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TonyO
September 15th, 2005, 09:57 AM
NY Times
September 15, 2005

No Middle Ground, to Riders' Delight

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2005/09/15/nyregion/15train2_lg.jpg
A prototype of New Jersey Transit's new two-level trains, on display Wednesday at Newark Penn Station. Each train will have about 225 more seats.

By PATRICK McGEEHAN
NEWARK, Sept. 14 - New Jersey Transit officials offered commuters a glimpse of their train-riding future here on Wednesday and it was not drab, rigid or strictly horizontal. But what clearly was most appealing to all who beheld it was that it would eliminate the chance of spending more than an hour a day pressed between two strangers.

"The middle seat is gone," cheered Maxine Marshall, who commutes from Plainfield, N.J., to work for a trust company in Jersey City.

Well, it is not gone yet. The gleaming vehicle that had Ms. Marshall grinning was a prototype of New Jersey Transit's first bilevel passenger car, which will not be in service for at least a year. It was unveiled on Wednesday at a ceremony at Newark Penn Station.

But in late 2006, the railroad plans to start running the first batch of 100 cars to ease crowding on its trains into and out of Pennsylvania Station in Manhattan. Those trains are rapidly approaching full capacity during the rush hours, and there is no room in the tunnel or at Penn Station for additional trains.

The only solution is to squeeze more people onto each train, and the most comfortable way to do that is to add a second level, said Jack Lettiere, the state's commissioner of transportation and the chairman of New Jersey Transit. With two levels, the cars hold more passengers, even though there are only two seats on each side of the aisle. A typical 10-car train will have 1,375 seats, or about 225 more than on a comparable train today.

"That dreaded middle seat is the bane of commuters' existence," said Mr. Lettiere, who was on hand for the unveiling. "It becomes a place where people pile things to keep others from sitting there. It's not what the customer wants."

The railroad's officials said they had figured out what passengers wanted by asking them. A group of riders, including Ms. Marshall, visited Bombardier, the Canadian company that is building the cars, and shared their opinions about how the cars should look and feel.

Aside from the two-by-two seating, Ms. Marshall said she particularly liked the "soothing" blue walls and seat covers and the "not too bright, not too dark" lighting. She said they were a significant improvement over the brown benches on some of the railroad's older trains.

"You don't feel too closed in," she said, adding that she would most likely choose to sit on the lower level because she was unsure about her ability to walk down the stairs while the train was moving.

The cars will have about 65 seats on each level. Each seat has about one inch more legroom than on the railroad's existing cars, said Richard R. Sarles, an assistant executive director who is overseeing the acquisition of the cars.

The money to buy the first 100 cars, for about $1.9 million each, came from the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey. John S. Wisniewski, a Democratic assemblyman from Parlin, N.J., who is the chairman of the transportation committee, described the Port Authority's chairman, Anthony R. Coscia, as "our rich uncle."

But New Jersey Transit already has ordered 131 more of the bilevel cars, and the state will have to come up with its own money for those. Mr. Lettiere said that he was confident there would be enough federal funding to pay for the second batch of cars.

The new cars will run on the railroad's main Northeast Corridor Line between Trenton and Manhattan and on its North Jersey Coast Line and Midtown Direct routes into Penn Station. At 14 feet, 6 inches high, they barely clear the tunnel under the Hudson River, which is owned by Amtrak. Amtrak and the Long Island Rail Road have already spent about $2 million clearing obstacles at Penn Station to make way for bilevel cars that come in from Long Island, an Amtrak official said.

To make New Jersey Transit's new model fit, Bombardier had to shave the front and rear corners off the roof, giving the car the profile of a giant harmonica. But as Mr. Wisniewski said, the railroad's passengers will be more concerned about what is inside.

"These are comfortable seats," he said. "The air-conditioning works really well in there. And there are no middle seats."

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2005/09/15/nyregion/15train.jpg
A prototype of New Jersey Transit's new two-level trains, unveiled yesterday in Newark. The trains will begin running in late 2006.

NIMBYkiller
September 16th, 2005, 04:31 PM
They look alot like LIRRs double deckers. I'm glad to see it's 2x2 seating.

fioco
September 16th, 2005, 06:33 PM
The prototype has a face only a mother could love. Was the Tin-Man its designer?

ablarc
September 17th, 2005, 06:43 AM
The interiors of these trains will be a great improvement, but the exterior design shows that New Jersey Transit has no interest in whatever riders can be added by projecting a glamorous image.

This is in marked contrast to European trains, which project images of speed and elegance with swoopy exterior design and slick livery.

ZippyTheChimp
September 17th, 2005, 09:53 AM
It already looks like it's been involved in an accident.

Swede
September 20th, 2005, 01:41 PM
This is in marked contrast to European trains, which project images of speed and elegance with swoopy exterior design and slick livery.
True, compared to Stockholm's new commuter trains (http://www.sjk.se/tag/nybild/20050615f.jpg), this is pretty sub-par looks-wise. But the rules for passenger cars are way diffrent in the US compared to the EU, which result in US trains looking much more robust. Still, the new NJtrans trains look like they've gone in for that anti-design look.

david lee
January 20th, 2006, 10:18 AM
Is this train running yet? I will be in MY this April and hope to travel from Newark to Manhattan

stache
January 20th, 2006, 01:39 PM
Take PATH or NJ Transit. PATH gets you right to Ground Zero.

NIMBYkiller
January 20th, 2006, 06:25 PM
The double deckers are not running in service yet. Still stuck with single level coaches for some time.

krulltime
July 22nd, 2006, 02:05 AM
In Test, Someone Forgot to Tell Double-Decker Train to Duck


By VINCENT M. MALLOZZI
July 22, 2006

New Jersey Transit and Amtrak have gotten their signals crushed during a test run of one of the double-decker trains that will begin carrying riders this fall.

On June 8, the first of New Jersey Transit’s planned fleet of 231 two-tiered rail cars, which cost roughly $1.9 million each, shipped out on a midnight test run to New York.

Built taller and wider than traditional suburban commuter trains, the bilevel train had trouble passing through one of the two tunnels heading into Pennsylvania Station, tearing down two signals as it chugged past the west end of Track 5.

Cliff Black, a spokesman for Amtrak, which owns much of the track that New Jersey Transit uses, confirmed that the train had done some damage during its test run, and attributed the problem to signals that were hanging too low from the tunnel ceiling. He said that no passengers were on board that night, and that the train’s engineer and its conductors were not injured.

“As a result of this incident, a test was made within the station to review any signals that might not comply with the new bilevel equipment,’’ Mr. Black said. “Any noncompliant signals will be adjusted.’’

Hélène V. Gagnon, a senior director of communications for Bombardier, the Canadian company that made the bilevel trains, said adjustments were being made to ensure that track signals were placed in the proper positions to accommodate the measurements of the new trains.

“We run the cars on low speed to verify whether they clear all elements on the routes where they will eventually run, such as tunnels, tracks and signals,’’ Ms. Gagnon said. “It was determined by Amtrak that its signals department had installed signal lights that did not conform to the Amtrak clearance profile.’’

By that, Ms. Gagnon meant that Bombardier was not responsible for last month’s incident.

“The bottom line is that Bombardier’s new rail cars were within the clearance envelope allowed by Amtrak,’’ she said. “And if the signals were properly located, the car should have cleared all signals.’’

Ms. Gagnon said she was told by Amtrak that an estimated 25 signals had recently been installed by a new company, and that the new signals hung lower from the ceilings of the two tunnels than those they had replaced. “We are confident that Amtrak will take appropriate actions to ensure clearance of the new cars,’’ she said.

Mr. Black said Amtrak “did not know for sure if the signals were installed incorrectly, but they certainly did not conform to the profile.’’

As for the rail cars themselves, Mr. Black said, “As far as we know, they are compliant.’’

Dan Stessel, a spokesman for New Jersey Transit, said the train that tore down the signals suffered only “minor cosmetic damages.’’


Copyright 2006 The New York Times Company

ablarc
July 22nd, 2006, 09:22 AM
Mr. Black said Amtrak “did not know for sure if the signals were installed incorrectly, but they certainly did not conform to the profile.’’
We don't know for sure that a crime actually took place, but we do know that a man with a ski mask and revolver sprinted out of the bank with a sack of money --after pointing the revolver at a bank teller.

TimmyG
December 11th, 2006, 09:33 AM
from the Times Trenton
Multilevel trains pull into stations today
Monday, December 11, 2006BY MICHAEL LAVITT
Special to the Times

The man standing at the train station stooped down to peer in the window of the train car's lower level, just a foot or so above the platform in the wee hours of Wednesday morning.
"You can ride it starting Monday," said someone who was getting off the train.
"NJ Transit?" asked the man, who was waiting for one of NJ Transit's more conventional trains.
Yes, NJ Transit. The state's first production set of multilevel vehicles or MLVs will start carrying passengers starting today with a noon departure from Trenton that is scheduled to reach New York at 1:27 p.m.
The late Tuesday night-early Wednesday morning trip along the Northeast Corridor was one of the final shakedown trips for the all-new train cars that will be NJ Transit's first without a middle seat.
NJ Transit allowed a journalist to ride the three-car train that was staffed by the railroad's engineering and operations personnel as well as some contractors who worked on the project.
The idea was to simulate day-to-day operations as closely as possible without actually carrying passengers, stopping at stations along the Northeast Corridor as it would in normal service. The crew opened the train doors as they would when picking up passengers.
But there were a couple of notable differences. First, the train had just three cars. And they were pulled by a diesel engine that night instead of one of the electric locomotives that normally ply the Northeast Corridor.
Also, in order to avoid having this special train delay other traffic on the corridor, Amtrak dispatchers told the crew to skip stops at Princeton Junction and Hamilton.
Based on my round trip between New Brunswick and Trenton, the new cars appear to live up to their promise of providing a better experience for commuters and other riders.

Cruising along at more than 80 mph between New Brunswick and Princeton Junction, the ride was smooth and quiet on the upper level. "You really don't feel it," said John F. Squitieri, NJ Transit's director of equipment and design and program manager for the MLVs.
The train cars will be qualified to run at 100 mph and eventually 125 mph, he added. But you won't see them running that fast in regular service.
The sculpted seat backs provide better support while also offering 25.27 inches of seat pitch or leg room, a full inch more than you get on NJ Transit's Comet V cars, the newest before today's introduction of the MLVs. Each seat is 2.2 inches wider than those on the Comet Vs, and you'll never have people sitting on both sides of you.
In fact, there will be two single seats at each end of the cars' upper levels, one with a small luggage rack next to it, near the stairs that lead to the mezzanine level where passengers will enter and leave the train.
Commuters have a way of finding the best place to sit, so you'll have to be one of the first few people to board if you want one of those coveted seats.
The seats are covered in two tones of blue vinyl that have a clothlike look and texture. A focus group of passengers from different NJ Transit lines helped select the covering.
"Ninety-nine percent of the people voted for vinyl," Squitieri said. They believed the vinyl seats would stay cleaner than cloth.
The seat backs are made of a white plastic that Squitieri said has a coating that will make them resistant to graffiti and easy to clean.
One tradeoff with the sculpted seats is that they won't flip in different directions, so half the people on a car will be facing backward. But Squitieri said the focus group members felt the tradeoff was worth the additional comfort.
In addition, not having latching mechanisms means there will be one less thing for NJ Transit to maintain.

"There are a lot of features that I like and the passengers will like," Conductor Douglas Ritchey said. "You have a clear line of sight from the vestibule. I can see all of my passengers."
The conductor said some passengers on current trains flip seats so they face each other, put their feet up and place their bags next to them, effectively taking up four seats. They won't be able to do that with the new seats in a fixed position.
Ritchey said he didn't think the four steps up and down would present a problem for crew or passengers. Crew members "basically walk back and forth to Manhattan all day," he said. "I don't know anybody who's going to be afraid of some stairs."
In addition to the customer focus groups, NJ Transit engaged conductors, engineers and maintenance staff in designing the new trains, Squitieri said.
"There are definitely a lot of things that will help us in day-to-day operations," Ritchey said.
Squitieri said months of testing had shown the need for minor changes, mostly adjustments to software for such things as the public address system, brake forces and environmental controls. Temperatures couldn't be well maintained on older trains, but the MLVs have four temperature zones per car, each with its own sensor.
All three levels have adequate headroom with a ceiling height of 6 feet 4 inches on the upper and lower levels.
Only the upper level has overhead racks, while the lower level has coat hooks that fold down from the walls. A fairly full backpack designed to hold a laptop computer was a tight fit on the rack but could be squeezed in.
Passengers with large suitcases or a lot of packages will probably want to stay on the mezzanine.
The mezzanine level at each end of the car will have seats that flip down from the side wall of the train. Those seats have lower backs than the ones on the upper and lower levels.

When the seats are folded up, the area can be used for passengers with wheelchairs or bicycles. There's also a padded "leaning station" that several passengers will be able to use to take the weight off their feet without sitting.
Most cars will have two doors at each end of the car leading to the mezzanine level. Cars with engineer cabs will have only one door on the end where the cab is located.
The new cars pack in a number of other passenger-friendly features. There will be call buttons in each car and in each restroom that passengers can push to request help in an emergency.
Destination signs in the cars will show where the request came from, so crew members will know where the problem is. They will be able to ask what the problem is over the intercom, and passengers will be able to respond.
"More than 50 percent of the cars will have toilets," Squitieri said. All 127 cab cars will have restrooms, while 132 coach cars will also have rest rooms. There will be 142 more without restrooms.
The sinks also have a lip around the corner that should help to keep water from splashing onto the floor. The restrooms have a more finished appearance than the industrial-looking ones on older trains.
All the restrooms comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act, providing enough room to turn a wheelchair around with the door closed.
"You almost have a sheltered, private cove" on the upper and lower levels, Ritchey said. The trains have more seating, more comfortable seats, new technology and a quiet ride, all factors that should make them popular with passengers.
"I kind of like it," said Marquis Smith, the "rear brake" or assistant conductor on the train. "The passengers will like it, too."

JCMAN320
December 13th, 2006, 07:52 PM
$30 million for Metropark improvements

NJ Transit will spend nearly $30 million to build longer, wider platforms and to make other improvements at the busy Metropark Station in Woodbridge.

The agency's board this morning awarded a $29.8 million contract to Anselmi
& DeCicco Inc. of Maplewood to perform the work.

Metropark was built in 1971. It serves 106 trains and 7,200 NJ Transit riders on a typical weekday.

The longer platforms will be able to accommodate trains up to 12 cars long. The project includes improvements to the station building, climate controlled waiting shelters and better pedestrian access from Route 27 to the platforms.

The work will begin next year and is expected to be completed in 2010, NJ Transit Executive Director George Warrington said.

Contributed by Tom Feeney

TimmyG
January 21st, 2007, 08:20 PM
Hearings continue on rail revival

Public to review the plan to restore service from Hoboken to Scranton
Sunday, January 21, 2007BY JIM LOCKWOOD
Star-Ledger Staff
Another round of public hearings are being held on a long-sought plan to revive passenger rail service between Hoboken and Scranton, Pa., by restoring the defunct Lackawanna Cutoff in Sussex and Warren counties.
The concept, though still years away from becoming reality, has taken a step forward with the completion of NJ Transit's "draft environmental assessment," a 154-page document that is posted on the agency's Web site, www.njtransit.com (http://www.njtransit.com), as well as at various area libraries in both states.
The draft review is one of the preliminary stages imposed by the Federal Transit Administration before a project can be considered as a possible candidate for federal funding and before engineering can begin.
"Maybe we're starting to see some light at the end of the tunnel," said Sussex County Transportation Planner Tom Drabic, an advocate for the rail plan.
The project calls for eight trains daily and stations in Andover and Blairstown in New Jersey, and in Delaware Water Gap, East Stroudsburg, Analomink, Mount Pocono, Tobyhanna and Scranton in Pennsylvania.
The public hearings are necessary to get input toward a final environmental assessment that goes to the FTA for consideration. If that agency finds there are no significant impacts, the project will then move on to engineering phases and, eventually, construction, if it gets federally funded.
The first of four NJ Transit hearings was held Wednesday in Scranton.
The next will be held Tuesday from 3 to 8 p.m. at Perona Farms on Route 517 in Andover Township. At this session, NJ Transit officials will give formal presentations about the plan at 4 and 7 p.m.
Additional hearings will be held Thursday in Stroudsburg, Pa., and Jan. 29 in Blairstown at the municipal complex on Route 94, both from 3 to 8 p.m.
The goal of the rail plan is to create a mass-transit commuting option in the growing northwest New Jersey and northeast Pennsylvania region, and to reduce the congestion on perennially overcrowded Route 80.


Similar hearings held in 2004 elicited both support and opposition, particularly from residents in Byram who believe the rail plan is costly and would destroy the rural character of the area. The Byram Township Council, which already had been on record as opposing the rail line, passed a resolution on Tuesday that calls for the cutoff rail bed to become a recreational trail, in the "Rails to Trails" mode.
The environmental draft study does not contain any significant environmental impacts from the project. However, it provides an updated cost estimate that shows the price tag has soared from $350 million in 2004 to $551 million in 2006. A decade ago, the cost estimate was $200 million.
The review also estimates that the rail line from Scranton to Andover would have 3,350 eastbound daily riders, with 280 boarding in Blairstown and 150 in Andover, and the rest getting on at the six stations in Pennsylvania.
With annual operating and maintenance costs estimated at $26.2 million, and annual revenue estimated at $13.9 million, the rail line would run an annual deficit of $12.3 million that would need to be subsidized, according to the draft.
Byram Councilman Earl Riley said the project does not make any financial sense, and the funding could be better spent on a fleet of commuter buses.
"If you reduce it (traffic on Route 80) by their best projections, what's the overall impact on Route 80? Negligible," Riley said. "The whole thing financially is not a viable solution to the transportation problems that affect northwest New Jersey."
Drabic believes the NJ Transit ridership estimates are "extremely conservative. He also noted that NJ Transit recently spent $250 million on a new light rail line that was only one mile long in Newark, in an area already heavily serviced by trains and buses. And the cost to widen Route 80 is estimated at $50 million per mile, Drabic said.
The draft assessment also estimates that population and commuting growth in the area will soar.
"If you think traffic on Route 80 is bad now, you ain't seen nothing yet," Drabic said. "The only option we have is to try to get people out of their cars and into trains."

Jim Lockwood may be reached at jlockwood@starledger.com or (973) 383-0516.

JCMAN320
January 23rd, 2007, 12:18 PM
^^That's great to hear anything to help further extend our great extensive commuter rail system and take cars of our roads will help. However the article below isn't good news:

NJ Transit head recommends 10 percent fare increase

1/23/2007, 11:23 a.m. ET
By JANET FRANKSTON LORIN
The Associated Press

NEWARK, N.J. (AP) — The head of New Jersey Transit is recommending a 10 percent fare hike, which would begin on June 1.

The increase, the first since July 2005, would apply to both bus and rail fares.

It would close a budget deficit of about $60 million in the agency's proposed $1.5 billion budget.

New Jersey Transit will hold public hearings on the proposal in February and March.

Outgoing NJ Transit executive director George D. Warrington made the recommendation to the agency's board of directors at a meeting Tuesday morning.

"We need to make up for that number in short order," said Kris Kolluri, state transportation commissioner, referring to the $60 million shortfall.

Warrington said the increase is necessary to keep up with inflation as well as increases in utility costs and insurance premiums.

The agency would rather increase fares than cut service, he said.

Warrington said NJ Transit has cut more than $75 million in costs over the last several years, "leaving very little left to squeeze without impacting service."

"Given the ridership increases we are experiencing systemwide, we recommend against service reductions," he said.

He said he would have more details about the fare increase by the February meeting.

Kolluri said state aid to the transit agency did not increase in the fiscal year that began July 1. In the previous year, the state provided a $22 million increase in aid to the agency.

Warrington announced earlier this month that he would be leaving the agency at the end of March. Warrington was president of Amtrak, the national commuter rail system, when he was chosen to take charge of NJ Transit in March 2002 by then-Gov. James E. McGreevey.

