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Citytect
April 13th, 2006, 11:16 PM
I'd be happy to read through a few hundred of TLOZ's posts this weekend. I'll say 300 to start with. I don't want to commit to reading more than I can. If, however, I finish reading those 300 and still have time to read more, I'll post here again commiting myself to more.

BrooklynRider
April 14th, 2006, 12:23 AM
OKay, How about you and Greenie start at the other end of the spectrum.

Greenie, you start at number 1 and end at 300.

Krulltime you pick up at 301, moving upward, and report to this thread where you leave off or plan on leaving off.

ManhattanKnight is going down from 3320 to 2800.

Schadenfrau is going down from 2799 and will report back where she leave's off is plans on leaving off.

__________________________________________________ ______________

I just want to say good night all. I has been an incredible day at WNY. Peace...

Merry
April 14th, 2006, 02:53 AM
Secondly, I'm more than happy to help go through TLOZ's posts if someone will tell me what to do and where to start. If there's anything else you think I could do, you only have to ask.


I imagine you'll all be sleeping -- well, I hope -- at the moment, so I'll just start at post 1501 and let you know where I get up to tonight. I hope that doesn't conflict with anyone else.

Merry
April 14th, 2006, 08:27 AM
I imagine you'll all be sleeping -- well, I hope -- at the moment, so I'll just start at post 1501 and let you know where I get up to tonight. I hope that doesn't conflict with anyone else.
I got up to post 1750.

ManhattanKnight
April 14th, 2006, 09:20 AM
When I view TLOZ's WNY posts on my computer, they are numbered in reverse chronological order -- i.e., the oldest (from 11/13/02) is #3308 and the most recent (from 04/01/06) is #1. Is this what everyone else is seeing (or is there a user setting that I've missed that has some members seeing the posts numbered in chronological order)? My current assignment is reading posts 2800-3308; I'd like to be sure that means the earliest, not the last, 500.

BrooklynRider
April 14th, 2006, 09:21 AM
I just want to restate our objective with this portion of th project. We are looking for TLOZ post that can be used for his memorial plaque. We are hoping to find something that captures words relating his relationship to the city. We believe THAT would be an appropriate memorial from the WiredNewYork community.

Keep reading - but please note the post number of any posts you think are possible for this use. Perhaps our reviewers could start to post the TLOZ post numbers and Edward or a volunteer moderator can begin creating a TLOZ MEMORIAL QUOTE thread where we can view these all side by side.

And Merry, in this forum you are no farther away than anyone else. Perhaps you burn the midight oil for us, but you are very much a part of this and your suppor has been incredibly generous.

krulltime
April 14th, 2006, 10:12 AM
When I view TLOZ's WNY posts on my computer, they are numbered in reverse chronological order -- i.e., the oldest (from 11/13/02) is #3308 and the most recent (from 04/01/06) is #1. Is this what everyone else is seeing (or is there a user setting that I've missed that has some members seeing the posts numbered in chronological order)? My current assignment is reading posts 2800-3308; I'd like to be sure that means the earliest, not the last, 500.

Oh I am confuse about that aswell. I sarted with post# 301. LOL! Then I noticed that was a more recent post. I think I have to go way back for the real 301 post that he made. Is there a feature to make the oldest post to appear first? Or I just simply figure it out.

BrooklynRider
April 14th, 2006, 10:15 AM
No, you are reading from the most recent backward. We have two of you reading backward and two of you reading forward. You might want to start at 2800 and read them forward from there. Make sense?

I absolutely must go now. I'll check-in when I get to my hotel in Washington DC.

krulltime
April 14th, 2006, 10:21 AM
Alright I got it then! Thanks for that clarification.

ManhattanKnight
April 14th, 2006, 10:33 AM
No, you are reading from the most recent backward. We have two of you reading backward and two of you reading forward. You might want to start at 2800 and read them forward from there. Make sense?


We just need to be sure that we have a common understanding of the task -- that posts 2800-3308 (the 509 most recent) actually refers to the posts that are numbered 1-509 (if that is, in fact, the case).

krulltime
April 14th, 2006, 11:30 AM
Ok I just want to say that this post by TLOZ is a good candidate...

http://wirednewyork.com/forum/showpost.php?p=91263&postcount=26

Schadenfrau
April 14th, 2006, 11:38 AM
I'm having trouble viewing TLOZ's posts. I can only see the most recent 500. Am I doing something wrong?

Citytect
April 14th, 2006, 03:08 PM
Greenie, you start at number 1 and end at 300.


Okay, so I should start reading the 300 most recent posts TLOZ made, correct?

When you say numbers 1-300 you are actually referring to the first 300 in the reverse-chronological list of TLOZ's posts, not his posts numbers 1-300?

Sorry, I just want to make sure I'm doing my task correctly.

Citytect
April 14th, 2006, 03:13 PM
I'm having trouble viewing TLOZ's posts. I can only see the most recent 500. Am I doing something wrong?

Did you try this link?..

All posts by TLOZ Link5 (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/search.php?do=finduser&u=2527)

ManhattanKnight
April 14th, 2006, 03:50 PM
Okay, so I should start reading the 300 most recent posts TLOZ made, correct?

When you say numbers 1-300 you are actually referring to the first 300 in the reverse-chronological list of TLOZ's posts, not his posts numbers 1-300?

Sorry, I just want to make sure I'm doing my task correctly.

There's definitely confusion about this. As I understand my assignment, it's to review the 500 most recently written posts, which are numbered 1-500, and that's what I'm doing this afternoon.

BrooklynRider
April 14th, 2006, 05:29 PM
Okay, I need to step back a moment on this.

Greenie, ManhattanKnight, Schadenfrau and Merry are the current volunteers on this specific task. As Schedenfrau is already multi-tasking on a couple of fronts and ManhattanKnight has identified posts and has the most questions, I am respectivefully nominating ManhattanKnight to use his experience in reviewing posts up to this point to direct this project activity. Please confirm to this group if it is acceptable to you.

You will not have to read all posts, but you can be responsible for ensuring that volunteers understand the process you are using. Please use the same subject I used above for your posts - which all TLOZ Post Review Volunteers shoud consistently read - and devise a system, logical to you by which our volunteers should operate. You will be the definitive person for answers on this part of the project and have the power of "yes" and "no" in decision making as relates to assignments. Edward and our moderators can assist you in deciphering the order and layout of the TLOZ Post Thread.

ManhattanKnight
April 14th, 2006, 05:52 PM
I am respectivefully nominating ManhattanKnight to use his experience in reviewing posts up to this point to direct this project activity. Please confirm to this group if it is acceptable to you.

You will not have to read all posts, but you can be responsible for ensuring that volunteers understand the process you are using. Please use the same subject I used above for your posts - which all TLOZ Post Review Volunteers shoud consistently read - and devise a system, logical to you by which our volunteers should operate. You will be the definitive person for answers on this part of the project and have the power of "yes" and "no" in decision making as relates to assignments. Edward and our moderators can assist you in deciphering the order and layout of the TLOZ Post Thread.

Here's what I've come up with based upon what I can find about current assignments:

TLOZ NUMBERED Posts/Volunteer Reviewer

1-500 -- ManhattanKnight
501-1000 -- Schadenfrau
1501-2000 -- Merry
3000-3308 -- Greenie

Post #1 is TLOZ's most recent post; #3308 is his earliest. Please post any comments or corrections in this thread, using the same heading. I shall post updated/corrected assignment information as it becomes available.

Any additional volunteers for this subproject should PM me.

I suggest that the reviewers select the language from each post that you would like to have considered and provide a link to the actual post, like this:

I dunno, have you seen pictures of Mamie Eisenhower? Probably a nice broad, but yikes!


