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MikeDavidson80
May 4th, 2006, 08:59 PM
Has all the redevelopment happening in Rahway gotten any attention yet? Rahway is in the middle of a complete revitalization.

Recently a large development of luxury rental apartments were completed downtown called River Place http://riverplacerahway.com/index.asp.

http://riverplacerahway.com/images/rahway-photo2.jpg

The catalyst for much of this growth has been a 16 million dollar renovation of Rahway's train station. Rahway is unique in that both the Northeast Corridor Line and North Jersey Coast Line both meet at Rahway. This gives the residents of Rahway quick access to the NYC, the Jersey shore, and is not that far from Philadelphia.

http://www.rcpnj.org/images/Station_cream.jpg



Built near the train station is a brand new parking garage.






http://rahwayparking.com/assets/images/Deck3.jpg




On the verge of being completed are the luxury townhomes named Riverwalk 3 blocks from downtown.

http://www.diversifiedcommunities.com/communities/community2.htm

http://www.diversifiedcommunities.com/images/riverwalk.jpg


Next in line is Carriage City Plaza to be developed downtown. This building is very exciting. It will be part retail on the 1rst floor, contain a hotel, and luxury apartments.

http://www.carriagecity.net/

http://www.skyviewliving.com/Art/rendering.jpg


Also in the works are numerous other residential communities similar to the Carriage City Plaza and Riverwalk.




http://www.chrisbernardo.info/2005/11/rahway_nj_the_carriage_city_ho.html

Rahway, NJ - THE CARRIAGE CITY HOTEL & TOWER

http://www.chrisbernardo.info/images/index_render_13-thumb.gif (http://www.chrisbernardo.info/images/index_render_13.gif) Rahway’s dynamic downtown redevelopment will mark a new success with the development of the Carriage City Plaza, at the corner of E. Milton Avenue and Irving Street in Rahway.
Named in honor of Rahway’s legendary status as the “Carriage City,” this state-of-the-art 380,000 square-foot, 15-floor tower will be the first mixed-use residential property in Union County to combine condominiums, retail outlets and a hotel in the same building, a configuration that is popular in New York and other cosmopolitan centers.
“The growth of new housing around our train station that is breathing new life into Rahway has been accelerated with this ambitious new development. Our easy access to Newark Airport and Manhattan has made Rahway an extremely desirable place to live and work, and Carriage City is an example of that,” said Mayor Kennedy.

“We have worked closely with Mayor Kennedy and the Commissioners of the Rahway Redevelopment Agency to make Carriage City Plaza a reality,” said Silva. “We are proud to be a part of the renaissance of Downtown Rahway. This project is signaling the rebirth of Rahway as a vibrant, dynamic urban center and will enhance the image of the city for years to come.”
Adding an upscale appeal to Rahway’s downtown, Carriage City Plaza will bring over 20,000 square feet of prime retail space to that area, including a 7,000 sq. ft. restaurant. The complex will also feature downtown’s only hotel consisting of 102 boutique studios and suites.
The building will also offer downtown’s only new mid-rise residential construction featuring 209 one-bedroom and two-bedroom luxury condominiums for sale. The condos will range in size from 850 sq. ft. to 1,600 sq. ft. and will be pre-construction priced from the mid-$200,000’s. According to Silva, homeowners at the Carriage City Hotel & Tower will enjoy the comforts of modern living spaces as well as onsite amenities such as a Fitness Center and Spa, a Rooftop Deck and Garden, 24-hour Concierge Service and Valet Parking. Many of the condos will boast spectacular views of the Manhattan skyline and the Watchung Mountains with the convenience of a quick and easy commute to Midtown Manhattan from the Rahway Train Station,located directly across the street from the building.
The project is designed by the renowned architectural firm of Nadaskay Kopelson in partnership with Arturo Palombo, AIA, both based in Morristown, NJ. Construction is scheduled to begin in the Fall this year and be completed by Spring, 2007.
Silcon Group, New Jersey’s fastest-growing real estate developer, is an integrated, privately held full-service real estate company. Founded by Carlos J. Silva in 1992, Silcon has distinguished itself as a prominent company with a fundamental commitment to excellence and a track record of success. Combining the accessibility and support of a local firm with the resources of a large development company, Silcon has the capabilities, experience and expertise in place to take a project from conceptualization through approvals and to its ultimate realization. Based in Elizabeth, New Jersey, Silcon’s portfolio of properties spans across the central New Jersey market and includes residential, commercial and retail properties for both sale and lease.







http://policy.rutgers.edu/vtc/tod/newsletter/vol1-num1/article_rahway.html


Municipal Spotlight: The Resurgence of Rahway


Once the site of a thriving retail corridor centered around the train station, the working class downtown area of Rahway (http://www.cityofrahway.com/), New Jersey had deteriorated since the 1970s due to increased suburban competition in Union County. In recent years, however, this same area has been the site of a major revitalization effort.
Several factors have contributed to the municipality's notable redevelopment efforts. Rahway is strategically located on the high-speed Northeast Corridor Line of NJ TRANSIT, which provides frequent “one-seat-ride” access to New York Penn Station, Trenton, and Newark Penn Station. Riders can easily reach the Newark Liberty International Airport terminals by transferring to the Air Train at the Airport stop just outside Newark. There is also access to and from the North Jersey Coast Line, which transports travelers south to numerous destinations along the New Jersey shore. Rahway's transportation advantage has made it attractive to industries and businesses — foremost being the pharmaceutical giant, Merck, which employs 4,500 individuals.