OmegaNYC
January 23rd, 2007, 02:23 PM
This sucks.... It is all ready a $4.75 ride from Paterson to Manhattan. The last thing I need is to take one of those dollar vans to the city. Those people drive nuts!

Ninjahedge
January 23rd, 2007, 03:18 PM
They went up just a short time ago, didn't they?

I know they need this kind of thing, but the one thing I am wondering about is with a service that is FULL coming from Hoboken (one bus every 5 minutes) and one of teh shortest round trips out theer for bus travel, what warrants the increase for some areas like that?

If I have to pay that much of an increase (probably $80 a month) I think I will just strap on the blades and take the PATH train again ($42 a month).

Why pay more for something only marginally more convenient?

($38/mo x 12mo = $458 a year pre-transit = approximately $300 a year after taxes. Nothing to sneeze at.).

They should always look to keep alternate forms of mass transit on equal footing when it comes to cost allocation/assignments.

JCMAN320
January 24th, 2007, 12:13 PM
From the Jersey Journal:

Kearny rail line to return

Wednesday, January 24, 2007

KEARNY - Municipal officials have struck a tentative deal with NJ Transit to construct a passenger train station somewhere in the area of the Bergen Avenue extension, which opened east of Schuyler Avenue last year.

The town received confirmation of NJ Transit's plans last month in a letter from George Warrington, the transit agency's executive director.

In the letter, Warrington detailed preliminary plans to rebuild the Harrison-Kingsland Rail Line, a defunct line running along the eastern border of Gunnell Oval, and construct a new station near Bergen Avenue.

The rail line, which would open sometime between 2010 and 2013, would initially lead to the Secaucus Junction station, where passengers could transfer to trains bound for Manhattan and other locations in New Jersey. Eventually, the Harrison-Kingsland line would travel through a new tunnel to be constructed under the Hudson River to connect with Manhattan's Penn Station.

The $7.2 billion tunnel is slated for completion sometime in 2016, although transit officials have yet to line up full funding for the project.

ROSE DUGER

NIMBYkiller
January 24th, 2007, 09:12 PM
WOW! This is big news. I never understood why they abandonned that line when they finished the Montclair connection. Glad to hear about this.

ablarc
January 24th, 2007, 09:23 PM
^ Now you can settle in for the ten year wait.

NIMBYkiller
January 25th, 2007, 10:34 AM
I decided to start early and take my number as soon as they abandonned the line

JCMAN320
January 26th, 2007, 12:07 PM
From a Lehigh Valley newspaper called The Morning Call:

Pocono rail line across New Jersey gets 'green' light
Study shows no impact on environment from New York service

By Matt Birkbeck Of The Morning Call

The 20-year effort to restore passenger rail service from New York to the Poconos is a step closer to reality now that a final study has determined there are no environmental issues blocking federal approval, New Jersey Transit officials said Thursday.

Laying 88 miles of track from Port Morris, N.J., through the Poconos to Scranton, and operating the line from Pennsylvania to Hoboken, N.J., and New York City won't affect air quality, water or the land, said officials who presented the rail plan and environmental assessment study at a public hearing in Stroudsburg.

The study shows the rail line will have no significant impact on the environment,'' said Jeffrey Stiles of Edwards and Kelcey, a consulting firm that conducted the study for New Jersey Transit, the state's public transportation corporation.

The environmental review is the final study required by the Federal Transit Administration, which is expected to determine later this year whether it will fund a portion of the estimated $550 million project.

Stiles said the service, if funding is approved this year, could be running by 2012 and would transport 6,700 riders daily from the Poconos to Hoboken and New York. ''Once the project is in the federal pipeline, it will take five years before trains are moving,'' Stiles said.

Fueled by continued population growth in Monroe County, now at 175,000 and expected to rise to 275,000 by 2030, Pennsylvania and New Jersey have quietly worked on resurrecting a service terminated in 1973.

The growing population in the Poconos has flooded Interstate 80 and other roads in New Jersey, which have suffered worsening congestion from Monroe County residents commuting to jobs in the metro New York region. In addition, New Jersey faces the loss of billions in highway funding unless it meets, by 2010, air quality improvements set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Clean Air Act.

Unable to build costly new highways, New Jersey and Pennsylvania have sought alternatives to getting cars off the roads, and the passenger rail project has become a priority for both states.

Jack Kanarek, senior director of project development for New Jersey Transit, said the project enjoys the support of New Jersey Gov. John Corzine and Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell, and New Jersey has committed ''some'' money to the project.

Last summer, President Bush signed a transportation bill that authorized $120 million for the project. Under funding guidelines for new rail service under the FTA's New Starts program, the FTA could fund up to 50 percent of the project, while the two states must fund the remainder. Rendell has set aside $40 million for the project.

Just how much each state would contribute has not been decided, Kanarek said, though officials from New Jersey Transit and the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation have held several meetings.

Despite New Jersey's pressing problems with congestion and air quality caused by cars, the environmental study determined that the majority of the ridership of the new service, 87 percent, would come from Pennsylvania. The study says rail service would remove nearly 3,000 cars from New Jersey's roads.

The funding issue must be ironed out as part of an operating agreement between the two states before final approval by the FTA, Kanarek said.

Once completed, the service would be operated by New Jersey Transit, with nine round trips daily into New Jersey and New York from four rail stations in Monroe County, at Delaware Water Gap, East Stroudsburg, Analomink and Mount Pocono, and one in Scranton.

Estimated travel time from Delaware Water Gap to Hoboken is nearly two hours, with a portion of the rail line running through Northampton County near Portland. There also would be two new rail stations in New Jersey, in Andover and Blairstown, with the Andover station serving as a connector to direct service into New York's Penn Station.

Lawrence Malski, chief operating officer of the Pennsylvania Northeast Regional Railroad Authority who has worked on the project for more than a decade, said he was pleased to finally reach a point where the project might become a reality.

''This is the last big hurdle,'' Malski said. ''And it's sorely needed. You can't drive on I-80 since it's getting worse and worse.''

Kanarek said the rail project is one of many projects under consideration by New Jersey Transit, which will begin a feasibility study later this year on extending train service to Phillipsburg that could support service from Lehigh Valley commuters.

''We already have one study under way and will use those results to begin a study on the I-78 corridor, which includes a detailed feasibility study of rail service to Phillipsburg,'' Kanarek said.

Bruce Davis, a co-founder of the Route 22 Coalition, which is supporting a $200 million, 3.5-mile widening of Route 22 from 15th Street in Allentown to Lehigh Valley International Airport, said he ''encourages'' a rail link in Phillipsburg. But he cautioned supporters of a rail link into the Lehigh Valley, citing the years it took Poconos officials to get their project to its present status.

ablarc
February 12th, 2007, 10:40 PM
Estimated travel time from Delaware Water Gap to Hoboken is nearly two hours
If this were built anywhere in Europe it would be high speed. What's the matter with us?

kevin
February 13th, 2007, 02:18 AM
If this were built anywhere in Europe it would be high speed. What's the matter with us?

Too many rednecks?

ablarc
February 13th, 2007, 06:47 AM
^ Does New Jersey have rednecks?

nick-taylor
February 13th, 2007, 09:48 AM
If this were built anywhere in Europe it would be high speed. What's the matter with us?Not even in Europe (or Japan) would you get HSR on these back water routes. Although that would probably differ on how you define HSR as I've noticed a few North Americans refer to speeds that are commonly referred to as being HSR, are really not much different from the average modern European commuter train speed.

What you really need to get rid of though are those Soviet battle trains hauling people around. Over 3hrs to get to Manhattan from Montauk...

kevin
February 13th, 2007, 10:59 AM
^ Does New Jersey have rednecks?

Mass transit programs are always under-funded and under-supported in this country. NJ would likely receive less of a grant (and support) for such a program from Washington than, say, if it was to expand Interstate 80.

Fahzee
February 13th, 2007, 11:47 AM
If this were built anywhere in Europe it would be high speed. What's the matter with us?


this is only speculation, but part of this regions lack of true, european style high speed rail has to do with our exisiting rail infrastructure and exisitng rail routes. High speed rail thrives on long straightaways, with wide curves when needed. Northeast rail routes tend to meander, and this affects speed (the Acela route from Boston to New York famously makes the equivelent of something like 13 full circles during the trip).

However, there are small examples of what can be done to increase travel time - like replacing wooden track ties with concrete ones, or making the overhead catenary wires super taut. Pennsylvania has actually been pretty successful with this, as they've made the Harrisburg to Philadelphia route the 2nd High Speed corridor in the country (High speed should be taken with a grain of salt, as it only allows for a max speed of 110mph - but still, it's a start)

MikeW
February 13th, 2007, 11:56 AM
Also, this looks like it'll be built as a commuter line, not an inter-city express. That mean lots of stops along the way.

JCMAN320
February 14th, 2007, 12:10 AM
Bus, light rail riders to see fare increase

NJ Transit bus riders can expect a 10 percent increase and passengers on the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail will see fares go up over 8 percent, the agency's executive director said today.

Commuters may see an overall fare hike of nearly 10 percent beginning in June, with different increases for different rail and bus lines.

NJ Transit Executive Director George D. Warrington offered a detailed breakdown of the proposed fare increase, the first since July 2005, at a meeting of the agency's board of directors today.

Pending approval from the board in April, the hike would begin on June 1 and close a budget deficit of about $60 million in the agency's proposed $1.5 billion budget.

Among the changes:

-Local bus routes would increase 9.9 percent and base one-zone rides would increase from $1.25 to $1.35 and base one-zone passes would increase from $45 to $49 in northern New Jersey and from $41 to $45 in southern New Jersey.

-The base fare on the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail would increase from $1.75 to $1.90 and the base pass rise from $53 to $58.

-A 9.9 percent increase for rail and interstate bus customers who ride from New Jersey to New York or Philadelphia and longer-distance buses between suburbs and urban areas.

-Fares for the New York-Meadowlands Sports Complex bus purchased on board would increase from $5 to $6 and fares purchased from ticket windows or vending machines would increase from $4.50 to $5.

Warrington said increase would also pay for new and expanded service, such as new multilevel rail cars and additional parking spaces.

NJ Transit will hold more than a dozen public hearings this month and next and written comments will be accepted through March 8.

Fares cover about 44 percent of NJ Transit's operating expenses, and the rest is picked up mostly by the state.

Warrington said fares did not increase for 12 years during the 1990s.

"During that period, the underlying annual operating need to fund inflation, extraordinary cost growth and new service was masked with a steady diet of increased transfers from the capital budget to cover operating expenses,'' he said.

Associated Press

ablarc
February 14th, 2007, 06:56 AM
New Jersey Transit already operates in other states as well. Some lines terminate at New York's Penn Station, and the Atlantic City line operates out of Philadelphia. Why is there no link from Trenton to Philadelphia?

What an inconvenience that makes of trips like Philadelphia-Princeton; you have to change trains and providers in Trenton and you have to buy a second ticket.

NYatKNIGHT
February 14th, 2007, 05:16 PM
Why is there no link from Trenton to Philadelphia?Because there is Amtrak, the River Line, and SEPTA regional, so probably due to redundancy. I know what you're saying though, it is inconvenient to keep switching trains.

ablarc
February 14th, 2007, 05:27 PM
it is inconvenient to keep switching trains.
...plus their schedules aren't co-ordinated. Cool heels.

NIMBYkiller
February 19th, 2007, 04:40 PM
Actually, the schedules between the NJT and SEPTA R7 ARE coordinated

JCMAN320
March 12th, 2007, 08:50 AM
Club opposes rails to Pa.

Monday, March 12, 2007
NEWHOUSE NEWS SERVICE

The Sierra Club's New Jersey chapter has formally opposed NJ Transit's $551 million plan to revive commuter rails between Hoboken and Scranton, Pa., saying it will promote "sprawl and overdevelopment" in rural areas.

The plan calls for a 133-mile passenger line between Hoboken and Scranton via restoring the cutoff, a 28-mile rail bed from Lake Hopatcong in Morris County to the Delaware Water Gap in Warren County.

The goal of the plan is to create a mass transit commuting alternative in fast-growing northwest New Jersey and northeast Pennsylvania. Advocates see it as necessary to remove cars from congested Route 80 in New Jersey, but opponents say it would mean only more development and traffic.

"We believe that this project will not enhance mass transit, but that its real intention is to promote sprawl and overdevelopment in environmentally sensitive and rural areas," New Jersey Sierra Club Director Jeff Tittel said. "We believe that NJ Transit's time and money should not be subsidizing sprawl in the Poconos."

MikeKruger
March 12th, 2007, 04:14 PM
:mad: that sounds really wrong....

roads promote sprawling, a rail line will keep development close to its stations.

NIMBYkiller
March 12th, 2007, 04:52 PM
Backwards logic much? Watch them throw millions of dollars in the next few monthes into a new project to expand I-80

JCMAN320
March 12th, 2007, 10:26 PM
I hope not. This rail line must get rebuilt! I usually agree with the Sierra people but this is just ass backwards.

ablarc
March 20th, 2007, 07:32 AM
That train would pass through some bucolic swathes that would be hurt even by transit-oriented development. Imo Sierra is right.

NIMBYkiller
March 20th, 2007, 11:00 AM
Yes, there would need to be some laws instated to protect lands, but other press releases seem to have pointed towards the Sierra Club's APPROVAL of expanding I-80!

And even without either project, the development will continue. It's now a matter of which option will be the less detrimental to the environment. I say rail by a long shot

JCMAN320
March 24th, 2007, 05:22 AM
NEW RAIL, BUS TIMETABLES TAKE EFFECT NEXT WEEKEND

Bus schedules change March 31; train schedules change April 1
March 21, 2007
NJT-07-022
Contact: Dan Stessel 973 491-7078

NEWARK, NJ — NJ TRANSIT will make minor adjustments to rail and bus schedules next weekend to improve on-time performance, respond to changes in ridership demand and better serve customer needs. New bus schedules will take effect March 31; new rail schedules will take effect April 1.

Customers are encouraged to review rail and bus timetables, which are available at customer service offices, online at www.njtransit.com or by calling 1-800-772-2222.


Rail schedule highlights (effective April 1, 2007)


Northeast Corridor

To provide better spacing between trains and improved service for local customers, train times will change on trains 3814 and 3704 for station stops between Trenton and Jersey Avenue. Customers between New Brunswick and New York will be unaffected by this change.
Minor adjustments will be made to several trains to improve on-time performance and connections.
North Jersey Coast Line


Minor adjustments will be made to several train times to improve on-time performance and connections.
Weekend/holiday service to Monmouth Park will begin on Saturday, May 12. Only weekend trains will only make stops at the Monmouth Park station until Friday, June 1, when daily service begins.
Raritan Valley Line


Minor adjustments of one to two minutes will be made to all trains to accommodate bridge repair work.
Morris & Essex Lines


Trains 344 and 339 will be extended from Summit to Murray Hill and be renumbered as 466 and 467, respectively.
Stops will be changed on trains 427, 879, 6431 and 6647 between New York and Summit.
Minor adjustments will be made to several trains to improve on-time performance and connections.
Montclair-Boonton Line


Minor adjustments will be made to several trains to improve on-time performance and connections.
Main Line/Bergen County Line


Several trains will operate two to three minutes later to improve on-time performance and connections.
Pascack Valley Line


Train 1604 will depart Spring Valley four minutes earlier and will arrive in Hoboken two minutes earlier.
Train 1610 will add a stop at Westwood at 7:19 a.m., closing a 37-minute gap in service.
Minor adjustments will be made to several other trains to improve on-time performance and connections.
Atlantic City Line


Several afternoon and early evening trains will be adjusted to coordinate with Amtrak’s Northeast Corridor service.
Trains 4662 and 4663 will operate between Atlantic City and Philadelphia on July 4 (early July 5) as an additional late night round trip.
Bus schedule highlights by county (effective March 31, 2007)

Bergen County


161 Paterson-Passaic-New York: An additional AM peak trip will operate via Commerce Boulevard in Carlstadt.
Camden County


318 Philadelphia-Camden-Six Flags Great Adventure: Weekend service to the park for the 2007 season will begin on Saturday, April 7.
453 Camden-Ferry Avenue-PATCO: The route will be adjusted to operate via Antioch Manor on Van Buren Street at Ferry Avenue and Ferry Manor on Davis Street at Ferry Avenue.
Essex County


195 Willowbrook-Cedar Grove-New York: Minor weekday schedule adjustments will be made between Cedar Grove and Little Falls.
308 New York-Newark-Six Flags Great Adventure: Service to the park for the 2007 season will begin when the park opens on Monday, April 2.
Hudson County


82 Hudson: New weekday afternoon schedule to improve on-time performance.
85 Hoboken-Harmon Meadow-Mill Creek: New weekday schedule to improve on-time performance.
Middlesex County


817 Perth Amboy-Campbell’s Junction: Buses will operate over a detour route in Union Beach due to the closure of the Union Avenue bridge for construction.
Monmouth County


307 Freehold-Six Flags Great Adventure: Service to the park for the 2007 season will begin when the park opens on Monday, April 2.
817 Perth Amboy-Campbell’s Junction: Buses will operate over a detour route in Union Beach due to the closure of the Union Avenue bridge for construction.
833 Red Bank-Freehold: Buses will no longer serve the Monmouth County Social Services Complex in Freehold Township due to low ridership.
Ocean County


307 Freehold-Six Flags Great Adventure: Service to the park for the 2007 season will begin when the park opens on Monday, April 2.
308 New York-Newark-Six Flags Great Adventure: Service to the park for the 2007 season will begin when the park opens on Monday, April 2.
318 Philadelphia-Camden-Six Flags Great Adventure: Weekend service to the park for the 2007 season will begin on Saturday, April 7.
Passaic County


161 Paterson-Passaic-New York: An additional AM peak trip will operate via Commerce Boulevard in Carlstadt.
195 Willowbrook-Cedar Grove-New York: Minor weekday schedule adjustments will be made between Cedar Grove and Little Falls.
197 Warwick-Wayne-New York: A weekday schedule adjustment will be made for trips operating to and from the William Paterson University Business School on Valley Road.
Bus holiday service note

Customers are reminded to consult the holiday service guide in bus timetables or online at www.njtransit.com for service levels on Good Friday, April 6, 2007.

JCMAN320
April 25th, 2007, 05:20 PM
PASSAIC-BERGEN RAIL PLAN ADVANCES
NJT Board amends contract to cover final design expenses

April 18, 2007
NJT-07-020

NEWARK, NJ – The plan to provide a new passenger rail service link between downtown Hackensack and the Main Line Station in Hawthorne moved ahead today with the NJ TRANSIT Board of Directors approving funds for the project’s final design.

The project will introduce FRA-compliant Diesel Multiple Unit (DMU) technology into the NJ TRANSIT fleet of rail equipment and will provide new passenger service along more than eight miles of existing freight track.

"I am pleased to see steady progress in this project, which will provide new and efficient travel options to the residents who live along this corridor," said Rep. Bill Pascrell. "I expect the service to promote economic growth."

The amendment approved today authorizes the expenditure of $5.7 million to fund final design, creation of an operating plan and preparation of bid documents. The Passaic County Board of Freeholders also has pledged their financial support of the project.

Customers will be served by up to nine stations along the alignment and will be able to make convenient transfers between Main Line and Passaic-Bergen trains in Hawthorne, as well as NJ TRANSIT buses that serve Hawthorne Station.

"The project leverages existing infrastructure to provide a new way for people to get to work in a very congested area of the state," said Transportation Commissioner and NJ TRANSIT Board Chairman Kris Kolluri.

"We envision this project as the first increment in fulfilling a need for east-west passenger rail service along the existing New York, Susquehanna & Western Railroad right-of-way," said NJ TRANSIT Executive Director Richard Sarles. "Hackensack-to- Hawthorne is where this cross-county service will start, thanks to Congressman Bill Pascrell’s unwavering support and leadership."

The Passaic-Bergen line will provide a walk-on connection to the Main Line and offers the possibility for future connections to the Bergen County and Pascack Valley commuter rail lines.

