Boymelgreen properties include Hudson Park Riverside at 323 West 96 Street at Riverside and RKO Plaza in Queens, a mixed-use residential and commercial project.

J/Brice Design International, Inc. has been designated an Interior Design Giant, and Architectural Giant since 1991 and has directed hotel design projects throughout the US, with emphasis on the East Coast, Las Vegas and California. Overseas, the firm has served the Taj Hotels in India and developed properties in Dubai, UAE. In 2004, Lodging Hospitality awarded J/Brice first-place honors for its design of the Westminster Hotel in Livingston, New Jersey. J/Brice ranks 24th out of 100 national firms, its staff has over 150 hotel/restaurant projects to its credit, and the confidence of all major hotel chains as a preferred design team. Founder Jeffrey Ornstein shuttles between J/Brice offices in Boston and New York. The Firm’s Los Angeles office is scheduled to open in September.
Telephone 617-695-9456. www.jbricedesign.com

Archit_K
February 28th, 2005, 12:25 AM
Project #11

http://www.corcoran.com/property/nd/photo/53BoerumPlace.jpg
Boulevard East
53 Boerum Place
Brooklyn, NY11201
Official website: http://www.boulevardeast.com

Brooklyn’s luxury bar has just been raised a bit higher at the 99-unit, 11-story Boulevard East at 53 Boerum Place. Readying for occupancy in December, it’s the first new construction in downtown Brooklyn’s new Redevelopment Zone. Tech-smart beyond imagination (including integrated home networks and radiant-heated bathroom floors in every unit) and amenity-filled (it has a fitness center and a gorgeous garden courtyard that’s perfect for sipping lattes), the studio, one- and two-bedroom homes range from 772 to 970 square feet. Add to that jaw-dropping views of the Empire State Building and the Verrazano Bridge from the upper floors. Ranging in price from $250,000 to the mid-$700,000s, more than 20 percent of the units sold on the first day they went on the market says Melinda Magnett, Corcoran Group Brooklyn president. “Here we are, three weeks later, and more than 50 percent have sold, some sight unseen, over the phone.”

Does anybody know who designed this building?

BrooklynRider
February 28th, 2005, 11:28 AM
Projects 9 and 10 seem to be moving at a start / stop pace.

Project #9 the first three floors of steel rose and then it stopped for quite a while. It's picked up again.

They've been working on foundations for #10 forever foundation

Gulcrapek
February 28th, 2005, 05:33 PM
Yeah, it was supposed to be above ground a year ago..

Derek2k3
March 1st, 2005, 12:20 AM
Project # 11

Boulevard East
53 Boerum Place
11 stories 97 feet
Stephen B. Jacobs Group
Dev-Procida Realty and Construction Corporation
Residential Rental
99 units 113,739 Sq. Ft.
Completed August 2002-Fall 2004

http://www.corcoran.com/property/nd/photo/53BoerumPlace.jpg

53 Boerum Place
Brooklyn,NY11201

http://www.corcoran.com/property/nd/detail_fr_overview.asp?ndevid=85

Be Here.
Nestled in the gateway to the best Brooklyn has to offer, amid historic, charming neighborhoods and today’s most sought-after destination shops, restaurants and cultural resources, is New York’s most exciting condominium complex.
Boulevard East at 53 Boerum Place… This is where the organic and the digital find a perfect union: an earth-washed terra cotta structure wired to be this crown jewel of high tech condo living in New York City.
It’s where living takes on an added dimension.
It’s where you want to be.

Amenities

NEW CONSTRUCTION! Enhance your lifestyle! Pre-wired for home network, high speed internet access and high definition or digital TV. Central A/C. Kitchen fully equipped with premium maple cabinets and sleek stainless steel appliances. Abundant closet space. Luxurious bathrooms feature extended vanity tops, polished chrome fixtures, and floors emitting radiant heat on demand! Building offers a LIVE-IN Super, 24-hour doorman, and on-site parking. Other amenities include fitness center, on-site laundry, and landscaped courtyard.

Kolbster
March 1st, 2005, 10:49 AM
The building should have been taller

Derek2k3
March 3rd, 2005, 09:19 PM
Project #12

112 Flatbush Avenue
557 Atlantic Avenue/558 State Street
8 stories 80 feet
Bricolage Designs
Dev-Denali Construction (Boerum Heights Realty Associates)
Residential
72 units 99,194 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2004-2006

Maybe I should give this a thumbs down ahead of time...

Derek2k3
March 3rd, 2005, 09:51 PM
Project #13

252 Atlantic Avenue
252 Atlantic Ave/89 Boerum Place
AHF Architects, LLC
8 stories
Dev-Marc Chemtob/Renaissance Realty
Residential Condominium
64 units 114,319 Sq. Ft.
Proposed 2006

http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=4871&highlight=252+atlantic+mobil

http://www.brooklynpapers.com/html/issues/_vol27/27_20/27_20bp.pdf

Condo planned for Atlantic Ave. Mobil Site
By Deborah Kolben
The Brooklyn Papers
Atlantic Avenue may now be home
to baby boutiques and designer furniture
stores, but many residents still
bemoan a two-block stretch in
Boerum Hill not-so-affectionately
know as “the dead zone” or “the gap.”
Filled with gas stations, parking lots
and a prison, the stretch of Atlantic Avenue
near Boerum Place separates rapidly
developing sections of the avenue to the
east and west.
But these days even the so-called gap is
beginning to fill in.
A developer is looking to replace the
Mobil gas station and car wash at Boerum
Place with an eight-story luxury condominium.
In addition to ground-floor retail space,
the building at 252 Atlantic Ave. would include
approximately 65 apartments and a
parking garage, according Patrick Jones,
attorney for the property’s owner, Marc
Chemtob.
Chemtob and his associates are still
working out design kinks but hope to
make an application to the Board of Standards
and Appeals soon.
Last week Jones presented the plans to
Community Board 2.
While the design kinks are sill being
worked out, the community is welcoming
the development with open arms.
“This is great news,” said Sandy Balboza,
president of the Atlantic Avenue
Better Association (ABBA), who called
the gas station an “eyesore.”
The organization has been working for
years to help develop that strip and in the
late 1990s sponsored a study examining the
problem between Court and Smith streets.
“Our goal is to eliminate that gap and
connect the two now-divided retail strips.
It’s one avenue with two separate retail
strips because of that area,” said Balboza.
The transformation began two years
ago when the city sold off a massive municipal
parking garage at the corner of Atlantic
Avenue and Court Street.
Real estate developer David Walentas,
best known for his redevelopment of
DUMBO, in the past year razed the
garage to make way for a 12-story building
with 20,000 square feet of groundfloor
retail space, loosely slated for a
home furnishings business, about 600 underground,
public parking spaces and 250
apartments on the second through 12th
floors. A 40,000-square-foot YMCAwith
an entrance on Atlantic Avenue is also part
of the project.
Down the block at Smith Street and Atlantic
Avenue, developer Shaya Boymelgreen
is converting a state-owned parking
lot into a retail and residential development.
The hulking Brooklyn House of Detention
still stands opposite the gas station
site at Atlantic Avenue and Boerum Place.
Last year, the city transferred all the inmates
from the jail to Rikers Island and
some neighbors are now asking the city to
sell it off or tear it down.
“There has been enormous change,”
said Sue Wolfe, president of the Boerum
Hill Association. “That was a real stopgap,
it was quite unpleasant,” she added.
Wolfe hopes Atlantic Avenue can be become
a grand boulevard connecting the
planned BAM Cultural District in Fort
Greene with Brooklyn Bridge Park — the
1.3-mile commercial and recreational
space planned along the waterfront between
Jay Street and Atlantic Avenue.
While Wolfe said she was excited about
the gas station development, there are still
several concerns.
“We think the design should be
rethought,” she said, noting the balconies,
which the developer has aggred to remove.
Wolfe said aesthetics were particularly
important because, for many people
coming off the Brooklyn Bridge, this will
be their first glimpse into the borough.
The Mobil gas station and car wash, on the corner of Atlantic Avenue and Boerum Place may be knocked down and replaced
with eight stories of luxury condominiums.

Kolbster
March 3rd, 2005, 09:57 PM
Now if only they built a tower a-top that. I really think they should upzone residential as well

Derek2k3
March 6th, 2005, 02:10 AM
Project #14

The Brooklyn Renaissance Plaza Expansion
345 Adams Street
23 stories 240 feet
SB Architects/William B Tabler Architects
Dev-Muss Development Co.
Commercial Hotel
283 units 180,000 Sq. Ft.
Proposed Winter 2005-Fall 2006

http://www.williamtabler.com/brp_exp_big_2.jpg

http://www.williamtabler.com/brp_exp_big_1.jpg

William B Tabler Architects
The Brooklyn Renaissance Plaza Expansion

http://www.williamtabler.com/brp_exp.htm

WBTA is currently working on a 283 Room addition to the successful Brooklyn
Renaissance Plaza Project. The new tower shall be connected to the existing facility
via a two level bridge designed as a floating trellis. The lower levels are clad in limestone.
The tower gracefully steps back at the corners, giving this edifice a stately appearance
that works well in this neighborhood of federal and local courts. Working with designers
SB Architects, WBTA developed an efficient floor plan on a tight 87' x 97' footprint.
The new building has meetings rooms and retail space.



NY Daily News

http://www.nydailynews.com/boroughs/story/273266p-233994c.html

Solid as a bedrock
Marriott has room to grow 24 stories

BY NICHOLAS LoVECCHIO
and MAGGIE HABERMAN
DAILY NEWS WRITERS

Mayor Bloomberg is flanked by Brooklyn Borough President Marty Markowitz (l.) and developer Joshua Muss at groundbreaking for Marriott expansion project in downtown Brooklyn yesterday.
Officials drove shovels into the dirt yesterday for an expansion of the booming Brooklyn Heights Marriott that will nearly double the size of the borough's best-known full-service hotel.

"It's just part of the revival of Brooklyn," said Mayor Bloomberg at a groundbreaking ceremony - much of which was held indoors because of the frigid weather.

The 24-story expansion will add 280 rooms to the Marriott complex on Adams St., bringing the total number of rooms to 656.

New street furniture will be put on the plaza between Adams and Jay Sts., and there will be a pedestrian bridge connecting the original hotel to the new building.

"There's nothing else of the scale and size in this area. This hotel is much needed here," said Philip Wolf, an executive at Muss Development, which is building the new structure.

Wolf added that they are hunting for a retail tenant for the first floor, hopefully something that will be open around the clock for the neighborhood.

"We want to get late-hour usage, to take advantage of all the students living nearby," Wolf said.

The expansion will be built on a patch of land adjacent to the hotel that Muss Development bought from the city for $5.2 million.

Bloomberg, noting that the Brooklyn Marriott is the chain's most productive hotel, said the $77 million construction project will create 100 permanent jobs. It is expected to be ready for business next year.

"It's great to be associated with a project that doesn't have any detractors," joked the Jets Stadium-supportive mayor.

Borough President Marty Markowitz noted that the hotel has "become so much a part of our life," adding: "When this idea was conceived, it was during some of Brooklyn's most challenging" times.

The original concept for the hotel came in 1983, but it took almost 15 years before it actually got built - the first full-service hotel in the borough in 70 years.

Once it did, it was widely seen as a beacon of Brooklyn's rebirth, signaling that people were willing to come across the river.

Within a year, the hotel was jam-packed, with an average 80% occupancy rate each year, considered high in the industry.

And its prices are competitive with another major hotel in the chain, the Marriott Marquis in Times Square.

Kathy Duffy, a New York-based Marriott spokeswoman, said that the average rate for a standard room at Brooklyn's hotel in January is $249.

At the Marquis, which is a far bigger hotel situated right in Broadway, the rates for the same type of room in January are $239 to $299, she said.

Originally published on January 21, 2005


Thread on the project here:
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=3677

Not much to see yet.

Kris
March 6th, 2005, 10:23 AM
March 6, 2005

DOWNTOWN BROOKLYN

Yet Another New Chapter for a Glamorous Old Theater

By JEFF VANDAM (http://query.nytimes.com/search/query?ppds=bylL&v1=JEFF%20VANDAM&fdq=19960101&td=sysdate&sort=newest&ac=JEFF%20VANDAM&inline=nyt-per)

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2005/03/06/nyregion/06schw_lg.jpg
Possibly the fanciest gym ceiling in town.

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/dropcap/f.gifrom its inception, the Paramount Theater in downtown Brooklyn was a knockout. Starting in 1928, it welcomed guests into its mirrored lobby and its impossibly ornate playhouse, where Miles Davis, Ethel Merman, Bing Crosby and Mae West performed under innumerable golden statues and fountains spewing dry ice. A Wurlitzer organ, second in size only to Radio City's, trumpeted tunes through yards upon yards of pipe.

These days seem different. If they notice, passers-by on Flatbush Avenue will see a barely legible blue script on the side of a tan brick building across from Junior's. "Paramount Theatre," it whispers, implying there is little else to remember the old place by.

But inside the building, now part of Long Island University's Brooklyn campus, nearly all the Paramount's trappings remain. Students consume sausage pizza in the lobby, its shimmering cylindrical chandeliers still hanging above their heads. Inside the theater itself, the rococo fountains and statues still stand, though they now peer down at a basketball court, where the L.I.U. Blackbirds have played home games since 1963.

Until now, that is. The Blackbirds are in the midst of the 2005 postseason, which will be their final games in the Paramount, currently named the Arnold & Marie Schwartz Athletic Center. This fall, the school's teams will move nearby into a bright new complex that will house athletic facilities and a community health center.

The Paramount, its magnificent aura intact, will become something else. Again.

"As beautiful as the old Paramount is, it really isn't an appropriate state-of-the-art facility for athletic competition," said Gale Stevens Haynes, provost for the university's Brooklyn campus. Her grand office overlooking Flatbush used to belong to the Paramount's manager.

Though no formal plans have been announced, Ms. Haynes expressed interest in perhaps placing a student union inside the Paramount. In the meantime, intramural events will continue to be held there, and pickup games are always welcome; last week, a group of gray-bearded professors played three on three.

Yet among those who grew up with the Paramount, there is a longing for something more. Joe Dorinson, an L.I.U. history professor, had his first date in the theater, an event that apparently did not go well. Nevertheless, Mr. Dorinson represents a group who would like to see the theater returned to its original usage.

"It cries out for something more dramatic," he said, voicing a wish that grand shows return to the Paramount's stage. "This would be a wonderful way to hail Brooklyn."

Copyright 2005 (http://www.nytimes.com/ref/membercenter/help/copyright.html) The New York Times Company (http://www.nytco.com/)

Derek2k3
March 6th, 2005, 01:29 PM
Project #15

The Joseph J. & Violet J. Jacobs Building
305-315 Jay Street
8 stories 115 feet
Davis Brody Bond
Dev-Polytechnic University
Mixed Use
68,000 Sq. Ft. (Six academic floors & Recreation/gymnasium complex)
Completed 2000-Summer 2002

http://www.wirednewyork.com/images/poly_newacademicbldg.jpg


The Joseph J. & Violet J. Jacobs Building, Polytechnic University

http://www.poly.edu/construction_renovation/academic.cfm

As part of Polytechnic’s transformation, the University is improving the physical plant at MetroTech Center. An eight-story Joseph J. and Violet J. Jacobs Building is currently under construction and will contain state-of-the-art classrooms and laboratories, as well as a fully equipped athletic center. Rogers Hall, Polytechnic's original academic building, is undergoing major renovations to provide students with access to modern, well-equipped laboratories and classrooms—wired for the Internet, long-distance learning and state-of-the-art audio/visual instruction.

The Addition will be a new eight-story structure that abuts Rogers Hall, the primary academic building on Polytechnic's Brooklyn campus. It will be situated on land already owned by the university, hence will require no new real estate transactions.

The Addition, adding approximately 68,000 gross square feet, will provide an entirely new facade to the university's main entrance. As such, it is likely to become the architecturally dominant feature of the south side of the campus.

The basement and most of the lower three floors will be devoted to a new gymnasium and supporting athletic facilities, while part of the third floor, and all of floors four through eight, will be devoted to academic functions.

The northern side of the Addition will adjoin Rogers Hall, which will undergo extensive renovation. Upon completion, the two structures will exhibit seamless floor-to-floor continuity, with the facilities within the Addition being fully integrated-both spatially and functionally-with facilities in the renovated Rogers Hall. The academic floors of the Addition and corresponding floors of Rogers Hall will conform to the following general pattern on each floor level: undergraduate design and innovation facilities will be located in the Addition; classrooms, upper division laboratories, and student departmental activities will be concentrated in the central core of Rogers Hall, near the elevator bank; research labs and offices will be primarily located in the southern portion of the Addition.

For detailed, floor-by-floor, architectural drawings and descriptions, click on the thumbnail images of the floors you wish to view

As part of Polytechnic’s transformation, the University is improving the physical plant at MetroTech Center. An eight-story Joseph J. and Violet J. Jacobs Building is currently under construction and will contain state-of-the-art classrooms and laboratories, as well as a fully equipped athletic center. Rogers Hall, Polytechnic's original academic building, is undergoing major renovations to provide students with access to modern, well-equipped laboratories and classrooms—wired for the Internet, long-distance learning and state-of-the-art audio/visual instruction.



Davis Brody Bond
Polytechnic Jacobs Building
Brooklyn, NY
2002

http://www.davisbrody.com/

Following the Polytechnic University Expansion Master Plan, Davis Brody Bond was commissioned to design the Joseph J. and Violet J. Jacobs Building, a mixed-use building consisting of six academic floors and a recreation/gymnasium complex. The academic areas include two lecture halls, several multipurpose seminar rooms, engineering and computer labs as well as wet-labs for the chemistry and biology departments.

This new building is an addition to the school’s existing Rogers Hall. Its L-shaped plan creates an internal, landscaped courtyard directly above the gymnasium level. Located on Jay Street in Brooklyn, it represents a new image and front door for the University. The entry lobby is a three-story atrium that offers access to both the academic floors and the gymnasium level. The lobby also serves to connect the building to other student meetings areas in the existing Rogers Hall such as the cafeteria and lounge space.

The materials used in the design of Jacobs Building unite the structure with the Othmer Residence Hall as well as the Dibner Library which was designed by Davis Brody Bond in 1992. A glass curtain wall, precast concrete and metal panels are all part of a consistent design vocabulary intended to create the sense of a cohesive campus. The unification of these structures will be further achieved by the upgrading of the original Rogers Hall in the next phase.

Joseph J. and Violet J. Jacobs Building
9 stories
Davis Brody Bond Architects
Completed 2002



Wired New York page on the building:
http://www.wirednewyork.com/polytechnic_jacobs.htm

Derek2k3
March 6th, 2005, 07:56 PM
Project #16

The Donald F. & Mildred Topp Othmer Residence Hall
101 Tech Place/85 Johnson Street
19 stories 195 feet
Davis Brody Bond
Dev-Polytechnic University
Residential DOrmitory
440 Units 115,591 Sq. Ft.
Completed 2000-2002


http://www.poly.edu/reslife/reslifeimages/photos/othmer.jpg

Davis Brody Bond
Polytechnic Othmer Residence Hall
Brooklyn, NY
2002

http://www.davisbrody.com/main.cfm?go=1

The new Othmer Residence Hall is the first dormitory building on the Polytechnic University campus. It realizes one of the major goals of the University’s expansion master plan to introduce student life and residential facilities that had not previously existed on this urban campus. As Polytechnic University is a predominately commuter school, this housing building enables the school to attract a more diverse student body.

The Othmer Residence Hall stands at 18 stories and is comprised of 400 dormitory bed units, a student cafeteria, and staff apartments. Open two-story lounges, situated on every other floor, provide informal areas for student interaction. The student residents are designed as suites. The second through eighth floors contain four person suites that are designated for freshman students, and the upper floors contain two person suites equipped with kitchen facilities. The completion of this new campus facility has helped create a more cohesive campus environment.


http://www.poly.edu/reslife/housing/othmer.cfm
http://www.emporis.com/en/wm/bu/?id=113873
http://newyork.construction.com/projects/02_BestOf/02_AwdMeritRes.asp

Wired New York page on the project:
http://www.wirednewyork.com/polytechnic_dormitory.htm

Gulcrapek
March 6th, 2005, 09:54 PM
199 State Street
11 floors, 116 ft
46 units
Architect: Fox&Fowle

http://a810-bisweb.nyc.gov/bisweb/JobDetailsServlet?requestid=4&allisn=0001080004&allboroughname=&allnumbhous=199&allstrt=STATE+STREET&s=2764E472656094405BCE4CFD7393E84A

Derek2k3
March 6th, 2005, 10:06 PM
Cool, that should be an interesting project.

Project #18

NYC Office of Emergency Management Building
159-165 Cadman Plaza East
3 stories 56 feet
Swanke Hayden Connell Architects
Dev-NYC Office of Emergency Management
Commercial Office
66,245 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction February 2006


http://www.shca.com/images/content/archive/oem-02.jpg
Swanke Hayden Connell Architects

NYC Office of Emergency Management
New York, NY

http://www.shca.com/portfolio/default.asp?svcId=1&sctId=376&thumb=oem-03.jpg&credit=&projType=Architecture

SHCA has been retained by the New York City Department of Design and Construction to provide architectural and interior design services for New York City's new Office of Emergency Management Headquarters. The facility, which will replace the former headquarters destroyed on September 11, 2001, will be located at Cadman Plaza in Downtown Brooklyn. Formerly the site of the American Red Cross building, the location places O.E.M. prominently at the northern terminus of Brooklyn's Civic Center. The project scope calls for a re-clad, gut renovation and addition to an existing 3 story building. The program, of approximately 65,000 square feet, includes a new 100 person Emergency Operations Center, Watch Command, General Office space and a Press and Conference Center. The building will be supported by state of the art A/V and IT systems as well as redundant electro-mechanical systems. Completion is scheduled for October 2005.

BrooklynRider
March 7th, 2005, 11:11 AM
The site for 557 Atlantic is completely cleared and ready to roll.

Derek2k3
March 7th, 2005, 02:36 PM
Cool, I'll be surprised if anything good springs out.

Project # 19

Schermerhorn House (HS Developement Site Phase II)
Corner of Schermerhorn and Hoyt Streets
11 stories
Polshek Partnership Architects, LLP
Dev-HS Developement Partners LLC/Common Ground Community/The Actors Fund
200 units 97,000 Sq. Ft.
Affordable Residential Condominiums
Proposed 2005-2007

http://www.aiany.org/eOCULUS/2005/images/0304/polshek_schermerhorn.jpg

http://www.aiany.org/designawards/2004/projects/jpegs/241a.jpg
Polshek Partnership Architects
http://www.polshek.com


GIVE THEM SHELTER
For pioneering affordable-housing advocate Rosanne Haggerty, good design is hardly an extravagance. In fact, it pays for itself.

AN SRO FROM THE GROUND UP
By Anna Holtzman

http://www.commonground.org/org_info/media/articles/2004-04_Architecture2/

Forging ahead into other realms of design, Common Ground is developing its first ground-up construction, a 200-unit building in downtown Brooklyn designed by firm partners Susan Rodriguez and Timothy Hartung of Polshek Partnership. The project is a joint venture between Common Ground and the Actors' Fund of America, for whom Common Ground already manages a low-income residence for entertainment professionals in Manhattan. Like the Times Square Hotel, the Brooklyn building will house a fifty-fifty mix of formerly homeless people and low-income tenants, many of whom, in this case, are employed in the arts and entertainment industries.

The land for the project, part of a parcel being developed by Hamlin Ventures and Time Equities, was given to Common Ground by the developers because, as a city-designated urban-renewal site, a portion of the property had to be dedicated to low-income housing. The rest of the site will contain market-rate residential and commercial buildings. Common Ground chose Polshek Partnership in part because of the firm's previous experience on projects like The Ed Sullivan Theater in Manhattan that also faced this site's peculiar challenge: close proximity to a subway tunnel. In some areas, the structure will sit only 5 inches above the train passage. Four 23-foot trusses, which are exposed at the first two stories, suspend the building over the tunnel and visually "set the presence of the building apart from traditional low-income projects" Hartung believes. "Part of Common Ground's mission [with this project]," he adds, is to establish "pride of place." Incorporating sustainable initiatives is another goal of the project; the architects are following LEED guidelines (and may apply for the certification, if funding allows) and are pursuing the use of green roofs, daylighting-the front of the building is mainly glass-and recycled materials. Construction starts next year, and completion is planned for 2007.

Beyond communicating its ideology through architectural expression locally, Common Ground is spreading its innovative thinking about homelessness to cities across the United States and around the world. In addition to partnering with local organizations on projects in London; Newburgh, New York; and Hartford and Willimantic, Connecticut, the nonprofit runs a "replication" program that educates housing organizations in countries as far away as Australia and Japan. With the First Step Housing competition, Haggerty hopes to also inspire other humane approaches to temporary shelter. With her imaginative and pragmatic approach to affordable housing, she stands a very good chance.

Articles on the entire development:
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=3067
http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m3601/is_23_50/ai_112862710

Photo of the HS Development Site from the NYT.

Derek2k3
March 7th, 2005, 10:27 PM
Project #20

U.S. Federal Courthouse for the Eastern Regional District
275 Washington Street/26-48 Tillary Street
18 stories 260 feet
HLW/Cesar Pelli & Associates
Dev-U.S. Government
Civil Building
650,000 Sq. Ft.
Completed 2000-2004

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/40556401.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/40556406.jpg


NEW U.S. COURTHOUSE

http://www.nyed.uscourts.gov/General_Information/Courthouse_Locations/Groundbreaking/groundbreaking.html

The new Federal Courthouse will be located in the Civic Center of downtown Brooklyn, visible from the Brooklyn Bridge, the Manhattan Bridge, lower Manhattan and surrounding neighborhoods. It will be constructed on the site if the former Emanuel Cellar building was razed in 1998.

The project is comprised of three architectural elements: the 6-story existing courthouse; a 6-story connecting entry hall, which includes the main building entrance, lobby and cross-building connectors; and the new courthouse, a 14-story, limestone-clad tower. The combined building elements will function as the new court complex.

The new $222 million building will ultimately house 16 District courtrooms, nine Magistrate courtrooms and 29 judges' chambers. The building will open in 2002 with 12 District Courtrooms, for Magistrate courtrooms, one Arraignment courtroom and 17 judges' chambers. To provide for both current needs and beyond, areas to be occupied by future courtrooms and chambers will initially house the U.S. Probation Department, which will be relocated from the building, as additional court space is needed. The courtrooms and chambers are arranged in a collegial layout with a single chambers floor located between two court floors. This layout reduces the size if the floorplate, creating a more tapered building profile. The smaller Magistrate floors, located in the upper tower, allow the building to be setback at the top. The Courthouse will also house a U.S. Court of Appeals Library, offices for the District Court Clerk, the Pretrial Services Agency and the U.S. Marshals Service. The building will include a food service facility and a Jury Assembly area, as well a below ground parking.

Designed by HLW International L.L.P and Cesar Pelli and Associates



Wired New York Page on the building:
http://www.wirednewyork.com/brooklyn/federal_courthouse/default.htm

Other links:
http://www.geocities.com/brooklyn_rise/fed.html
http://www.emporis.com/en/wm/bu/?id=100382
http://www.fwdodge.com/dcp/NYCN/NYjune02/top_proj2002/TP_8.html
http://www.fwdodge.com/dcp/NYCN/NYcover/NYfeature2-mar01.html
http://newyork.construction.com/features/archive/0311_Cover_C.asp
http://gothamgazette.com/community/33/news/831
http://www.stoneworld.com/CDA/ArticleInformation/features/BNP__Features__Item/0,4046,109040,00.html

Derek2k3
March 11th, 2005, 05:02 PM
Project #6

Fifteen Metrotech (Nine MetroTech Center South)
15 MetoTech Center/115-159 Myrtle Avenue
19 stories 325ft
Cesar Pelli & Associates/Swanke Hayden Connell
Dev-Forest City Ratner
Commercial Office
607,815 Sq. Ft.
Completed November 20, 2001-Summer 2003


http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/40686457.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/40686493.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/40686495.jpg

Not my camera obviously. You can download these full size fron the Forest City Enterprises web site.

http://www.forestcity.net/press_property_off.html

Derek2k3
March 11th, 2005, 05:50 PM
Project # 21

12 MetroTech Center/The Kings County Supreme & Family Courthouse
318-330 Jay Street/78 Johnson Street
Perkins Eastman & Associates
Dev-Forest City Ratner Companies
32 stories 473 feet
Civil Courthouse
1,125,000 Sq. Ft.
Completed 2001-2004

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/40686989.jpg

http://www.330jaystreet.com/

Twelve MetroTech Center
330 Jay Street Brooklyn, NY 11201

http://www.forestcity.net/Properties/Commercial/Office/Twelve_MetroTech_Center.html

330 Jay Street has been designed to be an integral part of responses to the context of downtown Brooklyn.

Location Description
Rising 473 feet high, 330 Jay Street consists of stories (including two stories that will house the building's mechanical equipment). The below grade parking and floors 1 through 25 will be occupied by the Supreme and Family courts and associated city and state agencies. The remaining floors (26 through 30) are being developed as commercial office space. The ground floor of 330 Jay Street will have three separate entrance lobbies, one each for Family Court and Supreme Court, and a third lobby serving the commercial office space.