-- http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=86749#post86749

There is a small discrepancy between the total number of posts made by TLOZ that the search function brings up (3308) and the total that appears beneath his name at the top of each of his posts (3320).

Jasonik
April 14th, 2006, 08:33 PM
I've been searching his posts using certain words, looking for certain topical posts.

These are some that I just like for whatever reason, I guess I'm looking for a specific tone for the wall mural (separate project from park/plaque), anyway:

This is how it began....
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=11866&highlight=crime#post11866

....droppin stats
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showpost.php?p=16385&postcount=6

Great sarcasm....
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showpost.php?p=2890&postcount=16

....great sensitivity
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showpost.php?p=7671&postcount=53

So friendly and optimistic....
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showpost.php?p=46047&postcount=3

Good luck everyone.

BrooklynRider
April 14th, 2006, 08:39 PM
Wow - you guys work quick! Thank you ManhattanKnight - excellent work. This has TLOZ energy all over it. Beautiful!

Merry
April 14th, 2006, 09:18 PM
Hello everyone.

I can now carry on from where I left off, and I'm aiming for 1751 to 2000 to begin with.

I was using the search result numbers in the top right-hand corner "Showing results nn to nn of 3308" for post numbers. Is that what you're all doing?

I had some trouble viewing the posts too, but it appears to be intermittent.

I'll happily take direction from ManhattanKnight. All for one, and one for all.

ManhattanKnight
April 14th, 2006, 10:01 PM
Hello everyone.

I can now carry on from where I left off, and I'm aiming for 1751 to 2000 to begin with.

I was using the search result numbers in the top right-hand corner "Showing results nn to nn of 3308" for post numbers. Is that what you're all doing?

I'll happily take direction from ManhattanKnight. All for one, and one for all.

You've got it right, Merry. Thanks for your renewed and increased contribution to our common effort. I have revised my description of your "assignment" in my first post.

Many thanks!

ManhattanKnight
April 14th, 2006, 10:26 PM
Thank you ManhattanKnight - excellent work.

Thanky, Rob. Now, go enjoy your weekend in the nation's humid armpit!

krulltime
April 14th, 2006, 10:34 PM
Ok I want to help looking at posts but I am now more confuse to where I should start. So if you give some numbers that makes sence I will be happy to look. That is, if you have any numbers that I can look at. ;)

Citytect
April 15th, 2006, 12:37 AM
Okay ManhattanKnight, I see what you're saying.

We're going to call TLOZ's final post on WNY Post #1. Likewise, the very first post he made back in 2002 will be called Post #3308.

Let's forget about chronology and stick with calling posts by this number system, so our heads don't explode. :)

Side note: Just started reading TLOZ's first posts on WNY. I'm finding it interesting that he was only 17 years old at that time. Very mature and thoughtful young man he was!

BPC
April 15th, 2006, 01:32 AM
Not to jump the gun, but of the contenders posted so far, I would vote for the following:

"New York ... embodies the urban success story in this country, as Americans began to believe in many of their cities once more."

Merry
April 15th, 2006, 05:23 AM
Hello everyone.

Well, I’ve had a go. Thanks, Jasonik, for taking the lead and providing a good format. If accepted, I envisioned these on the Mural.

POSTS 1501 TO 2000:

Justice and common sense:

New York State Death Penalty Suspended ( http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=30455#post30455)
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=30455#post30455

My opinions on the death penalty are often mixed. The legal killing of a human being, to me, sounds cruel, but the death penalty is seldom enforced in New York State. Murders have actually gone down for years as a result, while in states like Texas and Louisiana that "liberally" enforce the death penalty the murder rates are among the nation's highest.

However, the death penalty has been successfully used in this state as a bargaining tool to make accused criminals plead guilty and/or gather information on other cases that has resulted in the capture of other criminals or solving other crimes.

In my opinion, a hefty prison sentence with no possibility of parole is worse, and at the same time more humane, than a death sentence. Plenty of criminals see the death penalty as a way out, to end the insufferable monotony of prison. A prison sentence leaves the convict with the fact that (s)he is never getting out, save for — in the best of possibilities in this scenario — suicide, which is cowardly. That, to me, is more just and more satisfactory than a death sentence.

Republicans to Hold 2004 Convention in NYC (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=27073#post27073)
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=27073#post27073

I can't help but agree with you, Midnightrambler. I'll sacrifice the pristine state of the Great Lawn for any damage suffered from a large, albeit relatively large, rally, any day of the week.

The suggested alternate sites are not nearly as well-known to most Americans as Central Park, and this is supposed to be the most democratic city in America. Has free speech truly been surpassed in importance by aesthetics?

Central Park is our town square, and the least that City officials can do is let it be used as such.

Bloomberg vs. Board of Ed (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=24917#post24917)
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=24917#post24917

Bloomberg and Klein had the right idea. Failing students are held back all the time in many public school systems outside of New York; the old system was not working so their opponents had no basis for continuing it. It's about time for a bit of tough love.

New Central Park Northwest High-Rise (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=32205#post32205)
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=32205#post32205

I'm hoping for an impressive design, as well as that people in the neighborhood will get priority.

I'm all for revitalization, but I still hope that Harlem can be integrated while maintaining its history as a Black neighborhood; it would be a shame if families who have lived there for generations were to be priced out. It would be nice, however, if the boundaries between racially divided neighborhoods citywide could be a bit more blurred, in some cases penetrated in both directions.

Gay Marriage (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=24339#post24339)
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=24339#post24339

Yeesh, and now on the AOL boards right-wingers are complimenting the City for "turning away the gays." Cripes...Bloomberg upholds the law to avoid controversy and suddenly we go from being an American Teheran to Houston on the Hudson.

Observations:

Black People Not Welcome at Eden Bar & Restaurant (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=25955#post25955)
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=25955#post25955

New York is by no means Detroit, Chicago or Boston. Many old racial housing patterns, unfortunately, still exist (the stark divide along 96th Street between Yorkville and Spanish Harlem is still there: luxury apartments on the south side, housing projects on the north), but de facto segregation is much less frequent now than in more recent years and race relations haven't been better in recent history.

Brooklyn Questions (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=32200#post32200)
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=32200#post32200

Brooklyn will always be Brooklyn. To present an urban-forest metaphor, Brooklyn's Downtown plan will stand to give it a small grove of skyscrapers compared to Manhattan's dense thicket. Every great city should have its own bohemian enclave, as well as its own sports team. Gentrification happens, albeit often at the expense of the neighborhood's original denizens. BAM caters to a different audience and has a different vibe than Lincoln Center, and the Brooklyn Museum of Art is not as highbrow as the Met. And Brooklynites will always be Brooklynites. This question is similar to asking if Jersey City is becoming more like Manhattan: we're copied often but never bettered.

Sarcasm again:

Javits Center Expansion (& Cancelled Jets Stadium) (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=25499#post25499)
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=25499#post25499

Add some litter, a homeless man or two, and a bit of dog doo, and those renderings would look just like New York. :mrgreen:

Very exciting.

This one’s probably a bit insular/esoteric, but...

Which forum member do you think you’re most alike? (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=29470#post29470)
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=29470#post29470

Lessee...

I believe I share billyblancoNYC, NYCManiac, Stern and krulltime's unabashed zeal and love for everything New York, ZippytheChimp and Edward's combination of levelheadedness with occasional exuberance, Gulcrapek's fondness for the outer boroughs and kitties, londonlawyer's online "Cross me and you'll regret it" attitude, Schadenfrau's offline "Cross me and you'll regret it" attitude, BPC's occasional cautious optimism and reservedness, Christian Weiland's love for the printed word (especially regarding city life), Agglomeration and finddave's frustration with often-irrational NIMBYs, BrooklynRider, NYGuy, Ninjahedge, and Jasonik's occasional highbrow input, and alex ballard and ILUVNYC's high hopes for the future.