Project elements include a park & ride facility and up to nine stations, with construction expected to start in 2008 and be completed in 2010. The $156 million project will be funded through federal and state sources. The FRA has approved a grant for the vehicles.

JCMAN320
April 25th, 2007, 05:26 PM
CONSTRUCTION BEGINS ON A NEW METROPARK STATION
$47 million project to deliver comfort and convenience for thousands who use busy Northeast Corridor stationp

April 23, 2007
NJT-07-032
Contact: Public Information 973 491-7078

ISELIN, NJ – New Jersey Transportation Commissioner Kris Kolluri and NJ TRANSIT Executive Director Richard Sarles broke ground today on a $47 million project to rebuild Metropark Station on the Northeast Corridor.

Originally designed as a suburban stop for Amtrak Metroliner trains, Metropark became New Jersey’s first “park and ride” station when it opened on November 11, 1971. The station quickly became a model of a “regional interceptor,” a station located near a major highway, providing adequate parking and convenient train options for rail travelers. Today, Metropark is the busiest outlying (non-terminal) station in the NJ TRANSIT commuter rail network, accommodating four million passenger trips each year—14,200 NJ TRANSIT customers and 1,000 Amtrak customers each weekday.

Over the next three years, NJ TRANSIT will rebuild the station to accommodate higher ridership. The project scope includes new wider and longer covered platforms to accommodate trains up to 12-cars long, new climate-controlled shelters for customer comfort, an expanded station building and new public address and train information systems.

“We fight hard in Washington to ensure New Jersey train travelers have modern, comfortable stations that make their daily commute or longer-distance train trip enjoyable,” said Sen. Frank R. Lautenberg. “People in New Jersey deserve the best public transportation and this project will improve a premier system.”

“This investment is important on several levels,” said Sen. Robert Menendez. “Public transportation improves the quality of life for our residents, keeps our economy growing and it strikes a blow against global warming.”

Work on the platforms, station building and other components will be conducted in phases to allow the station to remain open to minimize inconvenience to customers. Crews will be deployed along tracks to keep workers safe at the station, where 106 NJ TRANSIT trains and another 47 Amtrak trains stop or pass through each weekday. Project elements include:

New longer, wider platforms able to accommodate 12-car trains

Heated and air-conditioned platform shelters

Expanded station building with a second vendor space and larger waiting room

New pedestrian link from Route 27 to the westbound station platform to provide safer, more convenient access for area residents

New canopies extended farther along each platform

New enclosed stairways, new elevators and refurbished pedestrian tunnel

New customer public address system, LCD train information system and lighting

New sidewalks and landscaping

The project, which is expected to be completed in early 2010, is funded with state and federal sources.

“These station improvements will really make a difference for our residents and our continued investment in public transit is crucial to keeping New Jersey moving,” said Assemblyman John S. Wisniewski, chairman of the Transportation and Public Works Committee.

The Metropark project is the second major NJ TRANSIT capital investment in Woodbridge Township in as many years. A $23 million rehabilitation project at Woodbridge Station on the North Jersey Coast Line was launched in the fall of 2005 and completed this spring. Together, the projects represent a $70 million investment, benefiting nearly 9,000 NJ TRANSIT customers.

“The investment in this station demonstrates Gov. Jon Corzine’s strong commitment to transit as an important way to relieve congestion, protect the environment and grow our economy,” said Commissioner Kolluri.

“This project will deliver a more comfortable and convenient travel experience for our customers, which is critical to making NJ TRANSIT the preferred choice for travel in New Jersey,” said Executive Director Sarles. “And it is part of our ongoing commitment to continue making critical investments in the Northeast Corridor.”

“This project recognizes the importance of Metropark Station and it will give the residents of Woodbridge the level of service, comfort and convenience they deserve,” said Woodbridge Mayor John E. McCormac.

“The rebuilding of Metropark Station is a win-win for commuters and intercity rail travelers alike,” said Anne Witt, Amtrak Vice President of Strategic Partnerships and Business Development. “Investments by state partners that improve the travel experience for our customers are good for Amtrak and good for the regional economy. This reconstruction project is a perfect example of our customers reaping the benefits of a coordinated planning process.”

JCMAN320
July 22nd, 2007, 03:44 PM
NJ TRANSIT ADVANCES PORTAL BRIDGE REPLACEMENT PROJECT
New crossing will expand rail capacity across the Hackensack River

July 11, 2007
NJT-07-064
Contact: Penny Bassett Hackett or Dan Stessel 973 491-7078

NEWARK, NJ — The NJ TRANSIT Board of Directors today approved funding for the final phase of environmental work regarding Portal Bridge, a nearly 100-year-old span that carries Northeast Corridor train traffic over the Hackensack River just west of Secaucus Junction.

Today’s action authorizes completion of the Final Environmental Impact Study (FEIS), coordinating the Portal Bridge project with the Access to the Region’s Core project, which features a new two-track tunnel under the Hudson River being built over the next decade.

“A new Portal Bridge crossing will have an immediate impact on thousands of our customers by reducing delays associated with the bridge’s operation,” said NJ TRANSIT Executive Director Richard Sarles. “Addressing this aging bridge is a necessity in its own right, but it’s of vital importance viewed in the context of the Access to the Region’s Core.”

The new Portal Bridge crossing will need to accommodate increased peak-period train traffic. The existing two-track span, which was placed into service in 1910, now operates near capacity during peak periods, carrying 23 trains per hour in the peak direction.

The new crossing is being designed to reduce the number of times it will need to be opened and to reduce the time needed to complete an open-and-close sequence. The existing swing bridge pivots open to permit marine traffic to pass, forcing Northeast Corridor Line, North Jersey Coast Line and MidTOWN DIRECT trains to wait.

The board amended the DEIS contract with AKRF Inc. and authorized the firm to prepare the FEIS, for a total authorization of $5.3 million.

NJ TRANSIT will continue to advance the project in partnership with Amtrak, owner of the existing bridge, the Federal Railroad Administration and the Federal Transit Administration.

JCMAN320
September 3rd, 2007, 11:15 PM
PASCACK VALLEY LINE CUSTOMERS TO GET IMPROVED SERVICE THIS FALL
NJ TRANSIT and Metro-North announce new off-peak and weekend service beginning

October 28
August 16, 2007
NJT-07-079

NEWARK, NJ — Pascack Valley Line customers will benefit from 121 new trains per week, including bi-directional, off-peak and weekend rail service for the first time—as a result of new “passing sidings” constructed along the single-track line.

Starting October 28, NJ TRANSIT will offer 15 new weekday trains—eight inbound to Secaucus and Hoboken and seven outbound—nearly doubling the level of service on the line. Of the additional weekday trains, one inbound and two outbound will operate in the evening, including a late-night train, with the remainder of the new service offered midday.

Also for the first time, customers will benefit from weekend service, with 23 trains operating on Saturdays and 23 on Sundays—11 inbound to Hoboken and 12 outbound each day.

“These passing sidings have enabled us to address the limitations that have long been posed by the Pascack Valley Line’s single track configuration,” said New Jersey Transportation Commissioner Kris Kolluri. “Bringing more rail service into Bergen County will encourage more people to leave their cars behind.”

“Working together with Metro-North, we will be able to offer bi-directional and off-peak rail service to our Pascack Valley Line riders in Bergen and Rockland counties for the very first time, making public transportation a more attractive option,” said NJ TRANSIT Executive Director Richard Sarles. “This project offers expanded travel opportunities in the near term, while paving the way for future improvements that will come with the construction of a new trans-Hudson commuter rail tunnel.”

“The introduction of midday, evening and weekend service on MTA Metro-North Railroad's Pascack Valley Line will make mass transit much more attractive and convenient for all Rocklanders,” said MTA Executive Director and CEO Elliot Sander. “The MTA's commitment to infrastructure improvement in our West-of-Hudson territory in the form of an entirely new train fleet, refurbished stations and expanded parking is matched by this significant service improvement. We hope Rocklanders rush to take advantage of these improvements.”

“The introduction of off-peak and weekend service makes the train a more appealing and enjoyable way to travel and commute,” said Carl Wortendyke, Rockland's representative on the board of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority. “Boosting the number of trains on Metro-North’s Pascack Valley Line is the culmination of years of work - building the passing sidings, purchasing an entirely new fleet of trains and the renovation of our three Rockland County train stations - Spring Valley, Nanuet and Pearl River.”

“We are pleased to have contributed to making these long-awaited service improvements a reality for our customers,” said Metro-North President Peter Cannito. “With the level of service on the line essentially doubled, we can offer increased flexibility to our Rockland County commuters traveling to and from work, while opening up new opportunities for leisure travel for both new and existing customers.”

The service improvements are made possible by three “passing sidings” constructed along the alignment in Hasbrouck Heights and Hackensack, NJ and Nanuet, NY. The passing sidings enable trains operating in opposite directions to pass one another on a short stretch of double track.

“We welcome the new off-peak and weekend trains that will soon be serving our community, presenting our residents with more travel options and flexibility,” said Wood-Ridge Mayor and State Senator Paul A. Sarlo.

“The additional Pascack Valley Line service is a highly anticipated improvement for the Borough, and we look forward to the expanded travel opportunities it will offer our residents,” said River Edge Mayor Margaret Falahee Watkins.

“The introduction of weekend trains to Montvale opens up new choices for leisure travel, and our residents are looking forward to taking advantage of the increased level of service,” said Montvale Mayor George B. Zeller.

In December 2004, the NJ TRANSIT Board of Directors approved construction of the Pascack Valley Line passing sidings to provide enhanced rail service. Construction on the project began in spring 2005.

Currently, all trains on the Pascack Valley Line—which serves approximately 7,700 trips on a typical weekday between Hoboken Terminal and Spring Valley, NY—must operate on a single track, limiting service to one direction. Metro-North provides operating support for service to the three stations in New York: Pearl River, Nanuet and Spring Valley.

TimmyG
September 4th, 2007, 10:36 AM
That's great news. There's been a couple of times when I wanted to use that line but couldn't because it was the weekend.

JCMAN320
October 10th, 2007, 10:00 PM
Scranton-N.J. rail line could help ease commuter woes

BY ROBERT SWIFT
HARRISBURG BUREAU CHIEF
10/10/2007

As commuter traffic from Monroe County to New York City continues to worsen, local leaders predict it's only a matter of time before passenger train service through the Poconos becomes a reality.

"The train is going to come," said Poconos builder Larry Simon, chairman of LTS Builder and Realty. "I think that is inevitable if the political hurdles in New Jersey can be surmounted."

The dream of a commuter rail link to New York City has been alive since the 1980s, when local rail authorities began purchasing miles of abandoned rail freight track in the Poconos.

Public patience has been tested as a series of unofficial train startup dates over the years slipped by unmet.

Area transit officials believe the train will be propelled into existence by a compelling demographic trend: The 20,000 commuters going from Monroe to the New York metro region each workday could double to 40,000 by 2020.

Since Interstate 80 can barely handle rush-hour traffic now, the necessity for a commuter rail is becoming more and more apparent, said Larry Malski, chief operating officer of the Pennsylvania Northeast Regional Rail Authority.

The project

The estimated $550 million project is envisioned as a 133-mile line linking Hoboken, N.J., with Scranton, where a new transportation hub is taking shape. If the vision is realized, there would be nine eastbound commuter trains and nine westbound trains running daily.

The project calls for building a Scranton yard facility at the western end of the line where trains would be serviced. The rail yard would be adjacent to the planned Scranton Intermodal Transportation Center, concentrating train, bus and taxi service on Lackawanna Avenue.

Boosters anticipate great things from this nexus.

"I think it is a great opportunity for growth for us," said state Rep. Ken Smith, D- Dunmore, who wrote a law this year to convey a parcel of state property for the center. "We hope people will see Northeast Pennsylvania as a very vibrant place to live and be able to commute into the city."

Determining factors

The rail line's future will be determined by several factors, including approval by the Federal Transit Administration of an environmental impact study, a meeting of the minds between the regional rail authority and New Jersey, and overcoming the competitive funding process overseen by the FTA.

The environmental analysis is a key document. For example, the FTA evaluates projects based on their ability to reduce auto emissions, a contributor to ozone. Reductions in emissions can help the region comply with federal air-quality standards. The environmental report discussed at public meetings this year concludes the trains would have little impact on the region's wetlands and other natural habitat, but suggests steps would need to be taken to create "quiet zones" at grade crossings in residential areas.

NJ Transit has a big say in how fast the project will move forward because it will operate the trains. NJ Transit has to make a decision on rebuilding track at the Lackawanna Cutoff, a 28-mile stretch of right of way that constitutes a missing link on the line.

NJ Transit is engaged in a $7.5 billion project to build a new trans-Hudson River rail tunnel linking New Jersey with Manhattan and a new passenger station on 34th Street. This is the centerpiece of a plan to expand commuter service in the Northeast corridor. If Manhattan can't accommodate more passengers, it doesn't do much good to add service to outlying areas, officials say.

"Our project is critical to New Jersey," said Jack Kanarek, senior director of project development for NJ Transit. "It's needed to allow our existing system to continue to grow. It will provide capacity for future lines. The Lackawanna Cutoff is one of those future lines."

Cost concerns

On the crucial question of how costs should be apportioned to bring passenger service to the Poconos, officials in New Jersey and Pennsylvania are only at the discussion stage, said Mr. Kanarek.

In the FTA's lexicon, the Scranton-Hoboken commuter rail is considered a "New Start" project. The FTA releases about $1.5 billion in federal funds annually for New Start projects, said agency spokesman Paul Griffo.

FTA officials decide which projects receive money through a highly competitive process evaluating such factors as cost-effectiveness, operating efficiency and environmental impact.

For the first time, Pennsylvania will provide money to help New Start projects pay for capital expenses. The new transportation law enacted in the summer provides up to $50 million annually for such projects. That pot of money will be divvied up among projects across the state, however.

Vital link

To some, a commuter rail line evokes thoughts of more than just a ribbon of steel through mountainous terrain.

"That is the literal and figurative link between the Scranton area and the Poconos," said Rep. Mike Carroll, D-Avoca.

Contact the writer: rswift@timesshamrock.com

Hamilton
October 12th, 2007, 08:20 PM
"I think it is a great opportunity for growth for us," said state Rep. Ken Smith, D- Dunmore, who wrote a law this year to convey a parcel of state property for the center. "We hope people will see Northeast Pennsylvania as a very vibrant place to live and be able to commute into the city.""

That's the problem not a benefit of this proposal. "A great opportunity for growth" for NE Pennsylvania means more suburban sprawl to replace forested valleys. More fuel consumption to ferry people longer distances to and from work, school, and home. Just stupid and inefficient. More oil $$$ leaving America for Dubai and Saudi Arabia, higher trade deficits. Also, more subsidies for roads and other infrastructure for far-off developments.

Zone for higher density closer to the CBD, and keep the wilderness off limits to Walmarts and McMansions.

JCMAN320
October 14th, 2007, 11:30 PM
No litter or loud talkers, NJ Transit launches campaign

by The Associated Press Sunday October 14, 2007, 6:21 PM

People who gab on the cell phone, spread their belongings across a number of seats or listen to loud music are being targeted by a new NJ Transit campaign.

The agency is launching a courtesy campaign aimed to curb the practices that drive many commuters crazy. As part of the campaign, the agency is putting up posters on all trains by the end of the month that feature pictures of people venting about many of the problems that commuters complain to NJ Transit about.

"The posters are a social safety valve," Doug Bown, president of the New Jersey Association of Railroad Passengers told the Asbury Park Press for today's newspapers. "Instead of having to initiate your case, you can point to the poster."

One poster shows a woman whose mouth is wide open, appearing to be screaming, under the words "How many seats do you need?" Another poster shows a man plugging his ears with his fingers under the words "I can't take the noise!"

The campaign came about after complaints from riders increased by 30 percent as of May, said Lynn Bowersox, an NJ Transit spokeswoman. About half of all complaints the agency receives are about loud talking.

JCMAN320
November 27th, 2007, 03:06 AM
NJ TRANSIT TO HOST MEETINGS ON PROPOSED WEST TRENTON RAIL LINE
Public invited to comment on plan at Hillsborough and Ewing

November 20, 2007
Contact: Dan Stessel (973) 491-7078

NEWARK, NJ — NJ TRANSIT is inviting the public to meetings in Somerset and Mercer counties to learn about and comment on a proposal to restore passenger rail service on the West Trenton Line.

The proposed 27-mile line would link the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA) West Trenton Station in Ewing (Mercer County) to NJ TRANSIT’s Raritan Valley Line in Bridgewater (Somerset County). Service on the Raritan Valley Line continues to Newark Penn Station.

New stations are proposed in Ewing, Hopewell Township, Hopewell Borough, Montgomery and Hillsborough. The line would provide additional transportation options in central New Jersey and promote Smart Growth planning and land-use principles near the stations, reducing roadway congestion.

The public meetings are scheduled for 4-8 p.m. on November 29 at the Hillsborough Township Municipal Complex, 379 South Branch Road, Hillsborough and December 6 at the Ewing community/Senior Center, the former JCC building, 999 Lower Ferry Road, Ewing.

Comments on the Draft Environmental Assessment will be accepted at the meetings and until January 15, 2008 by mail sent to Thomas Clark, Office of Government and Community Relations, NJ TRANSIT, One Penn Plaza East, Newark, NJ 07105-2245 or by email at WestTrentonEA@njtransit.com.

Funding has not been identified for the project, estimated to cost $219 million.

urbanaturalist
November 27th, 2007, 02:32 PM
NJ TRANSIT TO HOST MEETINGS ON PROPOSED WEST TRENTON RAIL LINE
Public invited to comment on plan at Hillsborough and Ewing

November 20, 2007
Contact: Dan Stessel (973) 491-7078

NEWARK, NJ — NJ TRANSIT is inviting the public to meetings in Somerset and Mercer counties to learn about and comment on a proposal to restore passenger rail service on the West Trenton Line.

The proposed 27-mile line would link the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA) West Trenton Station in Ewing (Mercer County) to NJ TRANSIT’s Raritan Valley Line in Bridgewater (Somerset County). Service on the Raritan Valley Line continues to Newark Penn Station.

New stations are proposed in Ewing, Hopewell Township, Hopewell Borough, Montgomery and Hillsborough. The line would provide additional transportation options in central New Jersey and promote Smart Growth planning and land-use principles near the stations, reducing roadway congestion.

The public meetings are scheduled for 4-8 p.m. on November 29 at the Hillsborough Township Municipal Complex, 379 South Branch Road, Hillsborough and December 6 at the Ewing community/Senior Center, the former JCC building, 999 Lower Ferry Road, Ewing.

Comments on the Draft Environmental Assessment will be accepted at the meetings and until January 15, 2008 by mail sent to Thomas Clark, Office of Government and Community Relations, NJ TRANSIT, One Penn Plaza East, Newark, NJ 07105-2245 or by email at WestTrentonEA@njtransit.com.

Funding has not been identified for the project, estimated to cost $219 million.


Wow. The northeast corridor is really trying to make transportations sans automobiles more convenient and efficient. This along with the one about the Poconos rail line are good projects.

ramvid01
November 27th, 2007, 02:44 PM
It is very refreshing to see that New Jersey is taking a very proactive approach to try and limit car use. Expansion or reuse of rail lines is always a positive note.:)

Eugenius
December 3rd, 2007, 12:38 PM
I know that in July NJ Transit issued a press release announcing their second double-decker train set. It has been pretty quiet since then, even though I happen to know that they added a third set in early August. Does anyone have an idea of how many double-decker sets are currently operating on the Northeast Corridor line, and during which time slots?

JCMAN320
December 8th, 2007, 05:37 AM
All aboard?

Sunday, December 02, 2007
BY ANDREW KITCHENMAN

EWING -- The West Trenton Train Station is quiet after the weekday morning rush hour, the parking lot and platform reduced to gravel after years of use as the end of a Pennsylvania commuter line.

