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spaceboy
May 4th, 2004, 10:55 AM
In an owner-occupied white glove luxury doorman building, can someone give me the etiquette on tipping / "holiday bonuses" for conceirge and doormen.

I've also heard you should tip when you first move in... any help would be much appreciated.

krulltime
May 4th, 2004, 02:18 PM
Well when I move in to my apartment I didn't tip any doorman...I didn't know you had to.

But I think in christmax I will give about $20...I don't know really but I have alot of concierge guys in this apartment building so I think is going to cost me if I am really generous!!!

:roll:

Edward
May 4th, 2004, 02:29 PM
Read these tipping points (http://www.newyorkmetro.com/nymetro/news/bizfinance/finance/features/3652/index.html) from NEW YORK magazine.

spaceboy
May 6th, 2004, 12:30 AM
Wow... thanks for posting that... that's pricier then I thought... do you guys actually hand your doormen $5 if he watches your car for you?

Anybody else share what they do?

TLOZ Link5
May 6th, 2004, 01:30 AM
I'd do around fifty dollars or so around Christmas time. Can't help you when it comes to cars.

Ninjahedge
May 6th, 2004, 09:26 AM
So if you live in a good place in the city, you have to tip the doorman, the super and the elevator guy?

As well as pay rent?

I know tipping is a sign of respect and appreciation, but when tips are expected, it kind of removes that from the equasion.

Also, where did this guy come up with the "european" tip method? Don't they actually pay their staff better over there? Good enough that they don't NEED to live off of tips?

I think it is appaling that restaurants can get away with paying their staff so low.

I always tip 15-20% in a restaurant unless the service was lousy. Hell, I even tip on takeout sometimes (guilty). But I still hate the idea that a tip is mandatory.

Taxes not being included also annoy me, but that is another matter.

Bar tips? A buck is fine for most drinks, even some cosmos (I have seen how much "work" goes into some of those fru-fru drinks and asking $2-$3 for a tip is a little greedy). Some others ARE a PITA to make and should be tipped more. Not because of them COSTING more, just because they are more labor intensive and the bartender should get a "thank you".

I have seen it where guys at bars would order a bunch of drinks and just leave whatever was left on their bill for the bartender. 4 or 5 beers with a $3 tip.

While I see that $1 per beer for a bunch of tap beers might be a little high, 50¢ a beer for tip is hardly acceptable either.

Back to the subject. Interesting on the doorman thing there. I have never had one. I would guess that you tip a bit if he helps you move in or something, but I would not see any reason to tip him too much as soon as you walk in the door........

What do you all think?

spaceboy
May 6th, 2004, 09:39 AM
So if you live in a good place in the city, you have to tip the doorman, the super and the elevator guy?

As well as pay rent?

Tell me about it.

Another question, do you guys tip them all equally?

BrooklynRider
May 6th, 2004, 10:20 AM
I lived in a doorman building on East 46th Street for some time. I tipped everyone and it does go a long way in assuring you and your apartment are looked over. Generally, I tipped equally, except for those that I had an especially good relationship with or those that helped me out - they would get more.

Overall, I was not overly generous throughout the year. I didn't want them to think that every request I had, which was part of their job, would automatically entail a payoff. Know thedifference between services guaranteed in your lease or contract and those services which can be viewed as "favors". I tipped favors - not their responsibilities.

ZippyTheChimp
August 14th, 2005, 07:35 AM
http://www.villagevoice.com/

The Essay

The Tipping Point

New Yorkers are great at leaving something extra. Tourists suck. A cocktail waitress spills the beans.

by Nona Willis-Aronowitz
August 12th, 2005 3:16 PM

http://images.villagevoice.com/issues/0533/essay.jpg
There is something the matter with Kansas!
photo: Kate Englund

Bleecker Street, Saturday night: The air is edibly humid; partygoers clog the streets, clutching wads of bills in their sweaty hands. While everyone is out spending their cash, I'm busy making it, cocktail waitressing. As I seat four new customers with unidentifiable accents, I take a second to look around. Chichi Europeans look amused at authentic New York frenzy, Long Island chicks suck down cosmos like they've seen Carrie do on Sex and the City, old rich guys order tequila shots for cute girls. Money is flying everywhere. As usual, I'm darting around, serving nebulous fun in liquid form, beaming, and swooping up bills left on the shiny wooden tables.