http://policy.rutgers.edu/vtc/tod/newsletter/vol1-num1/newsletter_files/rahway_1_map.jpg (http://policy.rutgers.edu/vtc/tod/newsletter/vol1-num1/newsletter_files/article_rahway1_map_large.jpg)
Rahway, NJ Transit Village Area (Shaded Circle)
Led by Mayor James Kennedy’s sustained support for downtown redevelopment, the municipality’s commitment to transit-oriented development principles have guided these recent revitalization efforts. The centerpiece of Rahway’s transformation has been the $13 million renovation of the NJ TRANSIT Station on Milton Avenue, complemented by the construction of a $1.5 million plaza directly adjacent to the station entrance. The renovation and preservation of the 1920s Union County Arts Center has been another major factor in downtown Rahway’s resurgence. The formerly abandoned building now hosts world-class concerts and theater events. Its location only a few blocks from the train station makes it attractive to patrons traveling from out of town. The redevelopment process has also been aided by the designation of Rahway in 2002 as a Transit Village, making the city eligible for grants and assistance under New Jersey's Transit Village Initiative.
Indeed, nearly all new developments in Rahway have capitalized on the central location of the train station in the downtown area. Within the ½-mile “transit village” area surrounding the station, no less than 15 major projects have been constructed or are in the planning and development phases. Several of the more noteworthy projects are: the 136-luxury apartment River Place development, the Park Square project which includes 159 apartments and townhouses plus retail space, the construction of three major hotels, and the redevelopment of a mixed-use building containing a movie theater and artist live/work spaces.

Developers and investors have realized that this particularly well-connected and compact municipality is an ideal candidate for revitalization. Construction activity within the ½-mile radius totaled over $105 million from 1999 to 2003. While much of this investment was directed to commercial or municipal projects, the stage has been set for residential expansion and over 1,500 residential units are now in the production pipeline.











http://policy.rutgers.edu/vtc/tod/newsletter/vol1-num1/newsletter_files/article_rahway2.jpg
Union County Arts Center, Rahway, NJ



Towns in New Jersey and elsewhere can learn valuable lessons from Rahway’s transit-based resurgence and its commitment to the tenets of transit-oriented development (TOD).























http://policy.rutgers.edu/vtc/tod/newsletter/vol1-num1/article_schwartz.html

Practitioner Spotlight: Joel Schwartz, Landmark Companies


http://policy.rutgers.edu/vtc/tod/newsletter/vol1-num1/newsletter_files/Schwartz_photo_article.jpgJoel Schwartz is a principal of Landmark Companies, L.L.C. (http://www.landmarkcompanies.net/), a design-oriented development firm located in Princeton and Keasbey, New Jersey. Prior to the formation of Landmark, he was a principal for 20 years of Atlantic Development Realty Corporation, located in Woodbridge, New Jersey. During this time, Joel was the principal-in-charge of more than a dozen major development projects comprised of more than 3,000 housing units and over 1 million square feet of retail and office space. In particular, Mr. Schwartz has a special interest and expertise in downtown redevelopment while embracing the principles of traditional town planning.
At Landmark, he is involved with every aspect of the firm: land acquisition, planning, design, development, approvals and construction. Landmark builds housing at all price points throughout New Jersey: affordable housing, multi-family housing, rental flats, market-rate condominiums and high-end, single-family homes.
One project which embodies a number of design features that Landmark believes are fundamental to successful downtown redevelopment is Franklin Square in Metuchen, New Jersey. Franklin Square is a six-acre infill site located just a five-minute walk from the NJ TRANSIT train station. The 105-unit project was designed to fit in architecturally with the surrounding neighborhoods, to wear well over time and to provide the residents with the amenities of beautiful streetscapes and convenient, but dispersed parking.

http://policy.rutgers.edu/vtc/tod/newsletter/vol1-num1/newsletter_files/article_schwartz1.jpg

Franklin Square, Metuchen, NJ
Franklin Square, a proven success with upscale homebuyers, has also attracted critical acclaim and media attention. Locally, this project was the recipient of the 2002 Achievement in Planning Award from the New Jersey Planning Officials (NJPO). The National Association of Home Builders in 2002 awarded Franklin Square its Best in American Living silver medal in the category of Best Smart Growth Community. It was also the cover article in Land Development magazine's Winter 2002 issue.
Landmark is spearheading other transit-oriented projects. In Rahway, plans have been approved for the construction of a $20 million mixed-use project, Park Square, which features 159 units of market rate housing and 6,000 sq. ft. of commercial space.
Joel is active in promoting the principles of "New Urbanism." He is a charter member of the Congress for the New Urbanism, a "nonprofit membership organization dedicated to the concept that compact, pedestrian-friendly, mixed-use neighborhoods are the best building blocks for vibrant communities." Joel has also served as a regular panelist with the New Jersey Mayors' Institute on Community Design, a select group that meets in multi-day retreats to discuss design and planning issues with Mayors from around the state.
Joel was born in Elizabeth, New Jersey. He received his undergraduate degree in American Studies from Brandeis University and his master's degree in Architecture from the University of Oregon. He is both a registered architect and a licensed planner in the state of New Jersey.

