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LonelyRoad
January 6th, 2006, 01:50 AM
Hello all,

I am a sophmore in college and I want to move to NYC when I graduate. I am a musician and plan on teaching while getting into the music sceen.

My question is what is the cheapest one can rent an apartment in NYC or NJ (Jersey City)? I have researched on apartments.com and found mostly rates around $1500. I would only need a studio or 1 bedroom. As a musician I have a lot of stuff (full size keyboard, guitars etc.) but I would have to make a small space work (500 sq ft. idealy 700).

I guess I would want the biggest bang for the buck as opposed to just the cheapest (I am curious about that though). I want to be in a safe neighborhood.

I just visited NYC for the first time in September and I can't wait to go back (was there WAY to short). As a musician my only real options are LA or NY (not country so can't do Nashville). I really love NY and I love the east coast. The fact the Boston, Philly and D.C. are so close is really apealing as well (went to school in Boston for two semesters).

Thanks in advanced. I've been reading this board for the past week since I came across it and it seems great!

LonelyRoad

MrSpice
January 6th, 2006, 11:03 AM
It depends on how much commute you can endure. There are lots of safe neighborhoods in Brooklyn where you can rent a studio for 800-900 a month and a 1-bedroom for 1000-1200 a month. For 1200, you can rent a very spacious one-bedroom (add to that 1 or 2 months broker fee, unless you find it by owner). I am talking about 45-55 min commute to midtown Manhattan and neighborhoods that are very safe but not very "cool" - no fancy restaurants, no eclectic bars, etc. As you move closer to Manhattan, prices go higher. Park Slope and Caroll Gardens in Brooklyn now have lots of cool cafes and restaurants and many intellectuals moved there from Manhattan to cope with a cost of living. The 1-bd there would probably run 1500-2000 a month, and you can find a studio for 1100-1500 depending on the size. Some of the cheapest areas in Manhattan to rent an apartment are on Upper East Side (around 90th Street, between York and 2nd Ave). A decent studio will run you at least 1500 a month.

LonelyRoad
January 6th, 2006, 01:24 PM
Thank you!

A one hour commute is not that bad. When I stayed in NYC it took me about an hour by subway to get to Pen Station. You gotta start somewhere.

Any specifics about the Brooklyn apartments? What would the sq. footage be (500?)?

MrSpice
January 8th, 2006, 01:26 AM
It depends on the area and on the price. You can rent a very spacious 1-bedroom for $1100-1200 in Bensonhurst (say, 750-900 sq feet). You can get to Midtown Manhattan from Bensonhurst in about 40-45 minutes, and even quicker to Downtown Manhattan (D train, stops 18th Avenue, 20th Avenue, Bay Parkway). There are lots of shops and restaurants along the 86th Street above which the D train runs.

No matter where you decide to live in Brooklyn, just make sure you live close to the subway. Taking bus and then train is very time consuming and difficult especially in the winter (don't let real estate agent convince you otherwise).

Other safe but relatively inexpensive areas: Midwood (avenues M to U around Ocean Parkway, Coney Island Avenue, Ocean Avenue on Q line), Kings Highway (Q/B line - express B train is really good), Sheepshead Bay (Q/B line)

Bay Ridge is very nice but because only the local R train runs there, the commute is about 1 hour to Midtown Manhattan, or you have to take express bus that is 2 times more expensive.

One other thing - you should only rent an apartment in an apartment building. Never rent in a private house even if it's cheaper - you are going to be very hot in the summer and very very cold in the winter (private owners always want to save up on electricity). Real estate broker often charge you 2 rents for apartment building rentals, but it's worth it.