After my new foursome's first round of drinks, I ask over the din, "Where are you from?" As effusive as can be, they tell me they're actors from Budapest, and it's their first night in New York. They're also enthusiastic and unrelenting drinkers. They eventually order $180 worth of drinks. Proud of my sales, I present them the check. They pay in cash, leaving me a tip of . . . $7. The radiant farewell smile I just gave them instantly turns into a scowl.

It's happened again.

Two middle-aged men from the Bronx, who've been sipping Jameson all night, overhear my complaint to another waitress. One winks and says, "Don't worry, sweetie, we'll take care of you." They leave me a crisp $50 bill.

New Yorkers are the best tippers on earth. They've been aware of the minimum dollar-a-drink rule ever since they got their first fake ID on West 4th Street. Some don't like it, but most know it. And most do it. But whether they realize it or not, the tip they leave highly depends on the shrewdness of their server.

Waitresses, cocktail servers, and their privileged cousins, bartenders, are often thought of as shameless flirts, cheerful Pollyannas, manipulative sex goddesses, or tough-as-nails task jugglers. And we are. We take on one or more of these qualities, depending on the situation. A bunch of guys? Touch often, laugh often, generally validate their manhood. A stern eyebrow-raising couple? Be sure to check on them every five minutes. A group of loud, drunk women? Make friends with the bartender, so you can give them a couple rounds of free shots. As a rule, the drunker they are, the better they'll tip. Late-night service jobs aren't like the rest—there isn't as much double-the-tax-and-a-little-more logic as there is in your basic sit-down restaurant. If we show you a good time, we expect a tip. And New Yorkers usually oblige. We not only learn how to multitask and deal unflinchingly with sputtering drunks, but also to nurture a symbiotic tip-your-server relationship.

Nothing embodies the city's rat race mentality and capitalist go-getting more than the custom of tipping. This system was not thought up by wily waiters plotting a get-rich-quick scheme or by sleazy men ready to create an intricate sexual-exploitation dynamic. These things are part of the bigger picture, but both would be irrelevant were it not for the business owners' idea of tipping as salary in the first place. It certainly works out for my boss. Cocktail waitresses, unlike waitresses and bartenders, usually don't even get a piddling shift pay. As far as my manager is concerned, there is a direct correlation between my income and my ability to hustle. There are no guarantees, he once told me, but if you really work your ass off you can succeed here. And if you make $37 one night . . . hey, shit happens.

Of course, paying no hourly wage is technically illegal. But perhaps the reason shamelessrestaurants.com (http://shamelessrestaurants.com/), a finger-pointing website detailing restaurant owners' shady practices, hasn't orchestrated a revolution is because tip money ain't bad. On the night with the Hungarians, I walked away with a bundle of $235 for seven hours of work. Tip money not only pays the bills, it can sometimes provide a sense of accomplishment more than any fixed 9-to-5 salary.

There's just one glitch in the tipping system: tourism. There's nothing like summer for an owner of a bar in midtown or the Village—sales double, even triple, every night in the wake of a tourist-packed evening. But the hordes of visitors present a serious conflict of interest to a well-trained manipulator like me: They just don't know the New York deal.

We mustn't blame them. Some tourists really don't know. Good ol' Americans don't have the audacity to leave nothing, but they will honestly pat themselves on the back for giving 12 percent. Internationals are even worse. Although often pleasantly surprised at the attention, foreigners seldom connect good service with dollar bills. Waitresses around the globe are stereotypically slow; if they're not rude, they're at best nonchalant. But why not? They get a steady paycheck no matter what, enough to pay their rent and take care of the kids.