When the number of passengers on NJ Transit's West Trenton line dwindled to 200 in 1982, the agency pulled the plug, leaving the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA) to maintain the station.

While many proposals to revive the line have been floated in the past 25 years, recent studies on restarting the line are more advanced than at any time since the line ended. The public will have a chance to weigh in on the potential revival of a second Mercer County rail link to North Jersey at a public meeting Thursday in Ewing.

"This is something that should be a priority from both a state and a federal perspective," Assemblyman W. Reed Gusciora, D-Princeton Borough, said of the line.

The projected $219 million project's future is uncertain because NJ Transit hasn't figured out how it will pay for the project and has listed other projects ahead of West Trenton in the line for funding. However, local officials are intensely interested in seeing whether the line can be revived, providing relief for residents interested in traveling north without using the heavily used Northeast Corridor line.

"We're going to have to take a look at ideas like reopening the WT line simply because of the pressures that are on our system already," Mercer County Executive Brian M. Hughes said.

The rail line was first built in the 1870s by the Delaware and Bound Brook Railroad and continued as a passenger line under various owners for more than 100 years. The line is still maintained south of the West Trenton Station by SEPTA, which uses it for its R3 line. North of West Trenton, CSX Transportation maintains a single track for freight traffic.

The project would include a series of improvements, including new tracks and train cars; a new rail yard and 90 new parking spaces in West Trenton, as well as new stations in West Trenton, near Interstate 95 in Hopewell Township, Hopewell Borough, the Belle Mead section of Montgomery, and Hillsborough. The 27-mile line would link with the NJ Transit's Raritan Valley line in Bridgewater before heading to Newark, where passengers would transfer to go to New York.

The new stations would be basic structures with canopies and windscreens to protect passengers from the elements, according to NJ Transit spokesman Joseph Dee. The exception is the Belle Mead station, where an existing structure could be renovated. There also is a small red-brick building in West Trenton, but the large original West Trenton Station was sold in 1989 to Clarke Caton Hintz, an architectural firm that renovated the building for office use.

Hopewell Township Mayor Vanessa Sandom said she supports the concept in a general way, but township officials want to know the plan's specifics, such as the exact location of stations.

"As a concept, whenever you move people out of car and into mass transit, the state as a whole benefits, and that includes Hopewell Township," Sandom said. "I think there's a great deal of interest in the town."

Sandom wants to make sure that parking and traffic concerns are worked out by NJ Transit.

A $3.3 million environmental assessment found the project would have no significant impact on either the environment, traffic or the historical heritage of the area around the line.

Jack Kanarek, NJ Transit senior director of project development, said the assessment was done with the expectation that it wouldn't cause problems because the line has been used in the past.

"The goal of these documents is to plan for the project," Kanarek said.

NJ Transit plans to finalize the assessment after the public comment period closes. From that point forward, nothing is certain.

"There just isn't any funding that's available," Kanarek said.

If the agency finds a way to restart the line, the trip from West Trenton to Newark's Penn Station would be one hour and 20 minutes, which is longer than the trip from the Trenton Train Station to Newark, which ranges from 45 minutes to one hour and 20 minutes de pending on the time and the number of stops.

NJ Transit projects that the West Trenton line would generate 2,660 daily trips by 2025 if the line was restarted.

Ewing resident Steve Carroll said it would be convenient to start trips to visit friends in Boston by taking a train from West Trenton.

"It would be nice to park right here," said Carroll, whose family operates Carroll Service Center, a Gulf gas station across Railroad Avenue from the West Trenton station.

Ewing Mayor Jack Ball said the possible rail line could relieve local traffic to employers like Merrill Lynch.

"I definitely think it would be of benefit to our residents and I think it's important to encourage people to use mass transit," said Ball, who cautioned that the state's difficult financial straits could make funding the project difficult.

Mercer County Freeholder Lucy Walter noted that these trips would provide relief for local drivers, as well as the Northeast Corridor trains. That line's Hamilton and Princeton Junction stations are at or exceeding their parking capacity. Walter urged the county to support the expansion.

"I think Mercer County and cer tainly the whole corridor that we live in is heavily populated," Walter said. "Everybody knows that and we can't keep putting cars on the roads."

Walter, a Ewing resident, said the project should be a priority for both NJ Transit and the federal government.

"This project should have been in place long before all of the hous ing developments were allowed to be built," Walter said.

On a recent day at the West Trenton Station, New York resident Elijah Rodrigez said he would like to be able to take a northbound train from West Trenton. He was returning from a week visiting his girlfriend and newborn son in Lower Moreland, Pa.

Rodrigez said he took a taxi from Trenton to Ewing to take the R3 to its Bethayres station.

"That would be a whole lot more convenient," he said of a new rail line.

The public meeting on the draft environmental assessment will be Thursday from 4 to 8 p.m. at the Ewing Senior/Community Center, 999 Lower Ferry Road. NJ Transit will accept comments on the plan until Jan. 15.

NJ Transit's board of directors would then decide whether to have the project advance to a preliminary design.

Even if the board of directors decides to proceed, many details would have to be worked out. These include reaching an agreement with CSX on splitting the line's use between commuter and freight, as well as Merrill Lynch's concern that no parking be located on its side of the proposed Interstate 95 station.

Both Gusciora and Hughes expressed hope the next federal administration could bolster the project's chances by increasing funding for mass transit.

The assessment is available on the Web at www.njtransit.com, under the system expansion section of the capital projects page.


Contact Andrew Kitchenman at akitchenman@njtimes.com or (609) 989-5706.

JCMAN320
December 27th, 2007, 10:27 PM
Scranton-Hoboken railroad - who pays?

by Carly Thursday December 27, 2007, 11:38 AM

The Scranton Times-Tribune published a list today of Pennsylvania county projects and the earmark funds used to pay for them. Included in that list is the Scranton to Hoboken passenger train - $1.3 million was earmarked to continue planning the somewhat controversial rail line.

In total, the train is estimated to cost $550 million and will be a 133-mile line link from Hoboken to Scranton, where a new transportation hub is being built. Once completed, there would be nine eastbound commuter trains and nine westbound trains running daily.

Supporters say the train will alleviate rush-hour traffic on Route 80, as Pennsylvania towns like Scranton and Easton have become NYC commuting hot spots. From Hoboken, train riders can take the PATH into the Manhattan. Those against the rail line say the plan would waste hundreds of millions of dollars and bring suburban sprawl to the Poconos.

TimmyG
December 28th, 2007, 09:00 PM
133 miles seems very long for a commuter rail line. It doesn't seem too practical.

ASchwarz
December 28th, 2007, 11:03 PM
The line makes perfect sense and will be a big success.

Northeast PA is the fastest growing part of metro NYC. In fact, it is the fastest growing part of the U.S. Northeast.

smackfu
January 3rd, 2008, 02:46 PM
Does anyone know anything about the big station they built next to Route 80 in the Ledgewood / Succassuna area? Exit 30-ish. I saw it when I was going home for the holidays and was very surprised... it's not really a big train area.

You would think a project that large would be on their NJ Transit capital improvements page but I can't find it.

smackfu
January 3rd, 2008, 05:40 PM
Aha, they're calling it the Mount Arlington Station.

http://www.railroad.net/forums/viewtopic.php?t=25901&postdays=0&postorder=asc&start=0

JCMAN320
January 11th, 2008, 06:49 PM
NJ TRANSIT CELEBRATES OPENING OF NEW WAYNE/ROUTE 23 TRANSIT CENTER
Intermodal facility opens to bus commuters on January 12; rail service begins January 14

January 11, 2008
NJT-08-006

NEWARK, NJ — NJ TRANSIT Executive Director Richard Sarles joined Assemblyman Scott T. Rumana and new Wayne Mayor Christopher P. Vergano to celebrate the opening of the new Wayne/Route 23 Transit Center, which will offer commuters along routes 23, 46 and Interstate 80 greater public transportation flexibility and more convenience.

The intermodal facility—which offers express bus, local bus and train service—opens to bus commuters tomorrow, January 12, with rail service beginning Monday, January 14.

"This project brings two modes of transit service to one location, offering improved access to public transportation for both bus and rail customers," said Transportation Commissioner and NJ TRANSIT Board Chairman Kris Kolluri. "With its convenient location, the new facility will help to relieve congestion along busy routes 23, 46 and Interstate 80."

"We are pleased to have worked with NJ TRANSIT on the Wayne/Route 23 Transit Center, which will ensure the long-term availability of parking for Wayne residents and area commuters along this heavily-traveled corridor," said Assemblyman and former Wayne Mayor Rumana.

"The Wayne/Route 23 Transit Center is part of a new generation of NJ TRANSIT facilities that maximizes flexibility and choice for customers," said Sarles. "This new facility serves as a model of an intermodal hub where commuters can easily turn off the highway and step aboard a bus or train."

"Projects like the Wayne/Route 23 Transit Center are key to ensuring the mobility of the region, offering commuters easy access to transportation options and the ability to leave their cars behind," said Susan Bass Levin, Deputy Executive Director of the Port Authority of New York & New Jersey, which helped fund the project.

"We welcome the addition of the Wayne/Route 23 Transit Center to our community and are excited that this new transit hub will serve as a model of intermodalism for the state," said Vergano.

On weekdays starting Monday, January 14, the Wayne/Route 23 Transit Center will be served by trains on the Montclair-Boonton Line, offering customers a new level of travel flexibility with 22 trains per day—eight inbound to Hoboken and 14 outbound. (Mountain View Station will remain open.)

The new facility also will provide more than 1,000 parking spaces, heated shelters and bus service seven days a week. In addition, NJ TRANSIT has created a new bus route—the 324 Wayne/Route 23 Transit Center-New York Express line—to provide frequent express service between the new facility and the Port Authority Bus Terminal in midtown Manhattan.

The Transit Center will also be served by the 194 Newfoundland-New York route and the new 198 William Paterson University-New York route (weekends only). Local service will be offered on the 75 Butler-Newark line (weekday peak periods only) and the 748 Paterson-Willowbrook line (Monday-Saturday).

Portions of the Mothers Park & Ride (located one mile north of the new facility) will remain open with weekday-only bus service and new hours of operation. Effective Monday, January 14, the new hours for New York bus departures will be 7:30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. Return service to Mothers will be available throughout the day via the 194 and 324 lines.

With the opening of the new Wayne/Route 23 Transit Center, the Willowbrook Park & Ride also will become a weekday-only operation. The Willowbrook Shoppers’ Stop will continue to be served seven days a week.

In September 2006, the NJ TRANSIT Board of Directors awarded a $16.3 million contract to J.H. Reid General Contractor of South Plainfield for construction of the facility, which includes an ADA-accessible high-level train platform, bus-boarding areas and a 1,000-space surface parking lot. The project also included equipping the facility with canopies and heated waiting areas for passenger comfort, as well as passenger information displays.

Located on a 10-acre parcel at the West Belt Road Interchange near the intersection of routes 23, 46 and Interstate 80, the new Wayne/Route 23 Transit Center is directly accessible from Route 23, eliminating the need for commuters to use local roads.

JCMAN320
January 15th, 2008, 05:42 PM
Aha, they're calling it the Mount Arlington Station.

http://www.railroad.net/forums/viewtopic.php?t=25901&postdays=0&postorder=asc&start=0

Customer Notice
Mount Arlington Station Opens Monday, January 21

NJ TRANSIT will open its new Mount Arlington Station on Monday, January 21, offering commuters along the busy Interstate-80 corridor convenient access to train service.

With nearly 300 parking spaces ideally located at the Howard Blvd. Interchange, the Mount Arlington Station is expected to reduce congestion on the busy I-80 corridor by giving commuters the ability to leave their cars in favor of rail service.

On weekdays, the new station will be served by trains on the Montclair-Boonton Line and the Morristown Line, enabling customers to travel to Hoboken Terminal, where transfers are available to bus, PATH and trans-Hudson ferries. Customers traveling to midtown Manhattan will be able to transfer to MidTOWN DIRECT service at Dover or Montclair State University stations.

The new facility is fully accessible for customers with disabilities, featuring two high-level platforms, heated waiting shelters on the inbound platform, a pedestrian underpass and public address and passenger communications systems. The project also reconfigured and expanded the existing carpool and bus park & ride lot by 57 spaces.

ablarc
January 20th, 2008, 06:29 PM
With nearly 300 parking spaces ideally located at the Howard Blvd. Interchange, the Mount Arlington Station is expected to reduce congestion on the busy I-80 corridor by giving commuters the ability to leave their cars in favor of rail service.
Why only 300? Why not a multistory garage?

Drop in the bucket.

JCMAN320
January 21st, 2008, 08:03 PM
The station is too small I think and it isn't a mjor stop on the line. To me that would be the only reason why it would have a low number of spaces.

ablarc
January 21st, 2008, 10:25 PM
^ Provide the spaces and they will come.

JCMAN320
January 21st, 2008, 10:28 PM
You have a point ablarc, we have to see how it goes considering today was the first day of it reopening. Also it is served by a bus route and if people car pool I think it should be enough but we have to see how it plays out.

JCMAN320
March 12th, 2008, 10:42 PM
NJ Transit says no to fare hikes

by tfeeney@starledger.comTom Feeney/The Star-Ledger Wednesday March 12, 2008, 7:11 PM

NJ Transit will not raises fares on its train, bus and light rail routes this year, Executive Director Richard Sarles said today.

Fares were raised by an average of 9.6 percent in 2007. Had another increase passed in 2008, it would have been the first time since 1989 and 1990 that fares were boosted in consecutive years.

Because of the state's financial troubles and the austere spending plan Gov. Jon Corzine has proposed, some commuters have expressed fear that NJ Transit would have to ask its riders to pony up again.

Sarles said the governor's proposed budget would boost the state's operating subsidy to NJ Transit by $60 million. Its subsidy this year is $300 million, in an operating budget of more than $1.5 billion.

"We recognize that this is extraordinary given the current budget constraints ... " Sarles said. "However, new services and extraordinary expenses will not be covered at this level of funding."

Sarles said the agency will have to make deep administrative cuts to balance its operating budget. He did not elaborate.

JCMAN320
March 18th, 2008, 08:53 PM
NJ TRANSIT TRIP PLANNING NOW AVAILABLE ON GOOGLE

Partnership with “Google Transit” is regional first
March 12, 2008
NJT-08-018

NEWARK, NJ — NJ TRANSIT today became the nation’s largest public transportation agency to partner with Google, the global leader in online content, to provide online trip planning via "Google Transit."

Using the same scheduling data that drives NJ TRANSIT’s online Trip Planner, Google Transit can provide specific trip times and transfers for travel between any of NJ TRANSIT’s 164 rail and 60 light rail stations, integrating the data into the familiar Google Maps interface for convenient access to essential travel information.

The partnership also brings new features to NJ TRANSIT's website (www.njtransit.com) by integrating Google Maps with the information pages for each rail and light rail station, enabling customers to find local businesses—dry cleaners, restaurants, car rentals—without ever leaving the NJ TRANSIT site.

"For visitors to the region or the occasional rider who is less familiar with New Jersey’s public transportation options, it gives them a starting point for learning about NJ TRANSIT and is a key tool for attracting new riders to our system," said NJ TRANSIT Board Member Kenneth E. Pringle. "We’re bringing transit trip planning into the 21st century."

"In partnering with a heavily-utilized, widely-recognized search engine, we are increasing NJ TRANSIT’s visibility among potential mass transit riders," said NJ TRANSIT Board Member Flora M. Castillo, who also serves as chair of the board’s customer service committee. "We are also improving the experience of our existing customers by offering access to technology that gives them station locations, train departure times and nearby services at their fingertips."

"Our partnership with the world-renowned, highly popular Google not only allows us to offer NJ TRANSIT schedule information through Google Transit, but helps to pave the way for the seamless integration of regional transit information," said NJ TRANSIT Executive Director Richard Sarles. "As more transportation agencies in the region come online, customers will ultimately be able to plan their trips across multiple transit providers."

"Our partnership with NJ TRANSIT is another step in Google's continued commitment to provide users with truly useful local tools," said Google’s New Business Development Manager Tom Sly. "We are delighted to bring this service to regular NJ TRANSIT riders and to the thousands of visitors to this region."

NJ TRANSIT is the first major public transit agency in the Northeast to partner with Google as it joins more than 30 transportation agencies in the United States and abroad that currently offer trip planning through the system.

Google Transit offers a number of features that benefit NJ TRANSIT customers, including:

-Suggested trips with next available departure and arrival times
-Ability to select desired departure or arrival time and date
-Estimated trip duration
-Reverse trips
-Transfer times and locations
-Visual depiction of the route on a geographical map
-Integration with other tools such as Google Maps for driving directions and Google Local for searches of nearby businesses and local landmarks
-Links to www.njtransit.com for customized planning tools and fare information
Bus schedule information is expected to be added to the system later this year.

The public-private partnership with Google Inc. was developed at no cost to NJ TRANSIT.

NJ TRANSIT customers can plan their trip via Google Transit at www.google.com/transit.

JCMAN320
April 21st, 2008, 03:57 PM
Zipcars available at five NJ Transit stations

by The Associated Press Monday April 21, 2008, 2:53 PM

Rental cars are now available at five locations used by NJ Transit rail commuters.

The transit agency is teaming with Zipcar to have vehicles at a light rail station at Liberty State Park, and four rail stations: Metropark, Montclair State University, Princeton Junction and Morristown.

Zipcar members can reserve a vehicle online or by phone and pick it up at a reserved parking location. Members have an access card that opens the vehicle and also serves as the ignition key.

JCMAN320
April 28th, 2008, 08:55 PM
NJ Transit to expand Northeast Corridor service, reduce Morris & Essex Lines

by Tom Feeney/The Star-Ledger Monday April 28, 2008, 7:07 PM

Weekend service will be expanded on the Northeast Corridor and reduced on the Morris & Essex Lines when NJ Transit adjusts its rail schedules later this month.

Four eastbound and five westbound trains will be added on the weekends on the busy Northeast Corridor between Rahway and Penn Station New York, NJ Transit spokeswoman Penny Bassett Hackett said. The new trains are expected to reduce crowding on other local Northeast Corridor and North Jersey Coast Line trains.

On the Morris & Essex Lines, trains will run about once an hour on the weekends between Summit and Hoboken when the new schedule takes effect May 11. Trains now run twice an hour during some parts of the weekend days on that line.

Riders farther west on the M&E -- between Dover and Summit -- will see trains at roughly the same intervals they do now, but they will have to transfer at Summit or the Newark-Broad Street Station if they want to go to Hoboken. M&E riders will see similar reductions in service during off-peak times Monday through Friday.

NJ Transit Executive Director Richard Sarles described weekend and off-peak ridership on the M&E as "anemic" when he addressed the board of NJ Transit on the subject earlier this month.

Hackett said the three- and four-car trains that run on the M&E off-peak average between 100 and 200 passengers, meaning they are sometimes up to three-quarters empty while trains elsewhere on the NJ Transit system are bursting at the seams.

The changes in the new timetables are not all bad for M&E riders: The schedule adds a peak-period train that will serve the two busiest stations on the line -- Maplewood and South Orange.

JCMAN320
June 4th, 2008, 05:45 PM
Plans move forward to revive Lackawanna Cutoff rail line

by Jim Lockwood/The Star-Ledger Wednesday June 04, 2008, 4:25 PM

A long-awaited plan to restore passenger rail service between Hoboken and Scranton, Pa., via the dormant Lackawanna Cutoff in Warren, Sussex and Morris counties took a major step forward today.

The North Jersey Transportation Planning Authority included in its transit plans a 7-mile stretch of the cutoff from Andover Township in Sussex County to Port Morris in Morris County. Officials said trains could be running on this segment of the cutoff within "a few years."

And NJTPA officials say this segment of the defunct rail line, estimated to cost $36.6 million to revive, is eligible for federal funding.

Restoring the dormant 28-mile Lackawanna Cutoff is a key to a $551 million plan to revive the 133-mile passenger rail line between Hoboken and Scranton. A revived line would ultimately link to New York Penn Station by connecting to existing NJ Transit's Montclair-Boonton and Morris & Essex trains.

