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Fabrizio
April 24th, 2006, 08:32 AM
A friend of mine has finished building apartments in Florence and has asked me if I´d help his company with preparing a presentation for the American market. However I´m stumped in describing some of the apartment features in English.

The apartments (which we a describing as lofts) have a second floor room that overlooks the living room on the first floor. This means each living room has a ceiling that is of 2 heights. Half of the living room is of normal height (where it is under the room above it). While the other half is double height. So how would I best describe the configuration of this living room?

Also: I see the term "great room" used in American real estate. Exactly what makes a "great room" different from a "living room"? Or is it just a new way for an old term?

And: if a room could be used as a bedroom or as an office, what would be the best way to indicate that on a floorplan? Would "bedroom/office" convey the proper meaning?

I´m unable to come up with a way of describing a small outdoor space outside of the kitchens:

These apartments have been carved out of an old factory building and are in a row like townhouses. The back of the building is built along an ancient wall. The small space that runs behind the building (between the building and the wall) was closed off for each apartment. The kitchens of each apartment open onto this small paved space. The space lacks the depth to be described as a true patio...it´s also closed-in by the high wall.... it would be used more for keeping potted plants, that sort of thing. How would you describe this space?

I´d appreciate any help.

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Moderators: If this kind of post is not proper for the forum (I thought it would be OK because it´s about real estate terms) let me know.

ablarc
April 24th, 2006, 11:18 AM
The apartments (which we a describing as lofts) have a second floor room that overlooks the living room on the first floor. This means each living room has a ceiling that is of 2 heights. Half of the living room is of normal height (where it is under the room above it). While the other half is double height. So how would I best describe the configuration of this living room?
The developers I work for would dispense with niceties and refer to this room as "double height."


Also: I see the term "great room" used in American real estate. Exactly what makes a "great room" different from a "living room"?
It's a Great Room if there's no "Living Room." A "Living Room" is not really a living room; it's a small, formal museum of furniture where salesmen and ministers are received. The real living room is called a Family Room and is bigger. If there's no separate Living Room, the Family Room is called a Great Room (perhaps to indicate that it's two rooms in one). Clear?


And: if a room could be used as a bedroom or as an office, what would be the best way to indicate that on a floorplan? Would "bedroom/office" convey the proper meaning?
Yup, but in the U.S. it's not a bedroom unless you show a closet.


Im unable to come up with a way of describing a small outdoor space outside of the kitchens...
Service yard?

lofter1
April 24th, 2006, 12:13 PM
The apartments (which we a describing as lofts) have a second floor room that overlooks the living room on the first floor. This means each living room has a ceiling that is of 2 heights. Half of the living room is of normal height (where it is under the room above it). While the other half is double height. So how would I best describe the configuration of this living room?

Double Height with Mezzanine would cover it.


Also: I see the term "great room" used in American real estate. Exactly what makes a "great room" different from a "living room"? Or is it just a new way for an old term?

A Great Room also tends to include a Dining Area and opens directly onto the Kitchen (without dividing walls) -- and sometimes includes the Kitchen.


And: if a room could be used as a bedroom or as an office, what would be the best way to indicate that on a floorplan? Would "bedroom/office" convey the proper meaning?

In NYC a "Bedroom" must have a window (per "light & air"). Often the designation of Office / Bedroom is used to show that it's not legally a bedroom -- but you could use it as one.


I´m unable to come up with a way of describing a small outdoor space outside of the kitchens ... The space lacks the depth to be described as a true patio...it´s also closed-in by the high wall.... it would be used more for keeping potted plants, that sort of thing.

You could try ATRIUM (http://www.answers.com/topic/atrium) or one of its synonyms:

noun

An area partially or entirely enclosed by walls or buildings: close (http://www.answers.com/main/ntquery?method=4&dsid=2083&dekey=C0264100&curtab=2083_1), court (http://www.answers.com/main/ntquery?method=4&dsid=2083&dekey=C0345000&curtab=2083_1), courtyard (http://www.answers.com/main/ntquery?method=4&dsid=2083&dekey=C0346200&curtab=2083_1), enclosure (http://www.answers.com/main/ntquery?method=4&dsid=2083&dekey=E0521400&curtab=2083_1), quad (http://www.answers.com/main/ntquery?method=4&dsid=2083&dekey=Q1215100&curtab=2083_1), quadrangle (http://www.answers.com/main/ntquery?method=4&dsid=2083&dekey=Q1215200&curtab=2083_1), yard (http://www.answers.com/main/ntquery?method=4&dsid=2083&dekey=Y1725400&curtab=2083_1). See place (http://www.answers.com/main/ntquery?method=4&dsid=2082&dekey=ROG146&curtab=2082_1).
VERANDA (http://www.answers.com/main/ntquery?method=4&dsid=1555&dekey=V0059300&curtab=1555_1) sounds great, but technically it tends to have a covering and is raised above the ground:
A porch or balcony, usually roofed and often partly enclosed, extending along the outside of a building. Also called gallery.

[Hindi varaṇḍā, probably from Portuguese varanda (perhaps ultimately from Vulgar Latin *barra, barrier, bar).]

Fabrizio
April 24th, 2006, 07:45 PM
Guys thanks so much...Im rushing and will go over these tomorrow. Thanks again.

ablarc
April 29th, 2006, 10:27 AM
The back of the building is built along an ancient wall. The small space that runs behind the building (between the building and the wall) was closed off for each apartment. The kitchens of each apartment open onto this small paved space. The space lacks the depth to be described as a true patio...its also closed-in by the high wall.... it would be used more for keeping potted plants, that sort of thing. How would you describe this space?

What did you finally call this?

Fabrizio
April 29th, 2006, 11:46 AM
I think I´m going to call it "enclosed court". It´s vague....holds no promises... and sounds nice, I think. Opinion?

ablarc
April 29th, 2006, 12:10 PM
Sounds good.

Anyway...what's in a name?