And then there are the tourists who only pretend they haven't heard of tipping. Last summer, I tended bar with a Frenchwoman I'll call Kayla. She once spent the whole night chatting it up with a group of French people en français, discovering, to her delight, that they had been here for months. "They must know the proper way," she whispered to me. She was left with exactly one dollar—four quarters stacked atop each other. Kayla craned her neck to see if the manager was in sight. When the coast seemed clear, she followed them outside, hurled the quarters at their car, and screamed in French, "You forgot your change, assholes!"

There are ways to get around this problem. Without the option of auto-gratuity they'd have in tonier restaurants, some servers resort to drastic measures. On one of my first days working at a little tourist hot spot of a jazz club, a bartender I used to work with let me in on a little secret. "Overcharge whenever possible," she cautioned. "If you hear a weird accent, if you can just tell by the look in their eye, the beer is eight bucks rather than six. You keep the extra two—they'll never know."

She's right. Fumbling drunk people in a strange, crowded setting will almost always fork over whatever money you ask for. "Aida," one of my former co-workers, overcharged all the time. "That's $118," she announced one Friday night, without so much as a stutter, to three toasted, cavorting Floridian lushes she "had a bad feeling about." The real amount was $98. A silicone-breasted blonde handed over her card, not even asking for a printout. Sure enough, the gratuity line on the charge slip later read $5, but Aida just shrugged. "I took care of the tip," she said. "Works every time."

One must be careful when attempting these antics. Nobody wants to face the wrath of New Yorkers who think they've been cheated (although waitstaff has been known to dupe natives mistaken for out of towners). When the summer heat—and the tourist invasion—come around, the most seasoned New York bar workers leave their old tricks behind and come up with new ones. In a world where we don't even depend on the boss for our salaries, the American value of rampant individualism is more annoyingly resonant than ever. We're used to feeling alternately validated and powerless. Maybe someday we'll be able to run around being rude all night.

Nona Willis-Aronowitz has written forThe Brooklyn Rail.

KarinBee
November 29th, 2005, 03:50 PM
Hello everyone,

my question is about tipping in restaurants. How is it usually done in NYC? Do you tell the waiter to round up to a certain amount before you hand him/her the money? Or do you wait for him/her to come back with your change and then leave the tip on the table when you leave? And when you pay with credit card, do you tell the waiter to add a certain amount as tip or do you leave the tip in cash when you leave?

Thank you.

Ninjahedge
November 29th, 2005, 04:11 PM
You usually leave it at the table, but if you are in a rush you can sometimes say round up to "blah" and leave it at that.

Chances are though, the round up will probably not be the 15%-20% before tax amount...

Also, with credit cards, they give you the receipt that you have to sign. there is a "tip" place that you fill in with the amount you want to tip them with.

A lot of times I just write "cash" and tip them with cash. It is better in that not all of it needs to be declared to taxes, and if the waiter really wanted to, they could take a buck of it for themselves instead of having to share all of it.

Depends on the situation.

NYatKNIGHT
November 29th, 2005, 06:04 PM
I never tell the waiter to add a certain amount as tip, I do it myself on either the credit card bill or with cash. If you're using cash, you can either leave it on the table after you get change or included it with rest of the bill.

If you have a large group some places automatically add the tip, so check to see if they've done that or not.

lofter1
November 29th, 2005, 09:49 PM
The NYC Tip Trick: Double the tax on your bill and you'll always be OK. For extra special service you can leave more.

Schadenfrau
November 29th, 2005, 09:53 PM
Aww, but that only leaves the server with a 16-17% tip.

I've found that 20% is a standard tip, if service is better, feel free to leave more.

ryan
November 29th, 2005, 11:27 PM
I tip 20% on the pretax total in NYC and more for cute tattoos.

TLOZ Link5
November 30th, 2005, 11:43 AM
I tip 20% on the pretax total in NYC and more for cute tattoos.

On the waiter, or is getting a tattoo an extra service in the restaurants you go to? :D

lofter1
November 30th, 2005, 12:47 PM
Re: doubling the tax:

Aww, but that only leaves the server with a 16-17% tip.