A previous design.
http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/40686984.jpg
Rendering Credit: Ernest Burden III, Acme Digital


http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/40686978.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/40686981.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/40686982.jpg

Wired New York page on the building:
http://www.wirednewyork.com/brooklyn/12metrotech/default.htm

Some additional links
http://www.wirednewyork.com/brooklyn/12metrotech/default.htm
http://www.geocities.com/brooklyn_rise/12mc.html
http://www.emporis.com/en/wm/bu/?id=101470
http://www.mrce.com/pages/projects/2002-5.shtml
http://www.enclos.com/blastres.htm
http://www.turnerconstruction.com/newyork/content.asp?d=1310
http://newyork.construction.com/NYCN/NYjuly02/feature2Jul02.html
http://newyork.construction.com/features/archive/0311_Cover_D.asp

Derek2k3
March 12th, 2005, 10:29 AM
Project #22

"Bruce Kaplan Tower"
Myrtle Avenue between Gold and Prince Streets
23 stories
Dev-K & L Development Co./Bruce Kaplan
Residential
350 units
Proposed

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/40706336.jpg

Brooklyn Papers

http://www.brooklynpapers.com/html/issues/_vol27/27_33/27_33nets3.html

A developer by the name of Bruce Kaplan plans to build a 200-foot residential building across Myrtle Avenue stretching to Johnson Street between Gold and Prince streets.

That site is not listed as one of the projected development sites in the Downtown Plan.

Kaplan is scheduled to present his plans at the monthly Community Board 2 meeting in October. Some residents who have gotten wind of the project have already started complaining about the height and size, according to James.

But real estate brokers and city officials say they are pleased, overall, with the increased activity downtown.

“This neighborhood has location, location, location, and now the rezoning has made it more fertile ground for investment,” said Rachaele Raynoff, a spokeswoman for the Department of City Planning.

Gulcrapek
March 12th, 2005, 01:14 PM
That was a while ago, there hasn;t been any news since then. Nothing about Catsimatides' (sp) thing either.

Derek2k3
March 12th, 2005, 09:28 PM
Well, it was just in October they were suppose to have the community board meeting so I bet we'll hear something by this summer...and demolition soon after hopefully.

Not sure if this building expansion is a real project yet or just an idea...

Project #23

New York City Technical College Expansion
Ehrenkrantz Eckstut & Kuhn Architects
Dev- New York City Technical College
Academic
Proposed ?

http://63.240.68.122/FirmFiles/8/images/nytechr1.jpg

http://63.240.68.122/FirmFiles/8/images/39422-int-full.jpg

Ehrenkrantz Eckstut & Kuhn Architects
New York City Technical College
http://www.eekarchitects.com/project.html

Location: Brooklyn, New York

EE&K Architects recently completed updating the Campus Master Plan for the New York City Technical College. To inform the design principles for this project, the most critical issues were identified through interviews and focus groups. EE&K Architects' analysis indicated that New York Tech's problems included insufficient vertical circulation, a separation between campuses, an inappropriate main entrance, a lack of visual identity, lack of a campus center, not enough casual gathering spaces, security issues, and no full production theatre.

Since the campus is landlocked, with no undeveloped sites available, all growth potential is through either demolition or expansion of existing buildings or the acquisition of new lands. EE&K Architects studied all three options and their variations. With the most limited of resources, our new master plan asserts the importance of New York Tech as a gateway to downtown Brooklyn. The plan fully satisfies the campus' need for growth and flexibility over time through the creative use of streets, zoning, and the joint use of adjacent facilities and property.

Forgot to take a pic of the low-rise for the expansion but here's the main building across the street.
http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/40726210.jpg

Derek2k3
March 13th, 2005, 07:46 PM
Projects #24 & 25

230 Livingston Street
25 stories
Karl Fischer?
Residential
226 units(total)156,615 Sq. Ft.
Proposed

225 Schermerhorn Street
14 stories
Karl Fischer?
Residential
226 units(total) 60,996 Sq.Ft.
Proposed

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/40774761.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/40774765.jpg http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/40774797.jpg

http://www.masseyknakal.com/buildingphotos/230livingston.pdf

Tower 1: 25 floors, 156,615 sqft residential
Tower 2: 14 floors, 60,996 sqft residential
Both with ground floor retail
Total units: 226
Architect: Karl Fischer

Site is now a parking lot.

http://www.masseyknakal.com/buildingphotos/230livingston.pdf

Derek2k3
March 19th, 2005, 11:25 AM
Downtown jail may
reopen for biz - city

BY HUGH SON
DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER

The dormant downtown Brooklyn prison on Atlantic Ave. could soon house inmates again because of two upcoming jail renovation projects, a city honcho says.

The overhaul of a floating East River jail barge and a Rikers Island facility could force the city to reopen the hugely unpopular Brooklyn House of Detention by 2007, Correction Commissioner Martin Horn told a City Council hearing last week.

"It's important to have that space available," Correction Department spokesman Thomas Antenen said. "The commissioner was just giving examples why we couldn't give it up."

Though Antenen stressed there was no formal plan to reopen the Atlantic Ave. jail, which was closed two years ago, the city has earmarked $18.4 million to refurbish the 11-story building.

The projects are "far too speculative justifications for taking up this extremely valuable piece of real estate," said Councilman David Yassky (D-Brooklyn Heights), who had grilled Horn about a possible opening date.

With a vacancy rate of about 8%, the 11 active city prisons are filled with more than 13,500 people - a figure that could surge if crime picks up.

Critics of the House of Detention - including Borough President Marty Markowitz - charge a reopened prison would hinder downtown Brooklyn's rebirth. They want the imposing gray building at 275 Atlantic Ave. turned into retail stores or housing.

"Having a jail smack in the middle of all this new development is not a good thing," Downtown Brooklyn Council head Michael Burke said.

An active jail would be a "huge turnoff" for renters and buyers at apartments that flank the site - and could knock 25% off values in the buildings, said Bill Ross, sales director of the Halstead Brooklyn real estate agency.

Before the jail closed, inmates' relatives formed long lines on nearby Boerum Place, and prisoners made catcalls to passersby from windows.

"They would whistle at men, women, boys, girls - whatever," Ross said.

Hundreds of luxury apartments in buildings at 125 Atlantic Ave. and 53 Boerum Place are nearing completion, as is a Brooklyn Law School dorm at 205 State St.

Putting a jail back in that spot would be "one of the worst decisions the city could make," Ross said, adding that the site could fetch $25 million for city coffers.

"This place don't belong here," John, a 33-year-old construction worker, said as he walked by the scaffolded site yesterday.

The Coney Island man said he spent a day in the Brooklyn cooler on a pot possession bust years ago.

"It was a hellhole," he said. "This is a beautiful neighborhood - why would you put 10 stories of prisoners here?"

Originally published on March 17, 2005

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/40969736.jpg

Derek2k3
March 23rd, 2005, 02:18 AM
Project #26

The Atlantic Building
397-399 Atlantic Avenue/90 Bond Street
6 stories 72 feet
Case Development Inc./JMJ Cross Enterprises
Dev-Bond and Atlantic Realty
Residential Rental
13 units 14,500 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2003-2005

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/41140428.jpg

399 Atlantic Ave. Takes Shape
by Linda Collins (linda@brooklyneagle.net), published online 06-18-2004

http://www.brooklyneagle.com/archive/brooklyn_space.php?id=1815

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/41140424.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/41140442.jpg

Derek2k3
March 23rd, 2005, 02:45 AM
Project #27

384 Atlantic Avenue
384-386 Atlantic Avenue
5 stories 50 feet
Rothzeid Kaiserman Thomson & Bee, P.C.
Dev-384 Atlantic Avenue LLC/Community Preservation Corporation Resources
Residential Rental
12 units 13,295 Sq. Ft.
Completed 2002-2003


http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/41140963.jpg

New York Times
February 23, 2003, Sunday
REAL ESTATE DESK
POSTINGS: Housing Group Builds For-Profit Project in Brooklyn; 12 Market Rentals And Two Storefronts
By EDWIN McDOWELL

http://www.communityp.com/index.php?sec=articles&page=forprofit

The Community Preservation Corporation in Manhattan has provided financing throughout New York and New Jersey for adding and preserving 93,000 affordable housing units over almost three decades. But last summer the housing group took a new path when its for-profit subsidiary, Community Preservation Corporation Resources, developed a vacant lot in Brooklyn into a four-story building with retail space at ground level and 12 rental apartments above.

''It's our first venture in new construction at market rates,'' said Michael D. Lappin, president and chief executive of the Community Preservation Corporation.

The building, at 384 Atlantic Avenue, rented all 12 apartments -- eight one-bedrooms and four duplex penthouses -- within two months. A lease is now being negotiated for one of the two 2,000-square-foot storefront spaces.

Six of the one-bedroom apartments, ranging from 585 to 629 square feet, rented for $1,500 a month, while the other two, which have decks, rented for $1,750. The two-bedroom duplex penthouses rented for $2,400 or $2,500.

The Galaxy Construction Corporation in the Bronx built the building. The architect was Carmi Bee of RKT&B, architects and planners of Manhattan.

The current structure is unusual for several reasons, Mr. Bee said, among them that it is a walkup, a rare new building that does not have an elevator. Balconies on the building's front are not so much for aesthetic purposes as for safety reasons: to allow crossing between apartments in case of fire.

Because the 50-by-100-foot lot is within the Atlantic Avenue special zoning district, the building had to be of a height approximating that of the general area. To harmonize with other buildings in the area, Mr. Bee used a combination of brick, precast concrete and decorative metal on the facade.

''It's a tricky business,'' he said, ''because you don't want to stick out like a sore thumb, but you want to add interest, and you want a good-looking and commodious building at a reasonable price.''

Mr. Lappin and Mr. Bee said they hoped the building would be the first of several in-fill rental structures developed by the group. ''We want to be the Johnny Appleseed of these projects,'' Mr. Bee said, ''so we can see more of them proliferate.'' EDWIN McDOWELL

Derek2k3
March 24th, 2005, 12:02 PM
Project #10

The Smith/Atlantic Court
295 Atlantic Avenue/75-91 Smith Street
13 stories 140 feet
Meltzer/Mandl Architects
Dev-Boymelgreen Developers
Mixed-Use
134 units 152,000 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2004-Early 2006

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/41186392.jpg http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/41186382.jpg

Derek2k3
March 24th, 2005, 01:14 PM
Projects #28-31

State Renaissance Court Phase I (Building I)
200 Schermerhorn Street
James McCullar & Associates
Dev-State Renaissance Court LLC/IBEC Building Corp./Strategic Development Group
8 stories 77 feet
Residential Rental
158 units 195,296 Sq. Ft. (Total Phase I Sq. Ft.)
Under Construction 2005-2006

State Renaissance Court Phase I (Building II)
200 Schermerhorn Street
James McCullar & Associates
Dev-State Renaissance Court LLC/IBEC Building Corp./Strategic Development Group
6 stories
Ventilation Shaft
195,296 Sq. Ft. (Total Phase I Sq. Ft.)
Under Construction 2005-2006

State Renaissance Court Phase I (Building III)
200 Schermerhorn Street
James McCullar & Associates
Dev-State Renaissance Court LLC/IBEC Building Corp./Strategic Development Group
8 stories 77 feet
Residential Rental
158 units 195,296 Sq. Ft. (Total Phase I Sq. Ft.)
Under Construction 2005-2006

State Renaissance Court Phase II
200 Schermerhorn Street
4 stories
James McCullar & Associates
Dev-State Renaissance Court LLC/IBEC Building Corp./Strategic Development Group
Residential Condominium
28 units
Proposed


http://www.mccullar-aia.com/BrooklynMcCRendAB.jpg
Phase I

http://www.mccullar-aia.com/StateRenaissPlan.jpg
Site Plan

http://www.mccullar-aia.com/TownhousesRedBrick.jpg
Phase II


James McCullar & Associates
Design of a mixed-use building over a subway station / Design in progress

http://www.mccullar-aia.com/StateRenaissance.html

The proposed design for Site B in the Hoyt-Schermerhorn Urban Renewal Plan is designed in two phases: Phase 1 includes an 8-story mixed-use building with 158 apartments, retail stores, and indoor parking. Phase 2 includes the design of new infill townhouses on State Street after completion of the 8-story building. The development team was selected in a competitive RFP by the Empire State Development Corporation with community based design guidelines.

The building designs are intended to form a transition in scale from the commercial activity of downtown Brooklyn to the residential character of "brownstone Brooklyn". The 8-story building is located above the Hoyt-Schermerhorn subway station that extends the length and width of Schermerhorn Street and the building footprint. The two level subway structure was designed to support a future building, but new seismic criteria requires a first floor truss-like structure isolated at load points and anchored by pile foundations at the adjacent townhouse sites. As a result, the 447-ft. frontage is treated as one building, with a central lobby leading to three elevator cores. The First Floor street frontages consist of retail stores, with covered parking located at the rear. The 8-story building will be divided equally between market-rate and affordable rental units. The Phase 2 townhouses will be a market-rate condominium.



BROOKLYN HEIGHTS PRESS
by Linda Collins

Developers of one of Hoyt-Schermerhorn Urban renewal Area projects in Dowtown Brooklyn have revcieved some assistance with their financing from the New York City Housing Development Corp. (HPD)

The HDC approved $35.2 million of tax-exempted bond financing and $3.5 million from its corporate reserves for what it calls the "first mixed-income rental apartment buildings in Brooklyn."

The developers of the site, to be known as state renaissance court with the address of 200 Schermerhorn St., are IBEC Building corp. and Strategic Development and Construction, both Brooklyn-based companies who will be operating as State Renaissance LLC.

Under the program, 30 percent of the 158 rental units will be reserved for low income housholds; 20 percent of the total units will be set-aside as middle-income housing; and the remaining 50 percent of the units will be rented at market rate, according to a published statement from HDC.

the range in income for a typical family of four will be $25,1000-$37,680 for the low-income units, with a cap of $125,000 for the middle-income units, according to IBEC's Samy Brahimy, who said he estimates that the application process for the affordable units will begin in January 2006. Brahimy also said his firm's website, ibecliving.com will be posting updated during construction
The apartments will be a miz of 17 studios, 40 one-bedroom units, 91 two-bedroom units, nine three-bedroom units and one superintendent's apartment.

"HDC's mixed-Income Program allows us to serve a wider range of economically diverse NEw Yorkers and allows our resources to go father," said Emily Youssouf, HDC president, adding that the HDC recieved national recognition for this innovative program at the recent annual meeting of the NAtional Council of State Housing Finance Agencies. "We look forward to financing more mixed-income developments as aprt of the mayor's housing plan."

As previously reported in the Brooklyn Eagle, the dite is bounded by hoty, Shermerhorn, Bond and State streets and will be built in two phases with this first phase erected atop the Hoyt-Schermerhorn Subway station.

Its design has undergone a few changed, according to John Frezza of Strategic Construction.

"In view of the mayor's initiative on affordable housing we wanted to create more affordable units so we embellished the project a bit," he said.

As originally planeed, a 135-unit apartment building with towo seperate aings-- one 8 stories, the other 6 stories--was proposed to include a one-story vent shart between them need for the subway.

"The design now calls for two eight-story wings with a 6 story connection, creating a more contectual look," Frezza said, adding that the developers have been working closely with the city and MTA on the plans [b]

"the building designs are intended to form a transition in the scale from the commercail activity of Downton Brooklyn to the residential charcter of the residential character of brownstone brooklyn," said architect Jim McCullar of James McCullar & Associates, who included the following description on his website: "The eight-story building is located above the Hoyt-Schermerhorn subway station that extends the length and width of Schermerhorn Street and the building foorprint. The two-level subway structure was designed to support a furutre building, but new seismic criteria requires a first floor truss-like structure isolated at load points and anchored by pile foundations at the adjacent townhouse sites. As a result the 447-foot frontage is treated as one building, with a central lobby leading to three elevator cores."

In addition to the rental units, there will be 17,000 square feet of space for retail stores at street level, with a 72-car private indoor parking garage at the rear. Other amenities will include 24-hour doorman service, laundry rooms, a fitness center and recreation room, and a landscaped outdoor terrace on the second floor.

HDC is not involved in Phase II of IBEC/Strategic project, which will eventually provide for 14 two-family market rate condominium townhouses build next to and after completion of the state REnaissance Court aparments.[b]

Both phases of the project were originally initiated through an RFP issued by the Empire State Development corporation, and are being developed under the auspices of the Department of houseing preservation and Development (HPD).

According to Richard Bearack, who heads the Brooklyn Borough President's Hoyt-Schermerhorn Task Force, it is important to note that this property only occupies the first three-quarters of schermerhorn Street between Hoyt and Bond, doesn't include any property on Bond, and doesn't occupy and already developed properties, such as the existing private homes and St. Nicholas Cathedral.

According to Frezza, constuction will begin "on or about Februarty 1." The closing on the property took place December 7.

The other two parcels in the Hoyt-Schermerho9rn Renewal area at smioth Street and atlantic Avenue, a mixed-use apartment building with a possible hotel being developed by Leviev Boymelgreen Developers and currently in redesign' and a site bordering by Smither, Schermerhorn, hoyt and State streets being developed by Time Equities and hamlin Ventures operating as HS developement PArtners LLC.

The Hs development site is still in the Design stage but has released the names of the architects for two parts of the three-part project. Rogers Marbel Architects will develop the town houses of Phase I; and for phase II, James S. Polshek Partners will design Schermerhorn house, the proposed 200 unit building containgin affordable houseing units being develped in conjunction with common ground and the Actors Fund. All three sites in the Hoyt-schermerhorn are were previously rented to parking lot owners by the State of New York.

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/41187661.jpg
3/22:Along Schermerhorn Street
http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/41187662.jpg
Phase I construction


Thread here:
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=5706&highlight=schermerhorn

Links:
http://www.ibecliving.com/src.htm
http://www.nychdc.com/apartments/d_mixedincome.htm
http://www.davidyassky.com/hoyt.php
http://www.nychdc.com/pressroom/pr_102504_boardmeeting.htm
http://www.wncinc.com/news.htm
http://www.knowledgeplex.org/news/67517.html

Derek2k3
March 25th, 2005, 01:59 PM
Project #32

State Street Townhouses
261-287/301-309 State Street
3 stories 49 feet
Rogers Marvel Architects, PLLC
Dev-HS Development Partners, LLC (Time Equities Inc. and Hamlin Ventures, LLC)
Residential Condominium
1 unit ~4,297 Sq. Ft. (X 14)
Under Construction Late 2004-2005

http://www.aiany.org/designawards/2004/projects/jpegs/216c.jpg

http://www.aiany.org/designawards/2004/projects/jpegs/216a.jpg

http://www.statestreettownhouses.com/statestwatercolor.jpg


State Street Townhouses
http://www.statestreettownhouses.com/

This is the first phase of the HS Development site. The second phase is already posted as "project #19."

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/41221061.jpg

Links:
http://www.corusbank.com/PRESS/PR-2004-Oct-26-StateStreet.htm
http://www.aiany.org/designawards/2004/projects/proj4.htm
http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m3601/is_23_50/ai_112862710

Derek2k3
March 25th, 2005, 07:28 PM
Project #33

120 Willoughby Street/Thor Tower
116-124 Willoughby Street/392-400 Albee Square
48/33 stories >512 feet
Kohn Pedersen & Fox ?
Dev-Joseph Sitt of Thor Equities
Mixed-Use
1.2 million Sq. Ft.
Proposed

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/41231646.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/41231738.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/41231748.jpg
Proposed to be the first tower to rise around "Willoughby Square"

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/41231292.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/41231301.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/41231831.jpg
Parking lot where Willoughby Square will go.


Whole thread on the project here.
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/topic.cgi?forum=4&topic=511

Links:
http://www.geocities.com/brooklyn_rise/ast.html
http://www.skyscraperpage.com/cities/?buildingID=29753
http://www.brooklyneagle.com/archive/editorial_viewpoint.php?id=3222

Derek2k3
March 29th, 2005, 03:25 AM
Project #34

The Heights
100/94-110 Court Street/44-50 Schermerhorn Street
13 stories 172/195 feet
Hardy Holzman Pfeiffer Associates
Dev-Forest City Ratner
Commercial Retail
141,224 Sq. Ft.
Completed June/July 2000

http://www.hhpa.com/photos/projects/commercial/100_l0.jpg http://www.hhpa.com/photos/projects/commercial/100_l1.jpg

Hardy Holzman Pfeiffer Associates
Court Street Retail Development
Brooklyn, New York

http://www.hhpa.com/projects/project_details.php?section=commercial&ID=100

Also referred to as The Heights, the HHPA-designed Court Street Retail Development combines a 12-screen cineplex and Barnes and Nobel bookstore into a hub of activity to a southern portion of Brooklyn's Court Street. The street, which separates the historic residential area of Brooklyn Heights from the borough's civic and downtown business center, fell victim to urban decay over past decade. Design of the new building responds to the assorted architectural influences of its surroundings, and with careful manipulation of massing and materials, minimizes its impact. A marquee at the southeast corner announces the cinemas' entrance and through the use of glass corners, exposes activities within cinema lobbies. To express individual cinemas and enliven the windowless facades, HHPA developed a design that juxtaposes a broad spectrum of colors, patterns, and setbacks creating an overlap that variegates the tower's dimensions and patterns.

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/41385331.jpg

Links:
http://www.emporis.com/en/wm/bu/?id=139351
http://www.fcrc.com/project_main1.asp?id=21&cc=1&rid=21
http://www.forestcity.net/Properties/Commercial/Retail/The_Heights.html

Derek2k3
March 31st, 2005, 12:39 PM
Project #35

Edmund T. and Jeanette Pratt Building /Pratt Center/Pratt Building at Long Island University
1 University Plaza
6 stories 85 feet
Mitchell/Giurgola Architects
Dev-Long Island University
Academic
70,600 Sq. Ft.
Completed 1999-March 2001

http://gortonassociates.com/Projects/LIUPratt-Reg.jpg

http://www.mitchellgiurgola.com/giuh_photos/prt_1.jpg

http://www.mitchellgiurgola.com/giuh_photos/prt_3.jpg


Mitchell/Giurgola Architects
Pratt Center,
Long Island University, Brooklyn.
Brooklyn, New York.

http://www.mitchellgiurgola.com/giuh_pages/prt_more.html

Completed:
2001

Area:
62,000 gsf

Cost:
$ 20,000,000

In accordance with the Comprehensive Master Plan for the Brooklyn Campus, Long Island University has constructed a new building on the site of an existing MTA substation, located in the heart of the campus. To satisfy the needs of a rapidly growing student and faculty population, LIU’s programmatic requirements for the Pratt Building included creating new space to relieve cramped and inadequate classrooms, student services, and supporting resources. Furthermore, the Pratt Building links with and expands upon the inter-building circulation system of the campus. In the future, LIU anticipates demolishing the adjacent “S” Building and replacing it with an extension of the Pratt Building. The overall design considers this potential development.

The six-story Pratt Building welcomes students and faculty from the main campus walk at its primary entrance, and from the north through the Triangle Theatre lobby. The most prominent façade of the building is clad in glass, giving relief to the long, windowless backside of the Metcalfe Building. The building houses various departments, computer labs, and student academic and career advisement services. It also provides critically needed flexible classrooms and offices wired for the school’s burgeoning technological needs.

The Pratt lobby runs the length of the site from east to west, anticipating the eventual connection to Flatbush Avenue and allowing a convenient passage to the center of the campus. A tall stone-clad wall defines the public corridor from the departmental office suites and classrooms flanking it. At the same time, the wall extends beyond the face of the building to mark the entry. The corridor/lobby arrangement repeats up through the building as two three-story atria, through which natural light diffuses. The ends of each corridor terminate in a lounge affording views into campus or across Flatbush Avenue.

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/41476124.jpg

Links:
http://www.designshare.com/Awards2001/ReviewProjectOverview.asp?project_id=86&ProjType=COL
http://gortonassociates.com/ProjSchoolLIUPratt.htm
http://www.aiany.org/designawards/2001/project/153_proj.htm

Derek2k3
April 5th, 2005, 11:57 AM
Project #36

180 Montague Street
176-180 Montague Street
33 stories 331 feet
H. Thomas O'Hara
Dev-Eichner Continuum Company
Residential Rentals
186 units 212,268 Sq. Ft.
Completed 1999-2000

http://www.hto-architect.com/images/180Montague.jpg

180 Montague Street
http://www.180montague.com

Brooklyn Heights, New York
180 Montague street's magnificent architecture transports you to an era when fine workmanship was prized and fine materials were standard.

Old world finishes give the phrase "quality of life"
a whole new meaning.

Outrageous views of Manhattan and NY Harbor - from the top floors you'll see well into New Jersey.

Elegantly Appointed Marble Lobby.

State-of-the-art security and intercoms for your safety, privacy and peace of mind.

On-site parking makes life easy and convenient - never worry about your car again.

Laundry room on the second floor.

24-hour Concierge

Pet Friendly

Pre -wired with DSL

Elegantly Appointed Marble Lobby

Breathtaking Manhattan Skyline Views

Nine-foot ceilings

Hardwood Floors

Pre-Wired Telephone Intercom System

State of the Art Fitness Center

2nd Floor Laundry Room & Lounge

On-site Parking Garage

34 Stories / 192 Residential Units

Valet Services Located on 2nd Floor

N-R-2-3-4-5-F-A-C Subways just steps away.

High Tech Video Security System

Nine Foot Ceilings

Hardwood Floors

Elegant Euro Style White Cabinets

White on White GE Profile Kitchen Appliances

White on White Ceramic Tile Bathrooms

White on White Microwave

Individually Controlled Heat & Air Conditioning

Many Residences with Walk-in Closets

Oversized Insulated Windows

Porcelain Tile Kitchen Floors


Studio $1,700

1 Bedroom $2,250

2 Bedroom $4,000



A high-rise grows in Brooklyn Heights

33-story complex dominates skyline; neighbors unhappy

http://www.thetimesharebeat.com/archives/2000/ts/tsjuly1.htm

By Cecily Barnes / Bloomberg News
Published in The Detroit News
June 8, 2000
NEW YORK -- New York's Brooklyn Heights, with its quaint 19th century brownstones and parks, is about to emerge from the shadows of Manhattan with a 33-story apartment complex that will dominate the borough's skyline.

The expected opening this fall of the 186-unit complex at 180 Montague St. -- about five blocks from the home of Washington Roebling who supervised construction of the Brooklyn Bridge from his bed -- is seen by some as a new refuge for migrating Manhattanites. Others see it as the loss of a tranquil oasis.

The developers, brothers Bruce and Stuart Eichner, say the building will capitalize on a growing number of people fed up with sky-high New York City apartment prices who are migrating across the river to Brooklyn Heights in search of cheaper digs.

Longtime residents complain it just doesn't fit with Brooklyn Heights' row houses and reputation as "an oasis in the city," says Judy Stanton, executive director of the Brooklyn Heights Association, a citizens group.

"The building is way too big for where it is," Stanton says. "It's 33 stories and it kind of dwarfs the district. It's this big tall building sort of eating up the sky."