With a few exceptions (mostly spammers) I anticipate and enjoy informed posts, educated questions and quality input from everyone here, whether it's NYatKNIGHT, Zoe, dbhstockton, YesISaidIWillYesIWill, RandySavage or anyone else, be they from the City or elsewhere.

Oh, god…

Alone at Night (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=24603#post24603)
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=24603#post24603

Most of New York is very safe to walk around at night, but you should always be wary of your surroundings because even the nicest of neighborhoods have some crime. I've never been mugged, even in notorios neighborhoods like Harlem, but always be on your guard.

Here are a few tips:

Walk assertively, confidently, briskly and close to the curb, like a native New Yorker. Like in any city, pickpockets and the like prey on anyone who looks like a tourist; easy marks. If you must look around or above you to take in the sights, try and be nonchalant about it.

Always have a MetroCard, enough money for cab fare, and loose change to use a payphone if you don't have a cell phone on you. This isn't necessarily due to staying safe, but if you're stuck in TriBeCa when your hotel is on 57th Street you'll want to be able to get back without having to walk.

At night, walk on the avenues or major streets (examples would by 59th, 57th, 42nd, and 14th) where there are more people and lights; random crime more often occurs on sidestreets that don't have as many nightspots or streetlights. If you think you're being followed, several options are available to you: pretend to call someone up on your cell phone (if you have it) and have a pretend conversation that would make passersby believe you're just about to meet someone. You could also duck into a restaurant, shop, hotel, "doorman" apartment building, or other place along these lines and wait until the person you suspect passes. If they wait outside or go inside with you, ask to speak to a hostess or manager and have them call the police (be sure to do this in a nondescript way if you're followed in). Often this will turn out to be a false alarm, but safety should come first. If the option of going into a place of business is not available, draw attention to yourself while you still have the option of doing so—going into a psychotic/schizophrenic fit has actually worked for a lot of my friends when they're in a sticky situation.

Even when you have the light or there don't seem to be any cars around, look in the direction traffic is coming from, (or both if it's a two-way street) as well as where it's turning onto. For example, if you're on the southeast corner of Ninth Street and Broadway and crossing to the southeast corner when you have the light, make sure that there is no crosstown traffic turning from Ninth onto Broadway. And always give taxi drivers the right of way.

The subways are safe, but stay away from the edge of the platform if you're worried about being shoved in (probably won't happen, of course, but be on the safe side if you have doubts). Late at night, ride in the more-occupied cars, namely the middle one where the conductor is or the front car where the driver is.

The parks are also safe, even at night, but it's not a good idea to go in them after dark. Joggers and people walking on their way home will do this with no problem, but there's always a chance of being mugged (though that chance is increasingly slimmer, thank God); or if you get into some other kind of trouble like get lost or hurt yourself, there probably won't be any people around to help you.

It's generally advised to visitors lodging in hotels, no matter the destination, to flip their deadbolts in addition to the automatic locks on their doors. I'd do this here, as well.

Use your common sense, above all things.

Have fun!

END OF POSTS 1501 TO 2000


Since you’re all in la-la land again, I’ll carry on with posts 1000 to 1500 today, and tomorrow as well if need be. I imagine you’ve all got things to do during the Easter break but I’m just taking it easy and, anyway, I have all of next week off from work as well, so I’m happy to keep doing this.

Citytect
April 15th, 2006, 04:36 PM
From TLOZ Posts #3000-3308:


TLOZ on His Family History:
"Third- or fourth-generation American mutt. *My dad's side is mostly German, with a hint of Welsh, Irish, Scottish and English from my paternal grandmother. *My mom's side is entirely Irish. *However, my mom's side of the family is what's considered "black" Irish, or descendants of Irish women who married Spanish sailors who washed up in Ireland after Britain defeated the Armada in 1588; as such, none of us have red hair or a large amount of freckles. *Who knows, if I trace my roots far back enough, I might find some Arab or Berber blood in me from ancestors who were alive during the Moorish occupation and the Reconquista.

My mom's a native New Yorker but was raised on Long Island. *My dad is from Newport, Kentucky, which is a suburb of Cincinnati. *He moved to New York in 1975 to take a job at EFHutton, where he met my mom. *My sister was born in '81, and I was born in '85. *We're all Catholic, although personally I don't necessarily practice the religion."
- Nationalities (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=11926#post11926)

Humor:
"The Ambercrombie & Fitch High School of Science?
Oh, God help us all..."
- Branding in New York Is Just the Beginning (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=980#post980)

"Oh, how sweet. It's circumcised."
- Torre Agbar - Barcelona (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=11022#post11022)

"Considering that one of my classmates has a personality shockingly similar to yours, I for one will just call you our little ray of sunshine, which is his nickname also http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/images/smilies/wink.gif
Now if only there was a Daria avatar :biggrin:"
- responding to a bit of negativity in Jamaica, QUEENS redevelopment (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=6974#post6974)

"It's certainly Hong Kong's greatest "erection" yet."
- The Goldman Sachs of the Pacific (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=10837#post10837)

Crime:
"Is there any site or something where they tally New York's current crime statistics (i.e.: the number of murders, rapes, etc. to date this year)? *I'm just kind of concerned with crime in the city; dunno why."
- Small-Time Crooks (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=11866#post11866)

"I've been to La Guaira, a port town north of Caracas. *Pretty seedy.
Five murders a day? *Yeesh, and idiots in this country say New York is crime-ridden. *We ought to send them all to Caracas and see how they appreciate us then."
- Caracas, Venezuela (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=11015#post11015)

NIMBY stategy:
"...But in the case that there is no [good] history, you just make it up."
- Con Ed site on the East River (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=5713#post5713)

A little venom:
Quote from voiceofreason: "You are all standard, pseudo-intellectual, arrogant "New Yorkers"

TLOZ Link5: "And you, sir, are a standard, ignorant, anti-New York-biased out of towner who draws all of your knowledge about the city from the two whole seconds you've spent there. *Wow, you are the voice of reason."
- Gaudi tower at WTC? (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=6376#post6376)

***

The rest of these I'm just going to give the link to them. These posts all demonstrate TLOZ's extensive knowledge of a variety of issues, stats, and events...

Rate the new WTC plans (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=5841#post5841)
Silverstein speaks (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=6508#post6508)
Why the World Trade Center MUST BE rebuilt (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=7276#post7276)
Memorial rises first Downtown (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=6196#post6196)
The Recession - The City's Sad Economic State (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=718#post718)
Peninsula Hotel (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=6525#post6525) (comparison of urbanity in NYC and Paris)
Should NY State and NY City Split into 2 States? (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=587#post587)

ManhattanKnight
April 15th, 2006, 06:52 PM
TLOZ NUMBERED Posts/Volunteer Reviewer

1-500 -- ManhattanKnight
501-1000 -- Schadenfrau
1001-1500 -- Krulltime
1501-2000 -- Merry
3000-3308 -- Greenie

Krulltime: Based upon your request to join in this project, I have provisionally added you to the list. Please PM me if there's a problem.

Posts 2001-2999 are still available for review -- any volunteers?

To resolve any lingering confusion about the numbering system, please remember that (since posts don't actually have numbers), the numbers shown here refer to the numbers that are assigned by the forum search tool, for example:

http://img106.imageshack.us/img106/5165/tlozsearcha4oh.jpg

BrooklynRider
April 15th, 2006, 08:36 PM
You guys and gals are amazing! I hope every component of this project goes as well! Thank you again ManhattanKnight!