I've found that 20% is a standard tip, if service is better, feel free to leave more.
Funny: when I first moved to NYC (back in the ice age) 15% was considered a generous tip.

I know many people claim that 20% is the new standard. Clever how the service sector folk managed to work that number up even as prices in restaurants have escalated like crazy.

Eugenius
November 30th, 2005, 12:51 PM
Sometimes it depends on what I ordered. If the check is blown out by an expensive bottle of wine, the tip is smaller as a percentage of the total (if you think about it, the waiter didn't need to work harder bringing me a $60 bottle of wine than if I ordered a $30 one).

Azazello
November 30th, 2005, 08:15 PM
Although my belief of tipping mirrors what was said in the first scene in Reservoir Dogs, I do tip but I don't mindlessly pay the unsurprisingly increasing percentages that some servers seem to expect.

-- 15% for standard service. Grudgingly, be even waiters gotta eat.
-- Double the outrageous NYC tax if the service is more than parroting my order to a cook and bringing the plates back to me. Examples: engaging me or my table mates beyond talking about the weather, talking intelligently about the specials as opposed to just reciting them, etc.
-- 20% for outstanding service.

Once had a server who, rightfully, dressed down one of my tablemates for being snippy, almost rude. She, the waiter, did it in such a way that the other person was shown to be the ass that he was. That was a 20% tip. Waiters are people too!

BTW, I believe these percentage are the same for elsewhere in the US.

NYatKNIGHT
December 1st, 2005, 10:29 AM
I was appalled by what people leave for tips when I lived out west. Not only that, but the amount of bars where the bartender actually bought me a drink were few and far between, no matter how much I tipped or how many drinks I ordered. It's not the same everywhere.

ryan
December 1st, 2005, 11:06 AM
For whatever reason (and obvious benefit to restauranteurs) our country allows servers to be paid less than minimum wage, shifting the payment of their salaries directly to the people they work for (patrons). I've never understood the cheapskate resistance to this fact (though I assume it mostly has to do with never working in service) but the reality remains that these people live on their tips, so pay them decently already.

tloz- I think a bit unsanitary to get a tattoo with food.

Ninjahedge
December 1st, 2005, 11:16 AM
For whatever reason (and obvious benefit to restauranteurs) our country allows servers to be paid less than minimum wage, shifting the payment of their salaries directly to the people they work for (patrons). I've never understood the cheapskate resistance to this fact (though I assume it mostly has to do with never working in service) but the reality remains that these people live on their tips, so pay them decently already.

tloz- I think a bit unsanitary to get a tattoo with food.

You have never thought of getting a Tomato Tattoo?

ryan
December 1st, 2005, 11:27 AM
You have never thought of getting a Tomato Tattoo?

A tattoo of a tomato?

Ninjahedge
December 1st, 2005, 01:08 PM
A tattoo of a tomato?

Using Brushetta.

lofter1
December 1st, 2005, 07:26 PM
*ahem* ... bruschetta ;)

GINGER
January 15th, 2006, 06:07 AM
Us Brits are tight wads when it comes to tipping,we don't really do it!!!!What is the usual protocol for tipping in NY?Do you tip a bartender everytime you go to the bar?As you leave?What is the normal accepted percentage for a tip?Where is it commonly accepted that you leave a tip,we in England rarely tip a barman/lady,often tip in restaurants and usually tip a taxi driver a little!
I really don't want to offend anyone so some guidance would be appreciated!!
Thanks in anticipation
Ginger.

CMANDALA
January 15th, 2006, 07:45 AM
Tipping Guide

The customary tipping rate is 15%-20% for taxi drivers and waiters; bellhops are usually given $2 per bag in luxury hotels, $1 per bag elsewhere. Hotel maids should be tipped $2 per day of your stay.

A doorman who hails or helps you into a cab can be tipped $1-$2. You should also tip your hotel concierge for services rendered; the size of the tip depends on the difficulty of your request, as well as the quality of the concierge's work. For an ordinary dinner reservation or tour arrangements, $3-$5 should do; if the concierge scores seats at a popular restaurant or show or performs unusual services (getting your laptop repaired, finding a good allergist, etc.), $10 or more is appropriate.