Rents at the high-rise, the only one of its kind in the area, will range from $1,900 to $6,700 a month.

Tenants will get views of the Manhattan skyline, a marble-laden lobby, fitness center and 24-hour concierge service. Top floor residents will be able to see New Jersey.

Melinda Magnett, president of Corcoran Group's Brooklyn office, says Wall Street firms like Bear Stearns and Goldman, Sachs are bringing more apartment seekers into the area as they open offices in downtown Brooklyn.

"I suspect that this building (on Montague Street) will house a lot of the employees," she says.

The apartment building is 20 percent preleased, according to the developers, who declined to disclose the cost of the project.

Some residents and brokers warn that the project will bring an increased interest in Brooklyn Heights, accelerating rent increases and disrupting the area's sense of neighborhood.

"When the owners of brownstone apartments see the higher rents being obtained, they'll think in terms of higher rentals for the units they have," says John Noonan, a real estate broker with Noonan Associates.

Adds Magnett, "I would bet money next year's rental averages will be up considerably because of these apartments."

The average cost of a Brooklyn Heights rental has increased more than 50 percent to $1,811 since 1995, according to Corcoran Group. Rental prices for two-bedroom apartments have almost doubled to $2,910.

Building publicist Melissa Green says the developers have worked with Brooklyn's planning commission to alleviate most of the concerns.

"In the planning stages, (the Brooklyn Heights Association) objected to it, and we had to adjust everything to them, and that's how we got it approved," Green says.

For Bruce Eichner, 54, and Stuart, 50, the project is a return to their roots.

Bruce got his start in Brooklyn Heights in the early 1970s by renovating brownstones. Stuart came on board later and the money they made financed their move into Manhattan, where the two have developed 10 major projects.

The projects include CitySpire at 150 West 56th St., the city's tallest mixed-use property, and the Manhattan Club near Carnegie Hall in Midtown, one of the city's first time-share properties where one-week stays go for $19,000.

The Eichners, though, have a less than sentimental reason for going back to Brooklyn.

"It was a combination of a very, very good (land) acquisition price and reasonable long-term lending rates," Stuart says.

(c) Copyright The Detroit News. All rights reserved.


http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/41681850.jpg

Links:
http://www.emporis.com/ge/wm/bu/?id=115543
http://skyscraperpage.com/cities/?buildingID=4659
http://www.hto-architect.com/180montague.htm
http://www.ibrooklyn.com/buildingbrooklyn/residential_mmk.html
http://www.vjbconstruction.com/recently_completed.php?sub=rec_pro#
http://www.apartmentratings.com/rate/NY-New-York-180-Montague-Street-251737.html#continued

Derek2k3
April 9th, 2005, 11:35 AM
Project #32

State Street Townhouses
261-287/301-309 State Street
3 stories 49 feet
Rogers Marvel Architects, PLLC
Dev-HS Development Partners, LLC (Time Equities Inc. and Hamlin Ventures, LLC)
Residential Condominium
1 unit ~4,297 Sq. Ft. (X 14)
Under Construction Late 2004-2005

http://www.aiany.org/designawards/2004/projects/jpegs/216c.jpg

http://www.statestreettownhouses.com/statestwatercolor.jpg


State Street Townhouses
http://www.statestreettownhouses.com/

www.14townhouses.com

Corcoran
14 townhouses
267-287 State Street
Brooklyn,NY11201

http://www.corcoran.com/property/nd/photo/14orange.jpg
http://www.corcoran.com/property/nd/index.asp?BDD=Y

Overview
COMING SOON!
Introducing 14 Town Houses, a new development now underway on historic State Street in Boerum Hill, Brooklyn. Conceived by cutting edge developers Abby Hamlin and Francis Greenburger, this unique project will create a limited number of carefully crafted, modern single family homes across from a classic row of restored landmark townhouses. Designed for contemporary city living, these 4,000 square foot town houses combine dramatic, double-height entertaining space in an open-plan layout with gracious family quarters that include five bedrooms and four full bathrooms. Daylight will flood these interiors through nine foot high south facing windows, a twenty foot high north facing glass wall, and an eight foot wide skylight above a custom wood and steel stair. With elegant modern detailing, state-of-the-art Bulthaup kitchens, top-of-the-line stainless steel appliances, a private backyard and roof terrace, these homes are perfect for the sophisticated, design-savvy urbanite.

14 Town Houses' location is ideal too. With Manhattan a brief subway ride away, you are around the corner from everything in Boerum Hill - unique shopping, fine dining, contemporary culture and entertainment venues, esteemed schools, parks and more. Once you get here, you'll never want to leave.

This rare opportunity to acquire a brand new, architecturally distinguished urban home won't last. Designed by the award-winning firm of Rogers Marvel Architects, this contemporary row house composition of only 14 will quickly become an exemplary, lived-in modern urban block.

Derek2k3
April 17th, 2005, 12:38 AM
A preview of the Switch Building?

Project #37

322 Hicks Street
322-324 Hicks Street
5 stories
Smith-Miller + Hawkinson Architects/LSGS Architects
Dev-Second Development Services, Inc.
Residential Condominium
6 units 11,770 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction October 2002-Fall 2003

http://www.lsgsarchitects.com/photos/Hicks_Street.jpg

http://www.archnewsnow.com/features/images/Feature0064_02x.jpg

322 Hicks Street

http://www.lsgsarchitects.com/display.asp?code=874

Client: Second Development Services, Inc.
Project: Hicks Street
Location: Brooklyn, New York
Project Type: Housing and Community Development / New Construction
Description: 322 Hicks Street is a new building on one of the last open sites in the Landmarked District of Brooklyn Heights. For this reason, the project represents a special design challenge in an historic urban fabric. The insertion of a five story multiple dwelling, with luxurious full floor single apartments on floors 2-5 and two generous duplex units with walk-out garden access on the ground floor and basement level, introduces a typology foreign to the neighborhood of single family residences. It was our goal to produce a design that was both contemporary, yet very sensitive to the district, both in the scale of its massing and in its details. For that reason LSGS, working in conjunction with facade consultant Smith-Miller + Hawkinson Architects, developed a proposal to link typologically the building's design to familiar neighborhood structures. The two predominant Brooklyn typologies: the Brownstone and the Warehouse, provided various design cues. From these precedents came the inspiration for the "bay" or oriel window, the size and scale of building, the relationship of building skin to openings, the mitigation of the scale of the building through canopy, and provision of a street scaled space at sidewalk level by the articulation of the ground floor. The resulting design with its front facade inflection serves to unify the entire block, while giving it new focus. This project uses building materials of the highest quality: a Norman size brick with a "historic Brooklyn Heights" orange hue, a shot-peaned stainless steel canopy, steel-section oriel windows, and an extensive glass curtain wall system on the rear facade to take advantage of spectacular New York Harbor views. Interior finishes are of a similar high quality. 322 Hicks building construction will begin in the winter of 2002, with expected completion Fall of 2003.


New York Times
POSTINGS: New Brooklyn Heights Condominium; Warehouses And Oriels As Inspiration
By ROSALIE R. RADOMSKY
Published: August 25, 2002, Sunday

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9901E2D6173CF936A1575BC0A9649C8B 63

The Brooklyn Heights Historic District is known for its 19th-century brownstones, but the design for a new five-story condominium building that won the approval of the district's guardians was uncompromisingly contemporary.

The design for the new building, to rise on an empty lot at 322 Hicks Street, was approved by the Landmarks Preservation Commission in July with the support of both the Brooklyn Heights Association and the Municipal Arts Society. Construction on the $3.5 million project is to start in October and be completed in a year.

''Brooklyn Heights has a long tradition of new buildings being contemporary,'' said Brian Hogg, director of preservation at the landmarks commisssion, who described the new design as ''exciting in its underlying inspiration between old and new buildings.''

In his design for the facade, said Henry Smith-Miller, ''I thought about the single family brownstone with its signature stoop and oriel window and the commercial warehouse with its loading dock and canopy.'' Mr. Smith-Miller's firm, Smith-Miller and Hawkinson Architects, which is noted for its contemporary designs, was brought in to collaborate on the building's design with the firm of Larsen Shein Ginsberg Snyder, whose partner in charge of the project is Douglas F. Korves, after a more traditional design was rejected at a landmarks hearing in March.

The building's brick exterior, resembling a vertically folded piece of paper, will echo the proportions of facades typical of the neighborhood. Mr. Smith-Miller said the building's loftlike apartments and stainless steel open trellis canopy will recall the ''warehouse ethos'' and the contemporary bay windows will recall the ''usual oriel'' found in the single-family brownstone.

Gerard F. Vasisko, chairman of the Brooklyn Heights Association's landmarks committee and a partner at the architecture firm Gruzen Samton, applauded the design. ''We believe historic districts are living, breathing entities reflecting the best architecture of the times,'' he said. ''For new buildings, why not have contemporary aspirations, materials and techniques of that age?''

There will be one apartment to each floor except for the first, which will have a maisonette with an entrance leading to the street and will share a lobby with another apartment. Apartment prices are expected to be in the $800,000 to $1.4 million range, with harbor views from the second floor up. All apartments -- about 1,900 square feet -- will have three bedrooms and fireplaces.

Louis Greco, who is involved in a number of other projects, with more traditional designs, in Downtown Brooklyn and is consultant to 322 Hicks Street L.L.C., the developer, whose principal is his wife, Linda, said: '' We took a bold step. If I had 150 units, I'd be nervous. With six units we could make a statement.'' ROSALIE R. RADOMSKY

Published: 08 - 25 - 2002 , Late Edition - Final , Section 11 , Column 1 , Page 1

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42158600.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42158603.jpg


Links:
A (Contemporary) Landmark Grows in Brooklyn
http://www.archnewsnow.com/features/Feature64.htm

In an unusual turn for typical historic neighborhood watchdog groups, the architectural custodians of the Brooklyn Heights Historic District have approved a decidedly contemporary design for a new five-story condominium building designed by Smith-Miller + Hawkinson Architects with Larsen Shein Ginsberg Snyder, Architect-of-Record. The Landmarks Preservation Commission, Brooklyn Heights Association, and the Municipal Arts Society gave the go-ahead for the building to rise on an empty lot at 322 Hicks Street. The red brick exterior, bay windows, and stainless-steel trellis canopy are in keeping with the neighborhood noted for it’s classic 19th century brownstones, but with a distinctly modern attitude. There will be one three-bedroom, loft like apartment per floor, each with a fireplace (and views of the harbor) from the second floor up, and two ground floor duplex apartments. Construction is expected to begin in October, and be completed in about a year.

http://gothamgazette.com/community/35/news/570
Newest Brooklyn Heights Condos Take Shape on Hicks Street
June 18, 2004
Brooklyn Eagle

http://www.brooklyneagle.com/categories/category.php?category_id=5&id=624
Despite Winter Weather, Heights Construction Sites Take Shape
by Linda Collins (linda@brooklyneagle.net), published online 02-07-2004

Derek2k3
April 18th, 2005, 08:30 PM
Project #37

The State House Condos
56-60 State Street & Hicks Street
5 stories 48 feet
Warman Pinkus Munoz Architects
Dev-56 State Street LLC
ResidentialCondominiums
11 units 28,856 Sq. Ft.
Completed Summer 2002


The State House Condos
SOPHISTICATED LUXURY IN THE HEART OF BROOKLYN HEGHTS

http://www.thestatehousecondos.com/

RARE AVAILABILITY! Duplex with 630 sq. ft. on first level with private entrance and 600 sq. ft open "rec" space on lower level. Downstairs has full bath ,laundry and convertible to 1-2 bedrooms or office or family room. First level has two exposures, chef's kitchen w/high quality construction including Pogenpohl cabinetry, Subzero refrigerator, Bosch dishwasher granite and marble finishes. $725K. Comes with deeded parking space! Check pricing page for more details!

Site History
The State House Condos sit on the historic site of the Brooklyn Flint Glassworks, which operated from 1823 to 1868. The factory was partially bounded by State, Atlantic, Hicks and Columbia Streets. Lured by incentives such as lower taxes, this glass blowing factory would move to Corning NY to become the now famous Corning Glass Inc

The State House Condos are the ultimate in luxury living and offer priveleged owners state-of-the-art amenities.

COMPLEX FEATURES
HEATING/COOLING SYSTEM
OUTDOOR SPACES
MASTER SUITE FEATURES
KITCHEN FEATURES
LAUNDRY FACILITIES
PARKING


Article in the NYT

March 24, 2002, Sunday
REAL ESTATE DESK
POSTINGS: At State and Hicks Streets; In Brooklyn, A New Condo With 11 Units
By RACHELLE GARBARINE

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9C03E6DE1038F937A15750C0A9649C8B 63

A five-story building rising at State and Hicks Streets is the first newly built condominium in Brooklyn Heights in nearly two decades. Called the State House, it is to have 11 one- to three-bedroom apartments as well as an enclosed garage with 16 parking spaces that are for sale. The building, designed to fit in with its neighborhood of 19th-century brownstones, fills a long-vacant site not far from an entrance ramp to the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway.

The developer of the $10 million project is 56 State Street of Brooklyn, which bought the site two years ago from a previous developer who had planned a rental building but after getting approvals decided not to proceed. Moti Pinson, the president of 56 State Street, said he had switched to condominiums ''because this is a family neighborhood and I wanted to give a product -- larger luxury-style apartments -- that people could buy and establish roots.''

The sales market in Brooklyn Heights ''is as strong as ever,'' said Michael Dowling, who with his partner, Sandra, runs Michael Dowling Ltd. and Brooklyn Heights Real Estate, the sales agents for the State House.

The apartments will have from 1,239 to 2,032 square feet. Top-floor units will each have a private roof deck. Sales are to start once the condominium's offering plan is accepted by the state; Mrs. Dowling said that approval was expected soon. Prices have not been set but they are estimated at from $590,000 to $1.89 million. The cost of parking spaces has not been set.

Ira S. Pinkus, president of Warman Pinkus Munoz Architects of Great Neck, which designed the building, said that it is clad in the salmon-colored brick that is common in the area and that it will have oversized windows. Completion is expected this summer. RACHELLE GARBARINE

Published: 03 - 24 - 2002 , Late Edition - Final , Section 11 , Column 1 , Page 1


http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42255416.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42255415.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42255418.jpg

Derek2k3
April 18th, 2005, 08:58 PM
Project #38

St. Francis College Academic Center
180 Remsen Street
8 stories 125 feet
Helpern Architects
Dev-St. Francis College
Academic
25,113 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction November 2005

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42256789.jpg


ST. FRANCIS COLLEGE “TOPS OUT” NEW ACADEMIC CENTER
City Council Speaker Gifford Miller to Offer Remarks

http://www.stfranciscollege.edu/Content/NavigationMenu/SFC_In_the_News/St_Francis_College_%E2%80%9CTops_Out%E2%80%9D_New_ Academic_Center/ST_FRANCIS_COLLEGE_%E2%80%9CTOPS_OUT%E2%80%9D_NEW_ ACADEMIC_CENTER.htm

For Immediate Release
Contact: Susan G. Messina
Director of Communications
(718) 489-5466
smessina@stfranciscollege.edu

Dec. 7, 2004 (Brooklyn Heights, N.Y.)—On Wed., Dec. 8, St. Francis College celebrates the “topping out” of its new academic center under construction on Remsen Street. At the ceremony, the steel beam to be placed at the top of the building will be signed by College administrators, student leaders, local government officials, and major donors to the project. Remarks will be given by City Council Speaker Gifford Miller.

“We are proud to honor those who made this project possible—from funders to the architects, engineers, and construction crew,” said President Frank J. Macchiarola, Ph.D., ’62. “The entire team’s commitment to high-quality design and construction makes it possible for St. Francis College to serve students, the community, and New York City in a meaningful way for the near future and beyond.”

Inherent to the academic center’s design are environmentally sustainable components, related specifically to the building’s heating and cooling system as well as its ability to maximize natural light. In addition, most building materials will be made of recycled materials. The 35,000 square foot center, which is scheduled to open in November 2005, will stand adjacent to the College’s main building. It will house 14 “smart” classrooms, a state-of-the-art library, a 90-seat theater-lecture hall, facilities for the communications arts department, an Internet-ready cyber lounge for students, and administrative space for several academic departments.

The ceremony takes place in Callahan Center, 180 Remsen Street, 8:30 a.m. (Breakfast will be served.) The ceremony precedes the actual placement of the final beam by about three weeks. The timing of the ceremony was planned to accommodate attendee availability vis-à-vis the College’s holiday schedule. The beam will be available for signing for several days after the ceremony by the College’s student body.

The academic center was designed by Helpern Architects. Turner Construction is leading construction.

St. Francis College, founded in 1858 by the Franciscan Brothers of Brooklyn, is located in Brooklyn Heights, New York. Since its founding, the College has pursued its Franciscan mission to provide an affordable, high-quality education to students from New York City’s five boroughs and beyond.

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42256780.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42256786.jpg

Links:
http://www.aiany.org/eOCULUS/Current_Issue.html#projectnews
Helpern Architects: St. Francis College academic center
St. Francis College celebrated the "topping out" of its new academic center currently under construction at its campus on Remsen Street in Brooklyn Heights. Helpern Architects designed the 35,000-square-foot center, scheduled to open in November 2005,; Turner Construction is leading construction. The project includes environmentally sustainable elements such as the heating and cooling system, natural light, and recycled materials.

http://www.nytimes.com/2004/11/28/realestate/28scap.html
STREETSCAPES
The Little-Noticed Demise of a Preservation Miracle
By CHRISTOPHER GRAY
Published: November 28, 2004

http://www.rejournal.com/ne/news/oldNewsDetails_sql.asp?id=7732&type=con&regg=ny
Archived News Details for 12/21/2004
BROOKLYN HEIGHTS, NY St. Francis College celebrate the “topping out” of it new academic center currently under construction at its campus on Remsen St. At the ceremony, the steel beam to be placed at the top of the building was signed by college administrators, student leaders, local government officials, and major donors to the project. The academic center, scheduled to open in Nov. 2005, was designed by David Helpern of Helpern Architects; Turner Construction is the construction manager. “We are proud to honor those who made this project possible – from funders to the architects, engineers and construction crew,” said president Frank Macchiarola, Ph.D. “The entire team’s commitment to high quality design and construction makes it possible for St. Francis College to serve students, the community, and New York City in a meaningful way for the near future and beyond.” Inherent to the academic center’s design are environmentally sustainable components, related specifically to the building’s heating and cooling system as well as its ability to maximize natural light. In addition, most building materials will be made of recycled materials. The 35,000 s/f center will stand adjacent to the college’s main building. It will house 14 “smart” classrooms, a state-of-the-art library, a 90-seat theater-lecture hall, facilities for the communications arts department, an Internet-ready cyber lounge for students, and administrative space for several academic departments. The ceremony preceded the actual placement of the final beam by about three weeks. The timing of the ceremony was planned to accommodate attendee availability vis-á-vis the college’s holiday schedule. The beam will be available for signing for several days after the ceremony by the college’s student body. The academic center was designed by Helpern Architects. Turner Construction is leading construction.

http://gortonassociates.com/ProjSchoolStFrancis.htm
Project: St. Francis College
Location: 180 Remsen St. – Brooklyn Heights, NY
Owner: St. Francis College
Architect: Helpern Architects

The project includes the construction of a new 13,000 sf gymnasium and administration office and the complete renovation of the locker rooms. The new gym and offices were constructed on the roof of an existing gym. In addition, there is an existing subway tunnel under the street where a crane needed to be set. The college stayed in full operation during the entire construction process. The project was completed in 12 months. Gorton Associates provided Project Management services.

http://newyork.construction.com/news/building/archive/2005/02.asp
St. Francis College Tops Out Center

St. Francis College has topped out its new 35,000-sq.-ft. academic center on Remsen Street in Brooklyn Heights. The Brooklyn college plans to open the center this November.

Turner Construction of New York is contractor on the environmentally sustainable project, which maximizes natural light and uses largely recyclable building materials. The building, designed by Helpern Architects of New York, will have 14 "smart" classrooms, a state-of-the-art library, a 90-seat theater-lecture hall, and various other student and staff facilities.

Kolbster
April 18th, 2005, 11:10 PM
i've been looking for a rendering of that building for a long time...i mean i was by it everyday and it annoyed me that i couldn't find a rendering. Thankyou deriko!

Derek2k3
April 29th, 2005, 12:24 AM
^No problem. Some random photos from last week.


Projects #3 & 4

Court House Tower I
211-233 Atlantic Avenue/125 Court Street
11 stories 128 feet
Ismael Leyva Architects
Developer-Two Trees Management
Residential Condominums
321 units 495,638 Sq. Ft.(Combined)
Under Construction Spring 2003-Early 2005

Court House Tower II
211-233 Atlantic Avenue/125 Court Street
11 stories 128 feet
Ismael Leyva Architects
Developer-Two Trees Management
Residential Condominums
321 units 495,638 Sq. Ft.(Combined)
Under Construction Spring 2003-Early 2005
http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42706793.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42706794.jpg
Do you guys think this should be considered as one building?


Project #7

Feil Hall/Brooklyn Law School Dormitory
58 Boerum Place/205 State Street
22 stories 231 feet
Robert AM Stern Architects/SLCE Architects
Dev-Brooklyn Law School
Residential Dormitory
210 units 242,752 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction Fall 2002-Summer 2005
http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42706795.jpg


Project #9

117-119 Court Street
183 State Street
10 stories 120 feet
Ernst & Associates Architects
Dev-JPKJ Realty, LLC
Residential Condominiums
7 units 22,500 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction Late 2003-2005
http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42706791.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42706792.jpg


Project # 11

Boulevard East
53 Boerum Place
11 stories 97 feet
Stephen B. Jacobs Group
Dev-Procida Realty and Construction Corporation
Residential Rental
99 units 113,739 Sq. Ft.
Completed August 2002-Fall 2004
http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42706796.jpg


[b]Project #36

180 Montague Street
176-180 Montague Street
33 stories 331 feet
H. Thomas O'Hara
Dev-Eichner Continuum Company
Residential Rentals
186 units 212,268 Sq. Ft.
Completed 1999-2000
http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42710622.jpg

Derek2k3
April 29th, 2005, 02:27 AM
Project #39

Hotel St. George Addition
100 Henry Street/51-55 Clark Street
11 stories 120 feet
William B.Tabler Architects/Gruzen Samton?
Dev-Hotel St. George Assoc. LLC
Boutique Hotel
68,000 Sq. Ft. 180 units
Under Construction 2003-Mid 2005

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42710443.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42710442.jpg
Renderings by The Drawing Studio
http://www.drawingstudio.com

http://www.gmsllp.com/img/projects/Hotel%20St.%20George.jpg


Gruzen Samton
Hotel St. George
Brooklyn, New York

http://www.gruzensamton.com/pdf/Hotel_St_George.pdf

The Hotel St. George complex, located in the heart of the
Brooklyn Heights Historic District in Downtown Brooklyn, suffered
a devastating fire in 1995 which destroyed much of the
original 1888 hotel structure and partially damaged the 1901
wing known as the "office" building. The Gruzen Samton
design for this project incorporates new construction on the
original site of the hotel, and together with the renovation of
the office building, will create a new 220-room boutique hotel in
Downtown Brooklyn. The project has been approved by the
New York City Landmarks Commission.
G R U Z E N S A M T O N L L P
Hotels
The new building is designed to reflect the colors and textures of
the adjacent Weller Building (1924) with a soft Tuscan beige
brick, accented with limestone and terra cotta details. The main
lobby of the new hotel will be through the office building
entrance, as it was in the 1901 scheme, and will include the
restoration of the vintage bronze doors and entry surrounds
installed in the 1930's. The hotel's famous marquee will be fully
restored to its original elegance with the addition of a backlit
glass skirt.
The top floor of the office building will incorporate a design
which provides a modern interpretation of the original observation
deck atop this 12-story building, the tallest building in
Brooklyn in 1901. The new building is designed to link the hotel
with the rest of the complex, much of which has already been
converted to condominium apartments, and will further enhance
the neighborhood with new bluestone sidewalks and trees.
The hotel will have a contemporary theme. The Hotel will have
a state of the art business center and a direct connection to an
adjacent health club which includes a swimming pool, basketball
courts, and squash courts. The 220 rooms will include built-in
wardrobes, marble baths, and state-of-the-art internet connections.
The ground floor will contain an elegant lobby with a
skylit garden, and a restaurant and bar for the enjoyment of the
hotel guests and the public.


http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42710504.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42710441.jpg
Looks plain.

Links:
http://www.qsl.net/wa5iyx/images/hotstgeo.jpg
Postcard of the entire hotel

Hotel St. George
Clark Street
Brooklyn, New York

Largest hotel in Greater New York, overlooks the
Manhattan skyline. Dual-purpose single rooms
in the Club Tower, single and double rooms with
bath and a variety of other accommodations.
Noted for comfort, quiet and low price. Many ex-
tra features including free use of world famous
natural salt water swimming pool and gym. 15
minutes from Times Square on 7th Ave. I.R.T. to
Clark Street station in the hotel.

http://gothamgazette.com/community/33/news/1055
St. George Hotel Construction Closes Clark Street Sidewalk
by Jess Wisloski
December 18, 2004
The Brooklyn Papers

http://www.gmsllp.com/projects/reno-hotel-stgeorge.htm
Hotel St. George
Brooklyn, New York

New eleven-story, 68,000 square feet addition to, and 42,500 square foot renovation of, existing steel framed hotel building.

http://www.tlinkassociates.com/docs/tlinkbrochure.pdf
•Hotel Saint George
Brooklyn Heights, NY
Pre-construction services for a $16 million, 11-
story hotel. The hotel will be completed in phases
and consist of the ground-up construction of an
11-story building plus the renovation of an existing
11-story landmark. The new building will be connected
to the existing building to form a 200 suite
luxury hotel.

Kolbster
April 29th, 2005, 08:30 AM
Ahhh, this is the one that burned down from a fire that was started by a homeless man in 1995

Derek2k3
April 29th, 2005, 10:41 PM
Project #14

The Brooklyn Renaissance Plaza Expansion
345 Adams Street
23 stories 240 feet
SB Architects/William B Tabler Architects
Dev-Muss Development Co.
Commercial Hotel
283 units 180,000 Sq. Ft.
Proposed Winter 2005-Fall 2006

http://www.williamtabler.com/brp_exp_big_2.jpg

http://www.williamtabler.com/brp_exp_big_1.jpg
William B Tabler Architects


New York Construction News
A Hotel Grows in Brooklyn
Building News - April 2005

http://newyork.construction.com/news/building/default.asp

Just seven years after the New York Marriott at the Brooklyn Bridge became Brooklyn's first new hotel since 1934, a brightening tourist picture is fueling a $77 million, 190,000-sq.-ft. expansion. "We don't have the room base" to meet demand, said Mike Brenner, senior vice president at Muss Development, the hotel's New York-based owner, which is also developer and construction manager on the project.

Located at Renaissance Plaza in downtown Brooklyn, the 24-story addition designed by San Francisco-based SB Architects will increase the hotel's capacity from 376 to 656 rooms. A two-level pedestrian bridge will link the poured-in-place concrete structure to the existing building. Completion is scheduled for fall 2006.

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42735702.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42735704.jpg

Derek2k3
April 30th, 2005, 12:23 PM
Very nicely designed site.

http://www.14townhouses.com/

Derek2k3
May 1st, 2005, 05:18 PM
Brooklyn's skyline.

