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Sandy Kramer
September 22nd, 2005, 06:35 PM
My wife and I will be visiting New York in very early October.

In 1910, my late father was born at 74 - 76 Sheriff Street.

As best as I am able to discern, the street which separates HAMILTON FISH PARK from a branch of the NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY on Houston, is/was SHERIFF STREET. Furthermore, I believe the area near what is/used to be the intersections of SHERIFF and STANTON, and SHERIFF and RIVINGTON more or less target the
address area I am seeking, and that the target area should be approached from the NORTH ( Houston ).

If you could provide any further information, I would be greatly indebted.

MORE IMPORTANTLY, my wife was terrified when I used the word "tenements" and "walking" in the same sentence. We ( at least I ) am/are planning to "walk" the abovementioned area on Sunday afternoon.

Could you provide any insight with regard to the wisdom of "walking" in the area on a Sunday afternoon.

TLOZ Link5
September 22nd, 2005, 07:08 PM
Here's a map of the area, focused roughly on the intersection of Sheriff and what appears to be Stanton. It appears, though, that your father's boyhood home has been replaced with a large housing project that bookends the east and south sides of Hamilton Fish Park.

http://www.mapquest.com/maps/map.adp?country=US&addtohistory=&formtype=address&searchtype=address&cat=&address=Sheriff%20St%20%26%20Stanton%20St&city=New%20York&state=NY&zipcode=10002&searchtab=home

The link below is to the NYPD's crime statistics for the Seventh Precinct, which serves the Lower East Side, as of the beginning of this month; with a historical perspective on 1993 and 1997. Though murders and rapes are numerically up slightly and robberies up percentagewise slightly, most other crime is down compared to 2004, and only a fraction of what it was in 1993. Keep in mind that the LES is home to more than 60,000 people, so its per capita crime rate per 100,000 is still lower than that of entire American cities. That includes the projects.

http://www.nyc.gov/html/nypd/pdf/chfdept/cs007pct.pdf

If you want to visit the area, it's best to use common sense and look as if you're familiar with the neighborhood and/or you know where you're going. If you're nervous, you can be on the defensive, but don't act explicitly paranoid. Personally, I've been in the area on late afternoons, and partied elsewhere in the neighborhood on late nights, and have never had a problem.

ManhattanKnight
September 22nd, 2005, 07:19 PM
A little quick research suggests that Sheriff Street was replaced by one of the area's large post-WW2 housing projects. The neighborhood might look a bit rough to a first-time visitor from Kansas, but daytime safety isn't a real issue. You'll find an overview of the neighborhood and some resources here: http://www.nycvisit.com/content/index.cfm?pagePkey=441 I suspect that the Tenement Museum, mentioned in that site, can tell you all you want to know and more about your father's birthplace. I'm sure that you can find period maps of the area at several places, including the NY Public Library, the Museum of the City of New York, and, probably, the Tenement Museum. There's a reason, by the way, why NYC now has a tenement museum; most of the originals are now condos.

If you're interested in exploring your roots in a little depth, there are many resources, including US Census records. You should be able to discover exactly who was living at 74-76 Sheriff Street in 1910 and 1920 and what their occupations, places of birth, and housing costs were. My father's parents were Jews to came to this country around 1905. I was able to track the family history through the 1910, 1920, and 1930 Census records, as my dad and his siblings were born and schooled, the family took in several boarders, and my grandmother entered into the first few of what became 5 marriages by the time of her death at age 96 (she outlived all 5 husbands).

macreator
September 22nd, 2005, 07:29 PM
While the area does feel like you're in "the projects", with the superblocks that come with them, the area is perfectly safe if you're going to be walking around midday or in the afternoon. This area is not really in the yuppie-fied sections of the Lower East Side which is truly above Houston and a bit West but this area is perfectly safe, you'll be fine.

lofter1
September 22nd, 2005, 07:33 PM
While you're over that way take the short walk on over to the East River Park (under renovation but there are some terrific areas -- and very NYC): http://www.newyorkled.com/eastriverpark.htm