Waiters should be tipped 15%-20%, though at higher-end restaurants, a solid 20% is more the norm. Many restaurants add a gratuity to the bill for parties of six or more. Ask what the percentage is if the menu or bill doesn't state it.

Tip $1 per drink you order at the bar, though if at an upscale establishment, those $15 martinis might warrant a $2 tip.

GINGER
January 15th, 2006, 08:03 AM
Thanks Cmandala,should save me a heap of embarassment!!:)

Edward
January 15th, 2006, 11:30 AM
See also
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=4835
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=7930

GINGER
January 15th, 2006, 11:46 AM
Thanks Edward.:cool:

FrankHegly
September 29th, 2006, 03:54 AM
Hey guys can people tell me how tipping works over there (NY)?

How much should I tip (if at all) the following:


The guy who takes my bags to the room
Room Service
Taxi Drivers
In a restraunt (I hear this is 35-50%!)It would be really usful to know what a good tip and what a bad tip is considered to be.....

Thanks

ablarc
September 29th, 2006, 06:26 AM
In a restraunt (I hear this is 35-50%!)
Whoa! 15% is average, 20% is good.

FrankHegly
September 29th, 2006, 08:14 AM
phew.... i was thinking 1/3 of a $200+ meal is a lot

but what about the rest...(taxi, bellboy etc)

Thanks

ablarc
September 29th, 2006, 07:10 PM
but what about the rest...(taxi, bellboy etc)
Two bucks is about right for hotel employees.

Cab drivers: 15% and 20%, 25% or even more for very short trips, outstanding service or an especially pleasant conversation.

When it comes to cabbies, my predilection is to tip high. Two reasons:

1, Though chances are you'll never encounter the same cabbie twice, I like to think that tipping well makes cabbies as a whole better-natured. So since we're all in the same boat and if we all tip generously, maybe we'll get more courteous and accommodating cabbies. I don't know if many folks act on this principle, but I can tell you that cabbies are much better-natured than they were twenty years ago. (Then again, so are New Yorkers in general).

2. It's hard and potentially aggravating work, and cabbies don't make enough money. Occasionally, I'll get a jerk who slings his car around corners, weaves dangerously around cars while constantly changing lanes, and slams on his brakes much too abruptly. Such cabbies cause me to slide around on the seat and fear for my safety and that of pedestrians and cyclists. In such cases I tip low and pleasantly inform the cabbie that his driving habits lowered his tip.

milleniumcab
September 30th, 2006, 12:22 AM
Two bucks is about right for hotel employees.

Cab drivers: 15% and 20%, 25% or even more for very short trips, outstanding service or an especially pleasant conversation.

2. It's hard and potentially aggravating work, and cabbies don't make enough money. Occasionally, I'll get a jerk who slings his car around corners, weaves dangerously around cars while constantly changing lanes, and slams on his brakes much too abruptly. Such cabbies cause me to slide around on the seat and fear for my safety and that of pedestrians and cyclists. In such cases I tip low and pleasantly inform the cabbie that his driving habits lowered his tip.

There is absolutely no reason for you to feel for your safety ablarc.. How about asking him to stop the cab and get out...Maybe the next cab you get will be mine.. I can use a good tiper like you, a few times a day...:D

ablarc
September 30th, 2006, 12:32 AM
There is absolutely no reason for you to feel for your safety ablarc.. How about asking him to stop the cab and get out...
Have you tried getting a cab during rush hour?

milleniumcab
October 1st, 2006, 02:24 AM
Have you tried getting a cab during rush hour?

Uuummm.. You got a point... I guess, buckle up and hope for the best..:eek:

ravishinglylow
October 1st, 2006, 02:26 AM
Uuummm.. You got a point... I guess, buckle up and hope for the best..:eek:
haha

FrankHegly
October 2nd, 2006, 04:08 AM
I will tip 26% then, just in case it is you milleniumcab.

milleniumcab
October 2nd, 2006, 11:20 PM
^^^Thank You very much for riding yellow and Have a Nice Day!....:D

milleniumcab
October 2nd, 2006, 11:23 PM
haha

Don't you buckle up in a cab?...Everyone should..;)

FrankHegly
October 3rd, 2006, 11:46 AM
should i tip room service and the bell boy?

