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300472
October 28th, 2005, 02:55 PM
Where would guys recommend to eat `the most important meal of the day`?

Thanks

300472
October 30th, 2005, 02:49 PM
Nobody?

lofter1
October 30th, 2005, 10:56 PM
In SoHo:

The Cupping Room (Broome / W. Bway)

Moondance Diner (Grand / 6th Avenue)

In NoHo:

NoHo Star (Bleecker / Lafayette)

Schadenfrau
October 31st, 2005, 11:06 AM
Do you mean brunch?

300472
October 31st, 2005, 11:10 AM
Do you mean brunch?

No, eggs sunnyside up,pancakes,waffles,grits b4 9am that sort of thing. Im staying near Madison Square Garden so not too far from there hopefully.
Wa



Is Norma`s any good?

NYatKNIGHT
October 31st, 2005, 01:05 PM
Better to ask someone from that neighborhood if no one answers here.

lofter1
October 31st, 2005, 01:19 PM
near Madison Square Garden so not too far from there hopefully.

Empire Diner @ 10th Ave. / W. 22nd St.

Norma's? don't know.

There is a terrific Southern Food restaurant (hole in the wall, take out available) on W. 34th just east of 9th Ave.

300472
November 1st, 2005, 05:02 AM
The Skylight Diner looks good, and just round the corner as well.

tdp
November 2nd, 2005, 01:45 PM
Try this site;
http://www.menupages.com/index.asp

It has a Diners & Coffee shops section with reviews and a chance to check out the menus also.

ZippyTheChimp
August 2nd, 2007, 05:21 AM
August 2, 2007

Downtown Diner Is Moving to Wyoming, Lock, Stock and Original Stools

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/08/02/nyregion/diner600.jpg
James Estrin/The New York Times
The Moondance, at Grand Street and Avenue of the Americas, is heading
for a second life out West: La Barge, Wyo., population 600.

By ETHAN WILENSKY-LANFORD

La Barge, Wyo., is a small town. It is so small, it does not have its own grocery store. Nor does it have a restaurant — well, one that is open, anyway. That’s all about to change, though, and in big-city style.

Two of the town’s 600 people are buying the Moondance Diner, a Manhattan mainstay for about 75 years, to put it on a truck and drive it more than 2,000 miles to La Barge.

“We haven’t had a restaurant in town for quite a long time,” said Betty Moceika, the town clerk of La Barge. “Everybody is real excited. This is a big deal in La Barge, you know.”

The buyers, Cheryl and Vince Pierce, got a decent bargain on the downtown diner, at Grand Street and Avenue of the Americas near the Holland Tunnel. It has had bit parts in a Spider-Man movie and television’s “Sex and the City” and “Friends.” Jonathan Larson, who wrote the hit Broadway musical “Rent,” even worked there as a waiter in the 1980s, according to a diner preservationist who helped find a home for the Moondance.

“Seventy-five hundred!” said Ms. Pierce, a part-time librarian and mother of two in La Barge, speaking in a telephone interview yesterday. “What a good deal, huh?”

The diner, built in 1933, is the oldest in New York City, according to Michael Perlman, who led the campaign to save it. It has an arched barrel ceiling, the original stools and countertop, and wrap-around windows, he said, which are all distinctive of a railway-car style diner.

Mr. Perlman helped locate a nonprofit group in Providence, R.I., called the American Diner Museum, which relocates diners facing demolition. The museum advertised the diner on its Web site.

“Freestanding diners were manufactured to move, so this is ideal,” said Mr. Perlman, who became involved in the project after he learned in February that it would be closed this summer.

The Moondance is set to be lifted onto a flatbed truck next week and driven to the oilfields of southwestern Wyoming.

The move is the most difficult part of the project, which was reported by The Star-Tribune of Casper, Wyo., on Tuesday. Mr. Pierce and his father-in-law are truck drivers, Ms. Pierce said, but they have never driven a flatbed truck with a diner onboard before.

Ms. Pierce and her husband saw an untapped market, just waiting to be fed, in the small town. It was even smaller, but then there was a recent influx of oil workers, who live in temporary barracks-style housing known locally as “mancamps.” The town does have three bars and one restaurant, called the Hideaway Cafe, that was supposed to open this week but had to delay its opening.

The Pierces saw the diner on the museum’s Web site and decided they had found just the thing.

“We were toying around with the idea, and said, ‘Wow, it would be nice to have a place in La Barge,’ ” she said. “This is in New York, but it sure is a nice-looking diner.”

The menu might have to change, she added, in order to suit the tastes of the local population.