And then walk south under the Williamsburg, Manhattan and Brooklyn Bridges (there is a path / walkway -- if you keep walking south beyond the Brooklyn Bridge you'll arrive at South Street Seaport -- a little farther and you're at Battery Park).

http://content.answers.com/main/content/wp/en/b/b4/LGBWilliamsburgBridge.jpg
The Manhattan side of the Williamsburg Bridge with the East River Park along the river.

angler
September 26th, 2005, 08:07 PM
I took a similar walk during my NYC visit. My ancestors had a store on Lewis Street on the lower east side. Sadly, the entire street had been rebuilt and there were no old buildings. Still, it was interesting to walk there.

We felt perfectly safe in the area (and in all of NYC) during daylight hours. Even though we quite obviously looked like tourists, nobody bothered us. Many people went out of their way to be helpful.

ASchwarz
September 26th, 2005, 08:11 PM
The area is completely safe. You will have no problems anywhere in the Lower East Side during daylight or early evening hours. The eastern portions of the Lower East Side all went through urban renewal during the postwar era and have few tenements. The tenements are mostly to the west. Ironically, the tenement area is now the fancier part of the Lower East Side, while the urban renewal area is generally less desirable.

BxOne
September 26th, 2005, 10:18 PM
The area is completely safe. You will have no problems anywhere in the Lower East Side during daylight or early evening hours. The eastern portions of the Lower East Side all went through urban renewal during the postwar era and have few tenements. The tenements are mostly to the west. Ironically, the tenement area is now the fancier part of the Lower East Side, while the urban renewal area is generally less desirable.

Thats what that women who was shot and killed earlier this year thought.

Always use caution in an area you are not familiar with. Low-income Housing Projects breed crime, this area has tons of them. Just be aware and you should be fine.

TLOZ Link5
September 26th, 2005, 10:24 PM
Thats what that women who was shot and killed earlier this year thought.


I don't want to blame her for her death, but if this is the case I think it is, then she should have handed over her wallet and not said, "What do you think you're going to do? Shoot us?". Either way, they caught the killer pretty quickly.

BxOne
September 26th, 2005, 10:57 PM
I don't want to blame her for her death, but if this is the case I think it is, then she should have handed over her wallet and not said, "What do you think you're going to do? Shoot us?". Either way, they caught the killer pretty quickly.

She was a fool. If she would have givin up the cash, she would be alive today. Never ask someone robbing you at gunpoint "What are you gonna do, shoot me?" That's just stupid. You are intimidating them. Even worse it was a group.

When walking through the L.E.S. just be careful, the area has a lot of drug activity. Never know when some desperate crack head may need a few bucks. Especially around the housing projects. Just be aware of whats going on around you, and people won't bother you. They go for the weak, easy targets. Lost tourist, someone on an iPod, ect.

lofter1
September 26th, 2005, 11:59 PM
Thats what that women who was shot and killed earlier this year thought.
Wasn't that at 3 AM??

redhot00
September 27th, 2005, 05:10 AM
Yeah, it was about 3AM. I hate to blame the victim, but it's true, she didn't react in the smartest way to the mugging. But being that she was from the midwest, and had been in NY for a while without incident, she probably felt invincible and let her guard down --huge mistake. Add to that the fact that she had just left a bar and I'm quite sure had a few drinks and there is a tragedy waiting to happen. I think it happened at Rivington and Essex or Rivington and Ludlow.

Just stay off the streets in the middle of the night, and use common sense during daylight hours, and you should be fine in the LES.

ASchwarz
September 27th, 2005, 09:58 AM
Um, why are people responding to a troll?

lofter1
September 27th, 2005, 11:21 PM
It looks like this area has it's hidden dangers (haha):

http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=7432

AmeriKenArtist
October 24th, 2005, 10:25 AM
Bx is there a news article?


"Thats what that women who was shot and killed earlier this year thought.

Always use caution in an area you are not familiar with. Low-income Housing Projects breed crime, this area has tons of them. Just be aware and you should be fine."