stache
May 5th, 2006, 06:58 AM
Rahway gets points for being a transit hub, but that Carriage City building looks absolutely dreadful.

ablarc
May 5th, 2006, 07:22 AM
Key to any urban resurgence is keeping out parking lots. Multistory garages are OK but need ground floor retail --or they can be masked entirely with a veneer of residential or office directly attached. Pedestrian continuity is thus maintained. And you end up with genuine urbanity, i.e. a little city.

Ed007Toronto
May 5th, 2006, 05:14 PM
Is the prison from the "Scared Straight" TV show still in Rahway?

MikeDavidson80
May 5th, 2006, 07:10 PM
http://www.localsource.com/special_sections/ProgressUNION-0126.pdf







Ground to be broken in Rahway

By Kitty Wilder

RAHWAY — Redevelopment officials expect the face of the downtown business district to change greatly in 2006.

With four major projects scheduled to break ground this year, Rahway Redevelopment Agency Executive Director Peter
Pelissier said this will be an “incredible” year for new development in the city. The Carriage City Hotel and Tower, long viewed as the “cornerstone” of redevelopment in Rahway will break ground this year at the corner of E. Milton Avenue and Irving Street, according to Pelissier. Developer Silcon Group is responsible for creating the project. Standing 15-stories tall, the hotel will incorporate a mixture of 102 extended-stay studios and suites along with 209 condominiums. The combination of the hotel rooms and condominiums under one roof has been praised by local officials and the developer who say the structure will be popular with travelers seeking access to New York and Philadelphia.

Plans also call for 20,000 square feet of retail space and 7,000 square feet of restaurant space. A health club and a roof-top garden will also be included. The project will pay $2 million to the Rahway Redevelopment Agency when it is completed, with the agency picking up $10,000 per unit on award of a certificate of occupancy. Named for the city’s historic ties to carriage manufacturing, the hotel is expected to be complete by spring 2007. Just down the street, another mixed-used project is slated to bring 140 rental units and 6,000 square feet of retail space to Irving Street. The Park Square project calls for two buildings containing one- and two- bedroom apartments. One building will front Irving Street. The other will face West Main Street.
According to plans, the development will have a park and courtyard as its centerpiece. Pelissier said he expects construction on this project to pick up with warmer weather this spring. The project witnessed several delays due to environmental work and property acquisitions last year. Pelissier has expressed confidence in the developer, Landmark at Rahway LLC, which has at least $2 million invested in the project.

Another developer that stepped forward with large investments in Rahway last year was Dornoch Holdings LLC.
Dornoch will be responsible for two projects that will result in major changes on the Main Street side of the downtown district.

Monroe and Dock streets and will incorporate 36 residential units along with 7,200 square feet of retail space. Just across the street, Dornoch is planning on creating another project, a six-story building with about 120 luxury apartments and 20,000 square feet of retail space. The project will include a parking garage and will altogether occupy one of the city’s most prominent downtown blocks.


Together, these projects will largely re-shape the image of downtown Rahway, Pelissier said, adding that this year, “My
major goal is to make sure major projects break ground and move forward.”



Other projects just outside the downtown area will also add to the city’s expansive redevelopment efforts. On Essex Street, once considered among the most blighted areas in Rahway, developer Ken Schwartz of Diversified Communities has sold the first of 86 townhouses recently built along the Rahway River. The project, named Riverwalk, includes two-bedroom units with amenities like hardwood floors, 9-foot ceilings, loft space and, in some cases, a river view. According to Pelissier, the city will gain back the initial $1.5 million it loaned to the developer to initiate the Riverwalk project.

The city will also collect full taxes on each unit and the Redevelopment Agency will pick up a prorata share of the
commission on each unit.

Just across the river, Schwartz and Diversified are pursuing another project. Details of the potential mixed-use development have not yet been solidified, but Schwartz and Pelissier have confirmed the three-and-a-half acre site of The Center Circle —an indoor sports complex near City Hall — has been contracted by the developer. Schwartz has said he plans on pursuing a project incorporating commercial and residential space. The central location of the property, which is near the library, recreation center and post office makes it “the perfect spot for redevelopment,” Pelissier said late last year.