Citytect
April 16th, 2006, 12:15 AM
Posts 2001-2999 are still available for review -- any volunteers?

Ok, I can read some more. I'll take 2700-2999.

Merry
April 16th, 2006, 02:10 AM
Hello, everyone.

I’ve just noticed in ManhattanKnight’s latest update that Krulltime is doing 1001 to 1500. I didn’t see this until after I’d started. I’ve stopped now, but I thought I’d post the ones I’d chosen already (I hope you don’t mind, Krull).

I guess the more reviewers there are, the better the diversity in choices. I’m happy to do some more, but I’ll wait for further instructions to avoid any conflict and/or overdoing it.

POSTS 1001 to 1151:

Life in NYC:

”I was Walking in NYC and......." (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=41865#post41865)
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=41865#post41865

It's not so much the blocking the sidewalk that annoys me, but when really unaware people walk really d*mn slowly on crowded streets. It just reminds me of a Dilbert comic strip when he's trying to get the attention of these two "oblivious slow-walking women" who are blocking the hallway

"Time stands still as I prepare to take my next step."

NY attitudes (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=45358#post45358)
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=45358#post45358

Cold? Unfeeling? Certainly not! Just because we live in apartments and brownstones as opposed to subdivisions or rural towns doesn't mean that we have no sense of community. I'm friendly with the people who live in my building, I know the owners of the restaurants and shops of the area. I live in as much of a neighborhood as does anyone else. Anyone who says otherwise needs to be hit over the head with a copy of The Death and Life of Great American Cities.

Softcover, of course

Making friends in NY (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=46047#post46047)
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=46047#post46047

Today was the second time in eight days that I chatted it up with a random stranger on public transit. I was on the B train and a woman sat next to me when she got on at 42nd Street-Bryant Park. She works for Verizon and we talked a little bit about the sale of the 6th Avenue building, and how much she hoped that she wasn't transferred to Basking Ridge. She lives far uptown, maybe Harlem, Washington Heights or Inwood, so commuting to New Jersey would take her two and a half hours one-way. So we talked about that, her night classes in accounting at CCNY, and NYU — turns out she took some classes there in the early '80s. In my experience, New Yorkers are definitely nice people after being slightly gruff in the first minute or so of talking.

On NYC architecture:

Marriott Residence Inn - Bryant Park Tower (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=43816#post43816)
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=43816#post43816

Ugh! Blech! Puke! Blach! ::suddenly sotto vocce:: No.

Demolished/Destroyed (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=46440#post46440)
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=46440#post46440

Penn Station is the obvious choice, which the article conceded. But other gems have been lost to "progress." There's a reason that at the same time the Great Bambino reigned from Yankee Stadium, New York was earning the nickname "The House That Ruthlessness Built."

Getting to know him:

What kind of music do you like? (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=43773#post43773)
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=43773#post43773

A little bit of everything. I'm a huge fan of Prince and Fleetwood Mac, but I also love U2, the Stones, assorted Motown, Alicia Keys, Led Zeppelin...the list goes on and on. Lately I've gotten into Jimi Hendrix and other bands and performers from the '60s. I like The Darkness, but I think at this point that they're doomed to be a one-hit wonder — nay, a one-hit spectacular, considering that their album went, what, four times platinum?

The philosopher:

You know… (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=43482#post43482)
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=43482#post43482

You know you live in the year 2005 when...

1. You accidentally enter your password on the microwave.
2. You haven't played solitaire with real cards in years.
3. You have a list of 16 phone numbers to reach your family of four.
4. You e-mail the person who works at the desk next to you.
5. Your reason for not staying in touch with friends and family is that they don't have e-mail addresses.
6. You go home after a long day at work and still answer the phone in a business manner.
7. You make phone calls from home and dial "9" to get an outside line.
8. You've sat at the same desk for four years and worked for three different companies.
10. You learn about your redundancy on the 11 o'clock news.
11. Your boss doesn't have the ability to do your job.
12. You pull up in your own driveway and use your cell phone to see if anyone is home.
13. Every commercial on television has a website at the bottom of the screen.
14. Leaving the house without your cell phone, which you didn't have the first 20 or 30 (or 60) years of your life, is now a cause for panic and you turn around to go and get it.
15. You get up in the morning and go online before getting your coffee.
16. You start tilting your head sideways to smile.
17. You're reading this and nodding and laughing.
18. Even worse, you know exactly to whom you are going to forward this message.
19. You are too busy to notice that there was no #9 on this list.
20. You actually scrolled back up to check that there wasn't a #9 on this list.
21. And now, you're laughing at yourself.

Oh, god...

(Several posts in the same thread)

Subway late night (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=42653#post42653)
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=42653#post42653

Originally Posted by Kris
That's enough. If you want to go on discussing soccer, create a topic in Anything Goes.

Sorry, Daddy. We won't do it again. We promise.

(joking)

Anyway, the subways are pretty safe on weekends also, because so many people go out. I've been on the subways at midnight and it's like rush hour.

http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=42852#post42852

Weekends.
A bit of extra advice on subway safety: if you think someone's casing you, don't panic. Act natural, particularly when your stop comes up. If you think they're going to follow you, don't get off the train right away when your stop comes. Wait maybe five seconds after the doors open, then get off the train. If no one follows you, then maybe you're just being paranoid or they got the hint. If someone does follow you, then try and get help.

http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=42855#post42855

I've never been mugged or attacked, especially not on the subway. I did come close once, but I was in Bushwick and it was 11 at night — an uncommon time to take the subway in that area. I was with a friend and though it was obvious that the three guys were considering it, they backed off.

Other than that, I've been fine.

http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=42874#post42874

Whoops, shoulda explained. I had ridden the subway TO Bushwick, and the guys who were casing me were on the train and got off at the same stop. I was headed to a friend's party.

END OF POSTS 1001 to 1151

BPC
April 16th, 2006, 11:56 AM
NY attitudes (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=45358#post45358)

Cold? Unfeeling? Certainly not! Just because we live in apartments and brownstones as opposed to subdivisions or rural towns doesn't mean that we have no sense of community. I'm friendly with the people who live in my building, I know the owners of the restaurants and shops of the area. I live in as much of a neighborhood as does anyone else. Anyone who says otherwise needs to be hit over the head with a copy of The Death and Life of Great American Cities. Softcover, of course


Great work, all. Of the ones cited so far, I think this one might work, perhaps with a little editing.

ManhattanKnight
April 16th, 2006, 12:28 PM
TLOZ NUMBERED Posts/Volunteer Reviewer

1-500 -- ManhattanKnight
501-1000 -- Schadenfrau
1001-1500 -- Krulltime
1501-2000 -- Merry
2501-2700 -- ManhattanKnight
2701-3308 -- Greenie


Posts 2001-2500 (from the period just before JB started at NYU) are still available for review -- any volunteers?

I am working to resolve the apparently overlapping assignments issue that Merry pointed out earlier today. More on that soon, I hope.

BrooklynRider
April 16th, 2006, 07:08 PM
Very impressive results. We continue to invite all members to review TLOZ quotes and add any posts you feel might have been overlooked. ManhattanKnight, Edward and I will discuss some ideas for how to set up posts for team voting and eliminations processes. We will bring our proposal to you for approval. We appreciate your continued hard work, dedication and patience.

Citytect
April 17th, 2006, 06:06 PM
Just wanted to give an update on the posts I'm reviewing.

I have finished reading #s 2700-2999 and have the noteworthy ones bookmarked. I'll type up a list of those quotes before tomorrow morning. I have to do some work now.

BrooklynRider
April 17th, 2006, 11:24 PM
Thank you all. Of the few I've had a chance to read, I am concurrig with BPC so far.