“We would love for people to be able to catch their fish and bring it in,” Ms. Pierce said. “Possibly down the road, we might be looking at a buffalo burger.”

Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company

ablarc
August 2nd, 2007, 06:22 AM
^ Shame about that.

Hof
August 3rd, 2007, 11:43 AM
Call me obsessive-compulsive,but one of the daily themes to my life has always been to seek and consume a good breakfast.
The components are simple--some coffee,followed by eggs,accompanied by a pork product,potatoes and a bread.Juice is optional.Sometimes,I'll substitute grits for 'taters ( I live in Florida) sometimes I'll substitute pancakes for eggs,but 360 out of 365 days,the mornings' menu persists.Frequently I'll cook,but when thoughts of cracking my own eggs,busing my own table and washing my own mess interfere,I'll go to a restaurant.Also,the tips at my place are lousy.

Oh,and the cost of the meal is important as well.

When I visit the City I aways try to find a convenient diner or coffee shop close to my hotel,and moments after brushing the moss from my teeth (another OCB trait)I'm there,sitting down to a hot cup,unfolding the morning's "Times" and ordering from rote.

The best of the lot,for me anyway,is the Manhattan Diner,Broadway and 77th.
The M.D. INCLUDES coffee and juice in their bkfst special menu,and their prices are right and the portions are generous.

Order eggs,and you get a mound,any style.Omelettes look like yellow baseball mitts.Order bacon and you get a sinfully thick and crispy platter-4 strips; bread choices include challah,bagels,cornbread,biscuits,British Muffins,crunchy toasted Italian or plain old wheat toast.Or anything else you can dream up,like biscotti or croissant.

Their sausages are a meal by themselves,thick and plump.You get two,and they pop when you cut into them;the juice (4 choices) is in a large glass,not some damn teeny shotglass of OJ that most places charge $2,50 for.
When all this bounty arrives,it fills up the table with plates and glasses and the main breakfast is falling off the platter,it's so generous.
People with hot coffeepots roam the aisles,forbidding you to have less than half a cup at ANY time.
And there's real cream in little tin containers,the kind with the lids designed for patrons with opposible thumbs.As you consume,the wait staff will snatch up any empty plates or glasses,keeping the table neat,busing it on the run.
I always leave a nice tip.The service is worth it.

The bill is always around six,seven bucks,a real deal.Last month I was staying at the Hotel Pennsylvania,and for breakfast I'd hop a Subway uptown just to begin the day with a M.D. Special.I'm obsessive,remember.

After I got back to Florida,I went to a neighborhood restaurant and carefully perused their menu.Most bkfst items were $5.49.Coffee was $1.50 more.So was juice.The portions were puny (you could read a newspaper through the bacon strip,it was cut so thin.And,there were only 3 strips of this joke meat).
It cost 9 bucks and I had to get a waitresses' attention to get a coffee refill.Their "cream" is in little plastic containers with tug-off lids,about the same size as the orange juice serving.

If you ever find yourself on the UWS around 7 AM,try the Manhattan Diner.There may be better places to eat breakfast in Manhattan,but they couldn't be THAT much better.

Bob
August 4th, 2007, 10:14 AM
The Ritz-Carlton (Battery, adjacent to the Skyscraper Museum) seems to have the right stuff when it comes to breakfast: 100% real maple syrup. And the French Toast is about an inch thick. Most likely, a pricey affair, but it sure looks good...mmm.

ablarc
August 4th, 2007, 10:23 AM
Norma's: http://www.parkermeridien.com/nymagn.htm

Hof
August 4th, 2007, 11:55 AM
What ever happened to The Cosmic Cafe,just down 8th Ave from Columbus Circle?
They used to be a great breakfast joint,but earlier posts here indicated that they closed.Anybody know??

brianac
August 4th, 2007, 01:01 PM
Manhattan Diner for me.

Hof says it better than I could.

718Bound
August 4th, 2007, 02:11 PM
The move is the most difficult part of the project, which was reported by The Star-Tribune of Casper, Wyo., on Tuesday. Mr. Pierce and his father-in-law are truck drivers, Ms. Pierce said, but they have never driven a flatbed truck with a diner onboard before

Oh no... I hope they are not seriously thinking about moving it themselves. I don't care how many years of truck driving experience they have! The job should be left to people who move buildings / houses every day! Especially trying to get it out of tight NYC streets...