Finally, in a different, but still central area of the city, preliminary plans for extensive arts facility have also been laid out by Main Street developer, Dornoch. On the former Hamilton Laundry site on Hamilton Street, Glen Fishman, managing director of Dornoch told the Redevelopment Agency in December he plans on creating a location that will attract artists of all mediums. With a restoration of the historic site, the creation of a Black Box theater, work space for a variety of artists, a cafe or restaurant and possibly living space, the facility will aim to highlight the city’s focus on the arts. The project is still in preliminary stages, but Fishman has said he’d like to see the arts part of the project up and running by the end of the year. The residential component would follow. Rahway’s “manageable” downtown size and the site’s proximity to the train station will help make the project successful, Fishman told Redevelopment Agency commissioners. The same sentiment has been expressed by other developers.

MikeDavidson80
May 5th, 2006, 07:23 PM
http://www.new-jersey.ws/modules.php?name=News&file=article&sid=1058



Rahway: Comedy Club Could Be Coming To Rahway
Posted on Wednesday, April 28 @ 14:25:05 CDT by staff report
http://www.new-jersey.ws/images/topics/rahway.jpg (http://www.new-jersey.ws/search.php?query=&topic=20)

RAHWAY—Mayor James Kennedy’s dream of creating an arts district has moved closer to fruition. Comedian Joe Piscopo has expressed interest in creating a comedy club at the site of the former Hamilton Laundry.

The proposed comedy club would serve as a theater during the day, and a club venue from Thursday through Sunday.

Piscopo’s interest came after a chance meeting with Kennedy during a fundraiser that both men attended. Kennedy gave Piscopo his pitch for Rahway’s arts district. Piscopo said, “It's been a dream of mine to have a club of my own.”

Piscopo is working with Parsippany-based Woodmont Properties on the project. Woodmont CEO Eric Witmondt and Piscopo outlined their concept proposal at a meeting last week before the Rahway Redevelopment Agency, which selected them to redevelop the Hamilton Laundry site. They will now have between 60 and 90 days to work on their proposal and draft conceptual drawings. Piscopo has been touring the country with his own original Big Band tribute to Frank Sinatra, as well as his multi-media comedy show. He was a guest at the Italian American Celebration at the Governor’s Mansion in New Jersey on April 24, hosted by Governor and Mrs. James McGreevey.

stache
May 5th, 2006, 08:36 PM
We're into spam territory here -

Dagrecco82
May 6th, 2006, 10:54 AM
Is the prison from the "Scared Straight" TV show still in Rahway?
Still there. It's such an old Prison. I love the architecture which they used.

MikeDavidson80
May 13th, 2006, 11:37 PM
http://policy.rutgers.edu/vtc/tod/newsletter/vol2-num1/article_village_update.html

Rahway Update: Projects, Projects, Projects!
Since Rahway (http://www.cityofrahway.com/) was featured in our first issue (http://policy.rutgers.edu/vtc/tod/newsletter/vol1-num1/article_rahway.html), a lot has been happening in this Transit Village as it continues toward its redevelopment goals.

http://policy.rutgers.edu/vtc/tod/newsletter/vol2-num1/images/article-village4.jpg
Riverwalk at Rahway (http://www.riverwalkatrahway.com/) is an 86-unit townhouse project on nine acres along the east side of the Rahway River. It is a five-minute walk to the NJ TRANSIT train station along the Northeast Corridor. Three buildings have been completed with 20 units sold or under contract. The sales agent for the developer, Diversified Communities (http://www.diversifiedcommunities.com/), reported that buyers clearly value the easy access to the train. Prices currently range from $400,000 for a 1,455 square foot unit to $550,000 for 2,300 square feet. Diversified has just purchased an adjacent hotel site along Route 1 & 9 and plans to extend Riverwalk to include stacked flats at this location. Part of the site along the Rahway River will become Riverwalk Park and will feature a restored natural habitat, a walking/bike path and a boathouse for non-motorized watercraft.

http://policy.rutgers.edu/vtc/tod/newsletter/vol2-num1/images/article-village5.jpg
Building permits are about to be issued for a 15-story mixed-use project opposite the train station, to be known as Carriage City (http://www.carriagecity.net/). The building, being developed by Silicon Group (http://www.silicongroup.net/), will feature 20,000 square feet of retail and office space, 102 extended-stay hotel rooms, and 200 one- and two-bedroom residential condominiums.


Dornoch Holdings, LLC, of Morristown, New Jersey, now has three ongoing developments in Rahway after purchasing $12 million worth of properties in the Central Business District.
The first is a 36-unit residential project at Main and Monroe Streets, with 6,000 square feet of retail space at grade and parking for residents underground. Construction is expected to begin soon.
The second is diagonally across from the train station featuring 150 residential units, 20,000 square feet of office space, 20,000 square feet of retail space, and a 324-car parking deck.
The third project is the redevelopment of the Hamilton Laundry site, near the Union County Arts Center, into artist lofts and studio space, a restaurant and comedy club, plus market-rate housing. Gardens, landscaped open space and courtyards, and a bridge across the river are proposed as part of this plan. The city is currently engaged in asbestos removal on the site.

http://policy.rutgers.edu/vtc/tod/newsletter/vol2-num1/images/article-village6.jpg
http://policy.rutgers.edu/vtc/tod/newsletter/vol2-num1/images/article-village7.jpg
Heartstone Development, LLC, of East Hanover will soon be building 150 rental units two blocks west of the train station once acquisition of properties now on the site is complete. Heartstone is also the developer of River Place - a 136-unit market-rate apartment complex on the corner of Dock and Lewis Streets completed in 2004, becoming the largest privately-funded residential housing development to be built in the Central Business District in 25 years.