In Brooklyn you can buy Bay News that has a lot of rental ads. Use craigslist too. http://newyork.craigslist.org/cgi-bin/search?areaID=3&query=&catAbbreviation=aap&subAreaID=2&group=H&bedrooms=1

ryan
January 8th, 2006, 01:18 PM
Lonelyroad, you belong in Brooklyn. Specifically Williamsburg, Greenpoint or Bushwick, where hype has led all the other artists, musicians and wanna-bes. Outsiders all complain about it, but there is a specific need for artists and musicians to live in communities or artists and musicians (= "cool"). The other neighborhoods Mrspice is talking up are nice areas (some even nicer than North Brooklyn) but they are sleepy areas that won't help your career any. You'd find a nicer apartment in those areas, and more of a commute to the places you'll need to go or people you want to see.

Away from the first 3 stops on the L you'll find 400-500 sq feet for less than $1000 (you should give up on safe & 700 sq feet, though you can have that much space if you want to live in a possibly sketchy post-industrial neighborhood). These neighborhoods are 20-40 minutes from the downtown bars you would want to go to (Williamsburg has it's own music scene though and you might not even need to commute.)


One other thing - you should only rent an apartment in an apartment building. Never rent in a private house even if it's cheaper - you are going to be very hot in the summer and very very cold in the winter (private owners always want to save up on electricity).

I completely disagree. Not only would this cut out most of Williamsburg and Greenpoint, but I've never had this problem, nor have I ever heard of this specific complaint. For one, in a private house, you'll control (and pay for) your own a/c. I live on the top floor of a house, so if anything it's too warm for me and I open windows in the winter. A commercially-run building will also have stricter credit/income requirements and want more money down to move in. My landlord didn't even ask about credit or money, and only wanted 1 month security from us.
I'm sorry if you'd had problems, Mr. Spice, but that's no reason to cut out a huge portion of the housing stock.


Real estate broker often charge you 2 rents for apartment building rentals, but it's worth it.

The only people I know who've used brokers in Brooklyn regret it. Everyone else I know went through craigstlist or their own personal network. Manhattan is a different market from Brooklyn, where a broker is more of a necessary evil, but it's out of your price range, so don't worry about it.

MrSpice
January 8th, 2006, 03:49 PM
ryan: I agree that Williamsburg is cooler than, say, Bensonhurst and is closer to Manhattan, but it's more expensive, especially in the areas where it is "cool". And by the way, just 5-6 years ago, Williamsburg was known as one of the poorest and least livable areas in Brooklyn. The area improved tremendously in the past few years, but it is still bad in places.

In the "sleepy" areas of Brooklyn, it's definitely a bad idea to rent in a private house. I met dozens of people that complained that it was terribly cold in their apartment in the winter. This is not my personal experience, it's sort of a thing that people know you should not do here. I guess it depends on the landlord. Maybe landlords in your areas are more honorable and honest.

The best thing to do for this person is to come to Brooklyn, walk around, see a bunch of apartment in all those areas and see what he likes better in terms of price, coolness and everything else...

lofter1
January 8th, 2006, 08:06 PM
cost of con ed electric: http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=78395#post78395

LonelyRoad
January 9th, 2006, 11:35 PM
Thank you everyone!!!

If you have more info or advise I would love to hear it.:)

lofter1
January 13th, 2006, 01:42 AM
and then, when you want to splurge, there's always this (although "ciao bella" on mott street -- and other locations -- has incredible gelato / ice cream for far less: http://www.ciaobellagelato.com/storelist.php) ...

$100 sundae at FAO Schwarz ice cream parlor

newyorkology
January 12, 2006

http://www.newyorkology.com/archives/2006/01/a_100_sundae_at.html

If eating too much ice cream doesn't make you sick, the price of the mega sundae at FAO Schwarz (http://www.faoschwarz.com/) probably will.

FAO Schweetz, the ice cream shoppe inside the tony Fifth Avenue toy store, is selling a $100 ice cream sundae called "The Volcano," according to the Post (http://www.nypost.com/news/regionalnews/60225.htm).