User Name
October 3rd, 2006, 09:09 PM
Should I tip room service and the bell boy?

A few bucks ($5) for the bellboy, depending on how many bags and how friendly he is. Figure about the same for room service, dependent of course on the total bill.

FrankHegly
October 4th, 2006, 03:55 AM
Thanks guys,

Everything I needed to know

TonyMontana
July 30th, 2007, 06:30 AM
I was just wondering if giving tips was a compulsory thing or if they are optional?Im not a cheapo by the way but just wondered if we weren't happy would we still have to tip? I need to find out exactly who gets what before I go as its all very new to me.:D

NYatKNIGHT
July 30th, 2007, 09:08 AM
^Tony, I moved your post to this existing thread which may help answer some questions. The short answer is yes, you do need to leave some sort of tip at a restaurant.

Ninjahedge
July 30th, 2007, 10:07 AM
*ahem* ... bruschetta ;)


I just thought it would be easier to "paint" with a "brushetta" ;)

Luca
July 31st, 2007, 02:27 AM
*ahem* ... bruschetta ;)

While we are at it:

USians and other 'eengleesh' speakers tend to pronounce it as:

Brush-edda

:( no, no, no, no, no, no, please

It's:

Brew-skett-ah

I once had a waitress 'correct' me on that :rolleyes: ;)

Me: I'll the the "brew-skett-ah..."

Waiteperson: "Huh? Oh... the brush-edda!"

brianac
July 31st, 2007, 04:28 AM
Tipping in NYC is difficult for Europeans who are used to a more reasonable 10%. I warned some people I know (about six of them) who were visiting NYC of what they would be expected to tip, but they were not prepared for what happened to them in Smith and Wollensky's restaurant.
They ran up quite a sizeable bill for their meal including a couple of bottles of Champagne. When they paid the bill they chipped in with the tip and I suppose some of them did not put in their fair share.
They seemed surprised when the waiter threw the tip back on the table and said. "I think you need this more than I do".

Me. I am just happy that I was not with them.

So Tony, you will have to be thick skinned if you intend to tip under the going rate.

Capn_Birdseye
July 31st, 2007, 07:59 AM
Tipping is difficult for us Brits as we're not used to 1) it being "compulsory" & 2) the "high" rate expected.
Whenever I'm in NYC I usually tip around 20% and give a few bucks to a cabbie.
I was once in Bob's Boatyard restuarant, Siesta Keys, Sarasota, Florida, with a couple of shipmates. We'd had a few drinks and at the end of the meal we all chipped in a few dollars to cover the tip. The waiter came over, collected up the money, and a few seconds later returned, slapped the bill & money back down on the table, with the comment (in a camp accent), "I think you've made a mistake here guys!" and flounced off. Needless to say we upped our tip! It turned out that someone hadn't contributed!
In London, tips vary according to place & service, but 10-15% is about average. In some places a "service charge" is included in your bill. I always tip a London cabbie!

econ_tim
July 31st, 2007, 08:49 AM
slight change of subject, but how is tipping of building staff done?

NYatKNIGHT
July 31st, 2007, 11:26 AM
I merged two other tipping threads, I believe your answer starts on Page 1.

TonyMontana
July 31st, 2007, 06:04 PM
Tipping is difficult for us Brits as we're not used to 1) it being "compulsory" & 2) the "high" rate expected.
Whenever I'm in NYC I usually tip around 20% and give a few bucks to a cabbie.
I was once in Bob's Boatyard restuarant, Siesta Keys, Sarasota, Florida, with a couple of shipmates. We'd had a few drinks and at the end of the meal we all chipped in a few dollars to cover the tip. The waiter came over, collected up the money, and a few seconds later returned, slapped the bill & money back down on the table, with the comment (in a camp accent), "I think you've made a mistake here guys!" and flounced off. Needless to say we upped our tip! It turned out that someone hadn't contributed!
In London, tips vary according to place & service, but 10-15% is about average. In some places a "service charge" is included in your bill. I always tip a London cabbie!

