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winterdon
May 5th, 2005, 11:35 PM
Please Help Me! I'm planning to take my daughter to NY for her birthday. It's an overnight stay. We both love to shop! We're looking for street vendor - bargins. The purses, shoes, clothes and jewlery. All those great hush hush bargins........
Where's the best place to find these - other then Battery Park, and could you recommend a good hotel that's close by?

Also, please pardon my ignorance, but where/what is the clothing district???

Thank You!

Schadenfrau
May 6th, 2005, 11:31 AM
Street vendors generally don't sell shoes, but you'll find plenty of purses, jewelry, electronics and more in Chinatown.

I think the clothing district you refer to probably the Garment District. Despite the name, there aren't many good retail stores in the area. The name comes from the concentration of fashion showrooms in the neighborhood.

You might want to check out Century 21 for big discounts on clothing:

http://www.c21stores.com/

Edward
May 6th, 2005, 12:02 PM
Combine shopping and education - shop Century 21 on Church Street, then cross the street and see Ground Zero.

NYatKNIGHT
May 6th, 2005, 12:32 PM
Canal Street in Chinatown. There's a Holiday Inn nearby on Lafayette St.

There's also that Lower East Side "Bargain District" around Orchard and Delancey Streets.

http://www.lowereastsideny.com (http://www.lowereastsideny.com/)
Click on Shopping and Services

Derek2k3
December 12th, 2009, 07:57 PM
http://www.tribecatrib.com/news/2009/december/433_sweep-of-canal-street-shops-shutters-29-alleged-counterfeit-vendors.html

Sweep of Canal Street Shops Shutters 29 Alleged Counterfeit Vendors

By Matt Dunning
Carl Glassman / Tribeca Trib

With the holiday shopping season in full swing, police and city investigators conducted a massive raid of alleged knock-off shops along two blocks of Canal Street that ended early Tuesday morning.

Steel barriers kept pedestrians at a distance from the piles of confiscated “designer” merchandise and the open stalls along Canal Street, between Broadway and Church Street, after 29 ground-floor retail shops were ordered shut down between 6 p.m., Monday and 12 p.m., Tuesday.

The raid was the city’s fourth major strike against alleged counterfeit merchants in the Canal Street area this year, according to Jason Post, a spokesman for the Mayor’s Office of Special Enforcement. No arrests were made, but Post said police seized about $1 million worth of imitation and allegedly counterfeit trademarked handbags, wallets, jewelry, perfume and other items purported to be genuine products of high-end designers like Gucci, Chanel and Tiffany. Post said the raid was the city's largest this year.

"We’re just not going to have any tolerance for people selling knock-offs," Mayor Michael Bloomberg said Tuesday afternoon. "It’s not fair to those companies that invest in their brand. [There is] nothing wrong with somebody making a less expensive product, but you can’t use the name of a more expensive product and sell it as though that was what it was."

Post said investigators spent the last month buying the knock-offs from stalls spread throughout 10 buildings on the south side of Canal Street, then used the items to get a court’s permission to shut down the vendors. The owners of the 10 buildings raided will not face criminal charges. In order to prevent new counterfeit merchants from setting up shop in vacated stalls, Post said the city negotiates requirements for tenant review with the building owners, and imposes a "hefty fine" if the illegal activity returns.

In addition to the fake goods, Post said police found a series of hidden doors leading to escape routes behind some of some of the stalls.

If the raid were to serve as a warning to other merchants in the area on Wednesday, that effect seemed confined to the south side of Canal Street. Those corners were free of the usual crowd of vendors who sell their goods out of duffle bags. On the north side of Canal Street, however, shops that appeared to be displaying many of the same products police were busy stuffing into evidence bags were open for business.

Since its creation in 2006, Post said the Office of Special Enforcement has conducted more than 20 raids on alleged counterfeit merchants in the Canal Street area. A year ago, the city raided a total of 34 retail stalls east of Broadway, half of them along one block of Canal between Centre and Lafayette Streets known locally as the “Counterfeit Triangle.”

Papercut
December 12th, 2009, 09:25 PM
canal street

Matthie
December 20th, 2009, 03:13 PM
In addition to the fake goods, Post said police found a series of hidden doors leading to escape routes behind some of some of the stalls.

I also heard that there are hidden rooms with much more bootleg items overthere.

I'm not sure if I'm happy with this clean up. NYC shouldn't lose more of it's roughness.

mandywilliams
January 27th, 2010, 01:16 AM
I think street vendors generally don't sell shoes, but you'll find plenty of purses, jewelry, electronics and more in Chinatown.

lofter1
January 27th, 2010, 01:38 AM
Almost all counterfeit and illegal -- and now under surveillance by NYPD cameras.