Meant to be shared by four people, the massive dessert comes with 12 scoops of ice cream from Bassetts of Philadelphia (http://www.bassettsicecream.com/fun.html) hidden under a hard shell of Belgian chocolate that when chiseled open, causes the ice cream to ooze out of the cracks like lava. Peanut butter swirl, chocolate chip cookie dough, coffee and pistachio are among the flavors inside, with seven toppings and whipped cream, glacé cherries and chocolate rocks.

Just imagine how many of those things a group of spoiled brats could eat during a FAO Schwartz in-store private sleepover (http://www.fao.com/catalog/boutique.jsp?parentCategoryId=280&categoryId=358), which has a starting price of $25,000.

deezee
January 14th, 2006, 02:04 PM
and then, when you want to splurge, there's always this (although "ciao bella" on mott street -- and other locations -- has incredible gelato / ice cream for far less: http://www.ciaobellagelato.com/storelist.php) ...

$100 sundae at FAO Schwarz ice cream parlor

newyorkology
January 12, 2006

http://www.newyorkology.com/archives/2006/01/a_100_sundae_at.html

If eating too much ice cream doesn't make you sick, the price of the mega sundae at FAO Schwarz (http://www.faoschwarz.com/) probably will.

FAO Schweetz, the ice cream shoppe inside the tony Fifth Avenue toy store, is selling a $100 ice cream sundae called "The Volcano," according to the Post (http://www.nypost.com/news/regionalnews/60225.htm).

Meant to be shared by four people, the massive dessert comes with 12 scoops of ice cream from Bassetts of Philadelphia (http://www.bassettsicecream.com/fun.html) hidden under a hard shell of Belgian chocolate that when chiseled open, causes the ice cream to ooze out of the cracks like lava. Peanut butter swirl, chocolate chip cookie dough, coffee and pistachio are among the flavors inside, with seven toppings and whipped cream, glacé cherries and chocolate rocks.

Just imagine how many of those things a group of spoiled brats could eat during a FAO Schwartz in-store private sleepover (http://www.fao.com/catalog/boutique.jsp?parentCategoryId=280&categoryId=358), which has a starting price of $25,000.

yea...and just try getting the rest of it back to brooklyn (or any place for that matter) in a doggie bag.

lofter1
February 18th, 2006, 11:06 AM
Retirement age 'will rise to 85'

By Paul Rincon
BBC News science reporter, St Louis
February 17, 2006

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/4726300.stm

The age of retirement should be raised to 85 by 2050 because of trends in life expectancy, a US biologist has said.

Shripad Tuljapurkar of Stanford University says anti-ageing advances could raise life expectancy by a year each year over the next two decades.

That will put a strain on economies around the world if current retirement ages are maintained, he warned.

He also told a science meeting in St Louis that 50-year or 75-year mortgages may not be unusual in the future.

Dr Tuljapurkar was speaking at the American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting in the Missouri city.

"People are going to do things they didn't get round to in their working lives.
Current institutions are really not equipped at the moment to deal with such long lives," Dr Tuljapurkar said.

"We are going to have to plan a lot more carefully, which people are not very good at."

Lifestyle trends

The Stanford researcher has been looking at relationships between historical trends in ageing, population growth and economic activity.

Based on this, he came up with a scenario in which anti-ageing technologies will increase the most common age of death by one year per year between 2010 and 2030.

Dr Tuljapurkar then applied this scenario to four countries: the US, China, Sweden and India.

He found that his projected trends in life expectancy would have profound effects on the economy, lifestyle and population demographics.

"It might be possible to go through two mortgages, for example, or even have 50-year or 75-year mortgages," Dr Tuljapurkar explained.

In the US, the cost of social security and medical care would almost double if people retired at 65 under Tuljapurkar's scenario.

But an increase in the retirement age to 85 would bring costs down to today's levels.

However these trends would also create a "permanent underclass" of countries where opportunities for increased life expectancy were not the same as in the industrialised world. "We can't even get retrovirals to some countries now," he told journalists.