I must note in this thread that we have a message out to the family via a relative that, should they wish, WNY would be very pleased to present them with a remembrance CD of TLOZ quotes. Please, as you post your selected quotes, try to categorize them as Merry has done, so we don't have to back track.

Mucho gracias

Classical123
April 17th, 2006, 11:38 PM
In response to ManhattanKnight's inquiry, I would be happy to review posts 2001-2500 (if this is still needed).

~ Allison

Citytect
April 18th, 2006, 02:04 AM
TLOZ Link5 Posts # 2701-2999:


On what makes NYC Great:
"My faves:
Chinatown: *A walk along Canal Street by day will blow their minds with the bustling crush of people. *Little Italy is a few blocks away, and the winding streets yield new surprises at every turn...
Times Square: *Natch. *New York's laboratory for unprecedented urban revitalization...
Grand Central Terminal: *The jewel in the city's diadem; New York's last vestige of the romantic age of rail travel..."
- Top 10 things to do in New York City (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=1895#post1895)


"Rockefeller Plaza is still tops among the greatest examples of modern urban planning. *A picturesque centerpiece to the world's first large-scale office complex."
- The Best Plazas (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=1823#post1823)

"Downtown had, and maybe still has, the world's most romantic skyline... *I wish that the Singer Building were still around..."
- Downtown Skyline (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=5152#poststop)

"It had class, substance, and in its time was the most famous skyscraper on earth. *It was one of the first buildings to implement corner diagonal cross-bracing, a support against wind pressure commonly used in later steel buildings. *And its unique slenderness, culminating in a slightly bulging crown, was quite reminiscent of a sewing needle, which was a fitting corporate gesture considering that the Singer company makes sewing machines. *In my opinion, its loss is no less than a travesty and an indictment of the city."
- On Singer Building, Downtown Skyline (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=5156#post5156)
He Loved some Bubble Tea:

"Has anyone here been to Silk Road MoCha on 30 Mott Street, where the Fung Kong Bakery used to be? *It just opened three months ago, and I've been there twice. *They serve the best bubble tea I've ever tasted, plus there's a small Krispy Kreme, dioramas chronicling the history of Chinatown, an assortment of ethnic Chinese snack foods, and a sidewalk Internet café that charges about $2 for 30 minutes online. *Quite possibly one of the best new franchises to open in the area for a long time."
- Silk Road MoCha - Tea bar in Chinatown (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=1648#post1648)

Dream:
"I've had dreams where I was at Windows on the World. *Or at least I thought it was. *I keep having these dreams where I'm in a place that looks nothing like the real thing, yet somehow in my mind it registers that I'm there.

Then there are dreams where I keep getting my teeth knocked out from walking into a doorjamb or something. *Or that I'm on a class field trip to North Korea. *A whole series of dreams about my ex-girlfriend stalking me. *And then there was that crazy dream where I watched Donald Rumsfeld beat the living bejeezus out of Beshar al-Assad, the President of Syria."
- Dreams... (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=12250#post12250)

Civic Responsibility & Compassion:
"In fact, acting on a spur of activism, I just finished E-mailing an editorial to Voice of the People:
In regards to Monday's report on the MTA's decision to put a project extending the N Line to LaGuardia Airport on hold: Hearing of Peter Kalikow's decision to delay this necessary project for the time being did not vex me as much as reading about the selfish complaints of Astoria residents who fear so-called 'noise and a loss of business.' *Their opposition, spearheaded by Queens Community Board 1 chairman George Delis—quoted as promising to "fight this thing as long as we have to"—seems less out of concern for the well-being of the city and reeks of Not-In-My-Back-Yardism.

These self-styled community activists are less interested in new jobs and better convenience for travelers and airport workers, as well as easing congestion on the Grand Central Parkway and reversing the airport's slow decline due to its isolation from mass transit; and more concerned about the immediate setbacks as a result of the construction. *While Hong Kong, Chicago, London and Tokyo, among others, now utilize mass-transit options for airport access, New York remains one of the few major international cities that lack rail links to regional airports—and unless City Hall stops showing tolerance for community groups trying to stymie such projects, it will remain that way for the forseeable future."

- LaGuardia Link Low Priority (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=1841#post1841)


"The way you put it, Agglom, they don't sound like NIMBYs. *You've quite accurately painted them as BANANAs. *I live on Second Avenue and my quality of life (or at least that of my parents, considering them I'm going to be living in an NYU dorm) will definitely deteriorate for some time during the subway construction. *But you know what? *None of us are complaining because this project is a necessity and in the end will improve the standard of living on the far East Side. *These people seem to have an adverse way of thinking, unfortunately.
Do the Community Boards have webpages? *You ought to send that to them, or at least as an op-ed to the Daily News as a counterpoint to their ludicrous argument."
- LaGuardia Link Low Priority (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=1840#post1840)

"Safety is not an issue that should be passed on, even if it's the family members trying to make an alleged ploy to stop construction. *I'd read about refuge floors--along with other new standards in skyscraper safety--in the March 2003 issue of Popular Science, and I truly hope that they become part of NYC zoning laws along with safety demands that might be of concern to the families. *That way, we can shut up both them and any other groups indoctrinated with "high-rise deathtrap" propaganda. *It's not easy to do, but sometimes you need to make concessions."
- 9/11 Families To Sue To Stop New WTC (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=9295#post9295)

"...My favorite feature about the new cars, however, is that they were custom-designed to take into account the craftiness of New York graffiti artists. *All surfaces can be easily wiped clean of paint or ink, and the window glass has a special polymer that is resistant to etching acid, which is what graffitists use to scratch tags or messages on the windows. *However, now some people have taken to using knives to carve into the drywall at the narrow ends of each car; but I think even that can be remedied..."
- New Subway Trains for NYC (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=1847#post1847)

"I agree. *Segregation is morally wrong on all accounts. *There's no difference between this situation and the "separate but equal" treatment that blacks endured in the South--although such dogma was practiced unofficially in the North as well."
- Gay school - all gay NYC high school (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=12642#post12642)

Canada's Gay Marriage Plan (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=12475#post12475)
More: Canada's Gay Marriage Plan (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=12482#post12482)

"...620 still isn't that many in proportion to New York's size, yet this should still be a matter of grave concern. *If that number is constant, then the murder rate would be (620/82 = ) 7.56 per 100,000 people, which is still well below the national average, and still lower than in most other American cities..."
- Under Bloomberg, Crime Falls Again (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=1607#post1607)

Humor:
"...Oh God, I'm turning into a preservationist! *Someone detain me before I start stealing babies and eating them!"
- Pennsylvania office tower (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=9847#post9847)

"Is it just me, or does anyone else think that it's the ultimate paradox that you can smell horse manure right outside the Plaza Hotel?"
- NYC - Spring 2003 (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=1377#post1377)

" 'Freedom Tower?'
Bleh...that's not kitsch; that's Middle America."
- Highest Offices in NY (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=9138#post9138)

ManhattanKnight
April 18th, 2006, 11:19 AM
We are nearing completion of this project. I am assembling a compilation of all the posts identified to date, the current draft of which is 15 pages long.

This is the current (revised) assignment list:

TLOZ NUMBERED Posts/Volunteer Reviewer

1-500 -- ManhattanKnight
501-1000 -- Schadenfrau
1001-1500 -- Merry
1501-2000 -- UNASSIGNED -- ANY VOLUNTEERS??
2001-2500 -- Classical123
2501-2700 -- ManhattanKnight
2701-3308 -- Greenie

Please feel free to continue to place the results of your review in this thread. To facilitate preparation of the compilation, I would appreciate your also sending them to me in MS Word (or, better yet, WordPerfect, form). Thank you!