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42810899.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42810880.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/42810855.jpg

Derek2k3
May 5th, 2005, 09:54 PM
Project #40

457-467 Atlantic Avenue
8 stories 80 feet
Van Brody Architects
Dev-457-467 Atlantic LLC
ResidentialCondominium
22 units 38,426 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2005-mid-summer 2006

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/43007076.jpg
Van Brody Architects

Brooklyn Eagle
8-Story Residential Building To Take Shape Soon on Atlantic Avenue
by Linda Collins (linda@brooklyneagle.net), published online 04-29-2005
http://www.brooklyneagle.com/categories/category.php?category_id=5&id=4058

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/43009054.jpg

http://www.mapquest.com/maps/map.adp?formtype=address&searchtype=address&country=US&addtohistory=&1ahXX=&address=467+Atlantic+Avenue&city=brooklyn&state=ny&zipcode=
Map

Derek2k3
May 8th, 2005, 09:42 PM
Project # 2

Bridge View Tower
197 Bridge Street
18 stories 216 feet
H2 Consulting
Dev-Bridge View Tower, LLC
Residential
59 units 90,063 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2004-2006
http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/43133223.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/43133225.jpg


Project #6

Fifteen Metrotech (Nine MetroTech Center South)
15 MetoTech Center/115-159 Myrtle Avenue
19 stories 325ft
Cesar Pelli & Associates/Swanke Hayden Connell
Dev-Forest City Ratner
Commercial Office
607,815 Sq. Ft.
Completed November 20, 2001-Summer 2003

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/43133222/original.jpg


Project # 8

LIU Athletic, Recreation & Wellness Center
Dekalb Avenue
5 stories
Arquitectonica
Dev-Long Island University
Recreational
110,000 Sq. ft.
Under Construction 2004-October 2005

http://www.brooklyn.liunet.edu/bbut11/arwcphotos/wellness_center_big.gif
http://www.arquitectonica.com/

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/43133224.jpg

Derek2k3
May 8th, 2005, 09:47 PM
Project #10

The Smith/Atlantic Court
295 Atlantic Avenue/75-91 Smith Street
13 stories 140 feet
Meltzer/Mandl Architects
Dev-Boymelgreen Developers
Mixed-Use
134 units 152,000 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2004-Early 2006

http://specialsections.nypost.com/news/nypost/nyphome/20050507/img/a_1_p39.jpg

Brooklyn checks in

Atlantic Ave. gets a hotel condo

By DAKOTA SMITH

BROOKLYN’S Marriott hotel is getting some new competition — and you can live there.

Named The Smith after its location on the corner of Atlantic Avenue and Smith Street, the 13-floor building will house 50 luxury residential condos and a 93-room hotel.

The edge of downtown Brooklyn may seem like an unlikely spot for a hotel-con-do building. But The Smith is just the latest in a line of new residential developments in the neighborhood (see box), an area once known more for its discount stores and courthouses.

"The neighborhood is definitely up-and-coming," says Danny Kim, development manager of Boymelgreen Developers, the firm behind The Smith.

There’s even an attmept to dress up the area by calling it BoCoCa (for the intersection of Boerum Hill, Cobble Hill, and Carroll Gardens).

Although no deal has been finalized with a hotel chain, The Smith itself will likely house a "boutique-like hotel" rather than a large chain, according to Kim. Sales for the building, which will open in June 2006, are expected to begin this summer.

Prices for the residences, a mix of one-, two- and three-bedrooms, ranging in size from 740 to 1,400 square feet, are still being determined, but costs should fall in the $700-a-square-foot range, Kim says.

The building itself will have a red-brick façade, with terraces jutting off the top penthouse units. The Smith’s amenities will include a gym, likely housed in the hotel, as well as concierge services.

Currently, the New York Marriott is the only large-scale hotel in Brooklyn.

The Marriott, located on Adams Street, is itself undergoing a massive renovation. When construction is finished in fall 2006, 280 rooms will have been added, for a total of 656.

The Smith, meanwhile, hopes to draw those working at Brooklyn’s courthouses, as well as parents visiting area colleges.

Additionally, when Pier 12 in Red Hook begins servicing cruise ships in spring 2006, the tourist crowd may opt to bunk at The Smith.

To maintain the integrity of The Smith’s neighborhood, the local community board asked that the residences resemble townhouses, according to Marvin Meltzer, vice president of Meltzer/Mandl Architects, which designed the residential units.

"They didn’t want a big glass structure," Meltzer says.

Derek2k3
May 12th, 2005, 01:38 PM
Next few will be in Boerum Hill.

Projects #41 & 42

324 Dean Street
322-324 Dean Street
5 stories 67 feet
Peter Himmelstein Architects, PC
Dev-Bernard Dillenberger
Residential
10 units 14,368 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction

328 Dean Street
326-328 Dean Street
5 stories 67 feet
Peter Himmelstein Architects, PC
Dev-Bernard Dillenberger
Residential
10 units 14,692 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/43285176.jpg

http://www.mapquest.com/maps/map.adp?country=US&addtohistory=&formtype=address&searchtype=address&cat=&address=328%20Dean%20St&city=Brooklyn&state=NY&zipcode=11217%2d1905
Map

http://www.newyork-architects.com/content/profiles/index.cfm?fuseaction=profile&architect=1961&lang=e
http://www.himmelsteinarch.com/site/phd.html
Peter Himmelstein Architects do nice work.

Derek2k3
May 12th, 2005, 07:09 PM
Project #43

377 Pacific Street
5 stories (4 story addition)
Miller, McLaren Architect
Dev-Pacific Ventures
Residential Condominium
2 units
Completed 2005

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/43293962.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/43293968.jpg
The base looks horrible.

http://www.mapquest.com/maps/map.adp?country=US&addtohistory=&formtype=address&searchtype=address&cat=&address=377%20Pacific%20St&city=Brooklyn&state=NY&zipcode=11217%2d2219
Map

Derek2k3
May 12th, 2005, 10:12 PM
Project #44

335 Warren Street
4 stories 55 feet
Minho Yang/Orlando Garcia of Scarano & Associates Architects
Dev-Glenn Chin of 335 Warren St. LLC
Residential Condominium
8 units 8,696 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction Early 2005-2006?

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/43299044.jpg http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/43299041.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/43299038.jpg

Scarano & Associates Architects
335 Warren Street

http://www.scaranoarchitects.com/

The double height apartment's interior spaces are expressed on the exterior in the large separation that exists between the floor decks. Influenced by the neighborhoods architecture and the roots of the modern architecture movement, the building stands as a testimony to its diverse roots.

All units are duplexes, with either storage lofts or cellar recreation rooms. High speed access lines, green building components and a landscaped roof enhance the livability of the units. Giving this common green roof ensured that every unit owner would have some out door space. Chimneys for the mechanical within certain units are expressed on the facade as an element of industrial. Tradition aside, the building has helped fill the gap in its urban fabric with a daring facade.


Links:
http://www.mapquest.com/maps/map.adp?country=US&addtohistory=&formtype=address&searchtype=address&cat=&address=335%20Warren%20St&city=Brooklyn&state=NY&zipcode=11201%2d6412
Map

http://www.brooklyneagle.com/categories/category.php?category_id=5&id=3485
8 New Condo Units For Boerum Hill`s Warren St.
by Linda Collins (linda@brooklyneagle.net), published online 12-30-2004

Derek2k3
May 13th, 2005, 12:09 PM
Project #45

The Bergen Street
328-330 Bergen Street
5 stories 60 feet
Henry Radusky of Bricolage Designs
Dev-Isaac Katan, Slope West LLC
Residential Condominium
29 units 37,313 Sq. Ft.
Completed

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/43318076.jpg
Bricolage Designs

Brooklyn Eagle
The Bergen Street Sells Out in Two Weekends, Broker Says
by Emily Hart (), published online 01-07-2005

http://www.brooklyneagle.com/

BOERUM HILL — A 20-unit condominium development in Boerum Hill, on the edge of Park Slope, sold out in just two weekends, according to Brendan Aguayo of Aguayo and Huebener Realty.

“It’s a testament to Park Slope’s growing popularity,” Aguayo said.

The building, now known as The Bergen Street, is at 328-330 Bergen St., just west of 4th Avenue. A project of well-known Park Slope developer Isaac Katan, operating here as Slope West LLC, the design is by Henry Radusky of Bricolage Designs of Brooklyn.

Basically, the development is actually two side-by-side five-story, 10-unit buildings on adjoining lots with separate entrances.

The 20 condos are a mix of two- and three-bedroom units, each with two baths, and including duplexes on the first and top floors.

The size range is 1,226 square feet to 1,912 square feet.

Each unit has outdoor space, either a private patio, balcony or garden, Aguayo said, and all of the new owners have access to the 700-square-foot rooftop terrace.

Other amenities include hardwood floors, oversize windows, chef’s kitchens with stainless steel appliances and granite countertops, bathrooms with pedestal sinks and jacuzzi tubs, central air, laundry rooms with washer/dryer hookups, central air and direct elevator access into every apartment. The asking prices ranged from $592,000 to $746,900.

Although his opinion differed slightly on how quickly the units sold, Peter Noonan of The Corcoran Group Brooklyn, who shared sales and marketing with Aguayo & Huebener, concurred that they went fast.

“The sizes were excellent,” said Noonan, who described the buyers as “spillover” from Park Slope.

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/43317982.jpg


Links:
http://www.mapquest.com/maps/map.adp?country=US&location=FT7doqmYYmzzW2gk6JRvti2AD%2bLkr9Iee8cLVrQ 5kz9LVKr7fJqqcltSjomzGdIsKsLzzqnz9gFHg9L7W2tERRxPr %2fxpgbLTZxNPveKA4SIWQYhGiPbHJJib6SbM3ShTcGwWDI7Ji v4%3d
Map

http://www.elliman.com/AndrewMapp

http://www.newsday.com/business/realestate/ny-nyresold4236002apr29,0,7970347.story?page=2&coll=ny-realestate-headlines
330 Bergen St.
This 2-bedroom, 1 1/2-bath duplex condo features a recreation room, private patio, full garden, central air conditioning, washer/dryer, new development near trains, shops and restaurants. Common charges $352; taxes $15; on market 203 days; asking price $646,900. (Corcoran Group)

Archit_K
May 22nd, 2005, 08:07 PM
Project #43

377 Pacific Street does not fit in at all. Is that a parking garage at the base? (omg)

Derek2k3
May 24th, 2005, 12:10 PM
Project #10

The Smith/Atlantic Court
295 Atlantic Avenue/75-91 Smith Street
13 stories 140 feet
Meltzer/Mandl Architects
Dev-Boymelgreen Developers
Mixed-Use
134 units 152,000 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2004-Early 2006


http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/43820849.jpg

Brooklyn Eagle
Back on Track for Completion in 2006:
Boymelgreen’s Smith St. Site
by Linda Collins (linda@brooklyneagle.net), published online 05-23-2005

http://www.brooklyneagle.com/categories/category.php?category_id=5&id=4193

Gulcrapek
May 24th, 2005, 05:34 PM
The Smith 5/22/05

http://img201.echo.cx/img201/4169/thesmith4sq.th.jpg (http://img201.echo.cx/my.php?image=thesmith4sq.jpg)

http://img201.echo.cx/img201/2716/thesmith20kf.th.jpg (http://img201.echo.cx/my.php?image=thesmith20kf.jpg)

Gulcrapek
May 24th, 2005, 05:36 PM
199 State Street

5/22

http://img201.echo.cx/img201/492/199state2jd.th.jpg (http://img201.echo.cx/my.php?image=199state2jd.jpg)

Gulcrapek
May 24th, 2005, 06:06 PM
5/22

I think this is 14 Townhouses

http://img201.echo.cx/img201/7447/statetown27by.th.jpg (http://img201.echo.cx/my.php?image=statetown27by.jpg)

http://img201.echo.cx/img201/8880/statetown1cn.th.jpg (http://img201.echo.cx/my.php?image=statetown1cn.jpg)



New York Marriott Brooklyn Bridge - Expansion

http://img201.echo.cx/img201/1747/mar20so.th.jpg (http://img201.echo.cx/my.php?image=mar20so.jpg)

Render

http://img208.echo.cx/img208/9854/marriott5dh.th.jpg (http://img208.echo.cx/my.php?image=marriott5dh.jpg)



The CourtHouse - bad shots from State Street of the base

http://img201.echo.cx/img201/2127/courth21ba.th.jpg (http://img201.echo.cx/my.php?image=courth21ba.jpg)

http://img201.echo.cx/img201/1423/courth5kd.th.jpg (http://img201.echo.cx/my.php?image=courth5kd.jpg)

http://img201.echo.cx/img201/6930/courth33dx.th.jpg (http://img201.echo.cx/my.php?image=courth33dx.jpg)

Um.. a corner.

http://img201.echo.cx/img201/3419/courthcorn7uc.th.jpg (http://img201.echo.cx/my.php?image=courthcorn7uc.jpg)



Feil Hall

http://img201.echo.cx/img201/2719/feilup7pj.th.jpg (http://img201.echo.cx/my.php?image=feilup7pj.jpg)

from Court

http://img201.echo.cx/img201/7098/feilct9js.th.jpg (http://img201.echo.cx/my.php?image=feilct9js.jpg)

from Boerum Pl

http://img201.echo.cx/img201/9852/feil37qz.th.jpg (http://img201.echo.cx/my.php?image=feil37qz.jpg)


Main entrance on State - I think the A/C vents should have been a different color

http://img201.echo.cx/img201/2969/feil50mo.th.jpg (http://img201.echo.cx/my.php?image=feil50mo.jpg)

Boerum corner

http://img201.echo.cx/img201/7812/feil41gh.th.jpg (http://img201.echo.cx/my.php?image=feil41gh.jpg)

These law school kids are gonna be friggin' spoiled.

Derek2k3
June 21st, 2005, 01:05 AM
A preview of the Switch Building?

Project #37

322 Hicks Street
322-324 Hicks Street
5 stories
Smith-Miller + Hawkinson Architects/LSGS Architects
Dev-Second Development Services, Inc.
Residential Condominium
6 units 11,770 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction October 2002-Fall 2003

http://www.lsgsarchitects.com/photos/Hicks_Street.jpg

http://www.archnewsnow.com/features/images/Feature0064_02x.jpg



New York Times
POSTINGS; Modern Look in a Historic District
By DENNIS HEVESI
Published: June 12, 2005, Sunday

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9400E4D61038F931A25755C0A9639C8B 63

THE wide-angle V-shaped facade of the new condominium building at 322 Hicks Street in the Brooklyn Heights Historic District, shoulder to shoulder with a century-old brownstone, is sleekly modern -- just the way preservationists wanted it.

''The initial proposal, we were less pleased with,'' said Tom van den Bout, chairman of the landmarks committee of the Brooklyn Heights Association. ''Rather than a pastiche of the past, which sort of compromises the integrity of older-style architecture, we recommended that the developer pursue a more contemporary design.''

And so, Second Development Services, developer of the Hicks Street building, resubmitted its design to the city's Landmarks Preservation Commission and gave the neighborhood association something it could be excited about, Mr. van den Bout said.

The architect, Douglas F. Korves, a principal in the firm of Larsen Shein Ginsberg Snyder, said the project eventually involved ''an extensive partnership with the Landmarks Preservation Commission to develop this uniquely modern building in this historic context of brownstones and town houses.''

Robert B. Tierney, chairman of the commission, called it ''the right architectural expression for a contemporary building in Brooklyn Heights.''

The five-story, 10,000-square-foot building, half a block from bustling Atlantic Avenue, stands on what had been two of the few remaining vacant parcels in the community, now combined into a 47-by-70-foot lot.

''When you view the building from the street, the front has a V-shaped face that goes up all five stories,'' Mr. Korves said, with one side 30 feet long and the other 16 feet long. A stainless steel canopy will soon be installed over the entrance.

The facade also has triangular steel and glass bay windows, Mr. Korves said, ''so that residents can sit in the windows and wave to their brothers or sisters or parents, or friends on the street, the way people used to do in the bay windows of old brownstones.''

The building has six apartments. Each of the second through fifth floors has a single 1,550-square-foot three-bedroom, two-bath ''loft-style home,'' Mr. Korves said, with a 45-foot-long, 16-foot-wide living, dining and kitchen space across the rear, with views of the harbor.

There are two 1,200-square-foot apartments that dip below the first floor, then step up to a greenhouselike space. ''Instead of a rear wall, the units have a full-width greenhouse that looks onto a private yard,'' Mr. Korves said. ''The greenhouse encloses the living room, dining area and kitchen.''

Sarah Williams, a vice president at Second Development Services, said three units have gone into contract. Prices range from $1.1 million for the ground-floor apartments to $1.7 million for the penthouse. The property was bought for ''a little more than $1 million,'' Ms. Williams said, and construction costs were $2.5 million.

Paula Shirk, a professional dog walker who lives a block away, likes the incongruity of the building. ''We can't be purist,'' she said. ''There's room for this.''

Published: 06 - 12 - 2005 , Late Edition - Final , Section 11 , Column 4 , Page 2


http://www.usemenow.com/web-log/queenbk3.jpg
Transfer
http://www.usemenow.com/web-log/

bkmonkey
June 29th, 2005, 02:20 AM
Does anyone have any information about the Thor tower? I keep on hearing rumblings about it, but never anything solid. The latest tidbit in the Brooklyn Papers says that Wal-Mart is considering opening a store in the base of the tower. However that is all, any new information on that or other office proposals interesting.

BrooklynRider
June 29th, 2005, 10:17 AM
Does anyone have any information about the Thor tower? I keep on hearing rumblings about it, but never anything solid. The latest tidbit in the Brooklyn Papers says that Wal-Mart is considering opening a store in the base of the tower. However that is all, any new information on that or other office proposals interesting.


You are months behind. There is not tower, just pretty conceptual renderingthat you can find in the thread. Walmart was defeated months ago and is a no-go.

bkmonkey
June 30th, 2005, 12:57 AM
That is what I thought as well, until I read the latest edition of the Brooklyn Papers, in which they cite the Thor tower, and Wal-Mart. The Brooklyn Papers seems to think that they are both very real possibilities

Derek2k3
July 2nd, 2005, 09:16 PM
Projects #2

Bridge View Tower
189-197 Bridge Street
18 stories 216 feet
H2 Consulting
Dev-Bridge View Tower, LLC
Residential
59 units 90,063 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2004-2006
http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/45619618.jpg
An architect’s rendering of Bridge View Tower, under construction at 189 Bridge St. in Downtown Brooklyn. At the base of the Manhattan Bridge, it will greet commuters and visitors upon entering Brooklyn, while offering its residents great views of Manhattan. Image courtesy Bridge View Tower LLC



Brooklyn Daily Eagle
Bridge View Tower Kicks Off Flatbush Avenue Extension Renewal
by Linda Collins (linda@brooklyneagle.net), published online 06-30-2005

59 Luxury Condos, 2 Retail Spaces Planned at Base of Manhattan Bridge
DOWNTOWN BROOKLYN — In what some say is the forerunner of things to come for Flatbush Avenue Extension in Downtown Brooklyn, work has begun on a new 18-story condominium tower at the base of the Manhattan Bridge.

A project of Bridge View Tower LLC, the site — at 189 Bridge St., between Concord and Nassau Streets — will see the first brand new construction for the area. And the building will greet commuters and visitors to Brooklyn entering via the Manhattan Bridge.

The site has been cleared and the foundation work is nearly complete, according to Crystal Tong, a spokesperson for the developer who prefers to remain unnamed (but she did say this is his first Brooklyn project). Work on the steel structure should begin in August, she said. Once that begins, she estimates completion would be about one year away....

Continue reading here:
http://www.brooklyneagle.com/categories/category.php?category_id=5&id=4394

Gulcrapek
July 3rd, 2005, 12:16 AM
Boo - it looks like the Elektra.

NoyokA
July 3rd, 2005, 12:21 AM
It'll add character to the area.

sfenn1117
July 3rd, 2005, 01:05 AM
arrrg too many balconies. And I usually like balconies.

MonCapitan2002
July 3rd, 2005, 06:28 PM
The Bridge Tower looks like it will be an eyesore.

Gulcrapek
July 3rd, 2005, 07:03 PM
It'll add character to the area.



You're serious?

Derek2k3
July 4th, 2005, 09:45 PM
This building will go up right next to Bridge View Tower.

Project #46

187 Bridge Street
183-187 Bridge Street/166 Nassau Street
9 stories 95 feet
Karl Fischer Architect
Dev-North Development Group (Isaac Hager)
Residential
8 units 11,020 Sq. Ft.
Proposed 2005-2006

Map (http://www.mapquest.com/maps/map.adp?ovi=1&zoom=9&mapdata=qNCyos1mfP6g0pBJrBgyVBcg9aN35QyuOOE1O2BqET yx%2b1Tcw%2fmaFZTdsarqGJl537VD28FZA%2fsbBUYVKRzwOX CnlmGVZh1GvK3YJL4JpP%2bosge0L67z%2bTc9I688QWeNY6nF 7XBVcPlBauk5W%2fYiU7WtaFtJcp7z8REd%2faPxAlPeN8DJNR NQROGx%2fYEsUb0EZCC4dq1NxO6YD3TRoZUk4rHKn9guY4jKM2 JZnVCqX9NjmHxfp4oAGL2UuP8JUFM0BCO8ceHE0z17RcCxU0sN Fzb%2fBXxY0kp%2b%2bQZOONcZwqjXzk%2f4LEt4KmCNhbFJ%2 fkgQVLEE%2fO21y%2bKflBIEmFYi0AenXmqYhF7b8%2bAG6KGW kPYcfw2s5H1Do4xGJspuHw%2fY8uxIxKtwACvDD4Hi6A8U6Nti YWXRW%2fHDieOSqEaKulvBGwoXfj8lfqwJMSsWBpzufxJlJ1k1 uXPiz5vPD6z%2fRwjMVmpdbQAj%2fHidtSa8jGuxnig%2blTSz WuGVo7PLROT8lx%2bjfdPzGhI%3d)

NoyokA
July 4th, 2005, 10:19 PM
You're serious?

Yes, on account of its size and that it’s not an entirely bad building. Not every building’s going to be a big success.

Derek2k3
July 5th, 2005, 12:05 AM
This should be Brooklyn's tallest residential building until Atlantic Yards comes along.

Project #47

147 Flatbush Avenue Extension
147-157 Flatbush Avenue Extension/302-310 Gold Street/151-165 Johnson Street
40 stories
Ismael Leyva Architets P.C.
Dev-147 Flatbush Ave LLC
Residential
309 units 375,600 Sq. Ft.
Under Construction 2005-2006?


http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/45735334.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/45735216.jpg


Map (http://www.mapquest.com/maps/map.adp?formtype=address&searchtype=address&country=US&addtohistory=&1ahXX=&address=147+Flatbush+Avenue+Extension&city=brooklyn&state=ny&zipcode=)

NoyokA
July 5th, 2005, 12:07 AM
Hope its better than that ugly Polshek-designed project on Atlantic, nearby.

Gulcrapek
July 5th, 2005, 01:15 AM
You like the bridge tower, I like the Polshek thing...

Derek: how did you find that? Is it replacing Kaplan's 200 ft proposal? I almost love you.

edit: the permit says 309 ft... that would mean every floor is 7.75 ft including the slab. Something is fishy. Unless it's city-sponsored housing for 'little people.'

NoyokA
July 5th, 2005, 10:31 AM
You like the bridge tower, I like the Polshek thing...

Derek: how did you find that? Is it replacing Kaplan's 200 ft proposal? I almost love you.

edit: the permit says 309 ft... that would mean every floor is 7.75 ft including the slab. Something is fishy. Unless it's city-sponsored housing for 'little people.'


I don't like the design, I think it has the potential to positively affect the urban collage of different styles that are proposed or exist in the area. Its the same situation as 180 Montague Street, I don't like that design either but it adds to the city fabric and it has character.

BrooklynRider
July 5th, 2005, 11:00 AM
...I almost love you...

You crack me up.

Derek2k3
July 6th, 2005, 08:13 PM
You like the bridge tower, I like the Polshek thing...

Derek: how did you find that? Is it replacing Kaplan's 200 ft proposal? I almost love you.

edit: the permit says 309 ft... that would mean every floor is 7.75 ft including the slab. Something is fishy. Unless it's city-sponsored housing for 'little people.'
lol. I've walked by the site a few times when I don't feel like taking the subway to Manhattan. It's a few blocks from the Kaplan site.
Yea, that height def. is an accident. Notice it's the same as the # of units.

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/45832080/original.jpg

rlagm3
July 13th, 2005, 10:03 AM
I am looking to invest in the 300k price range.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

THanks.

Henri
July 15th, 2005, 09:59 AM
Does anyone know of any condo(s) for sale around Tillary - Flatbush area?



I am looking already for the past two weeks, but everything seems to be Commercial, although I have found some rental spaces ( @ Tillary & Gold Street)

bkmonkey
July 28th, 2005, 03:01 AM
just read in the papers, that another big hotel might be comming to Downtown Bk. Brooklyn is getting a quite a few hotels ... the Downtown Brooklyn Bolygreen hotel, the mariot expansion, the St. George Botique hotel, and now this...

billyblancoNYC
July 28th, 2005, 11:07 AM
just read in the papers, that another big hotel might be comming to Downtown Bk. Brooklyn is getting a quite a few hotels ... the Downtown Brooklyn Bolygreen hotel, the mariot expansion, the St. George Botique hotel, and now this...

You mean the 500 room Sheraton? Is that for downtown? Nice.

bkmonkey
August 10th, 2005, 09:14 PM
A developer has quietly bought up property next to a Brooklyn Academy of Music theater, planning what neighbors believe will be a high-rise hotel and condo.

Manhattan-based developer The Clarett Group paid $12 million for three lots at the northwest corner of Fulton Street and Ashland Place, an assemblage that abuts the four-story BAM Harvey Theater.

Under the current C6-4 commercial zoning for that block, a more than 20-story hotel, office tower or mall could be built. The equivalent residential zoning, should a zoning change or variance be granted, could support up to a 30-story tower.

The Clarett Group did not return calls seeking comment for this article, but the company, which has built four tower-style, luxury residences in Manhattan since 2003, has in the past developed atop old theaters and church space. Several sites were in high-demand areas where they bought a large building, demolished it, and made room for a high-density residential tower.

The first project demolished the Olympia Theater at Broadway and 107th Street in Manhattan and built the 22-story Opus, a 64-unit building with family-sized luxury condominiums.

The company has since purchased the Sutton Theater, on West 57th Street, for its 36-story Place 57.

The Church of the Transfiguration’s parish house, a Gothic-revival building adjacent to the church at East 29 Street and Fifth Avenue in Manhattan, will make way for a 54-story tower called Sky House, while the church offices will move into the new building’s lower floors.

It seems no surprise then, that the new property acquisition is concentrated around the Harvey Theater.

“We would never sell that building,” BAM spokeswoman Sandy Sawotka said, laughing at the notion when told this week about the Clarett Group’s acquisitions.

Meanwhile, the leases of commercial tenants in the two- and three-story properties at 657-671 Fulton St. have been bought out since the Clarett Group purchased the properties in June.

“We weren’t approached about the Harvey,” Sawotka said, adding that she had heard talk about the move-outs. “We’re not involved, because it’s a private developer. They’ll build around us.”

Wendy Chanelis, who owns Yoga People’s Hot Yoga studio, wrote a farewell that she posted on the yoga studio’s Web site, thanking her clients.

“Our building on Fulton Street in Fort Greene, along with the rest of the block, is being torn down to make way for a big new hotel/condo. Our hearts are filled with gratitude for all your support since our opening in 2002,” the posting reads.

Ruth West, owner of Ruthie’s Restaurant, at 96 DeKalb Ave., had already been issued permits to renovate space in one of the Fulton Street properties, where she had hoped to move her soul food restaurant, when she learned the building had been sold.

“We were supposed to have been here, but we are not going to be going there now,” said West this week. “Every person on that block has moved out, except the BAM Theater — they weren’t going to sell.”

West said she heard that condominiums would rise on the properties.

“There is not one person on that block. It’s gone. That block is sold — the whole block. The church, the bar, there is nothing there,” she said.

“We’re troubled with all the development that’s going all around Fort Greene, with the Brooklyn Bridge Park, the Atlantic Yards, and Downtown Brooklyn being rezoned,” said Phillip Kellogg, president of the Fort Greene Association. “It’s going to be right across the street from what the BAM Local Development Corporation is going to be doing.”

The current plans for the BAM LDC’s Cultural District include arts space, housing and retail developments over four parcels of land just south of the Fulton-Ashland development site.

“We’ve heard it’s apartments,” Kellogg said, but added that since it was outside of the residentially zoned area his organization is trying to preserve as low-rise row-houses, many of them brownstones, he didn’t have much information on the Fulton-Ashland site.

Although no permit applications have been filed with the Department of Buildings, neighbors are convinced the buildings next to the Harvey Theater will be demolished.