© BBC MMVI

JCMAN320
February 21st, 2006, 05:14 PM
Here in Jersey City we have an Arts District you can apply for that is building up like madd and it's located Downtown. You can find a couple of apts around JSQ and in the Heights that would run btwn 600-1500. Downtown will be expensive and all these places have great apts and are in safe areas and close to mass transit. You would fit great here in JC we have a great art scene, musicans performing daily and we have a great music scene with many local bands, we have very frequent art festivals that exhibit not just gallerys, musicians and plays Downtown but throughout the entire city which as a whole is very impressive. The arts here are very much alive and are accompanied by awesome preformance spaces. PM me for more info. :)

lofter1
November 25th, 2006, 08:54 PM
Missed Mortgage Payments Rise 20% in Third Quarter

nytimes.com (http://www.nytimes.com/2006/11/25/nyregion/25foreclose.html)
By CHRISTINE HAUGHNEY

November 25, 2006


In the third quarter of this year, the number of city residents who had missed more than three months of mortgage payments jumped by 20 percent compared with the same quarter a year ago. Still, New Yorkers often have more time to try to hold onto their homes than homeowners in the rest of the country.


Data collected by PropertyShark .com, a real estate data company based in Brooklyn, shows that 1,468 city homeowners missed mortgage payments from July to September, compared with 1,220 in the comparable period last year.


That puts them in what is commonly known as preforeclosure, when banks typically warn people that they are at risk of foreclosure so the homeowner will take steps to catch up on the payments. But while more homeowners are in the danger zone, more have also been able to avoid foreclosure. In New York City, lenders foreclosed on 425 homes in the third quarter of 2006, compared with 545 in the year-ago period. (The city has 3,018,000 homeowners.)


John McIlwain, a senior fellow for housing at the Urban Land Institute, a nonprofit planning and research group in Washington, said of the jump in preforeclosures, “It’s a warning sign, but it’s not yet a serious problem in terms of the market.”


The neighborhoods with the highest number of preforeclosures are in Brooklyn and Queens. The Canarsie and Flatbush neighborhoods of Brooklyn had the largest number last quarter, with 37. Elsewhere in Brooklyn, Bedford-Stuyvesant had 32 preforeclosures and East New York had 31. Jamaica, Queens, had 31 preforeclosures. The same neighborhoods had the most preforeclosures the year before.


State laws give New Yorkers an advantage over homeowners elsewhere. According to PropertyShark’s chief executive, Ryan Slack, New York courts typically consider the buyer of the property to be the owner, while California treats the bank that holds that mortgage as the owner.


Banks in California can foreclose on a property and take it back in roughly seven months, but banks in New York have to go through a legal battle that can take more than two years.


That means that New Yorkers have more time to find ways to hold onto their homes.


“There are a lot of things you can do between the time you stop paying your mortgage and the time they can take it away from you,” Mr. Slack said.


Homeowners in Manhattan are less likely than those in other boroughs to lose their homes because they have often put up more money and because they can use the rising values of their homes as bargaining chips with lenders, Mr. McIlwain said.


Because Manhattan homeowners have amassed considerable resources to break into the condominium or co-op market in the first place, they can usually make their mortgage payments even if they lose their jobs or suffer an illness, he said. With divorce, those are the leading causes of foreclosure, he said.


“There’s just a lot more flexibility there,” Mr. McIlwain said. “People — instead of going to delinquency or foreclosure — can sell their property and avoid the mark on their credit. There’s also an ability to take out an equity loan.”


In many cases, banks warn homeowners that they are falling behind, in hopes of giving them time to catch up on their payments.


Last year, Guillermina Edwards, a 50-year-old bookkeeper, missed mortgage payments on the Flatbush home he has owned for 20 years when he had to pay for airline tickets and a funeral after a relative died abroad.


In December 2005, he was placed in preforeclosure, but as soon as he caught up with his payments, he said, the bank left him alone.