Last year, a series of hearings were held in New Jersey and Pennsylvania on a draft environmental assessment of the rail plan that showed no major problems, but a cost estimate that had soared from $200 million more than a decade ago to $551 million in 2006.

There are no timetables for construction on the rest of the line, beyond the 7.3 miles identified today.

The goal of the plan is to create a mass transit commuting alternative in fast-growing northwest New Jersey and northeast Pennsylvania. Eight trains would run daily, with stations in Andover and Blairstown in New Jersey, and in Delaware Water Gap, East Stroudsburg, Analomink, Mount Pocono, Tobyhanna and Scranton in Pennsylvania.

Proponents of the long-sought rail plan see it as necessary to remove cars from congested Route 80 in New Jersey.

But opponents say it would only cause further sprawl and increase traffic in Sussex and Warren counties and the neighboring Poconos, and would not remove cars from Route 80. NJ Transit estimates that rails from Scranton to Andover would have 3,350 eastbound daily riders, with most of those boarding at six stations in Pennsylvania, 280 getting on in Blairstown and 150 in Andover.

The Lackawanna Cutoff was built a century ago and abandoned more than two decades ago.

JCMAN320
June 11th, 2008, 08:11 PM
WOOD-RIDGE TO GAIN NEW TRAIN STATION ON BERGEN COUNTY LINE
NJ TRANSIT and private developer to share cost of Wesmont Station

June 11, 2008
NJT-08-043

NEWARK, NJ — The NJ TRANSIT Board of Directors today authorized an agreement that will provide a new train station for residents of Wood-Ridge in Bergen County, part of a plan to transform a former industrial site into a transit-friendly, mixed-use neighborhood.

"This project builds on the principles of transit-oriented development by converting an existing brownfield into a thriving community," said Transportation Commissioner and NJ TRANSIT Board Chairman Kris Kolluri.

The agreement between NJ TRANSIT and Wood-Ridge Development LLC, of Lakewood, NJ, will share the cost for design and construction of a new train station and parking facility on the Bergen County Line in the Borough of Wood-Ridge, on the site of the former Curtiss-Wright industrial plant. The train station will be known as Wesmont Station.

As part of the plan, NJ TRANSIT will realize $37 million in improvements including a new infrastructure maintenance facility.

"The new Wesmont Station and transit-oriented development will transform what is now an underutilized property in the Borough into a new, productive neighborhood with convenient access to rail service," said State Senator and Wood-Ridge Mayor Paul Sarlo.

"This is a win-win for NJ TRANSIT and the community," said NJ TRANSIT Executive Director Richard Sarles. "With more demands on our system, this plan will help us to better maintain our infrastructure to ensure safe, reliable service for the thousands of customers who use the Bergen County Line each day."

The Borough previously approved plans for redevelopment of the 78-acre property and selected Wood-Ridge Development LLC as the master developer. NJ TRANSIT has worked closely with the Borough and the developer on a plan that will provide a new, fully accessible rail station and parking facility to serve a transit-oriented, mixed-use community.

Construction of the new rail station is expected to begin in 2009, with completion in 2011.

JCMAN320
December 11th, 2008, 05:15 PM
PURCHASE OF LOW-FLOOR BUSES MARKS A FIRST FOR NJ TRANSIT
Board also approves new cruiser buses to further expand fleet

December 10, 2008
NJT-08-099

NEWARK, NJ — The NJ TRANSIT Board of Directors today approved the purchase of 57 new buses—including the State’s first with a low-floor design—that will enable the agency to better serve bus routes throughout the state and meet growing ridership demand.

"The purchase of 57 new buses represents our commitment to investing in New Jersey’s expansive bus system, and we are pleased to introduce the State’s first low-floor buses, with features that allow for faster, easier boarding and alighting," said Acting Transportation Commissioner and NJ TRANSIT Board Chairman Stephen Dilts. "These new low-floor and cruiser buses will supplement the 1,145 transit and suburban-style buses that are already on order as we renew and expand the fleet."

The Board authorized a $12.5 million contract with North American Bus Industries, Inc., of Anniston, Alabama, for the purchase of 39 low-floor, 32-foot transit buses to replace some of the agency’s older buses.

Also today, the Board authorized a $9 million contract with Motor Coach Industries, Inc., of Schaumburg, Illinois, for the purchase of 18 new cruiser buses, which are used on long-distance routes.

"These buses will help meet the record demand for bus service throughout the state," said NJ TRANSIT Executive Director Richard Sarles. "The cruiser buses fill a need created by growing ridership, especially on commuter routes to Port Authority Bus Terminal in New York, while the low-floor buses will allow us to replace some of our older buses and offer higher capacity in the southern part of the state."

The new low-floor buses will improve service reliability, offer comfortable interiors for customers, and provide greater capacity than the buses they are replacing. The low- floor design will enable customers to board and exit the bus more rapidly than buses with steps. A ramp in the front door and a kneeling feature will accommodate customers with disabilities.

Twenty-six of the low-floor buses will be used on NJ TRANSIT routes in southern New Jersey—primarily out of Egg Harbor Garage for use on Ventnor Avenue in Atlantic City. The remaining 13 will be used on contracted routes in Morris County.

"When I first arrived on the Board of Directors nine years ago, the purchase of smaller-sized buses for use in the Atlantic City area was a priority based on community feedback," said NJ TRANSIT Board Member Flora M. Castillo. "These new low-floor buses will replace the ones I inaugurated back then, continuing my commitment to meeting community needs."

The 18 new cruiser buses will be similar to NJ TRANSIT’s existing fleet of cruiser buses already in operation. Expanding the fleet will allow for greater operational flexibility, enabling NJ TRANSIT to better serve growing ridership demand throughout the state.

The cruiser buses will be deployed on New York commuter bus routes serving Bergen, Essex, Hudson, Middlesex, Somerset, Passaic and Union counties.

All 57 of the new buses will meet or exceed the latest environmental standards by incorporating technologies to reduce exhaust emissions.

Delivery of the 18 cruiser buses is expected early next year, with delivery of the 39 low- floor buses following in late 2009.

scrollhectic
January 5th, 2009, 01:15 PM
by Jeff Diamant (jdiamant@starledger.com)/The Star-Ledger

Friday January 02, 2009, 5:30 PM


A long-range transit plan to decrease commuter rail delays and increase train capacity between New Jersey and Manhattan has cleared an important hurdle after a federal agency approved a $1.3 billion project to replace an old train bridge over the Hackensack River, officials said today.

The Federal Railroad Administration, which was reviewing the replacement project's environmental impacts, ruled that plans can go forward for two new bridges with a combined five tracks. The bridges will take the place of a problematic two-track bridge between Secaucus and Kearny that presently carries all NJ Transit and Amtrak trains between New York and New Jersey.

http://blog.nj.com/ledgerupdates_impact/2009/01/large_pb.JPG
Jon Naso/The Star-LedgerA commuter train crosses the Portal Bridge, which runs between Secaucus and Kearny in this view from the Kearny side.

"It's a significant milestone in the project," said Dan Stessel, a spokesman for NJ Transit. "They issued a decision which allows money to flow. It brings the project into a shovel-ready status, meaning we can move to construction within a relatively short period of time."

Amtrak and NJ Transit will now begin designing the new structures. That work is expected to take between 18 and 24 months, said Richard Sarles, executive director of NJ Transit. Construction could then start around 2011 and would take an estimated five and a half years.

The current 99-year-old structure, known as the "portal bridge," poses
problems because its lowest point is only 20 feet from the river. The bridge can pivot to allow boats and barges room to pass, but when that happens train riders are often kept waiting in both directions. And sometimes, when the river traffic has passed, it does not smoothly revert to bridge form.

"It's 100 years old, and despite Amtrak's best efforts to maintain it, it doesn't close as soon as you'd like it to close," Sarles said.

The two new bridges -- one to the south of the current bridge, and one to the north -- will be 40 and 50 feet above the river, respectively. The two-track southern bridge would be high enough that far fewer trains will be disrupted by maritime traffic than are disrupted with the current bridge. All passing boats would be able to fit under the three-track northern bridge, Sarles said.

Three years ago, the U.S. Coast Guard began limiting river traffic at the portal bridge, allowing it to stay in continuous operation shouldering trains from 6 a.m to 10 a.m. and from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.

The new bridges, when paired with a proposed new $8.7 billion train tunnel under the Hudson River expected to open in 2017, will allow NJ Transit and Amtrak to more than double their combined number of hourly rush-hour trains entering or leaving Manhattan from 23 to 48, Stessel said.
In a 23-page document, the Department of Railroad Administration contends the added train capacity will lead to fewer automobile trips across the Hudson River and improve air quality.

stache
January 5th, 2009, 07:56 PM
Hopefully they will work out a system where they can share bridges in case of a maintenance problem. :cool:

JCMAN320
February 10th, 2009, 05:49 AM
NJ Transit looks to replace aging rail cars

By LARRY HIGGS • GANNETT NEW JERSEY • February 10, 2009

The silver-sided electric powered rail cars that have plied the North Jersey Coast, Northeast Corridor and Morris and Essex lines since the late 1970s are nearing the end of the line.

The oldest cars in NJ Transit fleet, known as Arrow IIIs, have been in service since NJ Transit re-electrified the Coast and Morris and Essex lines in the early 1980s. The cars ran on the Northeast Corridor before that.

NJ Transit officials have put out requests for proposals to replace the aging cars with similar cars that are powered by motors in each car instead of being hauled by a locomotive, said Richard Sarles, NJ Transit executive director.

Electric-Multiple Unit cars (EMUs) are better for high-density rail lines with more stops, Sarles said.

"Certain areas need quick acceleration," Sarles said.

NJ Transit's fleet includes rail cars hauled by electric locomotives, which some transit advocates had argued weren't able to meet the start-and-stop demands of some of its rail lines. Advocates argued the rail cars were too heavy for locomotive-hauled trains to match the acceleration of EMUs. Starting in 1989, about 230 Arrows were rebuilt.

NJ Transit is acquiring the last 100 multilevel rail cars, with 200 of them on the railroad now, he said.

The new multilevel cars, which have entered service during the past two years, are heavier than single-level rail cars. NJ Transit experimented with having two electric locomotives haul a train of multilevel cars to see if they could approach the performance of EMUs, Sarles said.

While a cost for the EMU replacements isn't known, Sarles said it would be funded through the state Transportation Trust Fund.

Courtesy of the Daily Record of Morris County

JCMAN320
February 11th, 2009, 02:46 PM
NJ TRANSIT LAUNCHES ONLINE GROUP RESERVATION FEATURE
Customers now able to start reservations process at njtransit.com

February 11, 2009
NJT-09-013

NEWARK, NJ — Customers interested in taking advantage of NJ TRANSIT’s discounted group rates now have the ability to book their trip online, thanks to a new feature activated today on NJ TRANSIT’s website, njtransit.com.

"This feature enables anyone who wishes to book a group trip—schools, employers or other organizations—to start the process anytime from the convenience of a computer," said NJ TRANSIT Executive Director Richard Sarles. "This is the latest in a series of web upgrades we’ve implemented to improve the customer experience."

NJ TRANSIT provides special discounted rates on rail and light rail trips for groups of 10 or more when planned in advance. Groups save up to 25 percent off adult and children’s rail Off Peak Round Trip fares and up to 13 percent off light rail fares.

The new online group trip sales feature simplifies the reservation process and makes booking a group trip more convenient. Previously, customers interested in arranging for group travel could only do so by telephone, which often resulted in the need for multiple return calls to gather information and confirm the reservation.

The online group trip sales feature is now active in the "Ticketing" section of www.njtransit.com.

JCMAN320
September 8th, 2009, 11:44 PM
NJ Transit purchases additional electric train engines

by The Associated Press
Wednesday June 10, 2009, 2:00 PM

NEWARK -- NJ Transit officials agreed today to purchase nine electric locomotives from a Pennsylvania firm, pushing the overall total to 36.

NJ Transit said the locomotives provide better acceleration and reliability while pulling its growing fleet of multilevel rail cars.

http://blog.nj.com/ledgerupdates_impact/2009/01/large_NJtransit.JPG
Star-Ledger file photo
A police officer stands near the entrance to NJ Transit train platforms in New York Penn Station in this 2004 file photo.

In December 2007, NJ Transit had approved a $245 million contract with Bombardier Transit Co. for 27 locomotives, including spare parts, with the option to buy more. Under the latest deal, NJ Transit will spend $72 million for the additional locomotives and spare parts.

The first of the new locomotives are expected to arrive early next year, with complete delivery anticipated in mid-2011.

http://www.nj.com/news/index.ssf/2009/06/nj_transit_purchases_electric.html

JCMAN320
September 16th, 2009, 06:53 PM
TRAIN RIDERS TO GET IMPROVED NEWARK PENN STATION PLAZA
Safety and traffic upgrades approved

September 16, 2009
NJT-09-098

NEWARK, NJ — The NJ TRANSIT Board of Directors today authorized a major pedestrian and traffic circulation improvement project at Newark Penn Station that will enhance safety, reduce vehicular congestion, strengthen the historic facility’s connection to an increasingly vibrant downtown business and entertainment district and create an estimated 125 jobs.

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act-funded improvements are planned for Alling Street and Raymond Plaza West, which extends along the station’s main entrance from Market Street to Raymond Boulevard. The project area serves pedestrian, taxi, bus and private vehicle traffic generated by the more than 50,000 transit customers who use the station each day.

“This improvement project is estimated to create more than 100 jobs while making much needed safety and traffic upgrades to enhance the commute for travelers using this busy transportation hub,” Governor Jon S. Corzine said. “We continue to invest in similar infrastructure projects involving roads, bridges and schools all across the state to further stimulate the economy and spur job creation opportunities for New Jersey’s hardworking families.”

“Reducing congestion and improving safety around Penn Station will enhance business opportunities in Newark, relieve traffic congestion and boost the regional economy,” stated Sen. Frank R. Lautenberg. “I am pleased that the Recovery Act will help fund improvements at one of New Jersey's most critical mass transit hubs.”

Project elements include a new roundabout on Raymond Plaza West midway between Market Street and Raymond Boulevard, realigning Alling Street near the Market Street intersection and an upgraded plaza at the corner of Market Street and Raymond Plaza West.

Other features include traffic-calming speed tables, in-crosswalk warning lights and increased drop-off and pick-up spaces. New street lighting, benches, plantings and way-finding signs also are among the improvements, along with integrated traffic signals, a taxi-queuing area and a Greyhound Bus pick-up and drop-off area.

“The significant improvements that we are bringing to Newark Penn Station will make it safer and easier for our customers to access the many transportation options within the station and out on the street,” said Transportation Commissioner and NJ TRANSIT Chairman Stephen Dilts. “The new level of convenience will promote the use of public transportation, which benefits the environment.”

“Improving pedestrian and vehicular flow at this major NJ TRANSIT facility will make a big difference in the lives of tens of thousands of customers who enter and exit the station every day,” said NJ TRANSIT Executive Director Richard Sarles. “This project benefits current customers and improves the functionality of the station, helping it to meet future demands that will come with growing ridership.”

The project will be built in phases to minimize inconvenience to pedestrians and motor vehicle traffic, with portions of existing pedestrian and roadway pathways open at all times during the construction phase. A contract is expected to be awarded during the next month. The project is expected to be completed in mid-2011.

stache
September 16th, 2009, 08:04 PM
Approaching Newark Penn from Market St is a nightmare. The lights are never in your favor. :(

JCMAN320
September 20th, 2009, 07:32 PM
NJ TRANSIT INTRODUCES NEW PROCEDURE TO SPEED BOARDING AT PORT AUTHORITY BUS TERMINAL
“Buy Before Boarding” begins October 19

September 17, 2009
NJT-09-103

NEWARK, NJ — NJ TRANSIT is introducing a new procedure at the Port Authority Bus Terminal that will improve the commute by speeding the boarding process, enabling the agency’s buses to get customers home faster.

Beginning Monday, October 19, cash will no longer be accepted on buses departing the Port Authority Bus Terminal. All customers will be asked to “Buy Before Boarding” and have their tickets or passes ready before boarding the bus.

By reducing cash transactions on buses, NJ TRANSIT can reduce delays associated with slow boarding and improve on-time performance.

“We hope to further improve bus on-time performance by ensuring that buses leave the terminal on time, allowing us to get customers home faster,” said NJ TRANSIT Executive Director Richard Sarles. “While we recognize that ‘Buy Before Boarding’ means a change in routine for many customers, we’re asking for their assistance to reduce the time needed for boarding so that everyone can benefit from a speedier commute.”

NJ TRANSIT bus on-time performance for August was 94.4 percent—a 0.9 percent improvement over the same month last year. Of the nearly 34,000 bus trips scheduled to operate, 1,890 experienced delays. On-time performance for buses serving the Port Authority Bus Terminal was 92.8 percent for the same month.

Most other bus carriers at the Port Authority Bus Terminal have already implemented the “Buy Before Boarding” procedure and have benefitted from improved on-time departures.

To get ready for the new boarding procedure, NJ TRANSIT is upgrading 14 Ticket Vending Machines to make them faster, and installing eight new machines to make buying a ticket even easier. Tickets and passes can also be purchased at any NJ TRANSIT ticket window on the main concourse. For maximum convenience and savings, customers may wish to consider buying a monthly bus pass.

Located in midtown Manhattan, the Port Authority Bus Terminal is the world’s busiest bus terminal and the largest bus terminal in the United States, serving approximately 200,000 passenger trips and 7,000 buses on a typical weekday.

JCMAN320
September 30th, 2009, 10:36 PM
NJ TRANSIT ANNOUNCES START OF MONTCLAIR WEEKEND SERVICE
Trains to Newark and Hoboken will serve Montclair, Glen Ridge and Bloomfield

September 30, 2009
NJT-09-106

MONTCLAIR, NJ — NJ TRANSIT Executive Director Richard Sarles joined Essex County Executive Joseph N. DiVincenzo and the mayors of Montclair, Glen Ridge and Bloomfield today to announce the start of weekend rail service on a portion of the Montclair-Boonton Line from Bay Street Station in Montclair to Newark and Hoboken Terminal.

“New Jersey has long been recognized as a national leader for providing safe, reliable public transit options,” said Governor Jon S. Corzine. “This new weekend rail service is one more building block in an expansive transportation infrastructure that will take cars off the road, increase travel access to shopping, recreation and entertainment venues and create economic opportunities for our citizens.”

“The people of Montclair, Glen Ridge and Bloomfield and other communities have waited a long time for weekend service,” said Congressman Bill Pascrell, Jr. (D-NJ-8), who has served on the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee. “Not only will this additional rail service encourage the people who live in these towns to use mass transit while they have their weekend fun, but it will also allow more people access to the shopping areas, recreational facilities and restaurants that these great communities have to offer.”

Starting Sunday, November 8, NJ TRANSIT will begin weekend trains with a demonstration rail service by extending existing train shuttles west to Bay Street Station in Montclair, that today operate only between Hoboken Terminal and Newark Broad Street on weekends.

Trains will operate approximately every two hours to and from Hoboken with stops at Bay Street, Glen Ridge, Bloomfield, Watsessing Avenue and Newark Broad Street stations, and will give customers the opportunity to connect at Newark Broad Street to Midtown Direct service to New York or to points west on the Morris & Essex Lines.

“NJ TRANSIT is able to extend existing trains west at virtually no cost, and without impacting existing train schedules or putting more strain on limited capacity at the Hudson River tunnels – which are under construction on weekends,” said NJ TRANSIT Executive Director Richard Sarles.

“Initiating weekend train service on the Montclair-Boonton Line at the Bay Street Station is another example of how NJ TRANSIT has been responsive to our residents' concerns,” said Essex County Executive Joseph N. DiVincenzo. “This service enhances access to Montclair and Essex County for business and leisure travel and provides travelers the chance to use less energy and help protect the environment by using mass transportation.”