Landmark Communities, LLC (http://www.landmarkcompanies.net/), of Princeton and Keasbey, New Jersey, is now clearing the site for its $20 million Park Square project that will feature 159 units of market-rate rental housing.

MikeDavidson80
May 27th, 2007, 02:11 PM
Changes to Cheer About. Really.
http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/05/06/realestate/06livi.xlarge1.jpg
Timothy Ivy for The New York Times
Tradition, Transition A condo going up in Rahway, whose renovated train station links to both the Northeast Corridor and the Jersey Shore.


By JILL CAPUZZO
Published: May 6, 2007
IF you ask most people what comes to mind when they hear the word “Rahway,” the first answer is likely to be the state prison. A second response might have something to do with Rahway’s role as a major stop on the New Jersey Transit (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/n/new_jersey_transit/index.html?inline=nyt-org) lines leading into New York City (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/classifieds/realestate/locations/newyork/newyorkcity/manhattan/?inline=nyt-geo).


http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/05/04/realestate/06livimap_190.jpgMap (http://javascript<b></b>:pop_me_up2('http://www.nytimes.com/imagepages/2007/05/04/realestate/06livimap_ready.html', '309_485', 'width=309,height=485,location=no,scrollbars=yes,t oolbars=no,resizable=yes'))Rahway, N.J. (http://javascript<b></b>:pop_me_up2('http://www.nytimes.com/imagepages/2007/05/04/realestate/06livimap_ready.html', '309_485', 'width=309,height=485,location=no,scrollbars=yes,t oolbars=no,resizable=yes'))


The first association is based on a misnomer, residents are quick to point out. To begin with, Rahway State Prison was renamed East Jersey State Prison 19 years ago. Then there is the fact that the prison is actually in Woodbridge, not Rahway. An arrangement made long ago between the Rahway post office and prison officials has trapped this Union County city in an embrace it has had a hard time loosening.
The second perception, on the other hand, is one that Rahway would like to capitalize on, and that opportunity might be close at hand. Having established a town center around a renovated train station and new plaza, officials are anticipating the completion of 1,500 housing units geared toward professionals. This has led to predictions of another kind for working-class Rahway.

“It’ll be yuppie town,” said Ted Gielen, owner of the Rahway Grill. ”It’ll be just like Hoboken.”

Mr. Gielen, who hung in when many other downtown businesses fled for the malls, is eager to see the empty shops along Cherry Street come back to life. So is Joe Cimilluca, a broker with the Able Agency Real Estate Company, which also stayed in Rahway when other agencies left.

“There’s a lot of buzz about what’s happening downtown,” Mr. Cimilluca said. “There’s no question that this thing is going to turn full circle, but it’s going to take time. Just like it took 15 to 20 years to deplete itself, it’s going to take that long for Rahway to build itself back up again.”

Many people attribute the turnaround to the mayor, James Kennedy, a nearly lifelong resident who has eaten, slept and breathed Rahway since his election in 1990. When other businesses fled Main Street and headed to the malls during the 1970s, his downtown jewelry store stayed put. When a house in the city’s historic district came on the market in 1983, he and his wife, Lori, grabbed it. (Mr. Kennedy has renovated nine other older buildings in town, including one that now houses the much acclaimed David Drake restaurant.)

More important, when it came time to entice investors to Rahway, the mayor’s connections to Trenton helped. Mr. Kennedy counts as one of his best friends former Gov. James E. McGreevey (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/m/james_e_mcgreevey/index.html?inline=nyt-per). Since 1999, more than $100 million in public and private money has been invested in Rahway. In the beginning, Mr. Kennedy admits, the place was a tough sell.

“People were buying here based on good values,” he said, “but they were skeptical, because of the reputation of the town, because of the prison. Once the town center is done, I think that stigma will start to evaporate very quickly.”

Linda Landmesser, a broker with Countrywide Home Loans and a 40-year resident, put it this way: “Rahway used to be a very quaint old town. To see it coming back like it is, that’s very hopeful to me.”
Ms. Landmesser, who remembers meeting friends to shop in the stores downtown and eat in the luncheonette, described the construction cranes and diverted traffic as a bearable price to pay, considering what they portend for the city’s health.

Projects range from the already completed town houses and apartments on the banks of the Rahway River to a 16-story hotel and luxury condominium being built opposite the train station.


What You’ll Find

Rahway’s three major arteries divide its neighborhoods into distinct pockets. Through the northern tier there is St. Georges Avenue, a stretch of restaurants, car dealers and shops that serve surrounding middle-class neighborhoods. Through the center of town run the train tracks, around which much of the development is taking place. And through the south runs a somewhat shabby stretch of Route 1, cutting off the southernmost pockets, some of which have not yet benefited from the residual effects of revitalization.