“They’re just harassing you,” he says. “I didn’t refinance or anything. You just pay back the months that you owe.”


Copyright 2006 The New York Times Company

lofter1
January 21st, 2008, 01:30 PM
Troubling trend ...

EAT IT & WEEP

GROCERY PRICES SOARING

NY POST (http://www.nypost.com/seven/01212008/news/regionalnews/eat_it__weep_445569.htm)
By SANDRA HURLEY, CATHY BURKE and ANDY GELLER

January 21, 2008 -- Food prices are skyrocketing - and it's enough to make you gag on your milk. That's because milk costs 29 percent more than it did a year ago, and that's not all: Eggs are up 36 percent, and tomatoes 31 percent.

The cost of groceries, as compiled by the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics, has jumped 5.6 percent in the last year - higher than the inflation rate - with dairy products soaring 13.4 percent.

"That's a huge increase, no question about it," says bureau economist Dave Richardson.

Bread rose 10.5 percent; fruits and veggies went up 5.9 percent; and meat, poultry, fish and eggs rose 5.4 percent.

Oil prices are the main culprit.

"Our industry is very gasoline-driven - everything has been shipped by trailers, and fuel costs keep going up," said Nelson Eusebio, executive director of the National Supermarkets Association.

Other factors include rising demand for ethanol, which is driving up the price of corn, from which ethanol is made, and changes in Chinese consumption patterns.

"China is importing milk products where historically they have not," says Patrick Jackman, another bureau economist.

"Meat also was something not purchased by the Chinese in the past, and that they're doing to a greater extent today," he said.

What all these factors add up to is a price increase in staples like milk, eggs and bread - and that's hitting Big Apple families hard.

Elyse Fisher, 39, who lives on the Upper West Side with her husband and 3-year-old daughter, said it's much more expensive to feed her family.

"I know I've been spending a lot more, but I'm not sure on what," she said at Whole Foods in the Time Warner Center.

The bill for her weekly groceries came to $208.62 - up by nearly $10 over last year.

Pam Unger, 31, who also lives on the Upper West Side with her husband and 3-month-old daughter, was also at Whole Foods.

"I don't think I ever realized how expensive milk is," she said.

Unger got no argument from Doris Centeno, 59, who lives in Williamsburg, Brooklyn.

"Milk has gone up a lot. My budget is a little tighter," said Centeno, who was shopping at the C-Town supermarket there.

Frances Ruiz, 28, a mother who was shopping at the same store, echoed Centeno. "Everything is way different - now my paycheck is not enough," she said. "Cereal and juices went up. It's hard with kids."

Another Brooklyn mom agreed.

"We just can't get what we used to," complained Pam Lopez, 38. "This year has been much worse."

For Fanny Rodriguez, 45, the increases hit home when she went shopping for a family favorite.

"Mac and cheese usually is three boxes for a dollar - now it's two for a dollar," she grumbled.

The 5.6 percent hike in grocery prices was higher than the rate of inflation, 4.1 percent.

And the bad news is that grocery prices will likely rise another 3 to 4 percent this year.

Additional reporting by Charles Niedringhaus

Copyright 2008 NYP Holdings, Inc.

Christine4Ever
January 25th, 2008, 01:25 AM
to live here in new york will cost $1000 or over for rent & more money if you wanted your own home, i live in new york i know :)

Trap
February 2nd, 2008, 05:03 PM
The 5.6 percent hike in grocery prices was higher than the rate of inflation, 4.1 percent.

And the bad news is that grocery prices will likely rise another 3 to 4 percent this year.

Is that really bad news? If the rate of inflation is 4.1 percent, and grocery prices rise between 3 and 4 percent, that means that groceries will actually get slightly cheaper this year in real terms.

brianac
February 2nd, 2008, 08:39 PM
Is 5.6% plus 3% less than 4.1% ?