“I am thrilled that Montclair residents will be able to take a safe, convenient and eco-friendly train into New York and Newark,” said Montclair Mayor Jerry Fried. “They will be able to leave their cars at home or at the Bay Street station, where the parking will be free through 2009. This is a great step forward, laying the groundwork for complete service that will link Montclair State University to the rest of the City and points east.”

“With two train stations, robust bus service and a community shuttle, public transportation is a vital part of the Township,” said Bloomfield Mayor Raymond McCarthy. “We look forward to welcoming weekend rail service in the near future.”

“As far as the extension of weekend train service to Glen Ridge and Montclair goes, I am very excited with this new development,” said Glen Ridge Mayor Peter A. Hughes. “Limited weekend service will be a benefit to the residents of Glen Ridge who wish to travel to New York City on weekends and holidays. Trains are a great way to travel. They are safe and operate at low cost to riders and to the environment.”

Marv95
November 4th, 2009, 08:21 AM
How much are you willing to pay for rent?
How much are you willing to pay for travel into Manhattan?
How close to NYC do you want to be? In fact where in Manhattan are you working?
Do you prefer suburb, urban, or a gated/somewhat isolated section in a city(ie Newport, Society Hill in Jersey City)?

NYatKNIGHT
November 4th, 2009, 09:38 AM
Many cities and towns have access to transit (http://www.njtransit.com/rg/rg_servlet.srv?hdnPageAction=StationParkRideTo) but walkable access and doing your daily chores depends on the town. So you'd have to supply more info and answers to Marv95's questions.

Eugenious
November 7th, 2009, 06:16 PM
I will do all of that research on my own later once I know what towns that it's possible and convenient to live in without a car. Thanks!

i just bought a condo in pompton lakes

Eugenious
November 9th, 2009, 07:40 PM
not sure since I own a car, I would say pretty tough it's doable if your one car household but not completely without a car...I know people who take the bus to Manhattan while their wives commute by car to their jobs etc and the have one car in the family.

Zoe
November 9th, 2009, 09:58 PM
If you want to live car-free and be in NJ, your best bets are Jersey City and Hoboken. Weehawken and Union City maybe....

OmegaNYC
November 10th, 2009, 12:48 AM
^^^

Not really. I'll expand it to Central and Southeastern Bergen, Southern Passaic, Eastern Essex, and maybe Northern Union Counties. Basically, any place that is close to an NJ Transit train station, or bus stop with multiple full service lines, you should get along pretty good. I live in Clifton, and I get along just fine without a car for the most part.

Hamilton
November 10th, 2009, 10:40 AM
^^^Agreed. I grew up in the Lakeview section of Paterson (southern Passaic County). Lived there for a while after college while commuting to work in Midtown. My NJ Transit monthly train pass was pretty much all I needed to do all of my chores since it let me get on any bus and even the Newark subway and Hudson-Bergen Light Rail for free.

Many parts of Clifton and Passaic have even better mass transit. Montclair has 6 or 7 train stations!

The Oranges, Nutley, Newark, Hackensack, North Bergen, Fort Lee, Hoboken, Jersey City, Union City, Secaucus, Elizabeth, even Morristown are other options, depending on what you're looking for in terms of price, safety, distance from New York, urban density, nightlife, etc.

Marv95
November 10th, 2009, 04:40 PM
If you want to live car-free and be in NJ, your best bets are Jersey City and Hoboken. Weehawken and Union City maybe....
I'm from EO and I'm car free. And even when I finally move out I'll still manage to be car free, even for a little while.
Unless you're out in the sticks or well north of Wayne, NJ, it is possible to be car-free.

West Hudson
November 14th, 2009, 01:38 PM
Harrison is a 20-minute direct train ride into the World Trade Center. Both condo units and rental units are about half the cost per square foot of what they are in Jersey City, and you don't have to fight your way onto the PATH during rush hour unlike how it is at Grove Street and other locations in Jersey City and Hoboken.

And, according to statistics, the crime rate per capita in Harrison is lower than it is in Hoboken.

JCMAN320
December 9th, 2009, 04:57 PM
NJ Transit approves Jersey Shore to Newark airport bus line

By Christopher Dela Cruz/The Star-Ledger
December 09, 2009, 1:09PM

NJ Transit's Board of Directors today approved a $10 million contract for Academy Lines to operate the route.

The No. 60 buses will leave the Toms River Bus Terminal and stop at several park-and-ride lots along the Garden State Parkway.

When they reach the airport, the buses will stop at the South Area; Terminals A, B, and C; and the North Area Transit Center.

The bus service will begin New Year's Day as part of a 30-month trial.

block944
February 27th, 2010, 11:36 PM
The 2020 Transit Map

Possibilities for the Future
The 2020 Transit Map: Possibilities for the Future conveys the potential for different types of transit services and lists potential new transit projects within New Jersey over the next twenty years. It is not a complete list of transit projects for implementation, nor is it a commitment to implement all the projects listed. Rather, it is an illustration of the potential projects and types of transit services appropriate to various areas of the state. The advancement of these projects is directly dependent upon their cost-effectiveness and a financial commitment above existing resources to both build and operate new services.
The 2020 TRANSIT Map:


Lists committed and potential new fixed guideway transit projects within New Jersey; and
Illustrates the calculated "Transit Scores" for different areas within the state that convey the various types of transit investment and services that may be appropriate for a particular area.

Details follow the map.
http://www.nj-arp.org/njt2020.gif

Listing of Committed and Potential New Fixed Guideway Projects

The numbered projects on the map fall into three categories of fixed guideway projects. The three categories are:


Committed Projects - The yellow lines show projects that are either under construction or will begin construction within the next year. Funding has been committed to complete these projects.
Candidate Projects - The red lines show potential new fixed guideway transit facilities. These projects at a minimum have had some degree of study, and a number are undergoing environmental, design, or other planning work to advance the process towards funding as a committed project. These projects are candidates for future funding and implementation; a candidate project can not become a committed project, until additional work is completed, and associated capital and operating funds identified/committed.
Projects to be Defined/Studied - The purple lines show projects that have not had any significant study. Further study and definition of the project’s scope, mode, and alignment is required to advance projects as candidates for implementation. These projects meet the Transit Score criteria for the appropriate fixed guideway type.

The 2020 Transit Scores

The green areas on the map indicate the Transit Score of an area. The darker the green, the greater the potential need for more transit service and more types (modes) of transit. The Transit Score suggests where transit investments in fixed guideways, different types of bus service, and intermodal facilities (including access to transit) are appropriate.
The 2020 Transit Score Factors:

The Transit Score examines four different factors that influence the potential for transit ridership. The Transit Scores are based on year 2020 forecasts for each factor. The four factors that are examined include the following:


Household Density
Population Density
Employment Density
Zero and One-Car Household Density

The 2020 Transit Score Categories and Investment Types:

The Transit Score indicates the relative potential for different types of transit usage in a geographic area based on observed land use and transit service patterns.
The Transit Score is employed to identify where three different types of transit investments may be called for subject to available resources. These three transit investment types are:


Fixed Guideway Transit - New commuter rail or light rail lines, extensions of existing rail services, potential new ferry routes and new bus-only highway lanes.
Bus & Other Transit Service - New services or expanded frequency or span of service on existing express, local bus, minibus or vanpool operations.
Intermodal / Access to Transit - New park and ride, shuttles to transit and intended terminal investments

A more detailed description of the relationship between an area’s Transit Score and the different types of transit investments, is available in the Transit Score Report: Possibilities for the Future from NJ TRANSIT. This technical report documents how transit scores were estimated and can be used as a guideline for potential transit investments.

http://www.nj-arp.org/images/but_home2.gif (http://www.nj-arp.org/index.html) http://www.nj-arp.org/images/but_documents2.gif (http://www.nj-arp.org/documents.html) http://www.nj-arp.org/images/but_search2.gif (http://www.nj-arp.org/search.html) This information was provided by NJ Transit. These files were created by Bob Scheurle.

Nexis4Jersey
February 28th, 2010, 01:36 AM
Heres the projects that are close to happening or that will happen this decade.

All the Committed projects are completed.

# 10 : possible , alot residents are open to this line.

# 11 : Should be open by 2013

# 12 : Should be done by 2011-12

# 13 : Completed last year

# 14 : i'm very optimistic about this line , i would say at the least 2013 , and most 2017

# 15 : This might be the last Light Rail line done in NJ , but if Elizabeth becomes a very popular city in terms of growth it could be different.

# 16 : This Project might be done as soon as 2018 becuz that area of NJ , is growing faster then Hudson & Bergen combined.

# 17 : I think this line will be one of the last restored due to the mostly rural ness.

# 18 : I think this line is set to begin construction later this year.

# 19 : This line is on the High priority list , it would relive congestion on the NEC and hit key areas of NY or Philly commuters. It should be restored in 4 years.

# 20 : This line would require little to be restored could be up by next year.

# 21 : Too early to say about this line, might be one of the last.

# 22 : I beleave Nimbys killed this project off , sad too becuz it would have brought more tourists up there.

# 23 : Phase 1 to Andover will open in June

# 24 : I think NY waterway has plans to bring service to Perth Amboy

# 25 : When the economy fully or partially rebounds i do see this project moving forward.

# 26 : Construction has started last year should open in 2017

# 27 : As population grows , this line and others in the Essex, Bergen , Passaic , Union County will be needed to balance traffic on strained roads , i do see this project happening before 2016.

# 28 : I'm so sure about this project , but you never know.

# 29 : This Project depended on # 22, so it won't go further.

# 30 : I do see this project happening before 2016 , but in a Light Rail format.

# 31 : The Light Rail is looking like it will happen more , this project might be a private line and could be up and running by 2015.

# 32 : Should happen before 2014 , but its too early to tell.

# 33 & 34 : Should be combined into a Light Rail , not much happens in AC.

~Corey

JCMAN320
March 2nd, 2010, 04:05 PM
NJ TRANSIT CONFRONTS SERIOUS BUDGET CHALLENGE IN FY10 AND FY11
New Executive Director reaches out to customers and public to help solve dire budget situation; NJ TRANSIT to hold hearings in late March

February 17, 2010
NJT-10-012

NEWARK, NJ – NJ TRANSIT Executive Director James Weinstein announced today that the statewide transit agency is aggressively confronting current and future budget shortfalls that have arisen due to the severe national recession and the state’s $2.2 billion current-year budget gap, and $11 billion FY11 budget gap. Weinstein called for riders and the public to provide input to NJ TRANSIT while the agency develops the proper mix of solutions to balance the budgets while maintaining safe, reliable bus and train service.

Last week Governor Christie announced an 11-percent subsidy reduction, about $33 million, to NJ TRANSIT’s FY10 state operating subsidy as part of a number of steps the Governor is taking to close the state’s current budget shortfall.

“This reduction is painful but we understand the challenge the state is facing,” Weinstein said. “We know the Governor appreciates the importance of the transit system to New Jersey’s mobility, but we recognize that difficult measures are required to keep the state budget balanced.”

The budget outlook is even grimmer for FY11, which starts July 1 for both the state and for NJ TRANSIT. Weinstein said the state faces an $11 billion deficit next year and is not likely to be able to continue to provide its historic level of NJ TRANSIT operating assistance. NJ TRANSIT also is unable to depend on another round of federal stimulus and other one-time federal transportation funding, which was utilized to help bolster the operating budget by $150 million.

In addition, NJ TRANSIT is facing inflationary cost increases for things such as fuel and equipment parts, even as ridership declined systemwide by about four percent year to date, reducing fare revenue.

“In the transition report that I helped prepare as head of the transportation committee, we indicated that NJ TRANSIT would face a budget deficit next year (FY11) of about $200 million,” said Weinstein. “After reviewing more recent data, the projected operating deficit in FY11 is approaching $300 million.”

“NJ TRANSIT has an obligation to balance its budget and we cannot ask the state for help it cannot afford to give. We also cannot pretend otherwise or we risk making a bad situation much worse,” he said. “Balancing the NJ TRANSIT budget will take a combination of actions and innovative thinking about doing things differently. But we will not compromise on safety and service reliability, and we will not ask our customers to pay more at the fare box until we have identified every possible efficiency, and sacrificed internally,” the executive director emphasized.

Weinstein said NJ TRANSIT will be as inclusive as possible as it studies options to meet the financial shortfalls and will seek input from customers and stakeholders on any fare and service proposals. The agency will be reaching out to customers and the public over the coming days to solicit comments and suggestions.

To that end, we are announcing today a series of public hearings on the fare and service change proposals. The hearings will take place mostly at our facilities and will be held in Newark, Atlantic City, Trenton, Secaucus, Camden, Paterson, Hackensack, Manalapan and New York. An extended period of public comment will be available online on njtransit.com beginning in early March.

More detailed information on the proposals and the hearings will be made available in the next week or two on our website and through formal public notices statewide.

“Clearly, some of the adjustments we will have to make will be painful,” Weinstein said. “But we can emerge from this challenging time as a stronger agency, with a more stable financial picture, and continued pride in our service.”

http://www.njtransit.com/tm/tm_servlet.srv?hdnPageAction=PressReleaseTo&PRESS_RELEASE_ID=2589

JCMAN320
March 2nd, 2010, 04:09 PM
NJ TRANSIT ANNOUNCES INTERNAL CUTS, SPENDING FREEZE TO HELP FILL BUDGET GAP

March 2, 2010
NJT-10-019

NEWARK, NJ — NJ TRANSIT today implemented an emergency spending freeze and told employees that it will reduce its workforce by more than 200, rollback spending on retirement accounts, and cut executive salaries.

A total of more than $30 million in reductions have been identified to help solve a combined $300 million budget gap projected for FY 2010 and 2011. The force reduction represents about 2% of the total workforce, and includes both union agreement and non-agreement employees.

“These are extremely painful steps, but unavoidable ones. We must close our serious budget shortfall, and we at NJ TRANSIT must do our part by making this the leanest, most efficient agency possible, without compromising safety,” said Executive Director James Weinstein. Weinstein noted that the workforce reduction will be the deepest one-year reduction in NJ TRANSIT’s 30-year history.

Meanwhile, the corporation’s contributions to employee 401K accounts will be reduced by one-third, and executive salaries will be cut 5%. These reductions follow in the wake of hiring and salary freezes that began last year, as well as unpaid furloughs for administrative (non-agreement) employees.

NJ TRANSIT officials also have identified cost reductions in parts, fuel, utilities, and contracts that will be renegotiated to avoid escalations. The emergency spending freeze allows the agency to halt spending that is not directly tied to operations or that is not critical for safety.

The agency also is continuing to develop fare and service change plans to respond to this financial crisis. Those proposals will be announced next week.

“Unfortunately, fare and service changes will have to be a part of NJ TRANSIT’s overall response to this financial crisis,” Weinstein said. “I know this will be painful for our customers. I welcome their suggestions and ideas as well as those of the public.”

He added: “The decisions we must make will not be easy. But together we can get through this very difficult time, and NJ TRANSIT can emerge a strong, stable agency that will be ready to respond to the transit needs of New Jersey citizens.”

http://www.njtransit.com/tm/tm_servlet.srv?hdnPageAction=PressReleaseTo&PRESS_RELEASE_ID=2595

newarkdevil1
March 2nd, 2010, 06:32 PM
Block

Do you have a larger version of that map, I had no success in finding it and trying to read it makes me go blind.



The 2020 Transit Map

Possibilities for the Future
The 2020 Transit Map: Possibilities for the Future conveys the potential for different types of transit services and lists potential new transit projects within New Jersey over the next twenty years. It is not a complete list of transit projects for implementation, nor is it a commitment to implement all the projects listed. Rather, it is an illustration of the potential projects and types of transit services appropriate to various areas of the state. The advancement of these projects is directly dependent upon their cost-effectiveness and a financial commitment above existing resources to both build and operate new services.
The 2020 TRANSIT Map:


Lists committed and potential new fixed guideway transit projects within New Jersey; and
Illustrates the calculated "Transit Scores" for different areas within the state that convey the various types of transit investment and services that may be appropriate for a particular area.
Details follow the map.
http://www.nj-arp.org/njt2020.gif

Listing of Committed and Potential New Fixed Guideway Projects

The numbered projects on the map fall into three categories of fixed guideway projects. The three categories are:


Committed Projects - The yellow lines show projects that are either under construction or will begin construction within the next year. Funding has been committed to complete these projects.
Candidate Projects - The red lines show potential new fixed guideway transit facilities. These projects at a minimum have had some degree of study, and a number are undergoing environmental, design, or other planning work to advance the process towards funding as a committed project. These projects are candidates for future funding and implementation; a candidate project can not become a committed project, until additional work is completed, and associated capital and operating funds identified/committed.
Projects to be Defined/Studied - The purple lines show projects that have not had any significant study. Further study and definition of the project’s scope, mode, and alignment is required to advance projects as candidates for implementation. These projects meet the Transit Score criteria for the appropriate fixed guideway type.
The 2020 Transit Scores

The green areas on the map indicate the Transit Score of an area. The darker the green, the greater the potential need for more transit service and more types (modes) of transit. The Transit Score suggests where transit investments in fixed guideways, different types of bus service, and intermodal facilities (including access to transit) are appropriate.
The 2020 Transit Score Factors:

The Transit Score examines four different factors that influence the potential for transit ridership. The Transit Scores are based on year 2020 forecasts for each factor. The four factors that are examined include the following:


Household Density
Population Density
Employment Density
Zero and One-Car Household Density
The 2020 Transit Score Categories and Investment Types:

The Transit Score indicates the relative potential for different types of transit usage in a geographic area based on observed land use and transit service patterns.
The Transit Score is employed to identify where three different types of transit investments may be called for subject to available resources. These three transit investment types are:


Fixed Guideway Transit - New commuter rail or light rail lines, extensions of existing rail services, potential new ferry routes and new bus-only highway lanes.
Bus & Other Transit Service - New services or expanded frequency or span of service on existing express, local bus, minibus or vanpool operations.
Intermodal / Access to Transit - New park and ride, shuttles to transit and intended terminal investments
A more detailed description of the relationship between an area’s Transit Score and the different types of transit investments, is available in the Transit Score Report: Possibilities for the Future from NJ TRANSIT. This technical report documents how transit scores were estimated and can be used as a guideline for potential transit investments.

http://www.nj-arp.org/images/but_home2.gif (http://www.nj-arp.org/index.html) http://www.nj-arp.org/images/but_documents2.gif (http://www.nj-arp.org/documents.html) http://www.nj-arp.org/images/but_search2.gif (http://www.nj-arp.org/search.html) This information was provided by NJ Transit. These files were created by Bob Scheurle.

stache
March 2nd, 2010, 11:51 PM
Me too.

JCMAN320
March 8th, 2010, 09:50 PM
Fare hikes on trains and buses, schedules reduced as NJ Transit slashes budget

Saturday, March 06, 2010
By TOM SHORTELL
JOURNAL STAFF WRITER

Hudson County commuters may change their travel plans later this year after NJ Transit hikes ticket rates and cuts some services in the face of a $300 million budget shortfall.

The changes announced yesterday afternoon call for raising fares 25 percent across the board, cutting 32 commuter trains and reducing some bus and light rail services, according to a press release on the NJ Transit Web site. The press release blamed a 4 percent decline in ridership for forcing the nation's largest statewide public transportation system's hand.

"Our service plan is designed to size our service to match ridership demand. We also looked at where we could squeeze out the most costs while impacting as few customers as possible," said Jim Weinstein, executive director, in the release.

A one-way ticket on the Hudson-Bergen Light Rail would jump in cost by 50 cents to $2.40 once the fare hikes take effect Aug. 1, according to the Web site. Weekend evening trains after 8 p.m. would also arrive every 30 minutes instead of every 20 minutes. About
4,800 people would be affected, according to the release.

NJ Transit buses in Hudson County would see a fare hike ranging from 35 cents to 80 cents, depending on how far riders travel. On top of that, several routes would have trips eliminated or would drop the frequency of their service, according to the Web site. A few, like the number 86 bus from Union City to Jersey City, would see both.

Each of the 11 train lines in the state would lose at least two trains. Trips to the Hoboken station were specifically singled out in the release because of a 13 percent drop in ridership to the station, compared to a 3 percent drop to New York.