So be forewarned.

KenNYC
January 31st, 2010, 08:07 PM
Almost all counterfeit and illegal -- and now under surveillance by NYPD cameras.

So be forewarned.

There is nothing illegal in buying counterfeit items at all. And if the NYPD is watching this, seems kinda weird they have no problem doing business in the middle of the street all over the city?

JSM007
January 31st, 2010, 09:24 PM
There is nothing illegal in buying counterfeit items at all. And if the NYPD is watching this, seems kinda weird they have no problem doing business in the middle of the street all over the city?

Quite correct. The operations by the NYPD I have read about all involve shutting down the vendors.

Just a general note for anyone having moral quandaries about china town shopping: the licensed vendors have yellow stickers.

JSM007
January 31st, 2010, 09:31 PM
Hello Winterdon-

May I suggest walking along 8th avenue from 42nd street Port Authority to 34th Street Penn Station. On the left side of the street are many cheap vendors that sell inexpensive shoes.

Harlem- 125th Street between St. Nicholas Avenue and 5th avenue. A unique and fun experience that you wouldn't expect.

lofter1
January 31st, 2010, 10:12 PM
There is nothing illegal in buying counterfeit items at all.


Not so sure about that ...

Guide to Buying Fake Handbags in New York City (http://www.nytix.com/NewYorkCity/articles/handbags.html)

The Ethical Dilemma Of Buying A Fake Handbag

Selling designer brand counterfeit handbags in New York City is a risky proposition for the vendors because when undercover police crack down, they arrest them, fine the landlord, and confiscate their knockoff wares. For the buyer, there is little risk of prosecution, as no one has ever been charged in New York City for buying a fake handbag, even though it is an illegal act.

*

NYC mayor warns tourists against buying fake goods (http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSN2637120920080226)

... Bloomberg said tourists and shoppers who flocked to the area known as "the counterfeit triangle" were guilty of helping prop up organized crime and were "stealing someone else's property."

"You may get something for nothing but it is against the law," he said. "When they realize that this city takes it seriously, hopefully they will not buy something that they have every reason to think is a rip-off."

*

While it seems that so far NYC has not prosecuted those who buy counterfeit items from vendors, a person who knowingly buys a counterfeit replica of a trademarked item could be deemed an interested third party and, in the eyes of the law, guilty of "contributory infringement of trademarks."

NY Law Journal (http://www.cmocouncil.org/programs/current/protection/NYLJ-McDonald.pdf) [pdf]

Intellectual Property

Case Law

In addition to the statutory enforcement outlined above, case law has pro- vided a foundation for holding third parties liable for the actions of another. The formative case, Inwood Labs., Inc. v. Ives Labs., Inc.,7 decided by the U.S. Supreme Court, established that the Lanham Act contains an implied cause of action for contributory infringement of trademarks. Contributory trademark infringement is found where a defendant intentionally induced another to infringe a trademark ...

... the movement toward enforcing liability against third parties has been a success in and of itself.

ZippyTheChimp
February 1st, 2010, 12:29 AM
NYC mayor warns tourists against buying fake goods (http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSN2637120920080226)Nowhere in that link did Bloomberg directly state that the act of buying a counterfeit item is against the law. What he said was,


"You may get something for nothing but it is against the law,"

"It" being the the sale of counterfeit material.

The "guilty" he mentioned is like how your mother makes you feel when you don't call her.


NY Law Journal (http://www.cmocouncil.org/programs/current/protection/NYLJ-McDonald.pdf) [pdf]Third-party liability discussed in the above is a civil suit recovery of damages by a plaintiff. It makes sense in the case of property owners who provide space for sellers, but no company is going to sue some lady for buying a fake handbag.

lofter1
February 1st, 2010, 12:50 AM
I bet if they did -- and publicized it (assuming they could actually get a conviction) -- then it would put a big dent in the selling of counterfeit items.

ZippyTheChimp
February 1st, 2010, 08:52 AM
(assuming they could actually get a conviction) --It would be "judgment for the plaintiff." What would that be, pay for the handbag? Great publicity.


then it would put a big dent in the selling of counterfeit items.I think the opposite.

The legal exposure is the same as passing a phony $20 bill to a retail clerk. You lose the money. So what do we do; have fashion police spot check for phony Pradas?

stache
February 1st, 2010, 09:54 AM
They check at international departures for contraband.