An assistant for Community Board 2 said the board had not yet received any applications for variances to the zoning on that block.

NoyokA
August 10th, 2005, 09:45 PM
Clarett's a fairly decent developer and they have tapped the talents of Fox and Fowle.

From their website:

Luxury Condominium Homes

Clarett is currently developing a luxury condominium to be located in one of Brooklyn’s hottest, trend-setting residential neighborhoods. Design is underway by Fox & Fowle Architects with construction estimated to begin in late 2005.

BrooklynRider
August 10th, 2005, 10:59 PM
Clarett?

Major Developers - all aboard! Next Stop - Downtown Brooklyn!

Gulcrapek
August 10th, 2005, 11:57 PM
I put the Clarett thing in the DUMBO thread.

NoyokA
August 11th, 2005, 12:06 AM
I put the Clarett thing in the DUMBO thread.

Im almost positive that because of its proximity to BAM that its in downtown Brooklyn and not in Dumbo.

BrooklynRider
August 11th, 2005, 07:44 AM
Right, isn't the Harvey Theater right across the street from BAM (diagonally)?

NoyokA
August 11th, 2005, 11:06 AM
Right, isn't the Harvey Theater right across the street from BAM (diagonally)?

http://www.bam.org/img/about/05755_webmap.jpg

Gulcrapek
August 14th, 2005, 12:35 AM
I guess this is the one mentioned earlier, 41 floors by Leyva... a bit too eighties for me...


http://www.mayronrend.com/Images_picts/FS_skyscraper%20final.jpg

http://www.mayronrend.com/Images_picts/FS_aerial%20final.jpg

NoyokA
August 14th, 2005, 10:30 AM
I think its all to do with the rendering. It’s not a bad looking building; you just have to look past the rendering and the rendered treatments. It is all glass, it has some nice setbacks and it has some very nice horizontal mullions, which here act as balconies. But the program is not very much unlike the Bloomberg Tower with an all glass facade, timely setbacks, and a horizontal mullion crown with other spandrels accenting the facade.

BrooklynRider
August 14th, 2005, 04:53 PM
That officially pushes major new development east of Flatbush in Downtown. This is one for the skyline.

Kolbster
August 14th, 2005, 05:44 PM
I agree with Brooklynrider and Stern. It's Brooklyn's first all glass skyscraper and it looks pretty good too.

Also, from the second rendering, the building looks as if it were towering over the other dowtown buildings...will this be so when it's built or is it just a rendering trick to make the building more eye catching?

Gulcrapek
August 14th, 2005, 07:22 PM
Stern: where do you see mullions on the crown?

I hope it just is the rendering effect, hopefully it'll be nice.

Kolb: It definitely has the potential to be taller than 4 Metrotech, and even more so with the crown (on further check, almost definitely). My guess it that it will end up between Renaissance Plaza (398 ft) and 12 Metrotech (473 ft).

NoyokA
August 14th, 2005, 07:26 PM
Stern: where do you see mullions on the crown?

I hope it just is the rendering effect, hopefully it'll be nice.

Kolb: It definitely has the potential to be taller than 4 Metrotech, and even more so with the crown (on further check, almost definitely). My guess it that it will end up between Renaissance Plaza (398 ft) and 12 Metrotech (473 ft).

Horizontal banding, mullions, spandrels, etc. etc.

sfenn1117
August 14th, 2005, 09:57 PM
^That one looks great, is it proposed, approved, u/c?

If it looks half as good as Bloomberg I'll be happy. Bloomy didn't look exceptional in its rendering but in person, the Bloomberg Tower is -breathtaking- even considering its boxyness. Beautiful glass easily makes a tower.

bkmonkey
August 16th, 2005, 12:38 AM
Is the tower above, the rendering of an old building (proposed) or the clarret groups new building. Judging from the quotes on the thread, it seemed like this building was going to be a reality (the glass tower) but no one has said if it is clarrets or not. What is the status on this?

Gulcrapek
August 16th, 2005, 01:56 AM
Given that's it's designed by Leyva and Clarett mentions Fox & Fowle, I think they're different.

Kolbster
September 4th, 2005, 03:13 AM
Ummm developement is starting on one of the plots downtown which is zoned for a 25-30 story tower...i think site M. I read it today in teh brooklyn papers

Clark 55
September 4th, 2005, 11:54 AM
I was excited about a nice botique hotel in the Brooklyn Heights neighborhood. But when did these plans get scrapped to make way for another student dorminotry? Today seems to be move-in day for Pace University students. This will change the character of this neighborhood drastically. What a joke.

Kolbster
September 4th, 2005, 04:23 PM
I was excited about a nice botique hotel in the Brooklyn Heights neighborhood. But when did these plans get scrapped to make way for another student dorminotry? Today seems to be move-in day for Pace University students. This will change the character of this neighborhood drastically. What a joke.

The university bought it in search for new dorm space for students i think a year or so back, and so renovation was picked up to restore the building from that fire in the Eastern Athletic club.

As for the students...oh yea, tell me about it we are going to have some kids out later than me!

Gulcrapek
October 22nd, 2005, 04:31 PM
Brooklyn Eagle has a different rendering of the Flatbush Avenue tower and its little brother (both Leyva)

http://69.94.74.25/inc/miniaturka.php?plik=100605143058.jpg&szerokosc=200

Derek2k3
October 22nd, 2005, 10:35 PM
Project #47

147 Flatbush Avenue Extension
147-157 Flatbush Avenue Extension/302-310 Gold Street/151-165 Johnson Street
40 stories
Ismael Leyva Architets P.C.
Dev-147 Flatbush Ave LLC (Dev-Winchester Realty LLC)
Residential Condominiums
309 units 375,600 Sq. Ft.
Proposed ?



http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/51121199.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/51121197.jpg


171 Johnson Street
NE Corner of Johnson & Gold Streets
22/~30 stories
Ismael Leyva Architets P.C.
Dev-147 Flatbush Ave LLC(Dev-Winchester Realty LLC)
Residential Condominiums
170 units
Proposed ?

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/51121198.jpg http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/51121201.jpg
9-2-05


http://69.94.74.25/categories/category.php?category_id=5&id=4404
Brooklyn Eagle
2 Residential Towers To Rise on Johnson Street
by Linda Collins (linda@brooklyneagle.net), published online 10-06-2005

http://brownstoner.com/brownstoner/archives/2005/08/development_wat_1.html
Brownstoner
August 23, 2005
Development Watch: Johnson and Gold?



Maybe the 22 story building on Gold Street the B.E. article is mentioning is actually this one:
http://i.pbase.com/v3/55/435155/1/50180837.GoldStreet.JPG
KFA

Derek2k3
October 22nd, 2005, 10:54 PM
Project # 8

LIU Athletic, Recreation & Wellness Center
Dekalb Avenue
5 stories
Arquitectonica
Dev-Long Island University
Recreational
110,000 Sq. ft.
Under Construction 2004-October 2005

http://www.brooklyn.liunet.edu/bbut11/arwcphotos/wellness_center_big.gif
http://www.arquitectonica.com/

http://www.brooklyn.liunet.edu/bbut11/arwcphotos/photos.htm

LIU'S ATHLETIC, RECREATION AND WELLNESS CENTER

The largest building project in the Campus’ 78-year history, the $40 million, 100,000 square-foot complex will provide state-of-the-art athletic facilities for students and other members of the Campus community. It will feature tennis courts, a running track, a broad array of workout equipment and a 25-yard swimming pool in addition to a 3,000 seat arena, where the school’s NCAA Division I teams will compete.

Additionally, the center will house resources and programs to promote the health of community residents. Cardiac rehabilitation, orthopedic therapy and asthma education services are planned, as well as the installation of specialized equipment, such as a separate therapy pool equipped with a hydraulic floor. The new facility also will provide an important venue for civic events. Ground was broken for the center last spring and construction is rapidly progressing. Its grand opening is scheduled for the first night of the NCAA Division I basketball season in October 2005.

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/51122361.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/51122364.jpg
10-7-2005

lofter1
October 23rd, 2005, 05:23 PM
Downtown Brooklyn In Store For A Major Facelift

October 21, 2005
NY1: http://www.ny1.com/ny1/content/index.jsp?stid=9&aid=54431#
Video here (including images of Thor Equity tower): http://real.ny1.com:8080/ramgen/real3/0013A472_051021_181142hi.rm

Downtown Brooklyn is starting to look like one giant construction site, a year after the city rezoned the area to spur development, and there's much more on tap. NY1’s Jeanine Ramirez filed this report.


The dorms for Brooklyn Law School are in full use, work is underway to expand the Brooklyn Marriott, which will double the hotel's capacity, and the former Board of Education building at 110 Livingston Street is turning into condos. These are just some of the many projects underway in Downtown Brooklyn, as developers help transform the area into a round-the-clock destination with a park as its centerpiece.

“We'll be creating a 1.5 acre park similar to Bryant Park in Manhattan with a 700-car parking garage underneath,” says Michael Burke of the Downtown Brooklyn Council.

http://www.ny1.com/ny1/content/images/live/88/175404.jpg

It'll be called Willoughby Square Park, and will stand where many parking lots are now located. Surrounding the park will be office towers like one designed for developer Thor Equities. Construction is expected to begin in 2006.

That 60-story building will be located where the Albee Square Mall parking garage is. Thor Equities already owns the site.

“That, once it's fully developed, will be about 1.2 million square feet of new space,” says Burke. “Most likely it'll be a combination of retail, office, perhaps a hotel and residential.”

Residential projects are popping up all over. Two landmarks, the Williamsburg Savings Bank and Verizon buildings, are turning into condos, and the State Street townhouses are designed to fit in with the historic district. They are expected to be completed in 2006.

Meantime, the adjacent parking lot will be transformed into low-income studio housing and a community theater. Construction on that project is scheduled for next year.

But there's still more happening this year. This month a landscaping project begins on Livingston Street, including tree plantings.

After this street gets spruced up, plantings are planned for Boerum Place to help unify the roadway with the landscaping on Adams Street leading up to the Brooklyn Bridge.

Plans are also in the works for streetscape improvements to modernize the Fulton Mall corridor. Storefronts are being upgraded, including Macy's, which is redoing all of its windows.

And there's a push to get other buildings along the commercial strip to reopen their vacant upper floors for use. The idea is to create an attractive Downtown Brooklyn for businesses, shoppers, pedestrians, residents and tourists alike.

- Jeanine Ramirez

Copyright © 2005 NY1 News

BrooklynRider
October 23rd, 2005, 11:15 PM
Raise your hand if you count "tree plantings" onLivingston Street as a "construction" project.

krulltime
December 20th, 2005, 03:40 PM
Brooklyn projects on tap
5 sites expected to be developed after downtown business rezoning


Published on December 19, 2005

The rezoning of the downtown Brooklyn business district in mid-2004 was intended to spur all kinds of construction, and thus create around-the-clock activity.

The rezoning did prompt a bevy of residential projects--no surprise, given the hot housing market. The question now is whether office and retail will follow in the 10 development sites created by the plan.

Though shovels have not yet hit the ground, the answer seems to be "yes.

"At least a handful of major commercial developments in the works should get going in 2006," says Michael Burke, executive director of the Downtown Brooklyn Council. He predicts that work will begin on five of the sites next year.

One of the proposed projects is an approximately 800,000-square-foot building on Red Hook Lane, which would include Class A offices, retail space and, perhaps, residences. Muss Development Co. and the city Economic Development Corp. are collaborating.

Mr. Burke says the first ground broken may be for a 1.4 million-square-foot mixed-use building at Willoughby Street and Flatbush Avenue Extension that could rise to 600 feet. Thor Equities, run by Brooklyn developer Joseph Sitt, has put that site on the market and is also looking to sell the adjacent mall, at 1 DeKalb Ave., which is anchored by Toys "R" Us and Forever 21 stores. The properties could fetch a total of about $200 million.

"That rezoning is what makes the site so valuable," says Thor's broker, William Shanahan at CB Richard Ellis. "It gives you density; it removes height limits, and you don't have to go through Ulurp," the city's costly and time-consuming review process for zoning changes.

The site will soon be enhanced by a new Willoughby Square Park on one side and a reconstructed, beautified Flatbush Avenue on the other. The mayor says these city-funded projects will engender private development.

The 1.5-acre park will replace parking lots, a city Human Resources Administration building and other low-rise structures. A 700-car garage will be built underneath it; the total cost could be in the low tens of millions.

The downtown segment of Flatbush Avenue, a crucial but nondescript artery, will get $13 million in improvements beginning in late 2006 or early 2007. At the same time, Fulton Street will be spruced up to the tune of $8.5 million, and Boerum Place for $2.5 million. The Metropolitan Transportation Authority will do its part underground, with a complete renovation of the Jay Street-Borough Hall station and a new pedestrian tunnel connecting it to the Lawrence Street station.

The new transit hub will make downtown Brooklyn a more enticing location for back offices and other uses, according to Mr. Burke.

"We conservatively estimate that 4.5 million square feet of new office space [will be built] over 10 years," he says. "There's not a demand for a lot of Class A office space, but that's in today's market. We created these development sites for future needs going out 10 years. Once we get into better economic times, the large corporations [seeking new space] are not going to need to turn to New Jersey."

--Erik Engquist


©2005 Crain Communications Inc.

BrooklynRider
December 20th, 2005, 09:29 PM
It looks like Sitt at Thor is more interested in flipping properties than developingthem.

Derek2k3
December 21st, 2005, 12:40 AM
The tower next to BAM (Fulton and Ashland Place) will be 28 stories 360 feet.
28-story to rise near BAM @ Ashland Place (http://ltjbukem.blogspot.com/2005/11/28-story-to-rise-near-bam-ashland.html)

krulltime
January 8th, 2006, 12:22 PM
Push to improve 5 Brooklyn blocks


Erik Engquist
January 09, 2006

A commercial and residential project that would transform five blocks of downtown Brooklyn and Fort Greene is in the works.

The underutilized land, rezoned last June to encourage mixed-use development of greater density, has been held for 20 years by supermarket mogul John Catsimatidis. He is negotiating with BFC Construction Corp. to launch a joint venture to build along Myrtle Avenue from Flatbush Avenue to Ashland Place.

BFC plans to build apartment towers with ground-floor commercial space. The rezoned site at the corner of Flatbush and Myrtle avenues allows for a 400-foot-high building that could accommodate 500 condominium units or luxury rentals. Moving east toward Ashland Place, 160-foot-high buildings would be constructed.

"We'll put a Gristedes in and upgrade the neighborhood," says Mr. Catsimatidis, adding that he is "cautiously optimistic" that a deal will be struck. Duane Reade, currently on the site, would probably be included in the project.

The apartments would be a mix of low-income, moderate-income and market-rate units. Pratt Area Community Council has been brought in to build the affordable housing at Ashland Place and has been awarded federal tax credits.


©2005 Crain Communications Inc.

Gulcrapek
January 9th, 2006, 05:42 PM
Finally some news on that...

kliq6
January 11th, 2006, 12:35 PM
http://www.newyorkobserver.com/finance_financialpress.asp

lofter1
January 11th, 2006, 12:54 PM
From another article in the Observer ( http://www.newyorkobserver.com/finance_newsstory1.asp ):

Life Getting Hot For Architect Rafael Viñoly

... The case sheds light on an issue that has dogged architecture firms that attempt massive and politically difficult urban projects, while at the same time attempting to deliver state-of-the-art design.

Witness Mr. Libeskind’s increasing marginalization at Ground Zero, or the recent shouting match from which architect Frank Gehry absented himself over the weekend over his plans for the Atlantic Yards terminal.

Anyone know anything about the Gehry brou-ha-ha?

BrooklynRider
January 11th, 2006, 01:19 PM
I don't know about that, but I know there was a NY Times forum last Saturday and Gehry was a speaker in a Q&A session. The questions were very pointed and very critical. I was told the whole auditorium had an eerie, uncomfortable feel as Gehry tried to answer question after question - all critical of the Atlantic Yards project. My friend said she actually felt bad for him because the questions came from such a negative stance on the part of audience members.

Derek2k3
January 11th, 2006, 02:09 PM
Gehry Grilled in Manhattan
http://www.observer.com/therealestate/2006/01/gehry-grilled-in-manhattan.html

lofter1
January 11th, 2006, 02:34 PM
^ thanks ....

If I paid 35 bucks those are the same questions I'd want to hear answered. Gehry must be more out of touch than I thought if he expected otherwise.

BrooklynRider
March 22nd, 2006, 02:08 PM
From Curbed:

Near the Bridges, Huge Towers For Flatbush

We missed this Crain's article last month about the condo boom along downtown Flatbush. Brooklyn Magazine also had a big story on the subject recently. Three of the biggest projects to emerge from last Summer's rezoning efforts include:

1. 167 Johnson Place: 40-story and 35-story towers.
2. Flatbush and Tillary: Isaac Hager's 400-foot-tall tower.
3. Myrtle East of Flatbush: Several 30-ish-story towers.

Not surprisingly, in the last three years, prices for a buildable square foot in this vicinity have gone from $75 to $150, according to Massey Knakal.

BrooklynRider
March 22nd, 2006, 02:14 PM
5 Atlantic Avenue Development Sites on Market for $24 Million
by Linda Collins (linda@brooklyneagle.net), published online 03-18-2006

Opposite Jail: Back-to-Back Lots on Atlantic Avenue, Pacific Street
Could Become Linchpin Site For Turnaround
By Linda Collins

DOWNTOWN BROOKLYN - This newspaper has learned that a group of five properties on Atlantic Avenue, opposite the jail in Downtown Brooklyn, are on the market as a package deal. The asking price is $24 million.

Mukesh Vasvani, a broker with Prudential Douglas Elliman in Manhattan, has the exclusive listing, according to a source. Mr. Vasvani had not returned calls by press time yesterday.

The five back-to-back properties - which are within Boerum Hill - are at 262 and 280 Atlantic Ave. and 253, 257 and 259 Pacific St., all between Boerum Place on the west and Smith Street on the east. Three of them are in use as parking lots; one is described as a warehouse; the fifth is a vacant lot. Together the lots total close to 25,000 square feet.

The largest of the properties, a parking lot at 262 Atlantic, is 10,800 square feet and measures 150.75 feet by 72.75 feet. A search of the New York City Department of Buildings (DOB) Web site reveals a 2003 approved permit application to construct a seven-story, 53,000-square-foot, extended-stay hotel with 46 residential units and commercial space on the first floor.

There are also "pre-filed" applications (both filed on March 15, 2006) noted on the DOB Web site for new buildings on two other lots: one for a 6,292-square-foot building at 280 Atlantic, currently a 1,973-square-foot parking lot; and the other for a 6,875-square-foot building at 253 Pacific, where there is currently a one-story warehouse on a lot 25 feet by 100 feet.

The zoning for all five lots is identified as R6 and R6A; the FAR (floor area ratio) is 2.43-3, with an increase possible by obtaining a variance from the Board of Standards and Appeals, as stated in the materials received at this newspaper.

According to other city documents, ownership for the five properties is described as follows: For both 262 and 280 Atlantic Ave. - 262-276 Atlantic Realty; for 259 Pacific St. - Pyramid Realty; for 257 Pacific St. - F&N LLC; and for 253 Pacific St. - F&G.

The properties are also adjacent to the Mobil Gas Station site at Atlantic and Boerum Place, which was reported to be on the market for $26 million earlier this year.

That site has approved plans and an approved variance to construct a seven-story, 100,000-square-foot mixed-use building containing 59 residential units, approximately 8,500 square feet of ground floor retail space and 24 parking spaces.

© Brooklyn Daily Eagle 2006

BrooklynRider
March 22nd, 2006, 02:20 PM
Is it Possible a Downtown Building Will Be Flipped?
By Linda Collins

DOWNTOWN BROOKLYN - In a very quick turnaround, a MetroTech building purchased at auction February 28 for $20.9 million appears to be on the market for $30 million. At least according to an ad placed recently on craigslist.org.

The ad, whose author is Daniel Fromm of Gabel Property Group, does not mention the building's address -which is 107 Lawrence Street, also known as 14 MetroTech Center - but the ad's property description is identical to that published for the site by the New York State Office of General Services (OGS).

Fromm, who was reached at press time, was reluctant to discuss whom he was representing.

The OGS conducted the auction on February 28, and reported the successful bidder as Samuel Cahan of Monroe, N.Y. According to the OGS's Christine Burling, no further information could be provided.

"As required, he gave a deposit of $500,000 at the auction," Burling said. "He now needs to give us an additional 15 percent of the bid price within 10 days of the receipt of a notice from us." That should have been received by Friday, March 10, she said, indicating his next payment is due by Friday, March 24.

The 24,000-square-foot, two-story circa-1963 building, which sits on a lot "roughly" 150 feet by 108 feet and was previously occupied by the State Department of Labor, had a minimum bid of $9.5 million. The auction was considered "very successful," according to Burling, who said the Department of Labor will use the money to upgrade its building at 250 Schermerhorn St., corner of Bond Street in Boerum Hill. That building is six stories and was also built in the early '60s.

As previously reported, the site has high-rise Class A office development potential as well as potential for a hotel, retail and residential dwellings in a mixed-use building.

© Brooklyn Daily Eagle 2006

BrooklynRider
April 6th, 2006, 09:54 AM
‘Cadman Plastic Park’: Rally Planned To Protest Artificial Turf
by Mary Frost (mfrost@brooklyneagle.net), published online 04-06-2006

[size=3]Activists Ready To Face Off Against Parks Dept., Officials [/soze]
By Mary Frost
CADMAN PLAZA — Banners of protest reading “Plastic Grass — Fuggedaboutit!” and “Honor Our Veterans” were hung last weekend on a chain-link barrier recently installed around heavily-used Cadman Plaza Park. In addition, the “Plaza” on the park’s identifying sign was taped over and replaced, to read “Cadman Plastic Park.”

“The neighborhood continues to be upset about plastic grass,” said a spokesperson for the Cadman Park Community Council (CPCC), which is opposed to the replacement of the sparse grass in the main rectangular field — originally designed to honor veterans of World War II — with artificial turf.

The group, which has gathered roughly 1,700 signatures on a petition opposing the turf, plans a rally for this Sunday at 1 p.m. in the park.

“Partners will be standing there with us. It’s a march for nature in this park and all over the city, and it’s a march for veterans — they deserve a beautiful park,” the spokesperson said. “It’s sad this park has been neglected for so long.”

Multi-Use Lawn Or Athletic Field?
Among other objections, the group says that the artificial turf will turn what is presently a multi-use lawn — so worn out in its center that it has earned the nickname “the Dustbowl” — into a field dedicated to athletic use only.

They also say that artificial turf can easily reach temperatures of 129 degrees and more in the summer, and contributes to the increasing amount of air pollution in the city.

“The BHA prefers real grass, but our board understood why the Parks Department decided to put artificial grass there, and we did not disagree with its choice,” Judy Stanton, executive director of the Brooklyn Heights Association, said last week.

She added that real grass “would entail closing the park at least once a year to seed the grass. Is that an acceptable option? I don’t think so. A lot of users would be unhappy — assuming that the Parks Department would have the maintenance staff to do it.”

While the Parks Department says that grass cannot grow in the area because of heavy use from school groups, Frisbee throwers, dog walkers and others, CPCC maintains that poor soil quality and a nearly total lack of maintenance are responsible for the park’s derelict condition.

“We tried to work the diplomacy angle; we showed them — Councilman Yassky and the Parks Department — all of our research,” the spokesperson said. “They didn’t want to hear anything. They were very closed to us.

“This is happening all over the city. It tends to be in disadvantaged neighborhoods and tends to be a quiet process,” the spokesperson said. “There are another 50 fields coming.”

On Saturday the lawn was trampled by more than 10,000 pro-immigration marchers who gathered there in preparation for a march across the Brooklyn Bridge.

On Sunday, the banners protesting the artificial turf were hung. By yesterday morning, the banners had been removed, and workmen continued to install more lengths of the chain-link barrier around the periphery of the park.

© Brooklyn Daily Eagle 2006

krulltime
April 13th, 2006, 01:04 AM
Two New Projects Redefine Downtown


http://i.pbase.com/o4/55/435155/1/58581905.200Livingston.JPG
An architect’s rendering of a
25-story residential mixed-use
tower that will soon rise at 200
Livingston St./189 Schermerhorn
St. in Downtown Brooklyn.


By Dennis Holt
04-12-2006

DOWNTOWN BROOKLYN — Everyone has been talking about the “New Brooklyn,” and two new developments bear witness that the New Brooklyn is now a reality.Yesterday, a bright light was cast onto that vision when ground was broken on two new tall towers that will hold more than 500 condos, and will rise a combined 75 stories off of Tillary on Gold Street.

The Eagle also obtained a rendering of another example of the Downtown boom — a planned 25-story residential building on Livingston Street where the Fire Department used to be headquartered. The building will be developed by Lou Greco.


Gold Shovels On Gold Street


http://i.pbase.com/o4/55/435155/1/58582437.JohnsonGold.JPG
An architect’s rendering of
the 40- and 35-story residential
towers that will soon rise at
Johnson and Gold Streets and
Flatbush Avenue Extension in
Downtown Brooklyn.


Yesterday, it didn’t rain on anybody’s parade, but it snowed forcefully on a large tent, white to begin with, as two surprising tall buildings planned for a surprising site were celebrated.

Gravel was scooped up by gold shovels rather than dirt as developers, the borough president, and friends and allies heralded the “beginning” of two residential towers of 40 and 35 stories, near the end of the Manhattan Bridge, on streets most people don’t know much about — Gold and Johnson.

These two buildings will jointly have 514 residential units and will be the first new structures to be built as a result of the 2004 rezoning of Downtown Brooklyn.

The rezoning — done mainly to be able to build substantial office buildings quicker than in the past — also accommodates creating larger apartment buildings than had been the case.

Developers Ron Hershco and Dean Palin know how to read zoning resolutions, and Hershco quickly acquired the sites in February 2005.

One of the towers, at 306 Gold St., will be 40 stories tall, the tallest new building yet to be constructed in Downtown Brooklyn. It will total 400,000 square feet with 303 condos. The second structure, at 313 Gold, will be 35 stories tall, with 250,000 square feet of space, and will have 214 condos.


Call Him Ismael

Both of the new buildings, which will be signature structures at one of the two main entrances from Manhattan, will be designed by Ismael Leyva Architects. The 306 Gold St. building is expected to be completed in January 2008.

It will feature a 50-foot pool, a squash court, an indoor basketball court, a fully equipped fitness center and a screening room.

The 313 Gold St. building will also have a 50-foot pool, a fitness center and a screening room. It is expected to be completed after the 306 building.

Prudential Douglas Elliman will handle sales and marketing for the project; TerraMark Development will serve as development and marketing consultants; and Plaza Construction Corp will be the construction manager. Hershco is not new to the area. He was the developer for the Toy Factory Lofts at nearby 176 Johnston St. and is currently constructing a mixed-use development at 133 Water St. in DUMBO.

Borough President Marty Markowitz, in talking to this reporter and later to the large crowd, asked, “If someone had said to us 10 years ago that something like this was going to be built at this site, we would have laughed.”

With everything that is happening in the greater Downtown Brooklyn area, and that is expected to happen, no one laughed. Markowitz suggested that when all is done at this site, people coming off the Manhattan Bridge will say, “Oh, wow.” And no one disputed this.


© Brooklyn Daily Eagle 2006

krulltime
April 13th, 2006, 01:59 AM
The Future is Here: Livingston Street Corridor Takes Shape
Corridor Moves Toward Goal: ‘Vibrant, Safe, 24/7’ Downtown Street


by Linda Collins
published online 04-12-2006

DOWNTOWN BROOKLYN —With the filing of permits for a 25-story residential mixed-use tower on Livingston Street in Downtown Brooklyn, it looks like the street’s planned transformation is moving forward. Like other areas of Downtown Brooklyn — such as Flatbush Avenue Extension — the Livingston Street Corridor, as it is known locally, will soon be the “vibrant, safe, 24/7 street” with a mix of retail, commercial and residential that local officials and community organizations are hoping for.

“As early as 2003, a change was starting to take place,” said Brian Leary of Massey Knakal Realty Services. “We called it ‘the sleeping giant’ at that time. Now we have the transformation of Livingston in the making.”