Yeh, I think I will be doing the same 15%-20%. Not gunna be tight:D Only ever tip a taxi driver on my way home from a night out and usually just give him a note and he can keep the change. Maybe £3 or £4. I think I will do the same for drinks in posh places but the $1 for beers in normal bars perhaps

DublinDude
November 5th, 2008, 05:10 AM
Hi all,

I will be travelling to New York next week from Ireland. I am a bit confused about the tipping situation over there as its a very different system over here!

Who do I tip and who don't I tip?? I get the impression you tip every person you pass on the street over there! haha

Also, I am hearing from some people that its 10% and others that its 15%!!

I know you are supposed to tip taxi drivers, bar staff, waiters etc! But do you have to tip staff in a shop, staff in McDonalds, Starbucks etc??

Its not that I don't want to tip its just all very confusing for somebody not from the United States!

Thanks

stache
November 5th, 2008, 06:40 AM
It's 20%, before any tax is put on the total. Speaking for myself. I very rarely tip for counter service when I am standing. (McDonalds, Starbucks etc.) Should the need arise, you tip barbers, cosmeticians etc. Store clerks and medical people do not get tips. Porters and maids get $5 (do others think this is too high?) Tip a prostitute if you had a good time. ;)

DublinDude
November 5th, 2008, 06:48 AM
wow, 20% is a bit steep especially for taxi drivers!

stache
November 5th, 2008, 06:56 AM
Cabbies can get tipped a little less.

lofter1
November 5th, 2008, 10:14 AM
Newly-enacted cab fares seem to have the tips built in to some degree (rates went up steeply, plus the already-levied extra charges for night rides, bags, etc.).

If needed at all then 10% should suffice for a cab.

In my line of work I never get tips. Which is as it should be.

Front_Porch
November 5th, 2008, 12:08 PM
I'm going to disagree here on the cab tips. I tip taxi drivers at least 15%, with at least 20% if I use a credit card to cover the surcharge that the cabbies have to pay.

Gas costs a fortune, and it's not like these guys are Rockefellers. The extra buck can't mean as much to you as it does to them, and if it does, take the bus.

ali r.
{downtown broker}

Ninjahedge
November 5th, 2008, 12:25 PM
Restaurants usually expect 15% to 20% before tax. Say the meal was $20 before tax is added. Tax is about $1.68 (8.375% I think? I could be off) a 15% tip would be $3 and 20% $4....

One easy way to do it is to take the tax and double it. That will be a tip of about 17%.

Other things? I do not know the amounts, but any "service" you are rendered gets a tip.

Porters, Cabbies, Waitresses, Bartenders, Contract Killers. All of them get something.... ;).

But don't feel pressured. If the service was lousy, you are not OBLIGED to tip. Just remember though, anyone you don't tip will probably remember you. So don't get stingy with people you will have to deal with more than once on your trip! ;)

Schadenfrau
November 5th, 2008, 01:34 PM
wow, 20% is a bit steep especially for taxi drivers!

How did you come to this conclusion? Front Porch is correct- cab drivers aren't rich, and that 20% tip helps to supplement a pretty meager income in one of the world's most expensive cities.

The 20% tip is standard for servers in sit-down restaurants, as well. If you think that's expensive, you need to learn to factor in the cost before you decide where you're going to eat.

antinimby
November 5th, 2008, 05:58 PM
DD, you do not tip at places like McDonald's or Starbucks. You should only tip at restaurants where there is someone that provides service and waits on you.

Why would you think this would be any different here than it is in Europe?

stache
November 5th, 2008, 08:03 PM
Because you don't really tip in Europe.

antinimby
November 5th, 2008, 09:00 PM
I was aware of that. I just don't get why he couldn't differentiate between a regular sit-down restaurant versus fast food places and coffee shops.