Bus riders at Journal Square grimaced at the news, but the changes didn't come as a shock.

"It doesn't surprise me at all. Everything else is going up," said Khalia Hankerson, a 25-year-old Union City woman. Hankerson said she spends $8.10 in light rail and bus fees each day on her commute to work at Ellis Island. "Hopefully, I can find a job closer to home," she said.

Along with the fare hikes and service changes, NJ Transit announced earlier this week it will layoff 200 employees, slash executive pay by 5 percent and contribute less to its employee 401(k) fund.

Public hearings will be held later this month on the changes. One hearing will be held March 25 at One Penn Plaza East in Newark from 5:30to 8:30 p.m. Another will be held March 26 at the Frank R. Lautenberg Rail Station in Secaucus from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. For more information, visit NJTransit.com/budget.

http://www.nj.com/news/jjournal/index.ssf?/base/news-4/126786034937000.xml&coll=3

Proposed Changes:
http://www.njtransit.com/var/var_servlet.srv?hdnPageAction=ProposedBusTo

JCMAN320
March 8th, 2010, 09:57 PM
U.S. Sen. Menendez to announce federal help for NJ Transit

By The Jersey Journal
March 07, 2010, 4:52PM

http://media.nj.com/hudsoncountynow_impact/photo/robert-menendezjpg-f6ef8a84ae747167_large.jpg
Journal file photo
U.S. Sen Robert Menendez to announce federal help for NJ Transit tomorrow.

On the heels of NJ Transit announcing fare hikes and cutbacks on Friday, U.S. Sen. Robert Menendez, along with other elected federal officials, plan to unveil a major federal recovery act for the New Jersey transporation system tomorow.

Menendez, the former mayor of Union City, will be joined by Rep. Donald Payne, D-Newark, officials from NJ Transit and local transportation planning organizations to announce details of the plan at 10:30 a.m. in the waiting room at Newark Penn Station.

As part of the Recovery Act, NJ Transit would receive $420 million.

On Friday, NJ Transit announced that fares and service in Hudson County would be affected by the agency's budget problems.

This investment could create an estimated 4,000 jobs, officials said.

It is hoped that this federal investment will help NJ Transit and the State of New Jersey with the budget woes that led the transit authority to announce fare hikes and reduced service on Friday.

http://www.nj.com/hudson/index.ssf/2010/03/us_sen_menendez_to_announce_fe.html

TimmyG
March 13th, 2010, 06:37 PM
Does anyone know for which projects the money would be used?

STT757
March 14th, 2010, 12:07 PM
Does anyone know for which projects the money would be used?

$36.2 million for the new transfer station for the Atlantic City line and the River line in Pennsauken.

$15.3 million to improve exterior pedestrian and traffic circulation at Newark Penn Station

$35 million for maintenance of up to 2,148 NJ Transit buses (this will draw more than $34 million from a reallocation of previously-committed bus funding, meaning that the actual net new funding is $890,000)

stache
March 14th, 2010, 01:14 PM
$36.2 million for the new transfer station for the Atlantic City line and the River line in Pennsauken.


I hope PATCO can get in on this!

JCMAN320
September 11th, 2010, 09:13 PM
NJ TRANSIT ANNOUNCES ‘MY BUS’ ENHANCEMENT
Text message-based system will provide bus customers with on-the-go schedule information

September 10, 2010
NJT-10-060

NEWARK, NJ — NJ TRANSIT Executive Director James Weinstein today previewed the agency’s upcoming “My Bus” system, which will provide bus customers with unprecedented access to bus schedule information while on the go. The program is set to launch in Atlantic County in October, followed by the remainder of more than 19,000 bus stops across the state.

“My Bus is part of our ongoing effort to use technology to improve the way customers access travel information,” said NJ TRANSIT Board Member Flora Castillo, who serves as Chair of the Customer Service Committee. “While the rollout of My Bus signs will start in Atlantic County, bus customers throughout New Jersey will be able to take advantage of My Bus using our website.”

“Through My Bus, any customer who has the ability to send a text message will literally have bus schedule information at their fingertips,” said Weinstein. “In addition, this enhancement will make automated bus schedule information available 24 hours a day for the first time.”

Based on a system of bus stop ID numbers—unique five-digit numbers NJ TRANSIT has assigned to each of its bus stops—My Bus will enable customers who have cell phones with SMS (text messaging) capabilities to receive bus schedule information for a specific stop directly to their phones.

When My Bus launches next month, customers will be able to text their five-digit bus stop ID to “MyBus,” and My Bus will respond with the routes and times for the next 12 scheduled trips that serve that bus stop.

As part of the program, NJ TRANSIT plans to post My Bus signs at bus stops statewide, displaying the bus stop ID and instructions for how to use the My Bus system. Sign installation will begin in Atlantic County and will be implemented across the state by the end of 2011.

In the interim, to obtain their bus stop ID, customers will be able to look up the number on a special section of njtransit.com.

My Bus will also improve the functionality of NJ TRANSIT’s IVR (interactive voice response) system. For instance, when customers call NJ TRANSIT either directly at 973-275-5555 or via 511, they will have an option of inputting their bus stop ID number to get the next three scheduled trips, with the option of more. This feature will make automated bus schedule information available 24 hours a day for the first time.

http://www.njtransit.com/tm/tm_servlet.srv?hdnPageAction=PressReleaseTo&PRESS_RELEASE_ID=2625

JCMAN320
November 11th, 2010, 10:59 PM
Slideshow about new Capital Projects with money from ARC Tunnel. Some highlights:

- Westmont Station for transfer between PATCO and AC Line

-Pennsauken Station construction for transfer between RIVER Line and AC Line

-New possible Metrocard style of fare collecting on buses

http://www.njtransit.com/sa/sa_servlet.srv?hdnPageAction=CustomerNoticeTo&NoticeId=2241

lofter1
November 11th, 2010, 11:54 PM
That ^ will really energize the state's economy, eh?

JCMAN320
November 12th, 2010, 12:49 AM
^^None of it will. Most of those projects are upgrading current stations; acquiring new buses, which has already started along with new rail cars. There are only two new stations being built while the rest shown are being upgraded.

Christie is an fat, arrogant, shotsighted bully. If he doesn't like you he'll just get rid of you. He wants NJT to add new commuter lines. Guess what you fat sack of s***; you can add more commuter lines all you want but you still will have a choke point and more so at the North Bergen Tunnels!!!

ASchwarz
November 12th, 2010, 03:06 AM
Christie is such a cancer on the state.

The fact that NJ residents will have to wait 3 years for Christie to leave and then start all over on the ARC tunnel is nothing less than a tragedy.

Of course, it will cost billions more, and force hundreds of thousands of residents to endure years of misery, but nothing can stand in the way of Christie's Presidential hopes. He needs to suck up to the Far Right by slashing transit, fighting teacher unions, rejecting global warming, etc.

I don't even think he believes all these things. When he voiced skepticism for global warming, I started thinking he's just roleplaying.

stache
November 12th, 2010, 06:31 AM
I can't imagine that tub as prez.

Marv95
November 12th, 2010, 08:18 AM
Christie is an fat, arrogant, shotsighted bully. If he doesn't like you he'll just get rid of you. He wants NJT to add new commuter lines. Guess what you fat sack of s***; you can add more commuter lines all you want but you still will have a choke point and more so at the North Bergen Tunnels!!!
Just have those lines terminate at Newark or somewhere else, just not in Hudson County.


New possible Metrocard style of fare collecting on buses
Not a bad thought. Just make sure you also get rid of these "zone fares" as well. I mean, does Essex, Hudson, etc. need multiple fare zones? Just have one set fare and be done with it. It costs as low as $2.25 to get from White Plains to Manhattan for pete's sake.

STT757
November 12th, 2010, 09:18 AM
Slideshow about new Capital Projects with money from ARC Tunnel. Some highlights:

- Westmont Station for transfer between PATCO and AC Line

-Pennsauken Station construction for transfer between RIVER Line and AC Line

-New possible Metrocard style of fare collecting on buses

This is where they are being totally being disingenious. All of those projects are already funded, and were in the works. These are not what they are going to do with the ARC money, this is what they were already doing. The Riverline/PATCO connection is being funded by stimulus funds, as is the Plauderville high level platforms and the Newark Penn Station improvements;

http://www.nj.com/news/index.ssf/2010/03/nj_transit_expected_to_get_52.html

Hoboken Terminal improvements is funded by the Port Authority, none of this is ARC money. Almost all these projects are already underway or almost complete.

STT757
November 12th, 2010, 09:21 AM
Slideshow about new Capital Projects with money from ARC Tunnel

JC none of that is being built because ARC got killed, if you look at the slide show most of those projects are already underway or almost complete. Most are not even funded by the State, the Plauderville high level platforms, PATCO/riverline transfer station were funded by Federal Stimulus. There's absolutely nothing new in that slideshow, all of those were begun under Corzine or funded by the Port Authority or Stimulus.

Here are the projects listed in the slideshow, all funded by Federal Stimulus funds and begun under the Corzine administration;

http://www.njtransit.com/tm/tm_servlet.srv?hdnPageAction=PressReleaseTo&PRESS_RELEASE_ID=2551

http://www.njtransit.com/tm/tm_servlet.srv?hdnPageAction=PressReleaseTo&PRESS_RELEASE_ID=2553

http://www.njtransit.com/tm/tm_servlet.srv?hdnPageAction=PressReleaseTo&PRESS_RELEASE_ID=2539

http://www.njtransit.com/tm/tm_servlet.srv?hdnPageAction=PressReleaseTo&PRESS_RELEASE_ID=2491

http://www.njtransit.com/tm/tm_servlet.srv?hdnPageAction=PressReleaseTo&PRESS_RELEASE_ID=2491

JCMAN320
November 12th, 2010, 05:55 PM
^^STT757 you are right!! Then what are they putting the f''''' money??

Nexis4Jersey
November 13th, 2010, 03:29 AM
The Tunnel had alot of problems ,alot of it didn't make it out to the General public.....but most Rail Fanners and Employees knew.....it very poorly planned and NJT was pushing an Agenda...... Meanwhile the ARC was killing projects like the Newark LRT system and Paterson LRT system , but now we can relabel it as PATH projects. The Current Tunnels can shake off another 20 years before needing a replacement , the Amtrak Tunnels should be built in 10 years...... Most lines Terminate in Hoboken so by reactivating lines were really causing anymore congestion then we already have. (Projected 2030 Daily Ridership : 750,000+)

Raritan Valley line by 2040 will have these lines
Flemington Line
West Trenton line
Philpsburg Extension
Amtrak Lehigh Service

The Morris & Essex Network will have these lines by 2020
Lackawanna line
Pompton line
Lackawanna Amtrak Service
Philpsburg Extension


The Main line will have these lines by 2040
Pascack Valley line extension
Graham line
West Shore line

The Northeast Corridor will have all these lines by 2040
Freehold line
Tom's River line
West Trenton line
Philipsburg line
Amtrak's Lehigh service
Amtrak's Lackawanna Service

The Atlantic line will have these lines by 2030
Cape May line
Ocean City line

STT757
November 13th, 2010, 08:43 AM
Nexis,

Where on Earth did you pull those items out of, none of those are even being studied. Amtrak Lehigh Service?..

Out of your list the only projects that have seen legitimate discussion and or have had some type of funding dedicated for studies are:

MOM:
Monmouth Jct, Red Bank, Amboy are the alignments they have studied

West Trenton

Lackawanna cut-off

The other projects you listed are just someone's fantasy;

Flemington, Amtrak Lehigh service, Pompton, Lackawana Amtrak service, Graham line, Toms River line, Cape May etc..

None of those are ever going to even get anykind of feasibility study funds.

Nexis4Jersey
November 13th, 2010, 09:23 AM
I got them form the long term , Penndot , Amtrak , NJDOT , NJT , DPRA and Metro-North plans , alot of them will get funding.....but for some it will take time. North Jersey has alot of projects that need to get done due to the fact that there slowing down Penndot , Amtrak and Metro-North , same with Central Jersey.......South Jersey is going to come last.....

STT757
November 13th, 2010, 11:32 AM
Again most of those are not even being studied, of the projects listed only Lackawanna, MOM, West Trenton and the Northern Branch LRT are being studied. However being studied does not mean they will be built, ARC's demise throws doubt on pretty much any system expansion for NJ Transit. Even though trains like MOM, West Trenton and Lackawanna were not going to go to Manhattan, their passengers are through connections at places like Newark Penn, Newark Broad Street, Secaucus jct etc.. And without additional capacity between NJ and Manhattan adding more passengers to already standing room only trains is just not feasible.

NJ Transit capital plan;

http://www.njtransit.com/tm/tm_servlet.srv?hdnPageAction=CapImprProjectsTo

Of all the NJ Transit capital projects the only one I give any chance to proceeding in the next ten years would be the Northern Branch Light rail, but I give that project only a slim chance.

Nexis4Jersey
November 13th, 2010, 11:40 AM
Most of the network is diesel so that leaves a whole lot still open and the Majority of the lines are very cheap to restore. As for the Capacity issues into NYC the Tunnels can last another 2 decades w/o being replaced. Infact NJt knew this and still went ahead with the botched ARC plan. Amtrak and the other agencies plans tend to move faster then NJT so we will see....

STT757
November 13th, 2010, 03:03 PM
I don't even know where to begin, pretty much all of that information is nonsense.

Newarkguy
November 13th, 2010, 04:26 PM
Nexis,

Where on Earth did you pull those items out of, none of those are even being studied. Amtrak Lehigh Service?..

Out of your list the only projects that have seen legitimate discussion and or have had some type of funding dedicated for studies are:

MOM:
Monmouth Jct, Red Bank, Amboy are the alignments they have studied

West Trenton

Lackawanna cut-off

The other projects you listed are just someone's fantasy;

Flemington, Amtrak Lehigh service, Pompton, Lackawana Amtrak service, Graham line, Toms River line, Cape May etc..

None of those are ever going to even get anykind of feasibility study funds. Amtrak Lackawanna is indeed possible. The Erie Lackawanna Railway had 3 famous Jersey city to Chicago trains....The famous Phoebe Snow, Lake Cities, and the Erie Limited. Phoebe Snow used the Lackawanna cut-off(morris and Essex line) side of the EL, serving Newark NJ, Dover NJ, The Stroudsburgs area PA, Scranton PA,Binghampton NY,Buffalo NY,Cleveland OH,Marion & Akron OH, Indianapolis ID via trackage rights, Finally, Chicago IL. Lake Cities and the ERIE limited used the old Erie main line(NJT's Main& Bergen lines) to Paterson NJ, Suffern NY, Tuxedo& Harriman NY, Middletown-Goshen NY, Port Jervis NY, Binghampton NY from there following the same path as Phoebe Snow to Chicago. So...Its possible if NY and PA lobby congress to help stimulate the Pocono PA and NY souther tier economy of these cities thru passenger rail.

Nexis4Jersey
November 13th, 2010, 10:52 PM
How , NJT knew the ARC wasn't necessary , every Rail Organization in NJ sniffed that out years ago. The Tunnels are only at 75% capacity , NJT plans on running more trains to Hoboken then NYP in the coming decades. I'm a Rail Fanner / Transit blogger , i think ikno my facts.....

STT757
November 14th, 2010, 09:27 AM
ow , NJT knew the ARC wasn't necessary , every Rail Organization in NJ sniffed that out years ago. The Tunnels are only at 75% capacity , NJT plans on running more trains to Hoboken then NYP in the coming decades. I'm a Rail Fanner / Transit blogger , i think ikno my facts.....

You might be a railfan, but your a mis-informed railfan.

You wrote:


As for the Capacity issues into NYC the Tunnels can last another 2 decades w/o being replaced

The new Hudson tunnels were never meant to replace the current tunnels, but to compliment them. At rush hour NJ Transit and Amtrak are at 100% capacity usage of slots, they cannot fit anymore trains in during the AM/PM rush. The ARC tunnels were meant to increase the maximum trains per hour NJ Transit could operate between NJ and Manhattan from the current 23 per hour to 45 per hour.

JCMAN320
December 8th, 2010, 04:45 PM
NJ Transit moves forward in effort to privatize parking lots

Published: Sunday, December 05, 2010, 10:00 PM Updated: Monday, December 06, 2010, 5:16 AM
Mike Frassinelli/The Star-Ledger

http://media.nj.com/star-ledger/photo/9100138-large.jpg
Robert Sciarrino/The Star-Ledger
Commuter cars fill the parking lot at St. John Vianney R.C. Church on Route 23 in the Stockholm section of Hardyston, were a new bus service started Nov. 1. There's a park-and-ride lot at the church, where commuters can get on NJ Transit Bus No. 194 that goes to New York City. Hardyston, NJ 11/11/10 (Robert Sciarrino/The Star-Ledger)

In a state where three-quarters of its residents live within five miles of a transit station and 10 percent of the work force travels by public transit — the highest statewide rate in America — the NJ Transit station parking lots could be paved with gold.

The cash-strapped transit agency will find out for sure in the coming months.

Hoping to privatize its parking lots to provide an additional source of operating budget revenue, NJ Transit has entered the next phase of a project to lease more than 37,000 parking spaces to a private firm for the next three to five decades.

The parking concession program, SPACES — System Parking Amenity and Capacity Enhancement Strategy — represents NJ Transit’s best opportunity to close a $100 million budget gap, agency Executive Director Jim Weinstein said.

On Friday, NJ Transit whittled a list of 10 candidates, down to seven qualified concessionaires. The seven will bid in March for the right to operate and maintain NJ Transit parking facilities at 81 stations. The final list of sites will likely change, with some dropping out and others being added.

Lots that are free are likely to start charging, and overcrowded lots that have waiting lists will likely get new parking decks.

Ralph Fucci, a 30-year commuter who has parked at NJ Transit’s Princeton Junction lot in West Windsor for 17 years and pays $195 quarterly, frets that a private operator will want to recoup its tens of millions of dollars of investment by raising parking fees.

"I can’t see how it’s not going to impact commuters negatively," said Fucci, a business executive who has calculated that he has made more than 14,000 trips.

Fucci may be right. History indicates that commuters are in for more sticker shock in the new world of privatized parking.

Privatizing Chicago’s metered parking facilities in 2008 led to an average parking fee hike of 178 percent, with some increases as much as 350 percent.

And any increases would be on top of a record-tying fare hike of 25 percent for NJ Transit train and interstate bus commuters in May. Light rail and local bus riders saw their fares go up 10 percent.

Weinstein said he would prefer gradual parking fee increases over time, instead of having one huge hike years later.

The teams that are finalists to take over the parking: KKR/ECI Investment Advisors/Ampco Parking Systems; Morgan Stanley/Central Parking System; Carlyle Infrastructure Partners/Nexus Parking Systems; MacQuarie Capital/Standard Parking/TimHaahs; JP Morgan/LAZ Parking; Cintra; and Edison.

Each concessionaire has built, on schedule and within budget, at least three parking decks containing 500 or more spaces each.

"NJ Transit is essentially leasing out its front door — the parking lots for its transit stations," said Matthew Stanton, a partner with the MBI GluckShaw public affairs firm in Trenton and former chief of staff of NJ Transit.

"I am confident that Executive Director Weinstein will select the team that clearly demonstrates the delicate balance needed between revenue, control over parking fees, management of the lots and quality customer service."

Weinstein said managing parking spaces is not the forte of the transit agency and that there are companies specializing in it that can run the lots better.

"We’re looking for a model where we can improve and we can standardize parking across our system," he said. "Hopefully, what we’ll do is get a private sector partner who will be able to make the improvements to upgrade technology — so that people aren’t putting dollar bills in slots."

The transaction is expected to close by the finish of the fiscal year that ends on June 30. The takeover of the complete inventory of parking sites will likely be phased in.

The proposal includes parking at a large swath of stations. It ranges from a free lot at Brick, where only about a third of the 347 parking spaces are used, to Metropark in Woodbridge, where nearly all of the 3,718 parking spaces are used and NJ Transit takes in more than $5 million a year.