Merry
April 18th, 2006, 08:05 PM
We are nearing completion of this project. I am assembling a compilation of all the posts identified to date, the current draft of which is 15 pages long.

This is the current (revised) assignment list:

TLOZ NUMBERED Posts/Volunteer Reviewer

1-500 -- ManhattanKnight
501-1000 -- Schadenfrau
1001-1500 -- Merry
1501-2000 -- UNASSIGNED -- ANY VOLUNTEERS??
2001-2500 -- Classical123
2501-2700 -- ManhattanKnight
2701-3308 -- Greenie

Please feel free to continue to place the results of your review in this thread. To facilitate preparation of the compilation, I would appreciate your also sending them to me in MS Word (or, better yet, WordPerfect, form). Thank you!

Hi, all.

I've actually already reviewed 1501 to 2000, the results of which are in post #26.

I started reviewing 1001 to 1500 and got up to 1151, the results of which are in post #31.

I'll wait until I hear back from you, ManhattanKnight, before going any further.

ManhattanKnight
April 18th, 2006, 09:11 PM
Hi, all.

I've actually already reviewed 1501 to 2000, the results of which are in post #26.

I started reviewing 1001 to 1500 and got up to 1151, the results of which are in post #31.

I'll wait until I hear back from you, ManhattanKnight, before going any further.

Correct you are, Merry. My apologies. I've re-revised the assignment list to reflect your comments and contributions:

This is the current (revised) assignment list:

TLOZ NUMBERED Posts/Volunteer Reviewer

1-500 -- ManhattanKnight
501-1000 -- Schadenfrau
1001-1500 -- Merry
1501-2000 -- Merry
2001-2500 -- Classical123
2501-2700 -- ManhattanKnight
2701-3308 -- Greenie

Schadenfrau
April 18th, 2006, 10:05 PM
While all of TLOZ's posts are eloquent and insightful, I'm not sure any of 500-1001 are appropriate for the plaque. The last post about Hurricane Katrina seems to be the most appropriate.


On losing his mother:
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=69413#post69413

http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=64862#post64862

On historical crime in NYC:
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=67508#post67508

http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=67418#post67418

On the present administration:
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=66505#post66505

On the origins of his handle:
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=65520#post65520

A day in the life of TLOZ:
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=61212#post61212

On keeping his cool on WiredNY:
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=54209#post54209

On September 11th and the GOP:
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=60587#post60587

On "an eye for an eye":
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=56415#post56415

What's a NIMBY?
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=52101#post52101

Poignant quote about Hurricane Katrina:
"...it's good to know that in the face everything bad that's happened in the past few days, something that speaks of humanity's good side has come out of it..."

http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=63884#post63884

BrooklynRider
April 18th, 2006, 10:48 PM
I am reading through the selections so far. I love this one because there is a real spirit and essence within it that captures what so many people have said about him in posts and emails to our fund Hotmail account.


Today was the second time in eight days that I chatted it up with a random stranger on public transit. I was on the B train and a woman sat next to me when she got on at 42nd Street-Bryant Park. She works for Verizon and we talked a little bit about the sale of the 6th Avenue building, and how much she hoped that she wasn't transferred to Basking Ridge. She lives far uptown, maybe Harlem, Washington Heights or Inwood, so commuting to New Jersey would take her two and a half hours one-way. So we talked about that, her night classes in accounting at CCNY, and NYU — turns out she took some classes there in the early '80s. In my experience, New Yorkers are definitely nice people after being slightly gruff in the first minute or so of talking.

This is a strong contender for a plaque in any Harlem garden.


I'm all for revitalization, but I still hope that Harlem can be integrated while maintaining its history as a Black neighborhood; it would be a shame if families who have lived there for generations were to be priced out. It would be nice, however, if the boundaries between racially divided neighborhoods citywide could be a bit more blurred, in some cases penetrated in both directions.

Here he is our great defender ending it all with a dash of humor.


Cold? Unfeeling? Certainly not! Just because we live in apartments and brownstones as opposed to subdivisions or rural towns doesn't mean that we have no sense of community. I'm friendly with the people who live in my building, I know the owners of the restaurants and shops of the area. I live in as much of a neighborhood as does anyone else. Anyone who says otherwise needs to be hit over the head with a copy of The Death and Life of Great American Cities.

Softcover, of course.

As I read these, I feel sad he is gone, but glad we have a piece of his spirit here.

Schadenfrau
April 18th, 2006, 11:59 PM
I really like the last quote.

Classical123
April 19th, 2006, 01:50 AM
Hi everyone,

I finished my initial review, but I'm still going back and revisiting posts to see if I skimmed over something that might be appropriate for this project. In the meantime, here are three quotes that help capture a bit of his love of New York, his wonderful sense of humor, and the way in which he examined issues from different perspectives:


On loving New York with a passion and focusing on the good he sees in it...

"If you love the place you live, love it with the same passion that so many New Yorkers do, then you'll learn to tolerate its imperfections if it hasn't been ingrained in you already. Be to its virtues very kind, but be to its faults a little blind."

http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showpost.php?p=18775&postcount=13



A little friendly rivalry with NJ...

"You take our jobs. We take your sports teams :twisted: :wink: :twisted:"

http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showpost.php?p=15534&postcount=56



Practical and philosophical reflections on why the cathedral of St. John the Divine was never finished...

"They're always revising, adding to, or otherwise revising the design. Combine that with an eternal shortage of money and you have an unfinished masterpiece. The cathedral is already the largest in the world (St. Peter's in Rome, being only a church with no resident bishop, is the largest church in the world as opposed to the largest cathedral), and many people like to think of its state of incompletion as reflecting the ongoing miracles of God."

http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showpost.php?p=15039&postcount=4



More are forthcoming...

~ Allison

Classical123
April 19th, 2006, 02:15 AM
Of note, I agree with Schadenfrau that the last quote in BrooklynRider's post is particularly good.

Merry
April 19th, 2006, 05:38 AM
POSTS 1152 TO 1500:

NYC infrastructure:

2 Subway Lines (A and C) Crippled by Fire (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=40849#post40849)
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=40849#post40849

It takes MTA construction workers two years at most to renovate a station, while last century they might have been halfway done with building an entire subway line in the same amount of time.

Almost every time I go to the West 4th Street IND station, the date of completion for the elevator they're installing there is pushed back another month. Meanwhile, when it rains, the leaky ceiling results in a veritable downpour on part of the uptown ACE platform.

You could probably count on one hand the number of hours the construction workers are actually being productive in any given week.


Grim Reaper falling on hard times (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=39266#post39266)
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=39266#post39266

In cases of violent deaths like homicides or traffic fatalities, there's one factor that I've noticed hasn't been acknowledged on these forums yet: the improvement in medical care over the years. Doctors and surgeons can easily treat a wound today that would have been considered fatal just a few decades ago. Note that assaults (this includes attempted murders that were prevented through self-defense or through the life-saving skills of medical professionals) have not declined to the same extent that murders have, both nationwide and citywide. Some criminologists theorize that, because of this, the barometer of crime statistics is no longer the murder rate, but the assault rate.


Lost New York:

Plaza Hotel (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=40441#post40441)
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=40441#post40441

The Plaza's plaza must have been grand back in the day. How weird that I regret the demolition of Penn Station and the Savoy-Plaza Hotel when I wasn't even alive to see them intact.

It would be pretty interesting if some developer got the idea to replace the GM Building with a mixed-use supertall, with a 450-foot base that echoes the massing of the old S-P and a shaft that steps back respectfully from the streetwall.

That's my flight of fancy for the day.