Besides the much anticipated development downtown, Rahway has a solid stock of single-family homes and has long attracted middle- and working-class families from New York and North Jersey seeking good value. So far, brokers say, they have not seen a big influx of upscale city dwellers suddenly discovering this four-square-mile city of 26,500.

“It’s always been a good commuter town,” said Freddy Rivera, an agent at ERA Village Green Realty in Clark. “Especially after 9/11, you had New Yorkers who wanted to get out of the city but didn’t want to move all the way out into the suburbs, so a lot of them came to Rahway.”

The simplicity of access to New York City should not be underestimated as an asset of this city 20 miles away. The 40- to 50-minute direct train ride is a boon for commuters, or anyone who wants to catch a Broadway show or sporting event.
Martha and John Echevarria bought a split-level ranch here for $170,000 in 1999, after having lived in Brooklyn (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/classifieds/realestate/locations/newyork/newyorkcity/brooklyn/?inline=nyt-geo). Mrs. Echevarria said the decision to leave Brighton Beach was made for them by the bullet hole they found in their car one day. It had been parked outside their apartment building. They both commute into New York to work, as does Mrs. Echevarria’s 72-year-old mother, Blanca Nu&#241;ez, who lives with them.

“It was really important to me that there was transportation available that she could take into work,” said Mrs. Echevarria, an admitting officer at the Hospital for Special Surgery in Manhattan (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/classifieds/realestate/locations/newyork/newyorkcity/manhattan/?inline=nyt-geo). “People ask me do I mind the commute. I tell them I love it here. It’s so peaceful and quiet. It’s like a vacation.”


What You’ll Pay

Because much of the work downtown is still in progress, real estate remains somewhat underpriced compared with neighboring Clark or Woodbridge. But the numbers are expected to creep up as the new developments are completed.

“I tell my clients to look at Rahway as a stock,” Mr. Cimilluca said. “The company’s on the rise, it’s done a lot of great things, but it hasn’t hit that top plateau yet. Once it does, you’re not going to be able to afford it.”
There are 189 houses on the market. Among the most popular neighborhoods is Inman Heights, in the northeast, where a typical split level, Cape Cod or smaller colonial, with three bedrooms and two bathrooms, lists in the low to middle $300,000s. Similar houses in the desirable Milton Lake Park are a little higher; a three-bedroom, one-and-a-half-bath ranch with lake views, for instance, is listed at $399,000.

The older Victorian or colonial-style houses in the historic district, closer to downtown, don’t come on the market very often, but when they do, depending on condition, they can top $500,000. The highest-priced older home now on the market here is a four-bedroom, two-and-a-half-bath colonial at the end of West Lake Drive, listed at $684,500.

On the new-housing front, just south of City Hall (which is moving elsewhere to make room for more new housing), the River Walk development on Essex Street has 87 town houses, priced from $440,000 to $600,000. The 222 condominiums in Skyview, the 16-story hotel/residential building expected to open next May, will list from $230,000 to $480,000, according to a Skyview sales representative.


What to Do

The heart of the still-fledgling arts district in Rahway is the Union County Arts Center, housed in the restored 1928 Rahway Theater building. More renovations will keep the site closed until next year, but in the meantime the arts center is holding performances at the high school and senior citizen center.

Milton Lake, with its marked paths, is a popular destination for fishermen and walkers. The city’s historic society headquarters, at the Merchant and Drovers Historic Tavern Museum, draws many visitors with events like the Halloween graveyard ghost tour.


The Commute

Rahway is where New Jersey Transit’s Northeast Corridor and North Jersey Shore lines converge. That makes it one of the busiest stations in New Jersey (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/classifieds/realestate/locations/newjersey/?inline=nyt-geo), providing service not only on the New York-to-Philadelphia route, but also to the Jersey Shore towns. Bus service is available, too, from a depot on St. Georges Avenue, with a commute a little longer than the train: just under one hour. The Garden State Parkway and the New Jersey Turnpike are also easily accessible.


The Schools

Rahway has four neighborhood elementary schools, teaching kindergarten through Grade 5: Grover Cleveland, Franklin, Madison and Roosevelt. Grades 6 through 8 are taught at Rahway Middle School, Grades 9 through 12 at Rahway High School. Despite illustrious alumni like the astronomer Carl Sagan, the high school has in recent years been troubled by disciplinary problems and low test scores. Rahway’s average math SAT score in the academic year ending in 2006 was 449, versus the state average of 516. The verbal average that year was 438, versus the state average of 492.

The high school’s performing and fine arts program, on the other hand, has consistently won praise.
There are several Catholic elementary schools in neighboring communities, including St. John the Apostle in Clark, and St. John Vianney in Colonia. Options for teenagers include Roselle and Union Catholic High Schools.


The History

Once home to the Lenape Indians, the town derived its name from a local tribal chief. Settled by Europeans in 1664 as part of the Elizabethtown Tract purchase, Rahway was not incorporated until 1858. Its central location made it an important stop for stagecoaches, boats on the Rahway River and, later, trains. It was also a stop on the Underground Railroad.