Leary, a broker, has personally sold three sites along the corridor — at 330, 230 and 204 Livingston — that will be developed as high-rise residential with retail at street level. And he has at least three more properties on the market with contracts on the table.

“There’s approximately one million square feet of development on the drawing boards today,” he told the Brooklyn Eagle recently, “and the potential exists for a couple million more.”


Completed Projects

• 180 Livingston, a 200,000-square-foot building that was completely renovated by the Treeline Companies into Class A office space upstairs above a restaurant at street level.

• 163 Livingston, The Bell Tower, Brooklyn Tabernacle’s “mostly new” building, houses an acoustically-treated choir room for the church’s 275-voice award-winning gospel choir, plus offices, a prayer room and retail bookstore at street level.


Projects Currently Underway

• 110 Livingston, the former Board of Education headquarters undergoing conversion by Two Trees Management Co. to include 300 market rate residential units, plus retail and cultural use in 335,000-square feet.

• Bond Street Garage, Thor Equity’s rehabilitation of the five-story 245,185-square-foot structure at Livingston and Bond, which will have retail at street level, including a new Greyhound bus office, and could have some future development potential.

• 200 Livingston, also identified as 189 Schermerhorn, the 25-story residential mixed-use tower that is being developed by Second Development Services partners Lou Greco and Mario Procida. The building, which will have access from both streets and will contain 214 condominium units, is being designed by The Stephen B. Jacobs Group Architects.


Currently in Planning Stages

• 230 Livingston and 225 Schermerhorn St., another through-site where two residential towers are reportedly in the works. The site, a 20,000-square-foot irregular lot being used for parking, was purchased by the N.A.L. Corporation in 2005 for $25 million. Leary, who handled the sale, said tentative plans call for 226 residential units in two towers totalling 235,000 square feet.

• 29 Gallatin Place, corner of Livingston: Work will begin before the end of this month on the conversion to Class A office space of the former Macy’s building at 29 Gallatin Place, corner of Livingston, which will also have retail at street level — with new entrances on Livingston.

As reported last October, Treeline will spend $20 million on infrastructure upgrades to convert the 10-story, 100,000-square-foot building which dates to the 1890s.

“We have possession and we have the floor plans already,” said Paula Ingram of Ingram & Hebron, which has the exclusive to lease the office space.

Final details of the lease deal — between Treeline and Federated Department Stores Inc., the owner of Macy’s — should conclude this week, Ingram said, and work will begin immediately. Completion is anticipated for January 2007.

“We will begin renting it in mid-2006,” Ingram said.

• Red Hook Lane at Boerum Place and Livingston St., a proposed 800,000-square-foot Class A office tower on a through-site from Fulton Mall to Boerum Place to Livingston and encompassing the remaining block of Red Hook Lane. The city has not released specific details or the name of the developer.

The new look for the corridor is what excites Leary, Ingram, Mario Procida and Michael Burke, executive director of the Downtown Brooklyn Council.

“I think the Livingston Street Corridor and the BAM Cultural District, when they are completed, will be the bowtie of Downtown Brooklyn,” said Procida.

Said Ingram, “This has been a big dream of mine for some time, having the downtown, and especially Livingston Street, look good, because I live and work here.”


Livingston Street BID

Ingram said she has also been active in planning for a Livingston Street Business Improvement District (BID), although that is now in an expansion mode. It will also include Court and Schermerhorn Streets downtown. “Basically everything that’s not part of the other existing BIDs will be included, plus the two northside corners at Court and Atlantic [Eckerds and The CourtHouse apartments],” said Burke. “It closes the gaps.” The Downtown Brooklyn Council is the sponsoring agency in the formation of the new BID.

“We are completing our outreach to merchants, tenants and property owners now,” he continued, adding that the response has been excellent. “There’s a lot of interest by a lot of the big property owners on the [Fulton] mall; many of their buildings go through to Livingston.”

The next step is to go through the city’s formal ULURP (Uniform Land Use Review) Process. However, there are a number of formal steps we have to take that are required by the city Department of Small Business Services.”

These steps include outreach, which has been done; and the writing of the BID Plan, which the committee is beginning to work on now. This must cover four areas: the geographical boundaries, budget, list of services and the assessment formula.

In addition to Ingram and Burke, those involved — called stakeholders — include property owners Penda Aiken, Frances Schor of TreeLine and George Silva of JWMays & Co.; representatives from St. Francis College, Brooklyn Tabernacle and Macy’s; plus the executive directors of the three neighboring BIDs — MetroTech, Montague Street and Fulton Mall; and representatives of Borough President Marty Markowitz and Council Member David Yassky.

“We hope the formal [ULURP] process will begin in early spring,” said Burke, who added that the process has been helped by two major grants, one from the Department of Small Business Services and one from the Independence Community Foundation.

Other sites on the market, according to Leary, include commercial buildings at 291 Livingston, 34-38 Nevins Street just off Livingston, and 55-57 Flatbush Ave. just across Flatbush from Livingston.

“These are all properties with great development potential,” said Leary.


© Brooklyn Daily Eagle 2006

londonlawyer
April 13th, 2006, 07:38 AM
Good news! What's currently on the site of 200 Livingston (an empty lot or a crappy building)?

BrooklynRider
April 14th, 2006, 12:46 AM
Livingston Street is dismal west of Court Street. I can't imagine a BID doing much as one whole side will be residential. Perhaps there is retail in the plan as well?

krulltime
May 9th, 2006, 08:06 PM
I guess this is the one mentioned earlier, 41 floors by Leyva... a bit too eighties for me...


http://www.mayronrend.com/Images_picts/FS_skyscraper%20final.jpg

http://www.mayronrend.com/Images_picts/FS_aerial%20final.jpg

Ok I am still confuse...

Is this one under construction?

If yes... is it one of the towers in this development? Or is it two different development that are close by?

http://i.pbase.com/o4/55/435155/1/59936392.BKGoldStreetTowers306a313.JPG

Gulcrapek
May 9th, 2006, 08:17 PM
I think the 80s-style one is an old design for the site.

krulltime
May 9th, 2006, 09:07 PM
I think the 80s-style one is an old design for the site.

Oh ok... thanks alot Gulcrapek for the clarification. ;)

TonyO
May 17th, 2006, 03:06 PM
NY Sun
5/17/06

Mayor To Name Development Tsar To Oversee Downtown Brooklyn

By DAVID LOMBINO, Staff Reporter of the Sun

The Bloomberg administration is looking to boost downtown Brooklyn by naming a Brooklyn development tsar to oversee the planned growth of the city's third largest business district.

If the city's initiative moves ahead as expected, the tsar would oversee a new organization that would coordinate economic development in the area and market downtown Brooklyn as a mixed-use neighborhood that is a cultural and entertainment destination. Development analysts said the reorganization shows the mayor is prioritizing Brooklyn's development, but critics said a centralization of development functions would stifle local input.

A leading candidate to head the new organization is a senior adviser of Deputy Mayor Daniel Doctoroff, Joe Chan, sources said. Mr. Chan has strong Brooklyn roots: He is a former director of real estate for the Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce and a director of a local development corporation for East New York.

About two years ago, the city passed an ambitious rezoning plan for downtown Brooklyn, envisioning as much as 5.4 million square feet of new commercial space and about 1,000 new units of housing.

The Brooklyn residential market has been booming, with tens of thousands of apartments planned, but as with most of the city the market for developing commercial space has been slower.

The city's proposed organization would attempt to streamline Brooklyn's development advocacy community by folding in the functions of a number of existing development advocacy groups, including the Fulton Mall and MetroTech business improvement districts, the Downtown Brooklyn Council, and the BAM local development corporation.The organization may also have some construction function, sources said.

The president of Brooklyn, Marty Markowitz,said the new structure would allow visions of downtown development to progress from vision to reality.

"By centralizing responsibility and leadership, this new position will help maximize the area's economic and cultural benefits," Mr. Markowitz said yesterday.

The president of the Real Estate Board of New York, Steven Spinola, said the proposed reorganization is "a signal of the resources that the city is prepared to put behind this effort" to boost downtown Brooklyn.

Mr. Spinola said the consolidation would improve efficiency and the distribution of resources by coordinating several entities under the same roof. He said areas earmarked for development in other boroughs could ask for a similar consolidation.

With a visible building boom across the five boroughs, widespread rezonings, and the city's support of several large infrastructure projects, Mr. Bloomberg can be assured that his

mayoral legacy will include his bold, active vision for development.

Critics of the administration's building initiatives, however, have complained that the mayor has prioritized development over the input of the local community. One example, some say, is that City Hall's funding of some local business improvement districts has decreased in recent years, and that centralizing planning comes at the cost of local knowledge and community input.

Council Member Leticia James, a Democrat whose district includes part of downtown Brooklyn, said she is concerned that the proposed reorganization would benefit developers over community interests.

Ms. James supported the rezoning of downtown Brooklyn, but she said plans could displace existing residents and small businesses and fall short of fulfilling the need for affordable housing.

"It could be driven from City Hall and not driven from the input of the community," Ms. James said.

Brian Ketcham, the executive director of Community Consulting Services, a group that has protested the size and scope of planned growth in downtown Brooklyn, said that adding the city's planned umbrella organization would just be "another level of bureaucracy separating them from the community."

Mr. Ketcham said plans call for the rezoning to double the amount of cars in downtown Brooklyn and double the load on mass transit. He said the downtown Brooklyn estimates do not include developer Bruce Ratner's plan to build a basketball arena and 16 mostly residential towers nearby in Prospect Heights.

"What about the people who live and work here?" Mr. Ketcham said. "It is good they are giving it some attention, but is this a masquerade or is this serious stuff?"

Derek2k3
May 27th, 2006, 03:43 AM
Ismael Leyva Architects have some cool new projects on their website including this 50 story building for Downtown Brooklyn.
http://www.ilarch.com/images/photos/29_060526_new.jpg
http://www.ilarch.com

krulltime
May 27th, 2006, 10:36 AM
^ WOW where did that come from and where will it go? A perfect looking tower. Hope it doesnt get killed or unbuilt.

MidtownGuy
May 27th, 2006, 12:01 PM
yes, WOW! I like it, and I will be glad to see downtown Brooklyn rise skyward in the 21st century. Anyone who doesn't think skyscrapers belong in downtown Brooklyn, have as much chance at stopping it as they do of travelling back in time to prevent the Williamsburg Bank tower from being built.
Why should the skyline be limited to Manhattan? Anyway, with all the rezoning along the waterfronts in Queens and Brooklyn, the people who think Brooklyn should be preserved in dry ice will have a lot of fighting to do.

This is inevitable, and gloriously so. KISS THE FUTURE!

BrooklynRider
May 30th, 2006, 03:55 PM
I couldn't find that project on their site. It's hard to tell exactly where that it, but I think it is the lot on the south east cormer of Flatbush where the Nevins Steet 2/3/5 station is.

Or, could it be this "BFC Construction Corp. plans a 500-unit building at the corner of Flatbush and Myrtle."

Derek2k3
May 31st, 2006, 10:33 AM
I couldn't find that project on their site. It's hard to tell exactly where that it, but I think it is the lot on the south east cormer of Flatbush where the Nevins Steet 2/3/5 station is.


I was thinking around there too.

SilentPandaesq
May 31st, 2006, 03:04 PM
Wooohhh mama that looks tall!

Is this a condo or a Office or a mixer-upper?

In 4 years when I can afford a downpayment on a condo, Brooklyn will have a lot to offer. Shame I have to move from the heights in 2 months. I would love to see these go up personally. :(

pianoman11686
June 3rd, 2006, 10:53 PM
[size=4]Record high-rises set for Brooklyn

Six towers with more stories than Williamsburgh Savings Bank planned; some worry about loss of low-rise charm

By Tiffany Razzano

The 40-story 306 Gold Street in Downtown Brooklyn will be the tallest new residential tower in the borough when construction on it is completed in 2008. But it's just one of many high-rises planned for Brooklyn, where buildings tend not to soar. The shift has some residents concerned.

More than 15 towers at least 20 stories tall are planned for the borough, including in Downtown Brooklyn, along the Williamsburg and Greenpoint waterfront, and in Dumbo. The rush to construct the tall towers follows major rezonings by the city and will lead to a north Brooklyn that looks like Battery Park City, Trump's Riverside South or the Miami skyline, depending on who's doing the talking.

The new vertically-inclined borough will also have half a dozen projects taller (in terms of number of stories) than the Williamsburgh Savings Bank building, now the tallest building in Brooklyn. The landmark spire rises above neighboring structures and serves as a point of orientation. In a sign of the booming market, the 34-story, 512-foot bank building is itself going residential with 216 condos, part of a project by Canyon-Johnson Urban Funds and the Dermot Company.

"A lot of projects that are coming into the area have been designed as high-rises and the area is going to change dramatically from low-rise to high-rise," said developer Ron Herscho, who is developing 306 Gold Street and sister tower, the 35-story 313 Gold Street, along with developer Dean Palin. "Since the rezoning, there are a lot of opportunities for high-rises that were never available before."

Some worry these energized high-rise developments will overshadow -- literally and figuratively -- western Brooklyn's brownstone charm.

"When people think Brooklyn, they think small-town feel next to a big city," said Kristina Lanuza, vice president of marketing and public relations at brokerage Nest Seekers. "Part of the backlash is that [the new buildings] are taking away from the artist community and attracting people who don't want to uphold the nice, neighborly feeling. Now you can walk around, see your neighbor and say hello. There's a fear of creating something large that won't have that same sense."

But the skyscraping development has strong advocates in City Hall. The rezoning of Downtown Brooklyn two years ago made way for the spate of new, large-scale commercial and residential projects now taking shape. Last year, sections of Williamsburg and Greenpoint were rezoned to pave the way for high-rise projects, particularly along the waterfront.

The city also offers developers the option of building more stories on new developments in exchange for allotting a small percentage of square footage for affordable housing, an approach already seen in finished or partly finished projects like Schaefer Landing on the Williamsburg waterfront, which includes a 25-story tower.

In Dumbo, the tallest tower so far is J Condominium, a 267-unit project that broke ground last summer under the auspices of Hudson Properties and Cara Development. When it's completed, the 33-story high-rise will be the tallest building in the neighborhood.

In Williamsburg, the proposed tower that appears to be the tallest so far, though some other projects haven't released height information yet, is a 38-story high-rise on Bedford Avenue between North Third and North Fourth streets. The planned project by Quadriad Realty and former Bronx Borough President Herman Badillo includes three other towers of 36, 20 and 12 stories and encompasses a total of 675,000 square feet. Plans were presented to Brooklyn's Community Board 1 in late April and the project would call for a change in zoning to go through.

In Downtown Brooklyn, construction on 306 and 313 Gold is set to begin in August. While no prices are set for either building yet, Herscho said that he anticipates both will draw $800 to $900 a square foot. Prudential Douglas Elliman, which declined to comment, will handle the sales and marketing. Berkshire Capital, Isaac Hager and Isaac Katan are others also planning lofty towers in the area (see below).

North Brooklyn will soon certainly look different, but what it will look like depends on whom you talk to.

New development marketer Michael Shvo recently said the Williamsburg and Greenpoint waterfront will "look like the Miami skyline in five years."

David Maundrell, president of Brooklyn brokerage aptsandlofts.com, has a different take. "Five years from now, north Brooklyn will look completely different," he recently told Crain's. "The entire area will be brand-new, like Battery Park City or Trump's Riverside South."

And love it or loathe it, Herscho said most of the transformation is a fait accompli.

"Like everything else the government does, there's going to be some resistance and opposition, but that's reality for you, and you can't change it," he said. "I like to have low-rise in the suburbs, but people have to understand there's no more land available. There's no other choice."

Here is a look at some of the other tallest projects:

• The Edge, a 1,300 unit project already under construction on the Williamsburg waterfront, will have 1,000 market-rate units and about 300 affordable-housing units. It's being built by Douglaston Development between North Fifth and Seventh streets. The million-square-foot project will be a mix of mid-rise buildings and high-rise towers, according to the developer.

• A joint venture of Toll Brothers, L & M Equity and RD Management is planning three high-rises on the waterfront. The first will be an FX Fowle-designed condominium at 164 Kent Avenue with 180 units.

• In Downtown Brooklyn, Berkshire Capital will convert the 27-story, 509,000-square-foot 7 Metro Tech Center, the former Verizon Building, into 244 condominium units.

• Isaac Hager is planning a 400-foot-tall residential building at Flatbush Avenue and Tillary Street.

• Developer Isaac Katan is planning to construct several buildings between 28 and 32 stories each on Myrtle Avenue, just east of Flatbush Avenue.

• BFC Construction Corp. is planning a 37-story building with 22 units near the Manhattan Bridge. The firm is also planning a 500-unit building on the corner of Myrtle and Flatbush avenues, according to published reports.

• Leviev Boymelgreen is planning a 23-story tower to be completed next year at 85 Adams Street.

With additional reporting by Vanessa Londono

Copyright © 2003-2005 The Real Deal.

czsz
June 4th, 2006, 12:35 AM
Why should the skyline be limited to Manhattan?

I was on the Staten Island Ferry last weekend, and the view from near the island was astounding- Manhattan's entire skyline could be seen (the island is on an angle from that perspective) without a gap between Midtown and Downtown. Jersey City arose majestically to the left, and Brooklyn provided crucial symmetry at right. The era of the bridge and tunnel skyscraper is at hand!

ablarc
June 4th, 2006, 01:30 PM
some worry about loss of low-rise charm
Charm? Downtown Brooklyn today? Maybe not.

czsz
June 4th, 2006, 04:01 PM
With regard to the area around the Williamsburg Savings Bank (also classified as "downtown Brooklyn"), at least, the new skyline will certainly loom over Park Slope and Ft. Greene. And the new towers on the Williamsburg and Greenpoint waterfronts will break the formula of those neighbourhoods quite decisively. Not that any of this is awful, but it will have a considerable effect.

antinimby
June 8th, 2006, 11:23 PM
A Site with Class

Two high schools planned for old courthouse


BY MELISSA GRACE

Brooklyn's empty and dilapidated former Family Court building is set to be transformed into two glistening new city high schools.
As part of the renaissance of downtown Brooklyn, the five-story, 1950s-era structure at 283 Adams St. near the Brooklyn Bridge will be converted into public high schools for more than 1,000 students.

The schools, which have not yet been named, are scheduled to open in September 2008.

"We plan to create two small high schools of 500 seats," said Department of Education spokeswoman Margie Feinberg.

The DOE said the schools, currently only in the early planning stages, likely will have specialized themes to attract students interested in specific careers. "We've selected the site for the schools," said Feinberg, adding that curriculum planning has not begun.

The DOE said 5,266 more seats are needed to stem overcrowding in existing Brooklyn high schools, but it could not immediately say how many seats were needed in downtown Brooklyn.

Parents applauded the new seats - and urged the department to start planning the curriculums now.

"These small schools require community partnerships," said David Bloomfield, an education law professor at Brooklyn College and a member of a parents' high school advisory panel. He said it takes more than a year to develop a specialized curriculum.

The 143,950-square-foot building was home to one of the city's most outdated courthouses until last July, when Family Court moved to a glistening tower at 330 Jay St.

The old courthouse building, which is city property, was tagged by DOE because of severe overcrowding in downtown Brooklyn, where real estate is scarce, Feinberg said.

The schools will open by grade over a four-year period, starting with the ninth grade, officials said.

Originally published on June 8, 2006 (http://www.nydailynews.com/boroughs/story/424262p-357997c.html)

All contents © 2006 Daily News, L.P.

BrooklynRider
June 9th, 2006, 11:11 AM
That's great. It is actually a nice looking building. VERY 50's, but worth saving.

Kris
June 11th, 2006, 04:55 AM
June 11, 2006
Posting
Goodbye Cubicles, Hello Condos
By JEFF VANDAM

http://graphics10.nytimes.com/images/2006/06/11/realestate/post.190.jpg
A rendering of 110 Livingston Street in downtown Brooklyn.

THE 12-story Italian Renaissance building at 110 Livingston Street in downtown Brooklyn has not historically been ranked among city favorites. As the headquarters of the Board of Education, it once made an easy target for accusations of inefficiency. One book title on the subject puts the building's name alongside words like "politics" and "bureaucracy." Another work, published in 2003, is more direct: "The Cannibals at 110 Livingston."

But today the air around the McKim, Mead & White building is much lighter, at least psychologically. Floors once crowded with office cubicles have been gutted, and 100,000 extra square feet of modern residential space are now rising on top of the existing building at the site.

Built in 1926, originally for Lodge 22 of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the structure was sold three years ago to the developer David C. Walentas, principal of the Two Trees Management Company, for $45 million. At that point the city relocated education employees to the refurbished Tweed Courthouse in Manhattan, among other places.

The Livingston Street building, which is to grow four glass-and-steel floors taller, will house 300 condominiums. The grand meeting hall, complete with curved ceiling of ornately carved flowers and other insignia, is to be reborn as a theater, run by a nonprofit organization.

"Downtown Brooklyn is really evolving, and we're part of that," said Mr. Walentas, leading visitors on a tour of various hollowed-out floors, where dropped ceilings and crawl spaces have been stripped out and piping is being extended floor to floor.

Units will come in various shapes and sizes. On one floor, ceilings approached 10 feet; on another, 20. Though the windows appear small and officelike from the ground, the picture inside is quite different.

"When you look at it from outside, because of the size of the building, the windows don't look so big," Mr. Walentas said, peering through one window toward Red Hook. "But they're not small at all."

Inside the new units, which go on sale Aug. 1, buyers will find amenities like Sub-Zero refrigerators and Dornbracht plumbing fixtures. Private rooftop cabanas will be available for purchase, but all residents will have access to a fitness center and a roof deck. A peek at three ground-floor model units revealed open kitchens with generous counter and shelf space, 15-foot ceilings and bamboo flooring.

According to Asher Abehsera, Two Trees' vice president for sales and marketing, a list of potential buyers interested in the building now has 1,800 names on it. Prices will start in the high $300,000's and range to $1.3 million, according to Mr. Abehsera, who said work on the building was to finish by February.

Copyright 2006 The New York Times Company

BrooklynRider
June 12th, 2006, 09:45 AM
The grand meeting hall, complete with curved ceiling of ornately carved flowers and other insignia, is to be reborn as a theater, run by a nonprofit organization.

I'm loving that we are getting a new performance theater in downtown. This is a major plus!

ablarc
June 12th, 2006, 11:43 AM
The Livingston Street building, which is to grow four glass-and-steel floors taller, will house 300 condominiums.
Hope they size the structure for at least ten additional floors they can add later; fourteen is better than four.

kurokevin
June 12th, 2006, 12:31 PM
http://graphics10.nytimes.com/images/2006/06/11/realestate/post.190.jpg
A rendering of 110 Livingston Street in downtown Brooklyn.

This looks like a rooftop addition done right! From the renderings it almost seems as if the glass and steel was apart of the original design. Let's just hope it turns out this great when complete

antinimby
June 12th, 2006, 03:53 PM
Hope they size the structure for at least ten additional floors they can add later; fourteen is better than four.Perhaps they maxed out their FAR's already?

ablarc
June 12th, 2006, 04:13 PM
Perhaps they maxed out their FAR's already?
If so, it demonstrates FAR's questionable value.

antinimby
June 12th, 2006, 04:27 PM
Yup. There are definitely flaws in the FAR system. Just look at the new 808 Columbus Ave. on the UWS with the block-long one-story base.

That's also a result of FAR's and the developer's natural tendency to try to concentrate much of it in one tower and so the rest of the plot is a dumb base that may not fit in with the neighborhood.

ablarc, we've had this discussion so many times before, so this is just another example of how we are correct.

krulltime
June 26th, 2006, 07:23 PM
New Super-Group Plans a World-Class Downtown
DUMBO ORGANIZATION ALSO MAKES ITS DEBUT


by Dennis Holt
06-23-2006

DOWNTOWN BROOKLYN — It is called the New Partnership for Downtown Brooklyn, a culmination of sorts of the ongoing effort to build a new Downtown.

Beginning as soon as various legal matters are completed, the partnership will be responsible for coordinating, leading, and planning all relative efforts for the continued evolving of creating a world-class Downtown.

Rumored for weeks, the establishment of this unit, which will report directly to the Deputy Mayor for Economic Development in the Mayor’s Office, was announced at the combined annual meetings of the Downtown Brooklyn Council, the Fulton Mall Improvement Association and the MetroTech Business Improvement District, held yesterday morning.

It was also announced the night before at the first meeting of the DUMBO Improvement District, a new BID without the word “business” in its title.

At both meetings, Josh Sirefman, the new president of the city Economic Development Corporation, made the announcement. Sirefman became known in Brooklyn for being on the planning team to create Brooklyn Bridge Park.

The executive director of the partnership will be Joe Chan, who lives in the Sweeney Building in DUMBO and formerly worked for the Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce. Lately he has been the senior policy advisor in the Deputy Mayor’s Office.

In explaining why the new organization was created, Sirefman noted all the development going on in Downtown Brooklyn, and said that “it is time that these various efforts, and those yet to come, have one place and one person to oversee all activities.” (Also, to have this function reporting directly to the mayor is not to be overlooked.)

Technically, the new entity will be a Local Development Corporation/ Business Improvement District. It will have an initial $2 million operating budget. It will be responsible for for coordinating matters with the BIDS for general planning, for marketing Downtown Brooklyn, for design and construction, and for efforts involving the BAM cultural district.

At the meeting that drew a sizeable number of Brooklyn’s leaders — in part because of the anticipation of announcement of the Partnership, and partly because the guest speaker was City Council Speaker Christine Quinn — it was also announced that the Fulton Mall Improvement Association, the city’s first BID, is 30 years old.


DUMBO Meeting


The previous DUMBO meeting on Wednesday night, at the St. Ann’s warehouse on Water Street, was the first meeting of this new organization. It was presided over by Tucker Reed, the organization’s new executive director.

He pointed out that most BIDs stress the business element — making it more appealing to shop within their areas — over others. In DUMBO, however, everybody is in the same boat, businesses, residents and visitors.

He highlighted some of the area’s needs — the buildings are old, and the infrastructure is out of date. Two critical situations that can cause floods have been documented by the Department of Environmental Protection. A study is being completed on public parking needs. While Sanitation pickup is only three days a week, a throwback to the industrial days, it will soon go to six days.

The MTA admits that the High Street and York Street subway stations need a complete overhaul, but this can’t be undertaken until 2010 at the earliest.

Beginning this fall, however, Washington Street will be completely overhauled with new sewer lines, new sidewalks, and new Belgian block street paving. Reed said that he hopes this will be “an example of what we can expect for other streets here in the future.”

The DUMBO organization will come under the new umbrella of the Partnership.

At the Thursday morning meeting, District Attorney Joe Hynes summed up where things were by saying, “In 1989, the bad old days for Downtown Brooklyn, no one thought we would be talking about such a bright future.”


© Brooklyn Daily Eagle 2006

sfenn1117
July 3rd, 2006, 12:16 AM
Check out this new tower by Ismael Leyva architects, right near the new Gold St. towers (Also by Leyva):

http://i5.tinypic.com/16irvhf.jpg

From the website ilarch.com

85 FLATBUSH AVENUE EXTENSION
BROOKLYN, NY


A sharp angled lot at the intersection of Flatbush Avenue Extension, Tillary and Duffield Streets in Brooklyn is offering Ismael Leyva Architects an opportunity to exercise pure architectural geometry. An echo of the proximity to the landing of the three bridges connecting Brooklyn to Manhattan, which are not paying much respect to the pre-established regular street grid, this sharp angle reminds the amazing street configuration which generated one of the wonders of the Manhattan architecture, the “Flatiron” building.

Ismael Leyva’s approach to this challenging situation is based on a direct response to the urban reality. Without being intimidated by the aforementioned historical example, the architect is creating a design in which the transparency of the glass is dematerializing the street walls. The fragile volume is emphasized through setbacks and repetitive balconies. The aggressiveness of the sharp intersection is sweetened through a powerful curved shape giving to the building a strong personality.

The twenty-one story condominium building in which almost every apartment has a balcony takes full advantage of the excellent views of the Manhattan and Brooklyn skylines and of the Bridges. This glass-enclosed building consists of 108 apartments that range from studios to three-bedrooms as well as duplex units that will have fireplaces. On the ground level, there are provisions for retail establishments and community space. The residential amenities include a swimming pool, fitness center and a street-level parking facility.