The Benniest
June 16th, 2008, 09:45 AM
Some good information in this thread. I'm struggling to find places to eat for my trip and this has helped. Thanks everyone. :)

didgeridoo33
June 16th, 2008, 11:21 AM
i stayed RIGHTTTT across from the Manhattan Diner when i was in new york last month. and i'm totally bummed i didn't eat there..:(

Encideyamind
June 16th, 2008, 12:36 PM
Call me obsessive-compulsive,but one of the daily themes to my life has always been to seek and consume a good breakfast.
The components are simple--some coffee,followed by eggs,accompanied by a pork product,potatoes and a bread.Juice is optional.Sometimes,I'll substitute grits for 'taters ( I live in Florida) sometimes I'll substitute pancakes for eggs,but 360 out of 365 days,the mornings' menu persists.Frequently I'll cook,but when thoughts of cracking my own eggs,busing my own table and washing my own mess interfere,I'll go to a restaurant.Also,the tips at my place are lousy.

Oh,and the cost of the meal is important as well.

When I visit the City I aways try to find a convenient diner or coffee shop close to my hotel,and moments after brushing the moss from my teeth (another OCB trait)I'm there,sitting down to a hot cup,unfolding the morning's "Times" and ordering from rote.

The best of the lot,for me anyway,is the Manhattan Diner,Broadway and 77th.
The M.D. INCLUDES coffee and juice in their bkfst special menu,and their prices are right and the portions are generous.

Order eggs,and you get a mound,any style.Omelettes look like yellow baseball mitts.Order bacon and you get a sinfully thick and crispy platter-4 strips; bread choices include challah,bagels,cornbread,biscuits,British Muffins,crunchy toasted Italian or plain old wheat toast.Or anything else you can dream up,like biscotti or croissant.

Their sausages are a meal by themselves,thick and plump.You get two,and they pop when you cut into them;the juice (4 choices) is in a large glass,not some damn teeny shotglass of OJ that most places charge $2,50 for.
When all this bounty arrives,it fills up the table with plates and glasses and the main breakfast is falling off the platter,it's so generous.
People with hot coffeepots roam the aisles,forbidding you to have less than half a cup at ANY time.
And there's real cream in little tin containers,the kind with the lids designed for patrons with opposible thumbs.As you consume,the wait staff will snatch up any empty plates or glasses,keeping the table neat,busing it on the run.
I always leave a nice tip.The service is worth it.

The bill is always around six,seven bucks,a real deal.Last month I was staying at the Hotel Pennsylvania,and for breakfast I'd hop a Subway uptown just to begin the day with a M.D. Special.I'm obsessive,remember.

After I got back to Florida,I went to a neighborhood restaurant and carefully perused their menu.Most bkfst items were $5.49.Coffee was $1.50 more.So was juice.The portions were puny (you could read a newspaper through the bacon strip,it was cut so thin.And,there were only 3 strips of this joke meat).
It cost 9 bucks and I had to get a waitresses' attention to get a coffee refill.Their "cream" is in little plastic containers with tug-off lids,about the same size as the orange juice serving.

If you ever find yourself on the UWS around 7 AM,try the Manhattan Diner.There may be better places to eat breakfast in Manhattan,but they couldn't be THAT much better.


They should pay for such an endorsement.

MidtownGuy
June 16th, 2008, 02:16 PM
I'm struggling to find places to eat for my trip and this has helped.

Benniest, this is just a suggestion...why not leave more up to chance? It's great to find a few places ahead of time that you'd like to try, but your best discoveries will come from simply walking around and trying what looks good at that moment. There are just so many restaurants in NYC...why struggle?:confused:
Planning every little moment can be an entertaining diversion during the lead up to a trip, but spontaneity has its virtues!

The Benniest
June 16th, 2008, 02:48 PM
Alright. Thanks for the help and advice MidtownGuy. :cool:

Jasonik
February 4th, 2009, 08:51 AM
http://images.nymag.com/listings/restaurant/4joesrestaurant.jpg (http://menupages.com/restaurantdetails?restaurantid=614)

BrooklynRider
February 4th, 2009, 08:48 PM
The Chip Shop in Park Slope, Brooklyn. A proper English breakfast.

Amberlicious7583
February 8th, 2009, 09:18 PM
Clinton Street Baking Co. is a good choice!
http://www.clintonstreetbaking.com/

The Benniest
February 9th, 2009, 01:50 AM
When I was in NYC last July, I ate brunch at a restaurant called Bubby's in Brooklyn... It's at 1 Main St., or, if it's closer, there is one at 118 Hudson St. in Manhattan.

Very good food. :)

Amberlicious7583
February 9th, 2009, 11:04 AM
That place look huge! Maybe I will have to check Bubby's out one day soon :)