There are places and situations you tip and others you don't. It's not like in his own words, "you tip every person you pass on the street over there."

stache
November 5th, 2008, 09:08 PM
I wasn't going to spell this out but I think he plans to be cheap and resents the American custom of tipping.

lofter1
November 5th, 2008, 09:45 PM
I don't think anyone should be compelled to tip just because that is what many folks do.

Tipping becomes extortion when coerced.

Mandated tipping = a tax of sorts.

If the product is so worthy then why not just up the price?

I do agree that good personal service should be rewarded.

Commonplace service on the other hand ...

brianac
November 6th, 2008, 04:54 AM
This is something I posted in 2007 on yet another thread about Tipping in New York.

Tipping in NYC is difficult for Europeans who are used to a more reasonable 10%. I warned some people I know (about six of them) who were visiting NYC of what they would be expected to tip, but they were not prepared for what happened to them in Smith and Wollensky's restaurant.
They ran up quite a sizeable bill for their meal including a couple of bottles of Champagne. When they paid the bill they chipped in with the tip and I suppose some of them did not put in their fair share.
They seemed surprised when the waiter threw the tip back on the table and said. "I think you need this more than I do".

Me. I am just happy that I was not with them.

So DD, you will have to be thick skinned if you intend to tip under the going rate.

DublinDude
November 6th, 2008, 05:21 AM
I was aware of that. I just don't get why he couldn't differentiate between a regular sit-down restaurant versus fast food places and coffee shops.

There are places and situations you tip and others you don't. It's not like in his own words, "you tip every person you pass on the street over there."

Well it seems you guys tip alot more people than we do here in Ireland! We tip if we feel the person deserves it rather than tipping because thats what we are supposed to do! We don't always tip taxi drivers (although some people do).

Also, there is no fixed rate of tip!! Thats down to the discretion of the customer. Generally, in restaurants most people tip unless the service was appalling but I believe its usually in or around 10%.

Again, I have no problem tipping!

DublinDude
November 6th, 2008, 05:22 AM
I wasn't going to spell this out but I think he plans to be cheap and resents the American custom of tipping.

If you read my original post you will see that I did say that it wasn't that I didn't want to tip! I was merely questioning how much is appropriate and who do I tip and who don't I.

The confusion I have with counter staff comes from a situation I had over there a few years ago, I was in a shop buying a mobile phone cover and had a brief friendly chat with the guy behind the counter! However, after I paid him and was leaving he gave me a rather strange look. It only occurred to me later that day that he might have been expecting a tip??? Hence my question here!

stache
November 6th, 2008, 06:58 AM
Like I said in post #2, one does not tip store clerks. Some people will give a favorite clerk a gift at Christmas time, but that's rare.

Ninjahedge
November 6th, 2008, 08:59 AM
The whole tip thing has come about due to the omission of service staff from the minimum wage requirements.

In short, they get paid squat.

So, in the US, it is expected to tip for services like wait staff.

The problem is, they have been obnoxious with this, expecting a tip no matter what, even making it mandatory on larger parties of people (Req'd 18% at most places for parties of 6 or more).

While I can understand where they are coming from, it is also irritating that something like a "gratuity" is mandatory no matter how thankful you aren't.....

stache
November 6th, 2008, 10:02 AM
While I'm not crazy about it, I understand the reasoning behind the mandatory gratuity for large parties. I have always tried to leave 'more than my share' at this type of function and quite often the voluntary tip amount for all involved comes in at less than 15% of the pre tax total, similar to the earlier steak house story.

Gregory Tenenbaum
November 6th, 2008, 10:44 AM
Tip if you get good service.

Do not if you do not, but be sure to explain to the server why.

Eg, taxi driver goes the wrong way when you gave perfectly understandable directions/address because he or she couldnt be bothered to understand English - in that example dont bother tipping.

If you are rich beyond dreams, tip all you want. Especially me.

NYatKNIGHT
November 6th, 2008, 02:01 PM
merged threads