25 Thames St - Downtown – Condo (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=37617#post37617)
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=37617#post37617

Agreed on the buildings north of 1 LP. In my opinion, U.S. Steel should have bought up that block instead of demolishing the splendid Singer Tower. A taller building there (obviously a potential building there would not have taken up the whole site) would have been an interesting juxtaposition to the former Twin Towers, and helped to integrate them into the skyline.

The Mayflower Hotel (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=36643#post36643)
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=36643#post36643

Every time I see the GM Building, my stomach turns. The destruction of the Savoy-Plaza Hotel ranks up there as one of the worst moments in New York real estate history.


Politics and respect for others’ views:

The Presidential Election (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=36423#post36423)
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=36423#post36423

Unfortunately, "obtuse" and "redneck" is the stereotype for Bush supporters; it is not an impression that should be cultivated and is just as reprehensible as labelling all Kerry supporters as hippies, socialists, media pundits, PETA activists, homosexuals or the Hollywood elite. Voting for Bush because you feel there is a good reason to and that you can back it up with believable convictions is one thing, and can be respected (my father, for all his intelligence, level-headedness and sophistication, falls into this category). The same goes with those of us who voted Kerry.

Yet there are the radically conservative, morally zealous, closeminded individuals who voted for Bush as a knee-jerk reaction because they feel threatened by more liberal, progressive values. At the same time, again, there are Democrats and others who fall into the same exact category; they just happen to be defined by a different primary color and have different social views.

Voting for Kerry for no reason other than a disdain for rural/suburban America is equally as close-minded. There were many informed people who voted both red and blue, and at the same time many uninformed people who voted both red and blue. I love my family in Kentucky, even if they overwhelmingly voted for Bush. They are not obtuse hicks, but I still dislike their politics; it does not mean that I dislike them — we simply don't discuss politics because we find it divisive, and we love each other just the same and love visiting each other.

Judging people by their vote, regardless of whether we find it misguided, is self-defeating and simply widens the rift that is already so palpable in this country in particular and the West as a whole. I can only hope that in his second (read last) term, that Bush can work to heal that rift, both at home and abroad.


JB knew…

Worst Ghetto/Project (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=35081#post35081)
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=35081#post35081

Red Hook has indeed improved greatly. At this moment, there probably isn't a single neighborhood in New York that isn't undergoing some sort of resurgence.

That said, however, I can tell you from personal experience that it's a pretty good idea to watch yourself in certain neighborhoods, especially late at night.


Common Sense:

Ratner's Beekman Street Tower (Gehry) (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=34025#post34025)
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=34025#post34025

"Out of scale?" Hello, it's the Financial District/Civic Center! The Woolworth Building is three blocks away! Neighborhoods (and views, as I'm sure that this is the primary cause for opposition, at least for residents of that building on Nassau Street) change, for crying out loud; if you wanted stability in your neighborhood, then I would recommend that you move elsewhere.

Yes…I wish we could

The Forumers' Thread (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=34027#post34027)
http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=34027#post34027

Might as well add my ugly mug to the mix...

<picture link broken>

My arms are outstretched because I'm supporting myself in the doorframe. But if you want to think I'm symbolically hugging the viewer, then go ahead. I've been told I hug well.

BrooklynRider
April 19th, 2006, 08:30 AM
Nice work Allison!

I really like this one too. We also have to be sensitive to space limitations, so this could fit nicely.


"If you love the place you live, love it with the same passion that so many New Yorkers do, then you'll learn to tolerate its imperfections if it hasn't been ingrained in you already. Be to its virtues very kind, but be to its faults a little blind."

lofter1
April 19th, 2006, 09:11 AM
Great work from all here ...

When looking for a quote for the plaque it seems we need to take into consideration the length of the text / number of words -- as we've gotten initial feedback from manufacturers that the lettering can't go below a certain size.

The original quote on the flyer is about 175 words.

The "cold? unfeeling?" quote is about 90 words.

Depending on the size of the plaque that we are able to create we might have to go for fewer words.

I'm supposed to hear back from one of the manufacturers today with more specifics and will up-date when I get the info.

lofter1
April 19th, 2006, 09:17 AM
This one is about 50 words:

"If you love the place you live, love it with the same passion that so many New Yorkers do, then you'll learn to tolerate its imperfections if it hasn't been ingrained in you already.

Be to its virtues very kind, but be to its faults a little blind."

lofter1
April 19th, 2006, 09:25 AM
I found a reference to that last line about virtues / faults HERE (http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0022-1953%28198724%2917%3A3%3C646%3AEAHEIH%3E2.0.CO%3B2-7&size=LARGE) (scroll down) .

ManhattanKnight
April 19th, 2006, 09:38 AM
Name: J.B.
Age: 18
Location: Greenwich Village
Birthplace: Upper East Side
Interests: history, architecture, music, reading, writing, computers, video games (but I barely have time for it anymore)
Random facts/talents: (recently changed) Junior at NYU, one older sister.


http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=13683#post13683 (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=13683#post13683)


Funny thing is, the trouble for me started when I got off the subway in Bushwick. Three guys were walking ahead of me and my friend, and they kept looking over their shoulders at us, as if plotting their next move to coincide with ours. It was obvious enough to my friend, who is from Washington Heights, that they were plotting whether to mug us, and even na ve little old me could tell something was off, too.

On our way back to the subway, a gaggle of hipsters — there must have been 30 of them; why do they always travel in packs? — swarmed out of the darkness — there are practically no streetlights there — just as we reached the station. It was surreal.

In most parts, Bushwick needs a lot of work. There's very little active streetlife like in the Village or even in Willimsburgh; truly residential areas aside, the dense concentration of warehouses create blank walls at ground level with little opportunity for retail without serious renovations: housing projects for hipsters. By comparison, I felt safer in Bed-Stuy because the area I went to was mostly rowhouses with front stoops, with a main commercial strip just a few blocks away.

In any case, I don't judge Brooklyn by what happens in Bushwick, and no one with any sense would do that either. It's like judging Boston by what happens in Dorchester.

http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=86682#post86682 (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=86682#post86682)


I go out at night at least once a week in Washington Heights and take the A-train home alone well after two in the morning. I visit a friend in East Harlem regularly. I go to parties occasionally all over Williamsburgh and in Bed-Stuy. I hang out on the Lower East Side at times. I've been to block parties in the South Bronx. I went to Bushwick once, in 2004, and it's the only neighborhood in New York I've been to where I've truly felt unsafe — not just a slight buzz of paranoia that you get in a slightly edgy or unfamiliar neighborhood, but a serious, tingly oh-God-this-place-is-bad sense that I couldn't shake. I wasn't by myself that night, either. I'm glad to hear there's some improvement, but it's going to take several years of that before I ever consider going back there. At least the friend that I went to visit that night has since moved to Bay Ridge.


http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=86484#post86484 (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=86484#post86484)


Oh, so cultural diversity is when white people can live a comfortable distance away from the immigrants enjoy the benefits of their food and culture, but ghettoization is when they're too close for comfort?


http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=84542#post84542 (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=84542#post84542)


Been reading up on this lately and it gets me really pissed off...how wonderful to think that homophobes in this country who want to recriminalize homosexuality essentially want the United States to emulate what is now the most murderous country on Earth. That's right, Jamaica now officially has a higher murder rate than Colombia (which doesn't have any laws making homosexuality a criminal offense) or South Africa (which recently legalized gay marriage). In fact, despite all of the political turmoil there, even HAITI (which likewise doesn't make persecuting gay people part of the political agenda) has a murder rate that's a mere FRACTION of Jamaica's. At least Sean Paul has enough sense to stand up to the idiocy and tell his fellow countrymen to cool it.


http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=83902#post83902 (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=83902#post83902)

Dear Mr. Tierney,

Though I have no shortage of respect for Landmarks, I cannot help but question the soundness of its decisions regarding the buildings that it has fought to preserve. During the Commission's attempts to save the Jamaica Savings bank, a nondescript brownstone adjacent to the Whitney Museum, and other structures of overall dubious architectural significance, many more distinguished structures are being bought up and replaced with banal developments at an appalling pace. I call your attention particularly to the plight of a group of attractive townhouses at 31-37 West 56th Street, which according to The Greenwich Group International are being purchased in preparation for the development of yet another luxury condominium tower. I implore you to look into this matter of concern, lest another elegant reminder of New York's past be replaced by a vulgar development that will only benefit the very rich people who build it and reside in it for a few months of the year at a time.


http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=83477#post83477 (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=83477#post83477)


A fond farewell to a role model of our times [Betty Friedan], who left just as we could use many more like her.