The city at one time served as a big home to manufacturing, including the Wheatena cereal and Regina Music Box companies. Today, only Merck & Company pharmaceuticals remains, with 4,500 employees.


Going Forward

Reviving the downtown is good news for merchants and residents eager to see real estate values increase, though some worry that it could create a class fissure between old-timers and new arrivals.
Many are viewing the transformation with a mix of anticipation and anxiety. Noting a “certain mind-set” among longtimers, Mr. Cimilluca, the broker from Able Agency, said, “Nobody likes change, even good change, but once it’s built, and people are there, they’ll be more receptive.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/05/06/realestate/06livi.html?ex=1180411200&en=1a97b0ba88b6160a&ei=5070

West Hudson
May 27th, 2007, 02:37 PM
Each time I pass through Rahway on the Northeast corridor line, I can't help but be amazed by the redevelopment. Last time I think I counted about 5-6 relatively large sites under contruction within a block or so of the train station. I think downtown Rahway is definitely well on its way toward a downtown Morristown-type makeover. It is probably right behind downtown New Brunswick in terms of new investment for a suburban city.

Does anyone know how many stories the Dornoch Holdings buildings will be? And, is this that massive complex going up on the opposite side of the NE Corridor from the Carriage City building?

kevin
May 29th, 2007, 01:54 PM
We're into spam territory here -

The sad thing is that all of this info is relevant, and I want to feel good about Rahway, but the fact that this guy doesn't respond to comments or anything makes me feel used. It's a standard PR tactic, even if it's poorly executed.
<sigh>

*eta* - More impressive is that that riverwalkatrahway site doesn't even link to a relevant website.

Punzie
May 29th, 2007, 02:26 PM
Sometimes there's a fine line between expressing great eagerness to share information and posting spam. Please try to address members' comments about Rahway, and try to answer some of their questions. Otherwise, I'll have to assume that you're posting spam.

MikeDavidson80
June 6th, 2007, 01:59 AM
The sad thing is that all of this info is relevant, and I want to feel good about Rahway, but the fact that this guy doesn't respond to comments or anything makes me feel used. It's a standard PR tactic, even if it's poorly executed.
<sigh>

*eta* - More impressive is that that riverwalkatrahway site doesn't even link to a relevant website.

Kevin,

Don't you think you're being a little harsh? I'm not on this web-site everyday. I just come once and a while to post updates about what's happening in Rahway. I'm a Rahway resident, actually moved there about a year ago.

I'd be happy to answer any questions regarding the redevelopment happening in the town, I try to pay pretty close attention to it!


Mike

MikeDavidson80
June 6th, 2007, 02:03 AM
Each time I pass through Rahway on the Northeast corridor line, I can't help but be amazed by the redevelopment. Last time I think I counted about 5-6 relatively large sites under contruction within a block or so of the train station. I think downtown Rahway is definitely well on its way toward a downtown Morristown-type makeover. It is probably right behind downtown New Brunswick in terms of new investment for a suburban city.

Does anyone know how many stories the Dornoch Holdings buildings will be? And, is this that massive complex going up on the opposite side of the NE Corridor from the Carriage City building?

I think the massive complex you're thinking of is Park Square. It's going up on Irving street, taking up a huge block downtown.

The Dornoch building your probably referring to is the one going up on main street. They've already torn down a few buildings in the spot they're going build. I believe the new building will be about 5 stories.

They are also building the savoy across the street. The savoy is going to be a smaller building, probably only 2 or 3 stories. Don't know exactly off the top of my head...

MikeDavidson80
June 6th, 2007, 02:08 AM
Sometimes there's a fine line between expressing great eagerness to share information and posting spam. Please try to address members' comments about Rahway, and try to answer some of their questions. Otherwise, I'll have to assume that you're posting spam.

I thought this forum was for people to share with others what's happening in their towns? How is posting articles about Rahway in a Rahway thread spam?

Punzie
June 6th, 2007, 05:27 AM
I thought this forum was for people to share with others what's happening in their towns?
I bolded your word "share". That's the key word - "share".

Sharing on this site is a two-way street. You can write extensively about your town, post a lot of photos, update it with current happenings, even brag about it. But you must make an attempt to answer questions and address substantial comments. The thread has to flow a bit like a conversation.

Providing information for Tbal was a good start. Maybe you'd like to solicit input from members; for example, maybe ask them straight out, "What aspects of Rahway would you be interested in hearing more about?"

Punzie
June 6th, 2007, 05:44 AM
(1) Re:

Key to any urban resurgence is keeping out parking lots. Multistory garages are OK but need ground floor retail --or they can be masked entirely with a veneer of residential or office directly attached. Pedestrian continuity is thus maintained. And you end up with genuine urbanity, i.e. a little city.
I think that Ablarc's observations ^^^ are keen, and I agree with him. But not all people do. What is your informed opinion?
Also, if they happen to already be integrating retail/office space with garages, what are some notable specific examples?
Can you envision Rahway as an "urbane little city"?