The sculptural treatment of the triangular glass tower is complemented by a triangular plaza animated by shallow waterfalls and glass pyramid-skylights above the underground swimming pool. The plaza is surrounded by landscaping well integrated in the space of the three street intersection.


Building permits are already being worked on, height of 256 feet. Solid stuff for downtown, I really like the look of this one.

NoyokA
July 3rd, 2006, 12:29 AM
The design is nice but its very Miami, LA ish...

ablarc
July 3rd, 2006, 02:54 AM
Too blue?

krulltime
July 3rd, 2006, 10:44 AM
It looks really nice. Yeah too glassy for its surroundings but it will go well with the other new stuff coming along in Downtown Brooklyn. :)

macreator
July 3rd, 2006, 11:07 AM
The design is nice but its very Miami, LA ish...

Hey, it's better than another 1 Carnegie Hill.

krulltime
July 24th, 2006, 09:34 AM
NEW DOWNTOWN B'KLYN 'HEIGHTS'
FLATBUSH TOWERS


http://www.nypost.com/photos/news07242006023.jpg
Developer: Thor Equities
Location: Albee Square West
Use: Tentavtive plans for hotel, offices and condos
Cost: Unknown
Height: 60 stories


By PATRICK GALLAHUE
July 24, 2006

Just call them the "Lords of Flatbush."

Developers are lining up to build Downtown Brooklyn's storied main drag into a billion-dollar thoroughfare.

At least eight new construction projects are in the pipeline for a now-gritty three-block stretch of Flatbush Avenue between Tillary and Willoughby streets, just blocks from Bruce Ratner's $4.2 billion planned complex of residential and commercial towers around the new Nets basketball arena.

"It'll be a completely new vista of Brooklyn when you come off the [Manhattan] Bridge," said Michael Burke, of the Downtown Brooklyn Council.

Among the projects being planned is a 60-story, multimillion-dollar hotel, office and condominium tower over a city-owned parking garage at Albee Square West, to be built by Thor Equities.

Down the block, on Myrtle Avenue, a $450 million pair of buildings - comprising a million square feet of space - are planned, according to John Catsimatidis, who will develop the projects.

"It's five minutes away from Wall Street and it's one-third the price of Manhattan. Why not?" said Catsimatidis, the Gristedes supermarket magnate. Catsimatidis said his tentative plans are to build just shy of the 400-foot building-height limits, with retail on the first and second floors.

Just across the street, BFC Development is hoping to break ground later this year on a roughly $200 million, 40-story residential and retail tower, by the architectural firm Skidmore Owings and Merrill, which designed the Freedom Tower.

"It's going to be in the area of a billion dollars between all [these] projects," said Ron Hershco, who broke ground on his own luxury 35- and 40-story buildings on Gold Street.


Copyright 2006 NYP Holdings, Inc.

pianoman11686
July 24th, 2006, 09:39 AM
It's been how many years since they first announced this? Two? Three? And there's still no sign of any real development.

krulltime
July 24th, 2006, 10:11 AM
I know is so frustrading. Just like that Harlem Hotel on 125th and park avenue. I was there yesterday and there still nothing. It is used for parking of some sort.

sfenn1117
July 24th, 2006, 12:37 PM
The two towers on Gold St are u/c already, as is the other blue one by Leyva I posted.

Other than that, you're right, it's been slow. However, the vast majority of new construction in the city always takes much longer than anticipated. Go to the first page of the NY Times Tower thread. When it was announced, the estimated completion date was late 2005 or early 2006, 1-1.5 years too early.

It'll happen, it just takes time in this city.

SilentPandaesq
July 24th, 2006, 01:05 PM
^^Are there official threads for all those buildings, or are they tracked in this thread?

BrooklynRider
July 24th, 2006, 01:36 PM
These repeated annoucements seem to be meant for some mysterious audience who is supposed to react in some unknown way. It certainly isn't for people here who read the news daily. I think it might to attract quality grocers like Trader Joes, Whole Foods, Fairway, Citarella & Balduccis or other merchants like bookstores, restaurants, coffe houses, and service oriented businesses (dry cleaners, laundry services, fitness centers)..

I thinnk the other challenge is building these luxury building in an area that has been perceived as down-trodden, poor, and the stigmas that get attached to predominantly minority areas based on memories of the late 1960's and 1970's. Although there are a lot of white workers who are in Downtown during office hours, Downtown Brooklyn and its shopping district has developed to cater to a predominantly black population. Fulton Street Mall is perceived to be cheap $1 stores and it isn't the case. I think there is a way to go for people (developers) in this city to realize that economic status is not automatically tied to race anymore. Fort Greene is a predominantly middle-class / upper-middle class black community. Diverse yes, but predominanyl black. Atlantic Avenue has a huge Muslim merchant population and then there's the exclusivity of Brooklyn Heights. The Heights holds a disprportionate amount of sway over Downton development and its associations have worked many times to have development and zoning favorable to them at the cost of less affluent areas.

Anyway, I think this piece is alot of fluff. It's saying "look what's coming." I have great doubts about that Thor Equities building in ther rendering. I seriously doubt Thor has the ability to do more than delver exciting renderings. That picture has been around for over a year - no movement.

BrooklynRider
July 24th, 2006, 01:39 PM
The two towers on Gold St are u/c already, as is the other blue one by Leyva I posted.


The blue Levya is going up on the northeast corner of Tillary and Flatbush, right? Looks like site prep going on there. Demo hasn't started. There is a steel superstructure going up just north of that site, along to Manhattan-bound entrance to the Manhattan Bridge. That building is a mystery to me. Anyone have any renderings, descriptions or information?

krulltime
July 24th, 2006, 01:51 PM
I think it might to attract quality grocers like Trader Joes, Whole Foods, Fairway, Citarella & Balduccis or other merchants like bookstores, restaurants, coffe houses, and service oriented businesses (dry cleaners, laundry services, fitness centers)

Or Banks.


There is a steel superstructure going up just north of that site, along to Manhattan-bound entrance to the Manhattan Bridge. That building is a mystery to me. Anyone have any renderings, descriptions or information?

Hmmm and you are sure is not these guys...


http://i.pbase.com/o4/55/435155/1/60228581.BKGoldStreetTowers306a313.JPG

BrooklynRider
July 24th, 2006, 02:05 PM
No, it is owned by a company called Bridgeview Tower LLC.

I think it is this. As always, if you want the facts, find the Derek post...

http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showpost.php?p=55858&postcount=88

krulltime
July 26th, 2006, 01:18 PM
One Brooklyn Plaza:


http://i.pbase.com/o4/55/435155/1/64136636.M22tt7id.OneBrooklynPlaza.JPG


Brooklyn, New York The early development of the site, “One Brooklyn Plaza,” sets the desired design quality for future development interests of Downtown Brooklyn, as it reflects the transition from the borough’s municipal center to both the retail and corporate districts. Additionally, it strengthens the eastern edge of the Adams/Boerum Place corridor through a family of buildings stretching from the Renaissance Plaza southward to Livingston Street.

The ground floor retail extends Fulton Mall activities westward, inviting new visitors, and complementing the ongoing improvement efforts of the Business Improvement District and local stakeholders.


http://www.eekarchitects.com

BrooklynRider
July 26th, 2006, 03:19 PM
Krull-

Is this real or a case study?

bkmonkey
July 26th, 2006, 03:49 PM
[quote=BrooklynRider]Krull-

Is this real or a case study?[/quote

Its a valid question because.. it simply looks to good to be true. Please tell me its real

krulltime
July 26th, 2006, 05:34 PM
It is real... there is a new story on the http://www.brooklyneagle.com/BrooklynDailyEagle.pdf

but you have to buy the print edition to go to page 2. ;)

NoyokA
July 26th, 2006, 05:49 PM
Sure its tall but the design is rather unimpressive.

BrooklynRider
July 26th, 2006, 05:59 PM
I love it love it.

I checked Mightymap and it shows the largest of the parcels belonging to Brooklyn Law School, but the other lots making up that site all seem to be owned by individuals.

Derek2k3
July 27th, 2006, 09:59 PM
Well, it was just in October they were suppose to have the community board meeting so I bet we'll hear something by this summer...and demolition soon after hopefully.

Not sure if this building expansion is a real project yet or just an idea...

Project #23

New York City Technical College Expansion
Ehrenkrantz Eckstut & Kuhn Architects
Dev- New York City Technical College
Academic
Proposed ?

http://63.240.68.122/FirmFiles/8/images/nytechr1.jpg

http://63.240.68.122/FirmFiles/8/images/39422-int-full.jpg

Ehrenkrantz Eckstut & Kuhn Architects
New York City Technical College
http://www.eekarchitects.com/portfolio_projects.cfm?searchField=brooklyn&ProjectID=15510

Location: Brooklyn, New York

EE&K Architects recently completed updating the Campus Master Plan for the New York City Technical College. To inform the design principles for this project, the most critical issues were identified through interviews and focus groups. EE&K Architects' analysis indicated that New York Tech's problems included insufficient vertical circulation, a separation between campuses, an inappropriate main entrance, a lack of visual identity, lack of a campus center, not enough casual gathering spaces, security issues, and no full production theatre.

Since the campus is landlocked, with no undeveloped sites available, all growth potential is through either demolition or expansion of existing buildings or the acquisition of new lands. EE&K Architects studied all three options and their variations. With the most limited of resources, our new master plan asserts the importance of New York Tech as a gateway to downtown Brooklyn. The plan fully satisfies the campus' need for growth and flexibility over time through the creative use of streets, zoning, and the joint use of adjacent facilities and property.

Forgot to take a pic of the low-rise for the expansion but here's the main building across the street.
http://www.pbase.com/archit_kderek2k3/image/40726210.jpg

Posted earlier by finnman69:

Piano is designing for Ratner and New York City College of Technology over by Metrotech a huge mixed use building. Think college building and condo towers.

Air rights deal = tower

http://www.construction.com/NewsCent...20060512ny.asp

For instance, Macari is finalizing an agreement to sell the air rights over a building at City College of Technology in downtown Brooklyn. The existing structure onsite would be demolished, and Renzo Piano of Italy has been hired as the architect for a new mixed-use facility that would replace it.

New academic complex, New York City College of Technology, Brooklyn
Cost: $186 million
Size: 262,000 sq. ft.
Current Phase/Expected Completion:
Design/December 2009
Architect: Renzo Piano Building Workshop, Italy; Perkins Eastman, New York
PM: DASNY


Can't wait to see the design. Attatched is a rendering of the study done by EEK. (http://www.eekarchitects.com/portfolio_projects.cfm?searchField=brooklyn&ProjectID=15510)
I believe the site is where that white one-story building currently sits.

krulltime
July 28th, 2006, 10:48 AM
One Brooklyn Plaza:


http://i.pbase.com/o4/55/435155/1/64136636.M22tt7id.OneBrooklynPlaza.JPG


Brooklyn, New York The early development of the site, “One Brooklyn Plaza,” sets the desired design quality for future development interests of Downtown Brooklyn, as it reflects the transition from the borough’s municipal center to both the retail and corporate districts. Additionally, it strengthens the eastern edge of the Adams/Boerum Place corridor through a family of buildings stretching from the Renaissance Plaza southward to Livingston Street.

The ground floor retail extends Fulton Mall activities westward, inviting new visitors, and complementing the ongoing improvement efforts of the Business Improvement District and local stakeholders.


http://www.eekarchitects.com


Major Office Tower Would Radically Change Downtown
‘One Brooklyn Plaza’ Envisioned For Area West of Fulton Mall


by Dennis Holt
published online 07-28-2006

BROOKLYN — All the furor over the Atlantic Yards project has obscured the plans for high-rise Downtown development, closer to the established business district.

For example, there now exists the prospect that a new 32-story tower will radically alter the entrance to Fulton Mall, where Joralemon Street, Adams Street and Boerum Place come together, near the Transit Authority building.

This new tower would not only change the skyline, but would have implications for the Fulton Mall shopping strip as well.

When the Downtown Brooklyn rezoning plan was being formulated, four sites were nominated for new office buildings. The sites were chosen because they were logical places for new buildings, although other sites were available.

No new buildings have yet been announced, but there has been speculation about at least two of the sites. One is at Willoughby Street and Flatbush Avenue, and a rendering has been published, showing what it might look like.

But another, recently found by this newspaper on the Internet, is perhaps even more dramatic, as shown in renderings and plans by Ehrenkrantz Ekstut & Kuhn, a major architectural firm. It has been known that a major Brooklyn developer has been formulating plans for the Boerum Place-Fulton Street-Livingstron Street area. So far, no definite announcement can be made, but the renderings suggest what may happen.

The 32-story office building, if constructed, could just about complete the overhaul of the Boerum Place segment that links Atlantic Avenue to the entrance and exit of the Brooklyn Bridge along Adams Street. Already, the Brooklyn Law School residence hall and an apartment complex called Boulevard East have been completed in the area. Nearby, the former Board of Education building at 110 Livingston St. is being converted to residential use.

The new structure, called 1 Brooklyn Plaza, would be totally dedicated to offices, with a major retail presence on the ground floor.

More stores are expected on the Adams Street side of the city-owned building at 345 Adams, which is largely vacant now.

Besides adding new commercial space to Downtown Brooklyn, the 1 Brooklyn Plaza project, if fully implemented, would significantly inject major new retail capacity where essentially none now exists. It also complements the major new apartment houses completed or under way within easy walking distance of this important site.

It has to be noted that this is one concept: many different versions are indeed possible, as is the shape and height of the proposed office building.


© Brooklyn Daily Eagle 2006

SilentPandaesq
July 28th, 2006, 11:05 AM
The proposed site is home to an HSBC and the Brooklyn Law School admin offices (as well as the bookstore).

I remember years ago (3 to be exact ) the Bursar's office ladies were talking about the school selling the building, but I did not give it much thought after they blew all my money on that dorm.

bkmonkey
July 28th, 2006, 11:22 AM
Despite the negative tone of this article.... the point is clear..

Muss development is responsible for one Brooklyn Plaza im looking forward to this one

Things looking up in Brooklyn, if you’re a skyscraper
http://www.brooklynpapers.com/html/issues/columns/brooklynangle/_vol29/29_29skyscraperpark1.jpg
http://www.brooklynpapers.com/html/issues/columns/brooklynangle/_vol29/29_29skyscraperpark2.jpg
“We are a city of skyscrapers. We are a city of towers.” That’s what Empire State Development Corporation Chairman Charles Gargano said last week, casting Brooklyn as the new Manhattan — a vision for the borough that many longtime residents and the newer Manhattan exiles simply do not share.
Gargano was talking specifically about Bruce Ratner’s proposed Atlantic Yards mega-developement — which would not be finished until 2016 at the earliest — but his dream of a skyscraper-filled Brooklyn is becoming a reality even before Ratner puts a spade in the ground.
The Downtown Brooklyn Plan — an upzoning and condemnation law passed two years ago — is finally bearing young with at least eight buildings on the drawing board for just a short stretch of Flatbush Avenue Extension from the Manhattan Bridge to Willoughby Street.
Here are some details:
• In April, developers Ron Hershco and Dean Palin broke ground at 303 Gold St. for a residential and retail tower — the first building within the Downtown plan.
This fall, construction will begin on the 40-story building’s 35-story twin at 313 Gold St. (both are pictured near right).
Taken together, the buildings represent a $400-million investment that will add 517 luxury condos to attract more Gaphattanites to Brooklyn.
• Thor Equities — the company that gave us plans for a Coney Island Xanadu — is in the preliminary phases of a 60-story tower called Albee Square West, which would rise near the Fulton Mall just west of Flatbush Avenue Extension (far right, top).
A spokesman for the developer said only that the building would contain 1.4 million square feet of offices, residential units and retail.
• Back on the east side of Flatbush, on Myrtle Avenue, Gristedes supermarket king John Catsimatidis is getting ready to break ground on his 400-foot tower, a building that would look quite at home on the new Upper West Side — which used to feel a lot like low-rise Brooklyn until developers went crazy (far right, bottom).
Catsimatidis told The Brooklyn Papers that his building will be “combination residential, including some low-income units and dorm space for Long Island University, plus essential services.”
“I’ve been a New Yorker all my life,” he said. “I want to make sure we have locksmiths and hardware stores and supermarkets and a place like Woolworth’s. Where have they all gone?”
He called his million-square-foot building a “perfect place for the middle-class — just five minutes from Manhattan.”
• Across the street, a company called BFC Development says it will build a 40-story, $200-million residential tower designed by the famous architectural firm, Skidmore Owings and Merrill.
The company did not return calls from The Brooklyn Papers.
• And just this week, a rendering of a new high-rise (inset) popped into our in baskets: Muss Development’s 32-story “One Brooklyn Plaza” tower at the intersection of Boerum Place, Fulton Street and Livingston Street (so long, Red Hook Lane, we hardly knew ye).
The building would be entirely filled with offices — no residential — with retail on the ground floor.
Taken together, the corridor from the Manhattan Bridge to Fulton Street is really going to make people look up.
“When we leave Brooklyn, we say, ‘Oy vey,’” Borough President Markowitz said at the 303 Gold St. groundbreaking. “But now, when we enter Brooklyn from the Manhattan Bridge, we will say ‘Oh wow!’”
If you like skyscrapers, that is.

krulltime
July 28th, 2006, 12:08 PM
Back on the east side of Flatbush, on Myrtle Avenue, Gristedes supermarket king John Catsimatidis is getting ready to break ground on his 400-foot tower, a building that would look quite at home on the new Upper West Side — which used to feel a lot like low-rise Brooklyn until developers went crazy (far right, bottom).
Catsimatidis told The Brooklyn Papers that his building will be “combination residential, including some low-income units and dorm space for Long Island University, plus essential services.”
“I’ve been a New Yorker all my life,” he said. “I want to make sure we have locksmiths and hardware stores and supermarkets and a place like Woolworth’s. Where have they all gone?”
He called his million-square-foot building a “perfect place for the middle-class — just five minutes from Manhattan.”


I wonder what this one will looks like. It seems that is just about to break ground.


“When we leave Brooklyn, we say, ‘Oy vey,’” Borough President Markowitz said at the 303 Gold St. groundbreaking. “But now, when we enter Brooklyn from the Manhattan Bridge, we will say ‘Oh wow!’”
If you like skyscrapers, that is.


Oh yes we do.

BrooklynRider
July 30th, 2006, 10:35 PM
Walked the Manhattan Bridge and Flatbush Extension to Park Slope. I think that quote by Michael Shvo about Brooklyn looking like Miami in the coming year or two just might actually be accurate. The whole east side of the avenue is in demolition stages (picture West 42nd Street just before the New Victory restoration was begun). Brooklyn looks a bit forlorn with the line of empty delapidated buildings on Flatbush extension, but each week a new construction shed seems to go up AND the Meiers Building at Grand Army Plaza becomes very prominent on the horizon once you get to Atlantic Ave. Bridgeview Tower is up to 12 floors (6 to go). 199 (?) Water Street has a rather nice architectural steel and black brick facade going up - looking good. J-Condo is big and about as ugly as everyone predicted. Beacon Tower turns it back on Manhattan. No matter how youlook at it, Brooklyn is growing up.

macreator
July 31st, 2006, 12:01 AM
It would be good to see Downtown Brooklyn get a new office tower out of this coming boom. I'm still worried that the Thor project will end up scaled down but I'm optimistic.

BrooklynRider
July 31st, 2006, 04:15 PM
If I had to make a prediction, I'd look for Thor to flip the property. They have nothing going on. Alot of renderings but there's no gas in that car.

bkmonkey
August 2nd, 2006, 11:15 AM
http://i.pbase.com/o4/55/435155/1/63836828.XB5nstkr.BK110LivingstonAve.JPG

I had no idea it was this well designed... This is already under construction

BrooklynRider
August 2nd, 2006, 11:46 AM
Wallentas has demonstrated that he builds quality buildings AND is looking to create and enhance the communities he operates in. I think he is one of the best - if not THE best - developer in Brooklyn.

bkmonkey
August 2nd, 2006, 12:19 PM
He understands what many developers dont. Especially when building residential units, it sometimes pays of to spend an extra million or two... to help your development blend in and add to the fabric of the surrounding area. His developments in dumbo and downtown significantly enhance the area, not detract from it. Court House is a hit, and so will this building. A huge departure from the simple, box condos that are going up in some parts of manhattan and other places.

pianoman11686
September 10th, 2006, 04:47 PM
Check out this new tower by Ismael Leyva architects, right near the new Gold St. towers (Also by Leyva):

http://i5.tinypic.com/16irvhf.jpg

From the website ilarch.com

85 FLATBUSH AVENUE EXTENSION
BROOKLYN, NY

A Flatiron on Flatbush

By JAKE MOONEY

Published: September 10, 2006

Slashing diagonally across Manhattan’s street grid, Broadway is responsible for memorable irregularities like Times Square, Union Square and of course the Flatiron Building, one of the city’s best-known and most-photographed structures.

In Brooklyn, Flatbush Avenue follows a similar wayward course, though the lower-slung buildings on the irregular lots that line the street are more likely to be gas stations, garages and warehouses than works of architectural distinction. But now, in a borough where comparisons with Manhattan remain a fact of life, some optimists are saying that a building planned for a triangular lot near the Manhattan Bridge could be a flatiron building of Brooklyn’s own.

The project’s architect, Ismael Leyva, does not shy away from the comparisons.

“To me, when I saw this site being triangular-shaped, the first thing that came to my mind was that this is going to be similar to the Flatiron Building,” he said on Thursday, adding that his team had rounded off the front of the planned building in an homage to the famous skyscraper.

Construction of Brooklyn’s flatiron building, a project of the developer Isaac Hager, is scheduled to begin in a few weeks and to be completed in the summer of 2008.

The differences between the buildings are considerable. The 22-story Flatiron Building, at 23rd Street, Broadway and Fifth Avenue, has a limestone and terra-cotta facade, while the new building, a 21-story structure at 85 Flatbush Avenue Extension, on Tillary Street, will be glass. Moreover, the Flatiron Building is commercial, while the new building will hold luxury condominiums. (Mount Hope Court, a 10-story 1914 structure on the Grand Concourse that is known as the Bronx’s Flatiron Building, is also home to apartments.)

Most significant, the Flatiron Building of 1902 is a revered architectural icon, while the Brooklyn building, even optimistically speaking, has an uphill climb to reach such status.

Still, the comparisons have come, beginning with those in The Brooklyn Papers, a weekly, which described the structure as looking “like the lovechild of the Flatiron Building and a spaceship.”

Mr. Leyva said he was gratified that people saw similarities between the buildings but demurred. “Most of the shape is dictated by the site and the zoning requirements,” he said of his project.

One way in which the two buildings really could be similar has to do with their role as a catalyst to development. The Flatiron Building helped open a heady era of construction, and in Downtown Brooklyn, Mr. Leyva’s project is one of several buildings to emerge from zoning changes made in recent years.

A few other tall buildings are planned for the immediate neighborhood. Two of them, on Gold Street, are from Mr. Leyva’s designs, and a third, at Flatbush and Myrtle Avenues, will sit on a similar triangular lot that could spawn another high-rise wedge.

In the opinion of Simeon Bankoff, executive director of the Historic Districts Council, an advocacy group, the planned building at 85 Flatbush Extension appears to be out of context with what is in the area now. But he added, tongue only partly in cheek, “Maybe it’s in context with the new Brooklyn.”

Copyright 2006 The New York Times Company

sfenn1117
September 10th, 2006, 06:30 PM
In the opinion of Simeon Bankoff, executive director of the Historic Districts Council, an advocacy group, the planned building at 85 Flatbush Extension appears to be out of context with what is in the area now. But he added, tongue only partly in cheek, “Maybe it’s in context with the new Brooklyn.”

There is no context there. It's nearly a highway lined with car washes and junk shops. This, along with the Gold St towers, will finally create a context where there was none.

TREPYE
September 12th, 2006, 04:05 PM
A Flatiron on Flatbush

By JAKE MOONEY

Published: September 10, 2006

Construction of Brooklyn’s flatiron building, a project of the developer Isaac Hager, is scheduled to begin in a few weeks and to be completed in the summer of 2008.

Copyright 2006 The New York Times Company

Music to my ears!!!! :D This is one hot looking building.
http://i5.tinypic.com/16irvhf.jpg

WinStreak
September 12th, 2006, 08:55 PM
i wonder how much a unit will cost in these buildings

krulltime
September 21st, 2006, 09:57 AM
CUNY Readies Brooklyn Project In Partnership With Ratner


By MICHAEL STOLER - Special to the Sun
September 21, 2006

With all the hoopla surrounding the Atlantic Yards in Brooklyn, another significant development has been cruising stealthily below the real estate radar: The City University of New York and Forest City Ratner Companies plan to begin construction of a 1 million-square-foot mixed-use tower in the heart of downtown Brooklyn as soon as next year.

The New York City College of Technology, the largest public school of its kind in the state, will be the backbone of downtown Brooklyn's renaissance — and a subtle reminder that the biggest players in the city's real estate industry are nonprofit and educational institutions.

This CUNY college, to be located at 300 Jay St. in the MetroTech Center, will occupy an entire city block bounded by Jay, Johnston, and Tillary streets. The recent rezoning of the downtown area is paying off: A 1 million-square-foot building now can be erected in an area that heretofore sustained nothing more than dollar discount stores.

The presence of Forest City Ratner makes the deal a significant public/private partnership. The first eight floors will house classrooms and a majority of the urban college campus. The upper floors will house a luxury residential condominium tower.


© 2006 The New York Sun, One SL, LLC.

krulltime
September 22nd, 2006, 01:53 PM
:cool: Just to show you how HOT is Brooklyn... here are some of the big developements in the works for Downtown Brooklyn and beyond... Everything is under-construction except for the 2 towers (and the CUNY & Ratner Tower) on the top of the picture and the Brooklyn Atlantic Yards (Gehry) at the bottom. (although there is more stuff in that picture that is under-construction aswell but in a smaller scale)


http://i.pbase.com/g5/55/435155/2/67316239.j7s3pOVb.jpg

TREPYE
September 22nd, 2006, 02:51 PM
CUNY Readies Brooklyn Project In Partnership With Ratner


By MICHAEL STOLER - Special to the Sun
September 21, 2006

With all the hoopla surrounding the Atlantic Yards in Brooklyn, another significant development has been cruising stealthily below the real estate radar: The City University of New York and Forest City Ratner Companies plan to begin construction of a 1 million-square-foot mixed-use tower in the heart of downtown Brooklyn as soon as next year.

The New York City College of Technology, the largest public school of its kind in the state, will be the backbone of downtown Brooklyn's renaissance — and a subtle reminder that the biggest players in the city's real estate industry are nonprofit and educational institutions.

This CUNY college, to be located at 300 Jay St. in the MetroTech Center, will occupy an entire city block bounded by Jay, Johnston, and Tillary streets. The recent rezoning of the downtown area is paying off: A 1 million-square-foot building now can be erected in an area that heretofore sustained nothing more than dollar discount stores.

The presence of Forest City Ratner makes the deal a significant public/private partnership. The first eight floors will house classrooms and a majority of the urban college campus. The upper floors will house a luxury residential condominium tower.


© 2006 The New York Sun, One SL, LLC.


I hope that this tower is much more respectable than the atrociousness of Ratner's Metrotech which is downright offensive.

antinimby
September 22nd, 2006, 03:15 PM
I hope that this tower is much more respectable than the atrociousness of Ratner's Metrotech which is downright offensive.You can hope but it'll probably be in vain.
A public institution in collaboration with FC is NOT likely to result in something pretty.
Expect a dull, forgettable box.

krulltime
September 22nd, 2006, 03:18 PM
CUNY, Ratner, Renzo Piano To Build New Tower
New Building at Tillary and Jay will be Front Entrance to MetroTech


http://www.brooklyneagle.com/images/foto/092106145457.jpg


By Linda Collins
Brooklyn Daily Eagle
published online 09-22-2006

DOWNTOWN BROOKLYN — Attracting world-class architects to Brooklyn is not a new concept these days, but Forest City Ratner’s surprise announcement yesterday of a brand new tower for Downtown Brooklyn added one more name to that growing list.