The majority of the affected lots in the proposal are in Bergen County (13 lots), Essex County (10) and Monmouth County (9).

With the state Transportation Trust Fund about to go broke and federal dollars becoming harder to get, NJ Transit has been looking to wring more cash out of its properties and parking spaces.

Jay Corbalis, policy analyst with New Jersey Future, a nonprofit organization in Trenton that promotes sustainable land use, wonders whether NJ Transit is trading millions of dollars in future revenues for a short-term budget fix.

He also questions whether privatization would hamper the development of communities built around transportation hubs — which make it convenient to get around without a car — and why transit riders are being assessed user fees while people who use the roads and bridges are not.

"By privatizing parking facilities, this proposal will have the effect of further raising costs for many NJ Transit riders," Corbalis said. "If New Jersey wants to move toward a user fee-based system to pay for transportation, it should apply the same approach to roads and bridges as it does for mass transit."

Weinstein said the SPACES program will help transit-oriented development and improve a parking system that, in some instances, has thousands of people on waiting lists for spaces.

"A conductor on the ‘Dinky’ (shuttle train) in Princeton tells me about parking passes being passed down three generations — and I think that is replicated across the state," he said. "We’re looking for a way to make it better. We’re looking for a way to make sure that the resources are there to make the improvements."

http://www.nj.com/news/index.ssf/2010/12/nj_transit_moves_forward_in_pr.html

Don31
December 18th, 2010, 12:29 AM
The Tunnel had alot of problems ,alot of it didn't make it out to the General public.....but most Rail Fanners and Employees knew.....it very poorly planned and NJT was pushing an Agenda...... Meanwhile the ARC was killing projects like the Newark LRT system and Paterson LRT system , but now we can relabel it as PATH projects. The Current Tunnels can shake off another 20 years before needing a replacement , the Amtrak Tunnels should be built in 10 years...... Most lines Terminate in Hoboken so by reactivating lines were really causing anymore congestion then we already have. (Projected 2030 Daily Ridership : 750,000+)

Raritan Valley line by 2040 will have these lines
Flemington Line
West Trenton line
Philpsburg Extension
Amtrak Lehigh Service

The Morris & Essex Network will have these lines by 2020
Lackawanna line
Pompton line
Lackawanna Amtrak Service
Philpsburg Extension


The Main line will have these lines by 2040
Pascack Valley line extension
Graham line
West Shore line

The Northeast Corridor will have all these lines by 2040
Freehold line
Tom's River line
West Trenton line
Philipsburg line
Amtrak's Lehigh service
Amtrak's Lackawanna Service

The Atlantic line will have these lines by 2030
Cape May line
Ocean City line

Geez, here we go again...... ~SIGH~

Don31
December 18th, 2010, 10:57 AM
The Tunnel had alot of problems ,alot of it didn't make it out to the General public.....but most Rail Fanners and Employees knew.....it very poorly planned and NJT was pushing an Agenda...... Meanwhile the ARC was killing projects like the Newark LRT system and Paterson LRT system , but now we can relabel it as PATH projects. The Current Tunnels can shake off another 20 years before needing a replacement , the Amtrak Tunnels should be built in 10 years......

The mere fact that you would make such outrageous statements indicates that you have a total lack of understanding of the region's transportation issues. As demonstrated in several other threads, no amount of discussion will get through to you.

Don31
December 18th, 2010, 10:57 AM
oh shush you , do some research and get back to me......go sort the cars in the yard....

Again, your immaturity is starting to bubble to the surface.....

Nexis4Jersey
December 18th, 2010, 11:02 AM
The mere fact that you would make such outrageous statements indicates that you have a total lack of understanding of the region's transportation issues. As demonstrated in several other threads, no amount of discussion will get through to you.

Go on RR.net and a few other sites , alot of ppl agreed with me..... anyone who looked at the plans did aswell , A tunnel to nowhere would be wasteful. Alt G to Grand Central would have been the best choice.....

stache
December 18th, 2010, 11:35 AM
Announcement to everybody. I am putting Nexis on /ignore. I suggest you do the same. With any luck he will leave this forum and go contaminate some other place.

Nexis4Jersey
December 18th, 2010, 11:47 AM
You might be a railfan, but your a mis-informed railfan.

You wrote:



The new Hudson tunnels were never meant to replace the current tunnels, but to compliment them. At rush hour NJ Transit and Amtrak are at 100% capacity usage of slots, they cannot fit anymore trains in during the AM/PM rush. The ARC tunnels were meant to increase the maximum trains per hour NJ Transit could operate between NJ and Manhattan from the current 23 per hour to 45 per hour.

Nah i'm pretty up to date , however i will admit i that i got some of the numbers wrong. Also i currently do not not beleave any Amtrak or NJT numbers , due to a few Urban planners telling me there numbers had been edited so to say. I can beleave them , NJT has done a few times in the past with ridership.

Don31
December 18th, 2010, 12:50 PM
Announcement to everybody. I am putting Nexis on /ignore. I suggest you do the same. With any luck he will leave this forum and go contaminate some other place.

I'm doing the same thing stache. I'm tired of his delusional fantasies. BTW, he's been chased from other forums as well, go figure.

Nexis4Jersey
December 18th, 2010, 12:57 PM
Well my views are not that off , i now have the backing of a few hundred rail rail fanners , who are getting sick of Engineers arguing we us when they know there wrong. I never have been chased off any sites , i left RR.net and a few other sites , so did a ton of other fanners.

Newarkguy
December 18th, 2010, 01:59 PM
Well my views are not that off , i now have the backing of a few hundred rail rail fanners , who are getting sick of Engineers arguing we us when they know there wrong. I never have been chased off any sites , i left RR.net and a few other sites , so did a ton of other fanners. Ive been at rr.net a few times. I recall asking why were the boonton line crossing gates "vandalized' in the same pattern at the Newark and Kearny grade crossings. It appeared that the small sidewalk gates were always toppled and the concrete foundation cracked like a vehicle hit it. The Large crossing gates all had the candy cane colored bars removed and the inside flashers. Soon some condescending railroad "employee " wrote back that it was "those Newark thugs" breaking things!! Really?! Newark "thugs" also stole the westbound #1 track? The boonton line passes Newark/belleville border. Its not a "bad area at all. I wrote back that the abandoned Boonton line and all signals and crossing gates were intact untill NYGL railroad sued NJT to allow public hearings to reactivate the lower Boonton line. Thats when all the Vandalism started! he wrote back that "you railfans know nothing blah blah...." well Im now with NJ transit, spoken with track foremen and signal maintainers and I learned.....The boonton line was pulled/ripped into a single track by Norfolk southern at NJT request. signals and crossing gates were NJtransit's . The line is mothballed as far as passenger trains are concerned. NS railroad still serves the Hartz Mountain factory in Bloomfield Newark area on the old Orange Branch. The plan was to leave the rail line intact w/ signals maintained for future reactivation as a light rail/or regular train line. But when the New York and Greenwood Railroad NYGL tried to run their own passenger trains btw montclair and Hoboken, NJT and NS pulled the tracks and removed crossing gates and flashers as needed replacements elsewhere to screw NYGL,because NYGL could NEVER afford to relay the westbound #1 track!! Railroads are known for the "I don't want it and neither can you have it" attitude when it comes to abandoned lines. They rather sell the ROW to developers and lose it forever than see another Railroad there! with todays pervasive enviromental /engineering costs costing hundreds of millions before track blueprints are even drawn....Its reasonable to assume now new Railroad on the scale of Erie Lackawanna or Pennsylvania will ever be built again.

Nexis4Jersey
March 22nd, 2011, 01:48 PM
http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?hl=en&ie=UTF8&msa=0&msid=215312482559953359515.00048b60c22710c9908f2&ll=40.75636,-74.140205&spn=0.131332,0.308647&z=12

I added some more things like the Mt. Holly Branch which my bus operator friend said would help alot down there along with the other proposals listed for South Jersey. I also pulled the Newark Light Rail line form Grove Street to West Orange via the Abandoned NS Orange branch. Stations would include Watsessing Avenue which would become a high level platform which is possible if you raise the platform canopy or demolish and rebuild that should not be an issue for NJT except the historical groups would be super mad , the Next station would be Glenwood Ave , Thomas Boulevard / Washington Street , Thomas Edison Historic site / Lakeside Ave and Park Avenue. Its feasible , so don't tell me its not.....the only probably is $$$....

futurecity
March 22nd, 2011, 02:04 PM
Announcement to everybody. I am putting Nexis on /ignore. I suggest you do the same. With any luck he will leave this forum and go contaminate some other place.

That is cyber bullying.

lofter1
March 23rd, 2011, 02:11 AM
Can't stand the heat ...

Sid
April 4th, 2011, 11:37 PM
I appreciate Nexis' dedication somewhat, but the problem is he almost NEVER gives links to any sources to back up what he says. I'm not just talking here, I see him on other forums as well. He talks about new light rail and heavy rail lines, and new stations in New Jersey all the time, but never shares his supposed sources. Ever.

Nexis4Jersey
April 5th, 2011, 01:02 PM
I appreciate Nexis' dedication somewhat, but the problem is he almost NEVER gives links to any sources to back up what he says. I'm not just talking here, I see him on other forums as well. He talks about new light rail and heavy rail lines, and new stations in New Jersey all the time, but never shares his supposed sources. Ever.

True , i guess i should work on that more.... 45% of my info comes form Employees , so i just assume there right and never check the source out. The Majority of times they are right tho....

Sid
April 5th, 2011, 05:07 PM
True , i guess i should work on that more.... 45% of my info comes form Employees , so i just assume there right and never check the source out. The Majority of times they are right tho....

I only say this because I'm often interested in reading more about these things you say. Like you'll say they're going to build a new light rail line going west through Jersey City from Hoboken Terminal. Why can't I find anything about that online? Or all these other new lines you talk about.

Nexis4Jersey
April 5th, 2011, 05:19 PM
I only say this because I'm often interested in reading more about these things you say. Like you'll say they're going to build a new light rail line going west through Jersey City from Hoboken Terminal. Why can't I find anything about that online? Or all these other new lines you talk about.

Some of this is old news , and thus the links are gone....thats the problem i have with alot of the projects. Even the ones UC like the Pennsuaken Transit Center , its very hard getting info on them for some reason. But if you dig hard enough or go to the cities where these lines are proposed to run through they have a map and info on it.

mariab
March 4th, 2014, 04:10 PM
Good news, but I think the rest of the article was either cut off, or the writer just wanted to get the news out before he had a chance to write it up.

http://www.mycentraljersey.com/article/20140303/NJNEWS10/303030049/NJ-Transit-begins-direct-Manhattan-service-Raritan-Valley-Line?odyssey=obinsite

JCMAN320
May 5th, 2014, 03:12 PM
Amtrak chief gives aging Hudson rail tunnels 20 years to live, tops

By Steve Strunsky/The Star-Ledger
Email the author | Follow on Twitter
on May 05, 2014 at 3:00 PM

http://imgick.nj.com/home/njo-media/width620/img/ledgerupdates_impact/photo/2014/05/arcworksitenorthbergenramintalaiegettyjpg-815ca1f024aeaac3.jpg
Workers demonstrated in North Bergen, in support of the ARC trans-Hudson rail tunnel in November 2010, which was cancelled by Gov Chris Christie. Amtrak CEO Joe Boardman warns the two existing tunnels now serving a crowded 160,000 passers per day could be forced to shut down within 20 years. (Ramin Talaie/Getty Images)

Amtrak Chief Executive Officer Joe Boardman said the two existing rail tunnels that now carry 160,000 commuters a day under the Hudson River will have to be shut within 20 years, according to a published report.

“I’m being told we got something less than 20 years before we have to shut one or two down,” Boardman said during a transportation conference last week in Manhattan, according to a report by Capital New York. “Something less than 20. I don’t know if that something less than 20 is seven, or some other number. But to build two new ones, you’re talking seven to nine years to deliver, if we all decided today that we could do it."

The executive director of the transportation think tank that hosted the conference, the Regional Plan Association, described Boardman’s remarks as “a big shock,” the report said.

“I’ve been hearing abstractly people at Amtrak and other people at New Jersey Transit say for years the tunnels are over 100 years old and we have to be worried about them,” the executive director, Tom Wright, was quoted as saying. “To actually have Joe put something concrete on the table, less than 20 years … Within my office, there was a level of, ‘Wow, this is really serious.'”

In late 2010, Gov. Chris Christie cited already rising cost estimates and potential overruns when he cancelled longtime plans for the so-called ARC tunnel, a multi-billion dollar project that would have added two new tubes and doubled trans-Hudson rail capacity.

NJ Transit was the lead agency on the project, which also involved the federal government and the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey. Christie directed the Port Authority to redirect $1.8 billion of the $3 billion it had set aside for the ARC project, and instead use it to overhaul the Pulaski Skyway and related infrastructure projects.

Amtrak has since announced that it would take the lead on a new, "Gateway" tunnel project, though funding for the project has not been determined, and projections for its completion date range from 15 to 25 years.

And that's not soon enough, said Boardman, according to the report.

NJ Transit declined to comment.

http://www.nj.com/news/index.ssf/2014/05/amtrak_chief_gives_hudson_rail_tunnels_20_years_to _live_tops.html#incart_river_hudson

lofter1
May 5th, 2014, 06:04 PM
What does Big Chris have to say about this?

stache
May 5th, 2014, 07:00 PM
"What's for dinner"? :p

Merry
September 26th, 2014, 02:08 AM
104-Year-Old Portal Bridge Presents $900 Million Problem for Rail Commuters

By PATRICK McGEEHAN

http://static01.nyt.com/images/2014/09/23/nyregion/PORTALweb1/PORTALweb1-master675.jpg
The Portal Bridge, over which 450 trains carry more than 150,000 riders a day, is in desperate need of replacement.
The cost of replacing the bridge, which is blamed for frequent delays, is estimated at $900 million, none of which has been lined up.
Robert Stolarik for The New York Times

It carries more passenger trains than any other railroad bridge in the Western Hemisphere, yet few people beyond those who rely on it have heard of it. It goes largely unnoticed, unless something goes wrong, which happens with irritating frequency. After all, the bridge is 104 years old.

Every time it swings open to let a boat pass is a test of early-20th-century technology that can snarl train travel from Boston to Washington, the nation’s busiest rail corridor. And over the years, because it is partially made out of wood, it also has proved to be quite flammable.

To the tens of thousands of commuters on the hundreds of trains that cross it going to or coming from New York City, the Portal Bridge is infamous.

Since the start of last year, the bridge has been blamed for about 250 delays on the rails, according to New Jersey Transit, which is its heaviest user.

Even in an era when so much of the nation’s infrastructure is in a state of disrepair, the Portal Bridge stands out. Everyone agrees that it is in desperate need of replacement, but no one has come up with the money for a new crossing. Two recent significant delays caused by the bridge have focused attention on Amtrak’s stalled effort to obtain the nearly $1 billion needed to replace the creaky bridge.

http://static01.nyt.com/images/2014/09/23/nyregion/PORTALweb2/PORTALweb2-articleLarge.jpg
A sparking wire set the wood fenders under the bridge ablaze in May 2005, disrupting Amtrak
and New Jersey Transit service on the Northeast Corridor.
Bill Kostroun/Associated Press

Each day, about 450 trains carry more than 150,000 riders over the Portal, a fragile choke point that crosses the Hackensack River halfway between Manhattan and Newark.

Every time its center section opens to let a tugboat push a barge full of sludge downriver, there is a reasonable chance that a lot of people will be late for work — or dinner — with delays radiating out from Pennsylvania Station in New York and stretching from the nation’s capital to Massachusetts.

When the bridge’s name is uttered in official announcements or in email alerts, riders know that frustration lies just around the bend.

“If you’re on the train and they say Portal Bridge, you know you’d better make other plans,” said Patrick Williams, who commutes to Midtown Manhattan from Long Branch, N.J. “It usually means big delays for thousands of people.”

http://static01.nyt.com/images/2014/09/23/nyregion/PORTALweb4/PORTALweb4-articleLarge.jpg
In November 1996, a northbound Amtrak train derailed and sideswiped another train right after crossing the Portal Bridge.
Bill Kostroun/Associated Press

Most of those delays are measured in minutes, but when serious problems arise, the backups can last for hours. That is what happened twice over the summer when the bridge failed to swing back into place, delaying trains for as long as 45 minutes during the evening rush.

A few weeks earlier, wooden fenders beneath the bridge caught fire just after 6:30 p.m., forcing Amtrak officials to cut power to the bridge. In the 70 minutes it took to extinguish the fire and reopen the bridge, 31 trains had been delayed and an additional 21 had been canceled. Commutes to New Jersey suburbs that would take just over an hour took three hours.

The bridge is largely made of steel, but it has burned before: In 2005, a sparking wire set the fenders ablaze (http://www.nytimes.com/2005/05/14/nyregion/14bridge.html), shutting down all train travel on Amtrak’s mainline in the region overnight.

Within Amtrak, which owns and operates it, the Portal is known as the “Achilles’ heel of the Northeast Corridor,” said Drew Galloway, assistant vice president for planning and development.

“There are maintenance crews there around the clock. But you can only do so much to a century-old swing bridge.”

http://static01.nyt.com/images/2014/09/23/nyregion/PORTALweb3/PORTALweb3-articleLarge.jpg
A rendering for a renovated Portal Bridge.
HNTB

For something built in 1910, Mr. Galloway said, “structurally, it probably is in reasonable condition.” But, he added, its mechanical and electrical systems are “reaching the end of their useful lives.”

Indeed, the bridge, expected to last 100 years, is swinging on borrowed time. Federal transportation officials have recognized its precarious state for many years, and they have a plan to replace it with a two-track bridge tall enough for boats to pass under it.

But that plan carries an estimated price of $900 million, none of which has been lined up yet. Mr. Galloway said Amtrak was pushing the project, with New Jersey Transit as its local partner. New Jersey Transit, which operates commuter trains and buses throughout the state, split the $32 million cost of the preliminary engineering of a replacement with Amtrak and also paid $12 million for its final design.

When the governor of New Jersey, Chris Christie, a Republican, announced that New Jersey Transit was canceling its plan to build rail tunnels under the Hudson River to Manhattan, he criticized Democratic elected officials for failing to include funding for a new Portal Bridge in that project. In 2011, Mr. Christie said he had let federal officials know that New Jersey was prepared to contribute a “significant amount of money” toward a new bridge.

“There can’t be high-speed rail between New York and Washington without a change at the Portal Bridge,” Mr. Christie said then.

In fact, since a train derailed on it on a Saturday morning in late 1996, the Portal Bridge has lowered the speed of trains approaching and leaving New York to 60 miles per hour. Several cars of that train, which was carrying mail, wound up falling from the tracks into the marsh below. No one was killed, but 43 passengers and crew members on two trains were injured.

Federal investigators determined the cause was a failure to return the rails to the right position after the bridge swung open for a tugboat. Before an opening, the tracks on the bridge’s deck must be raised so they can safely swing over the fixed segments that lead up to them. Getting the tracks lined up again has proved so tricky, and the traffic over the Portal is so heavy, that the Coast Guard has limited the times of day when boats can request an opening.

Bill Sheehan, the founder of Hackensack Riverkeeper, an environmental advocacy group, described the Portal as “decrepit” and said he favored the plan for a taller bridge, even though commercial use on the river had declined over the years.

The only regular river traffic comes from the tugs that push barges of sludge from the Bergen County Utilities Authority complex in Little Ferry to a sewage treatment plant in Newark, Mr. Sheehan said. But with its deck just 23 feet above the mean high water line of the river, the bridge is too low for even a fishing boat with a flying bridge to pass under, he said.

“The problem with this 100-year-old bridge is when something breaks, they literally have to go back to the machine shop and make a new part,” Mr. Sheehan said. “There isn’t a Bridges ‘R’ Us that has what they need.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/26/nyregion/portal-bridge-presents-northeast-rail-commuters-with-a-104-year-old-problem.html?ref=nyregion&_r=0