PDA

View Full Version : Upstate Syracuse, NY



cNYnorth
June 29th, 2005, 01:52 PM
Syracuse

http://www.pbase.com/ciceroclay/image/33376904.jpg
http://www.pbase.com/ciceroclay/image/33377140.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/ciceroclay/image/33377158.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/ciceroclay/image/33377160.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/ciceroclay/image/33377155.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/ciceroclay/image/33377171.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/ciceroclay/image/33377172.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/ciceroclay/image/33377200.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/ciceroclay/image/33377201.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/ciceroclay/image/33376809.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/ciceroclay/image/33376747.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/ciceroclay/image/33376115.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/ciceroclay/image/33376816.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/ciceroclay/image/33375960.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/ciceroclay/image/33375962.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/ciceroclay/image/33376172.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/ciceroclay/image/33376304.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/ciceroclay/image/33376296.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/ciceroclay/image/33376319.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/ciceroclay/image/33376332.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/ciceroclay/image/41260909.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/ciceroclay/image/41260703.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/ciceroclay/image/41260797.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/ciceroclay/image/41260715.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/ciceroclay/image/33377418.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/ciceroclay/image/33377428.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/ciceroclay/image/33377424.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/ciceroclay/image/33377375.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/ciceroclay/image/33375925.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/ciceroclay/image/41894630.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/ciceroclay/image/41894684.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/ciceroclay/image/41894787.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/ciceroclay/image/33375900.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/ciceroclay/image/45249972.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/ciceroclay/image/45249967.jpg

ryan
June 29th, 2005, 01:54 PM
Wouldn't be a complete tour of Syracuse without the carousel mall...

kz1000ps
June 29th, 2005, 03:28 PM
Great to see an extensive tour of Syracuse. I'm from Albany and also know Buffalo very well, Rochester, Utica, Binghamton a bit but Syracuse I've never been to (well, I've ridden by on Amtrak a gazillion times) for whatever reasons. This shows me I definitely need to get my butt over there sometime. What is the relatively new red-brick retail development you show? It's great to see a project with cozy little corridors like that....those kind of narrow pathways ALWAYS draw me in, regardless of what's down there.

cNYnorth
June 29th, 2005, 10:08 PM
Thanks!


What is the relatively new red-brick retail development you show? It's great to see a project with cozy little corridors like that....those kind of narrow pathways ALWAYS draw me in, regardless of what's down there.

Its not really a "new" retail development. Armory Square is a historic district that was redeveloped in the early 90s, containing shops, restaurants, and clubs. It is also THE "nightlife" spot in Syracuse.


Here is what the City of Syracuse website says about the area:
Armory Square (http://www.armorysquare.com/)was part of the historic Walton tract, and site of Walton's millpond that fed a mill (1805) located on Genesee St. In 1849 the millpond and its surrounding swamp were filled in with soil from Prospect Hill, helping to eliminate frequent epidemics of malaria. The area was graded, existing streets extended, and the oval-shaped Jefferson Park, site of the first Armory (1859) and parade ground, was established.
The 1820's brought the construction of the Erie Canal, and with the 1830's came the railroads. These developments sparked business and building activities. Two railroad companies chose this location for their terminals, resulting in a concentration of hotels, boarding houses, shops, warehouses, and factories. The removal of the railroads from the streets of downtown Syracuse in the 1930's brought a decline to the area. In the 1970's a group of enterprising owners and artists became interested in Armory Square, which has since experienced a renaissance. In 1984, Armory Square was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Architecturally the district's structures exhibit the technological innovations and construction methods found in the commercial and architectural styles of the middle and late 1800's and early 1900's.

The official website of Armory Square is under redevelopment: http://www.armorysquare.com/