As is known, Frank Gehry is designing the Atlantic Yards development, Enrique Norten is designing the Performing Arts Library at BAM, Rafael Vinoly is designing the Brooklyn Children’s Museum addition and Richard Meier is designing the all-glass building On Prospect Park at 1 Eastern Parkway.

Yesterday we learned from Forest City’s MaryAnne Gilmartin that Italian architect Renzo Piano — best known recently for his designs of the new New York Times building and the renovated and expanded Morgan Library — is designing the new tower proposed for the New York City Technical College (CUNY) campus at Tillary and Jay Streets.

Gilmartin was speaking at the Metropolitan New York Chapter of the Appraisal Institute’s annual September Conference held Wednesday at Club 101 in Manhattan.

Why is Forest City Ratner involved with City Tech, as it is called? The tower will also be the official front entrance to the MetroTech Center, according to Gilmartin.

“We are building a very tall, beautiful and slender tower,” she said, adding that it will be 800,000 square feet, will be completed in 2011 and will have a residential component above the academic component at its base. Gilmartin could not discuss details of the tower’s design and ultimate height, however.

The site is that of the existing two-story Klitgord Center on the southeast corner of Tillary and Jay. The Klitgord, also known as the Klitgord Auditorium, will be demolished to make way for the new tower. Reached yesterday afternoon, Michelle Forsten, a spokesperson for City Tech, as it is called, confirmed that there is a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between CUNY, Forest City Ratner and the New York State Dormitory Authority (the funding agent), which is expected to be executed by all parties this fall.

Forsten also said the mixed-use building, which is officially within the MetroTech Center complex, will include classrooms and offices for faculty members, and will house several different academic disciplines.

“We are very excited because we are so overcrowded now and we need all the space we can get,” she said.

Forsten did not say, but it could be assumed that the new tower is possibly related to the news reported this summer of a major academic reorganization at City Tech.

Announced in August, this reorganization has resulted in the establishment this fall of four new independent academic departments — Biological Sciences, Chemistry, Physics and Entertainment Technology.

“In the last few years, City Tech has hired several top-notch faculty members in the sciences who are conducting cutting edge research,” said Acting Dean of Arts and Sciences Pamela Brown, in making the announcement. “The time is right to form three separate science departments, which will help to develop fields of specialization in research as well as foster the development of new curriculum in these areas of rapid technological advance.”

Commented City Tech President Russell K. Hotzler, “This reorganization will position City Tech to continue attracting accomplished faculty who will share their considerable expertise with our students in the classrooms and labs and as mentors.”


Seven-Member Panel on Brooklyn’s Building Boom


In her remarks yesterday, Gilmartin was the sixth speaker on a seven-member panel discussing the building boom in Brooklyn, during which an audience of mostly Manhattan-based appraisers, bankers and realtors were treated to two hours of some very enthusiastic, pro-Brooklyn remarks.

And the panelists were preceeded by Brooklyn’s foremost booster, Borough President Marty Markowitz, and were moderated by another, Kenneth Adams, president of the Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce.

Said Markowitz, “Brooklyn is experiencing a true renaissance and the Brooklyn housing market is still the hottest around.”

Adams, in his introduction of “this unique panel of seven very significant players” in Brooklyn’s development boom, said, “In Brooklyn, we are proceeding at a heady, if not frightening page all across the borough.”


The other panelists included:

• Jeff Levine of Levine Builders and the Douglaston Group, who spoke of his Williamsburg waterfront project The Edge, a multi-building complex that will include 350 affordable and 1,000 market-rate units, 70,000 square feet of retail, 20,000 square feet of piers, “unparalleled” views and a waterfront promenade. Levine revealed he was born and raised in Brooklyn as was his father before him.

• David Walentas of Two Trees Management Co., who spoke about how he literally bought DUMBO for $12 million and also summarized his current projects. Walentas revealed that he was a resident of The Clocktower condominiums in DUMBO, one of the first buildings his company converted and the one with “the most fabulous view.”

• Alan Bell of The Hudson Companies, who spoke about the success of his firm’s J Condos in DUMBO and how, for a short time at least, it is the tallest in Brooklyn. Hudson is a developer of only residential properties and those a mix of affordable, middle-income and market rate.

• Joshua Muss of Muss Development, who spoke of the risks he took in not only creating a new neighborhood — at the Oceana Condominium in Brighton Beach — but in building a hotel (The New York Marriott at the Brooklyn Bridge), which he described as “the linchpin that helped make the new Downtown Brooklyn.”

• Robert Levine of the RAL Companies, who spoke about “our 360 acquisition adventure” with the Watchtower and Brooklyn Bridge Park organizations in acquiring and developing One Brooklyn Bridge Park, the former 360 Furman St. building — in all, a two-year process. Levine revealed that he was also a Brooklyn native.

• Joseph Sitt of Thor Equities, who spoke about his two projects in development — the massive mixed-use entertainment-hotel-residential project in Coney Island (“the best beach in the world”) and an as-yet-to-be-determined project in Red Hook, site of the Revere Sugar plant (“incredible views”) that has been vacant for 30 years. Sitt revealed that he was born and raised and still lives in Brooklyn, “and I love it.”


© Brooklyn Daily Eagle 2006

sfenn1117
September 22nd, 2006, 04:01 PM
“We are building a very tall, beautiful and slender tower,”
Sounds exciting!

Derek2k3
September 22nd, 2006, 04:16 PM
Sounds like this could be the centerpiece of Brooklyn's skyline.

Derek2k3
September 22nd, 2006, 04:32 PM
:cool: Just to show you how HOT is Brooklyn... here are some of the big developements in the works for Downtown Brooklyn and beyond... Everything is under-construction except for the 2 towers (and the CUNY & Ratner Tower) on the top of the picture and the Brooklyn Atlantic Yards (Gehry) at the bottom. (although there is more stuff in that picture that is under-construction aswell but in a smaller scale)


http://i.pbase.com/g5/55/435155/2/67316239.j7s3pOVb.jpg
Nice Job!

sfenn1117
September 22nd, 2006, 05:54 PM
Website launched for the Gold Street towers:

http://orocondos.com/

NoyokA
September 22nd, 2006, 07:24 PM
Couple of notes.

Im not happy that Piano who has already given the city three eye-sores and missed opportunities in the Whitney, Morgan, and NYTIMES is given another opportunity here, I hope he redeems himself here and at Columbia.

Second does the BAM Library now remind anyone else of the Museum at Ground Zero by our litte friend, Daniel Libeskind.

http://www.daniel-libeskind.com/press/middle/ChurchStreet.jpg

http://www.daniel-libeskind.com/press/middle/450PerformingArtsCenter_mil.jpg

sfenn1117
September 22nd, 2006, 07:51 PM
Missed opportunities, maybe, but certainly not eyesores. None worse than what NYC based architects are putting up today.

lofter1
September 22nd, 2006, 11:18 PM
Im not happy that Piano who has already given the city three eye-sores and missed opportunities in the Whitney, Morgan, and NYTIMES is given another opportunity here...


I walked by the TT tonight after dark -- with the lights on inside it glows and the exterior practically disappears. Beauteous.

krulltime
September 26th, 2006, 10:06 PM
Nice Job!

Hey Thank you Derek2k3! It took me a while to do it. :)

kurokevin
September 26th, 2006, 11:32 PM
Couple of notes.

http://www.daniel-libeskind.com/press/middle/ChurchStreet.jpg

http://www.daniel-libeskind.com/press/middle/450PerformingArtsCenter_mil.jpg

What is that beige building to the left and behind the new library?

lofter1
September 27th, 2006, 12:55 AM
The one with the arched windows? Brooklyn Academy of Music ...

Before the recent facade restoation:

http://www-user.tu-chemnitz.de/~rima/gastspiele/newyork/bam.jpg

With cornice restored / facade renovated:

http://www.officebrown.com/weblog/archives/CRW_4745.jpg

http://www.officebrown.com/weblog/archives/CRW_4747.jpg

kurokevin
September 27th, 2006, 10:28 AM
Sorry, I mean the more modern one with the cross bracing. I know it is does not currently exist. From the perspective of the rendering. It almost seems to be on the Western side opposite the library, on the other side of Flatbush Ave. Is it a proposed new building, or simply an artisitic addition?

Nice pics of BAM otherwise. Beautiful building with an amazing cinema inside. Brooklyn, and New York are so lucky to have such a great institution.

ablarc
September 27th, 2006, 10:42 AM
BAM...Beautiful building with an amazing cinema inside. Brooklyn, and New York are so lucky to have such a great institution.
You can say that again. Combine that with the Brooklyn Museum, Prospect Park and Atlantic Yards, and you can say Brooklyn is lurching toward worldclasshood. It's true, however, that some folks sound as though they prefer it as a backwater.

That restored cornice on BAM sure makes a huge difference. All amputated cornices should be restored; maybe the city could provide tax incentives to that end.

krulltime
September 27th, 2006, 10:43 AM
Sorry, I mean the more modern one with the cross bracing. I know it is does not currently exist. From the perspective of the rendering. It almost seems to be on the Western side opposite the library, on the other side of Flatbush Ave. Is it a proposed new building, or simply an artisitic addition?

Maybe it is 230 Ashland Place that is currently under construction?

http://i.pbase.com/o4/55/435155/1/61647305.ijNlWxZb.BK230AshlandPlace.JPG

kurokevin
September 27th, 2006, 10:55 AM
If you look closely they've added the Forte behind and to the right of the new BAM library -rising above and behind where the outdoor television-screen resides. This is on the other side, and rises above the library and out of the image.

antinimby
September 27th, 2006, 12:30 PM
You can say that again. Combine that with the Brooklyn Museum, Prospect Park and Atlantic Yards, and you can say Brooklyn is lurching toward worldclasshood. It's true, however, that some folks sound as though they prefer it as a backwater.Yeah, and then during economic hardtimes, complain that the city ignores them in favor of Manhattan.
Here's a chance for Brooklyn to grow and prosper, but those same selfish people would rather see Brooklyn stay stagnant. Complete idiots.

krulltime
September 27th, 2006, 12:52 PM
Image from The New York Sun...

http://i.pbase.com/o5/55/435155/1/67623489.uSBCDMxP.CUNYTower.JPG


Space TALK:
Hint of What Renzo Piano’s New Brooklyn Tower Will Look Like,
Courtesy of The New York Sun


by Brooklyn Eagle
published online 09-27-2006

DOWNTOWN BROOKLYN — Following last week’s story in the Brooklyn Daily Eagle on the new tower planned by CUNY and Forest City Ratner for the New York City Technical College, a similar article appeared in The New York Sun.

The Sun article also contained a model of what the tower — planned for the corner of Tillary and Jay Streets, at the entrance to City Tech and MetroTech — would look like.

However, Joyce Baumgarten, of Getto & DeMilly, a spokesperson for Forest City Ratner, said the model was not the official one.


© Brooklyn Daily Eagle 2006

posterboy
September 27th, 2006, 12:57 PM
at one million square feet, does anyone have an idea what the height of this thing will be? what are the dimensions of that site?

sfenn1117
September 27th, 2006, 01:21 PM
Well we can try to break it down:

Previous articles have mentioned an 8 story wing for classrooms. If that wing is truly 8 stories in that leaked rendering, then this tower looks about 40 stories.....it might push 500 feet?

Doesn't look overly tall....or very exciting shape wise.

posterboy
September 27th, 2006, 02:57 PM
that sounds about right ... though who knows, maybe we're in for a surprise.

Derek2k3
September 27th, 2006, 06:20 PM
Those buildings on the south side of the tower are about 20 stories tall. The right (east) one is a 19 story Polytechnic dormitory.

NoyokA
September 27th, 2006, 07:28 PM
Those buildings on the south side of the tower are about 20 stories tall. The right (east) one is a 19 story Polytechnic dormitory.

Then I would wager that it's a pretty tall building. Thats what I was thinking since the rendering shows a pretty slender building and 1 million square feet is alot for a residential.

antinimby
September 28th, 2006, 12:51 PM
May I remind everyone this?


However, Joyce Baumgarten, of Getto & DeMilly, a spokesperson for Forest City Ratner, said the model was not the official one.

sfenn1117
September 28th, 2006, 03:21 PM
Those buildings on the south side of the tower are about 20 stories tall. The right (east) one is a 19 story Polytechnic dormitory.

No, I don't think it's the dorm. It seems like the model only focuses on buildings for this project. Remember it is supposed to be surronded by 8 story wings.

If those low-rises were indeed 20 stories, the tower would have to be about 80, and we know that's impossible in this city.

Derek2k3
September 28th, 2006, 04:04 PM
Check out this aerial again. They mentioned the tower was on the SE corner of Tillary & Jay and if those buildings were indeed 8 stories the ones to the right would be like 2 floors.

http://i.pbase.com/o5/55/435155/1/67623489.uSBCDMxP.CUNYTower.JPG

krulltime
September 28th, 2006, 06:32 PM
Here is something new and under construction in Downtown Brooklyn on Duffield Street... Notice the little one aswell.


According to http://www.brooklyneagle.com/ it will be a Sheraton Hotel.

http://i.pbase.com/o5/55/435155/1/67681754.5xTLdT5N.DowntownSheratonHotel.JPG

lofter1
September 28th, 2006, 06:57 PM
One look at that ^^ yellow one and all I could think was "Gene Kaufman" ...

And lo and behold: DOB (http://a810-bisweb.nyc.gov/bisweb/JobDetailsServlet?requestid=8&allisn=0000520406&allboroughname=&allnumbhous=&allstrt) for 222 Duffield St.

Arch.: Gene Kaufman
Owner: John Lam
23 Stories
250' HeightHilton, Sheraton considering downtown Brooklyn

http://www.newyorkology.com/archives/2005/07/hilton_sheraton.html

Construction will begin in September on two new hotels in downtown Brooklyn, possibly a 300-room Sheraton or a 180-room Hilton Garden, according to Brooklyn Daily Eagle (http://www.brooklyneagle.com/categories/category.php?category_id=5&id=4499). (Free, but extremely annoying registration process required to see their story.)

The hotels would be built on adjoining lots at 216-228 Duffield St., near Willoughby Street. (Map (http://maps.yahoo.com/maps_result?addr=228+Duffield+St.%2C&csz=Brooklyn%2C+NY&country=us&new=1&name=&qty=).) The property was purchased in October by hotel developer John Lam of The Lam Group, which has built several other hotels in the city.

http://www.newyorkology.com/archives/images/bklynhotels-thumb.jpg (http://www.newyorkology.com/archives/images/bklynhotels.jpg)
The Duffield Street location is near Junior's cheesecake (http://www.juniorscheesecake.com/) empire and not far from the only other big hotel in the borough, a Marriott (http://marriott.com/property/propertypage/NYCBK), which is now undergoing a 280-room expansion. Nearby subway lines include the exciting M and R at Metro Tech; the 2 and 3 at Hoyt; and the A, C and F at Jay St./Borough Hall.

sfenn1117
September 28th, 2006, 07:09 PM
Wow! I'll deal with the little one if we can get the bigger one built! It looks over 50 stories tall!

And Kaufman even maintained streetwall. Shocking.

sfenn1117
September 28th, 2006, 07:55 PM
So I try to view the article online, and everytime I click on the link to the story, or any other story, it brings me to a stupid default page asking for money. Why did I bother to register?

And on the front cover, the rendering by Gene Kaufman hackitect says :

"The architect's rendering of the 27-story, 500 room side-by-side hotels planned for Duffield Street in downtown Brooklyn, which will have a shared rooftop with unparalleled views."

So let's see, the tower on the left is 23 stories, the right is about 50, what is going on here? I'm really interested in that right, glass tower now.

antinimby
September 28th, 2006, 08:02 PM
I think Krullie subscribes to the BE. Wait for his reply.

But damn! Kaufman is crossing the East River?

krulltime
September 29th, 2006, 11:20 AM
http://www.pbase.com/image/67681754.jpg


27-Story Sheraton Hotel Coming to Downtown Brooklyn
First New Commercial Building to Go Up Since Rezoning Plan Adopted in 2004


By Linda Collins
Brooklyn Daily Eagle

DOWNTOWN BROOKLYN — Construction fences are up and work has begun at the site of two new upscale and “hip” hotels in Downtown Brooklyn.A Sheraton and another, as-yet-unidentified “but hip” hotel are planned for the site, according to the developer, John Lam of The Lam Group, a Manhattan-based builder of hotels in the city.

This is the latest in significant development news for Downtown Brooklyn and the first new commercial building to begin construction since the Downtown Brooklyn Rezoning Plan — designed to create such construction — was approved.

There has been talk of a 600-foot-tall commercial tower to be built by Thor Equities at 120 Willoughby St., between Duffield and Gold Streets at Flatbush Avenue Extension; and a rumor of another one at the opposite end of the Downtown Shopping District, at Boerum Place and Fulton Mall. But no activity has been announced on either front, and Joseph Sitt of Thor has since put his property and the adjacent renovated Gallery at Fulton Street, formerly the Albee Square Mall, on the market.

The Sheraton Hotel site is on the west side of Duffield Street just feet from the gritty Willoughby Street, but also just feet from the glossy MetroTech campus, where the landmarked Verizon building at 101 Willoughby (7 MetroTech) is undergoing a conversion to luxury condominiums.

The site includes two properties — one a three-story building, the other a parking lot, with addresses of 216-228 Duffield St.

A search of the Department of Buildings website revealed that permits have been issued for the demolition of an existing three-story building, which contains one retail space and two apartments (all empty), and for the installation of the sidewalk shed and fencing. But permits have not been approved yet for construction of the proposed side-by-side hotels.

According to Lam, the side-by-side hotels will be 27 stories tall, will contain a total of 500 rooms and will share an indoor/outdoor rooftop bar which will command wide-angle views. Community space, a restaurant and a spa and pool are also planned.

“It will change the whole neighborhood,” said an enthusiastic Lam, when reached by phone yesterday. Lam also said that he anticipates about 1,000 business travelers a day.

“The Sheraton will be more of a formal business traveler hotel; the other will appeal more to the hip, young population who need a place of their own,” he said, adding that Brooklyn is definitely attracting this population now.

Describing the design by architect Gene Kaufman as “sleek,” he added, “It will have a very exciting look.”

Construction is expected to begin within one month on the first stage, the Sheraton with 320 rooms; and within six months on the 180-room adjacent hotel, for which he does not have a firm commitment yet. The hotels should be completed in two years, in fall 2008.

Denying that he is a visionary in selecting this particular site, Lam said Downtown Brooklyn definitely needed more hotel rooms, it was very difficult to find a site and was pleased to find this one. The site is adjacent to an 800-car underground parking development planned by the city and also included in the Downtown Brooklyn rezoning.

As reported last year in the Brooklyn Eagle, The Lam Group purchased the 15,000-square-foot site for $9 million. Brian Leary, a partner with Massey Knakal Realty Services in Brooklyn, was the broker. At that time, Leary said the rezoning would allow approximately 180,000 buildable square feet on the site. According to a DOB permit application, Lam plans a development of about 160,000 square feet. Leary also said last year that in a 30-day period he received multiple offers and the sellers were pleased with “Lam’s $9 million non-contingent full price offer.”

The Lam group is a very reputable hotel developer and operator in the New York City market, Leary added.

“This is great for the downtown office district and its surrounding communities. It will provide the borough with additional needed hotel rooms and opportunities for more local employment.” Mack Tham, the former director of Real Estate and Development for the Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce, who reported he has had several conversations with the “shy and reticent” hotel developer, who is originally from Hong Kong, is aware of at least seven major hotels Lam has built in the Greater New York City area. These include the Holiday Inn in Chinatown, the Clarion SoHo, the Four Points Hilton at 160 W. 25th St., the Best Western Convention Center at 522 W. 38th St., and Lam’s Convention Center Hotel at 449 W. 36th St. — all in Manhattan; and in Queens, the Sheraton at JFK and the Super 8 in Jamaica.


This is The Lam Group’s first Brooklyn project


Architect Kaufman, who is best known for his current designs of Schaefer Landing on the waterfront in Williamsburg and Steiner Studios at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, also has a lot of experience in designing hotel properties. These include the Chelsea Hampton Inn, Tribeca Boutique Hotel, plus a 21-story hotel at 160 W. 16th St. and a 28-story hotel at 1 E. 35th St.


© Brooklyn Daily Eagle 2006

lofter1
September 29th, 2006, 11:39 AM
The Lam group is a very reputable hotel developer and operator in the New York City market, Leary added.

or notorious, for those who follow wny ;)




... Architect Kaufman, who is best known for his current designs of Schaefer Landing on the waterfront in Williamsburg and Steiner Studios at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, also has a lot of experience in designing hotel properties. These include the Chelsea Hampton Inn, Tribeca Boutique Hotel, plus a 21-story hotel at 160 W. 16th St. and a 28-story hotel at 1 E. 35th St.

Better known here at wny for POS scattered about ;)

posterboy
September 29th, 2006, 11:42 AM
so what's up with the rendering of that tall tower in the image? i'd like that to be built, please. thank you.

Xemu
October 6th, 2006, 04:31 PM
What's up with that little park in front of the glass building in the rendering? Just some BS they put in so that we can see the base?

Kris
October 7th, 2006, 04:22 AM
October 8, 2006
Postings
A New Condominium With a Familiar Ring
By JEFF VANDAM

DEEP within a triangle of Downtown Brooklyn surrounded by the Fulton Mall, Flatbush Avenue and the MetroTech Center, the latest conversion of an iconic skyscraper into residential units is taking place. Less well-known than the Williamsburgh Savings Bank tower, which is being converted just a few blocks away, the former New York Telephone Company building on Bridge Street is at 27 stories no less impressive in its Art Deco grace.

The building, now called the BellTel Lofts, gets its new name from a wrought-iron facade hanging over its Bridge Street entrance, which still tags it as the Bell Telephone Company. The structure also bears other signs indicating a later role as an outpost of Verizon Communications, though its innards are quickly being transformed. Sales will start in the coming week, and by next spring, there will be 219 residential units. Prices per unit will range from $500,000 to $2 million.

The area around the building, one of the last sections of this part of Brooklyn to see major development, is a study in contrasts, with wig shops, driving schools and stores like Eyebrow Zone around the corner from the tranquil, tree-filled quiet of the MetroTech. Because several of the surrounding streets are closed to traffic, life at the BellTel Lofts may be more serene than the otherwise busy environs.

“While you’re sitting here in the middle of Downtown Brooklyn, you don’t have all the noise you would normally have in Downtown Brooklyn,” said David Bistricer, the developer of the building. He pointed out that the MetroTech Business Improvement District maintains sanitation and security services in the area.

Inside, the building’s conversion has been assigned to Beyer Blinder Belle, the architectural firm that renovated Grand Central Terminal for the Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Units will range from studios to three-bedrooms, and judging from model units being completed, ceilings will be 11 feet tall, floors made of bamboo, kitchens open and windows large. Verizon will equip each apartment with fiber-optic cables.

In addition to ground-floor retail spaces, the building will include expansive dual roof decks on the 19th floor, with views of the Statue of Liberty, Grand Army Plaza, New York Harbor and nearly everything else in the immediate area.

At the tower’s base, residents will have access to separate rooms for fitness, yoga and office activities.

On the roof deck, Mr. Bistricer talked of investment in Downtown Brooklyn as a smart buy, considering the high prices in nearly every other surrounding area. But more development is coming soon, he said, pointing toward a parking lot on Duffield Street that was being readied for construction. “That’s a sign,” he said.

Copyright 2006 The New York Times Company

lofter1
October 7th, 2006, 11:06 AM
http://belltellofts.com/

http://www.elliman.com/NYCPhotos/NewHomeDevelopment/nhd_home/76584a.jpg

Derek2k3
October 7th, 2006, 12:59 PM
What's up with that little park in front of the glass building in the rendering? Just some BS they put in so that we can see the base?

A 1.2 acre park paid for by the city.

antinimby
October 7th, 2006, 02:00 PM
Partnership Working To Revitalize Downtown Brooklyn


By DAVID LOMBINO - Staff Reporter of the Sun
October 4, 2006 (http://www.nysun.com/article/40835)


Brooklyn's residential neighborhoods have transformed over the last few years into some of the most desirable urban areas anywhere. Now a public-private partnership is taking aim at revolutionizing downtown, the city's third largest business district.

The offices of the new Downtown Brooklyn Partnership, high up in the Metrotech Center, enjoy panoramic views of the borough, from the Verrazano Bridge north to Newtown Creek, where Brooklyn it borders Queens. The organization's president, Joe Chan, and his staff of 25 want to expand and refashion the borough's central business district.

"If our views are obscured, we'll know we've done a good job," Mr. Chan said. :)
Since the 1980s, downtown Brooklyn has been popular as back office depots for tenants from the financial services industry, like Bear Stearns, Bank of America, and JP Morgan Chase, which have their corporate offices in Midtown Manhattan.

The business district was rezoned in 2004, but the commercial expansion that was envisioned has not happened. Instead, the city's residential market exploded and Brooklyn's neighborhoods boomed. The surrounding areas, like Fort Greene, Boerum Hill, Cobble Hill, Brooklyn Heights, and Dumbo, are among the most desirable in the borough, but the commercial district at their center remains a ghost town after 6 p.m. and on weekends.

The Downtown Brooklyn Partnership, a public-private, non-profit organization created earlier this year, is an attempt to streamline the duties of four local economic development organizations and catalyze development.

Mr. Chan, 35, has some powerful friends, including his old boss, deputy mayor Daniel Doctoroff, whom he served as a senior policy adviser. Previously, Mr. Chan was the director of real estate for the Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce.

"Who — beyond back offices of banks and insurance companies — are the next group to populate downtown Brooklyn?" Mr. Chan asked.

Mr. Chan said that in the next six months he hopes to convince a developer to build a large, mixed-use project of more than 1 million square feet in the business district. He hopes to leverage the workforce of the surrounding borough to create a business district centered on more creative industries, like publishing, entertainment and design companies. New buildings, he said, will be designed for a new generation of tenants, and are unlikely to contain the large floor-plates that characterize Metrotech.

To set the stage, Mr. Chan promises a host of new initiatives to make transform the area into a more vibrant 24/7 environment, one of the signature goals of the Bloomberg administration's economic development strategy. That includes a creating a pedestrian friendly Flatbush Avenue, hiring a landscape architecture firm to create open space around the BAM cultural district, attracting a mixed-income housing project east of Flatbush Avenue, and connecting downtown to the low-rise brownstone neighborhoods to the south.

Real estate experts say that downtown Brooklyn competes for office tenants with Jersey City and Long Island City, areas where businesses pay less rent to work outside Manhattan, but want to remain within striking distance of Midtown or Lower Manhattan. Last week, it was reported that Viacom could move some of its offices and studios to Long Island City in Queens, bolstering the area's hopes for itself as an eastern province of Midtown. Other areas, like Jersey City, enjoy big tax breaks and low rents.

Some real experts say that downtown Brooklyn's advantages are better transportation infrastructure, with access to 9 subway lines and the Long Island Railroad, along with more restaurants and services. They say that the demand for Brooklyn office space exists, but that the supply of the right kind of space is lacking.

Deputy mayor Daniel Doctoroff said that downtown Brooklyn will compete for tenants with Jersey City. To spur the area's development, he said the city will direct nearly $500 million in public funds towards parks, open space, infrastructure improvements and to pave the way for the nearby Atlantic Yards project and an accompanying basketball arena.

"We lost 50,000 to 60,000 jobs to New Jersey in the nineties because we didn't have the space," Mr. Doctoroff told the Sun. "Downtown Brooklyn is changing dramatically over the next five to ten years. What we have to sell will be very different than what we have had to sell before. We will have the ability to attract a totally different kind of corporate tenant."

© 2006 The New York Sun

antinimby
October 7th, 2006, 02:01 PM
^ Now that's the kind of talk we need to hear more of from the folks in this city.

sfenn1117
October 7th, 2006, 10:39 PM
I drove by the Bridgeview Tower yesterday. I was going pretty fast, but it's about 15 stories up, the bottom 7 or so cladded. It was hard to tell, but it looks like limestone?? Not 15 CPW quality, but it didn't look bad. Anyone else get a better look at it?