"Remember me...but ah, forget my fate." [Purcell, Dido and Aeneas]


http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=81800#post81800 (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=81800#post81800)


The whole outdated perception of the city being crime-ridden definitely gets to me.

http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=79973#post79973 (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=79973#post79973)


Hopefully, the gods of good taste are trying desperately to stymie any and all efforts to make this building happen.


http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=76309#post76309 (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=76309#post76309)


Suck it dry, Robertson.


http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=76238#post76238 (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=76238#post76238)


I believe in the theory that life as we know it first came about when Gil Gerard built a time machine, went back to the Hadean Eon, and ejaculated into the primordial ooze.


http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=72287#post72287 (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=72287#post72287)


We at Baptists Are Saving Homosexuals have BASHed enough so-called "gays" with the blunt love of Jesus to know how to spot deviants across a crowded sale at Saks. Outside of Italian shoes, nothing sends up a rainbow-colored flare that you are dealing with a flaming homosexual more reliably than when a man breathlessly gushes the word "faaabulous!" When a Christian lady hears this word outside of her hair salon or florist, she instinctively reaches for the Bible tracts in her purse because she knows a nancy boy is within throwing range.
. . .

Therefore, conservative Christians throughout the land have become increasingly uncomfortable as they dutifully mask each awkward pause with a flurry of polite applause and yells of "more wars!"*during President Bush's somewhat laborious attempts at speaking. While Tony Blair may have mastered the Queen's English, our President's vocabulary calls to mind any number of queens' English. Even our least vigilant Republican social commandos have noticed that Mr. Bush has been peppering his otherwise delightful litany of patriotic jingoism and pleasantly embroidered CIA-intelligence recaps with the effeminate mating call "fabulous" -- three giddy syllables that are tantamount to coyly cooing, "Hello, sailor!"


http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=70726#post70726 (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=70726#post70726)


I'll never stop loving Canada. I can't get mad at a country that's given the world poutine, the Barenaked Ladies, Sarah McLachlan and most of the good comedians on this continent...and all is certainly forgiven re: Tom Green.

And if it's not too much trouble, please burn down the White House again before 2008.


http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=70725#post70725 (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=70725#post70725)

::sings::

O Lord, won't you buy me a Mercedes-Benz?
My friends all drive Porsches; I must make amends!
Worked hard all my lifetime, no help from my friends.
O Lord! Won't you buy me a Mercedes-Benz?


http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=13437#post13437 (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=13437#post13437)


But seriously...I loved the Twin Towers because of their sense of presence. Approaching the city after a trip out of town, you'd see them loom over the horizon before the rest of the skyline came into view, almost as a gesture of welcoming you home. Although lacking in architectural grace, they had perfect massing and symmetry and their twinnesss was what made them unique (is that an oxymoron?). They were the defining feature of the skyline of the Financial District, and to people around the world they were symbols of America—even if to us they were symbols of half-hearted, '60s-era efforts at urban renewal.

The towers are gone because of their symbolism, but the ideals they represented still endure. It was their loss that sparked my interest in tall buildings, the history of New York, and an overall renewed appreciation for my home. Even though the term is now extremely clich&#233;, after 9/11 I loved New York, my home, more than ever. I still do.


http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=13192#post13192 (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=13192#post13192)


Most neighborhoods in New York are safe, just so long as you take certain precautions that you might take in Vegas, or LA, or Chicago. *Very few people would ever attempt to accost you during the day; most homeless people are generally harmless and will probably bother you just ask you for some spare change. *At night, if you're wary about walking around, be sure to avoid side streets—one-way crosstown streets generally fronted by walk-ups—as much as possible, and stay in well-lit, well-travelled areas with lots of other people around. *And if you feel that someone is following you, it helps to start acting crazy if they get too close for comfort. *Believe me, this works; just start thrashing around and scream incoherent phrases, like "The bees! *The bees!", or something of that nature. *New Yorkers generally back off if we think you're psychotic.

The subways are safe during the day and relatively safe at night. *If you do take the subway at night, stand far from the edge of the platform and ride either in the front car where the driver is, or the middle car where the conductor is. *It's a general consensus that you shouldn't ride in the rear car of a subway train during off-peak hours.

Other than that, there's very little to be afraid of, provided that you also look both ways before crossing the street. *Have fun, and have a safe trip!


http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=2179#post2179 (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=2179#post2179)

BPC
April 20th, 2006, 12:26 AM
The towers are gone ... but the ideals they represented still endure. It was their loss that sparked my interest in tall buildings, the history of New York, and an overall renewed appreciation for my home. Even though the term is now extremely cliché, after 9/11 I loved New York, my home, more than ever. I still do.


http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=13192#post13192 (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=13192#post13192)


I really like this one (edited slightly).

krulltime
April 20th, 2006, 12:28 AM
^ I agree!

Schadenfrau
April 20th, 2006, 12:48 AM
"If you love the place you live, love it with the same passion that so many New Yorkers do, then you'll learn to tolerate its imperfections if it hasn't been ingrained in you already.

Be to its virtues very kind, but be to its faults a little blind."



I really can't imagine anything would be more perfect than this.

Merry
April 20th, 2006, 06:42 AM
I really can't imagine anything would be more perfect than this.

I really like this one too.

I'm also very fond of the three choices made by BrooklynRider, but particularly the "Cold? Unfeeling?..." quote. This is my favourite, I think. Passion mixed with humour. Perfect.

And I agree that the "I'm all for revitalization..." quote would be just right for a Harlem garden plaque.

lofter1
April 20th, 2006, 09:01 PM
Please check HERE (http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showpost.php?p=94028&postcount=42) for up-date following our meeting today with NYRP.

BrooklynRider
April 22nd, 2006, 06:30 PM
I have to thank the quotes team for the work in this thread. In addition to fulfilling our objective, this thread has really made me feel closer to JB and inspired to succeed. It makes me a lot more thoughtful in my posting, when I see the thoughts he put forth. I have also changed one behavior definitely in response to this tragedy. I always give to anyone begging on the street. I keep getting pulled back to that being his last willful act. It is so simple and so powerful. I get the brain flash each time I'm about to pass, "what kind of person do you want to be remembered as...."

It has also really made me sadder that he is gone. Having read these quotes over and over and using them to try to motivate potential donors and reporters has made me just absorb so much of him. I'm doing my volunteer work this weekend with people dealing with grief and loss and I had a wall of emotion roll over me today thinking of those headlines, "They laughed." It was a good cry with people who "got it." I'm glad we have people in this community who get it too. This is a very special thread.

krulltime
May 4th, 2006, 01:59 AM
"If you love the place you live, love it with the same passion that so many New Yorkers do, then you'll learn to tolerate its imperfections if it hasn't been ingrained in you already.

Be to its virtues very kind, but be to its faults a little blind."


I really can't imagine anything would be more perfect than this.


That one is just perfect.