(2) I love Joe Piscopo's comedy style. I felt that his somewhat weak supporting SNL cast, (Eddie Murphy excepted), kept him from achieving his full potential in show business. So... I guess you can figure out what I'd love to hear about: all the "inside info" on Joe Piscopo's involvement in Rahway.:D


Just because I'm a moderator, doesn't mean you have to address my Rahway requests first.;)

kevin
June 7th, 2007, 03:24 PM
Kevin,

Don't you think you're being a little harsh? I'm not on this web-site everyday. I just come once and a while to post updates about what's happening in Rahway. I'm a Rahway resident, actually moved there about a year ago.

I'd be happy to answer any questions regarding the redevelopment happening in the town, I try to pay pretty close attention to it!

Mike

The problem was that several people wrote comments after your initial posts, and your subsequent posts ignored, even seemed oblivious to them. After seeing a couple of my favorite message boards overrun by spam, I get a bit wary of people who post but do not respond.

To be blunt, I felt like you were Ponch from CHiPs, or that woman from that 70s show trying to sell me a timeshare in Arkansas or Sunny Las Vegas! I don't know if I speak for everyone here, but my perception is a little different when someone's opening up a dialog, rather than trying to sell us a bill of goods. I'm happy to see that you're responding to our messages.

That being said, I haven't been in Rahway in a while. I used to take the train on both the NJCL and the NEC, and I remember thinking that the place had some potential. But why would someone want to move to an expensive apartment in Rahway (on par or even more than what we pay in Newark) when they could easily buy in the suburbs, or rent much closer to NYC?

Punzie
June 7th, 2007, 04:19 PM
To be blunt, I felt like you were Ponch from CHiPs, or that woman from that 70s show trying to sell me a timeshare in Arkansas or Sunny Las Vegas!Your other comments are on the mark; please leave out personal insults.

kevin
June 11th, 2007, 12:14 PM
Your other comments are on the mark; please leave out personal insults.

That wasn't a personal insult. I was explaining why the original poster might think I was being a little harsh - his initial posts reminded me of the hard sell that those famous people (the guy who played Ponch on CHiPs and the woman who played the next door neighbor on that 70s show) put on during commercials late at night on the Discovery Channel. Not a flame, not an insult, just an observation.

West Hudson
November 22nd, 2013, 10:49 PM
Roseland is Mack-Cali's subsidiary that is currently at work constructing most of the buildings on the West New York/Weehawken waterfront, the Marbella II in Jersey City, and Riverpark in Harrison. I think their entry into the market in Rahway signals alot of optimism about the future of the market there.

Courtesy of GlobeSt.com:

Mack-Cali's Rahway Apt. Buy Boosts Arts District

http://cdn.globest.com/media/newspics/232/rahway_ParkSquare.jpg Park Square


RAHWAY, NJ-Mack-Cali Realty Corp. has added another multi-family property to its burgeoning portfolio, this one a two-building, 159-unit complex here that was purchased for $46.5 million.

The Park Square development is situated close to the downtown Rahway's train station and within a growing Arts District. It includes a parking garage and 6,000 square feet of retail space.

Mack-Cali’s Roseland subsidiary will manage and lease the property, which was purchased from Landmark Companies of Keasbey at a price that works out to almost $292,500 per unit.

HFF marketed the property for Landmark. Its sales team included Kevin O’Hearn, Jose Cruz and Michael Oliver from HFF’s New Jersey office, along with Andrew Scandalios and Jeff Julien from HFF’s New York City office.

“In Mack-Cali/Roseland’s first apartment purchase in New Jersey since their merger, they did an outstanding job of working through some items that arose during the process and solving them efficiently and effectively," said O'Hearn. " Their investment in Rahway is a tremendous endorsement for the town and its growing downtown Arts District, as well as a testament to the high-quality property developed by Landmark.”

Mtchell E. Hersh, president and CEO Mack-Cali, called Park Square “a true luxury rental community that offers residents spacious, well-appointed apartments in an ideal transit-oriented location.”

It has one- and two-bedroom units ranging from 800 to 1,480 square feet, and is currently 94% occupied. The complex has a 24-hour fitness center, 24-hour resident service, private garage parking options, a community room with Wi-Fi and abilliards room.
Park Square is a two-minute walk from the Rahway train station.

Mack-Cali now owns or has interests in 276 properties, consisting of 266 office and office/flex properties totaling approximately 30.7 million square feet and ten multi-family rental properties containing over 3,400 residential units, all located in the Northeast.

Link: http://www.globest.com/news/12_740/newjersey/multifamily/mack-cali-rahway-aparatments-340031.html

Don31
November 23rd, 2013, 05:10 PM
Still there. It's such an old Prison. I love the architecture which they used.

Actually, the prison is in the Avenel section of Woodbridge. It never was in Rahway. Close to the boundary, but definitely not in Rahway......

Nexis4Jersey
May 12th, 2014, 07:41 PM
New Condos and apartments in Downtown Rahway

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5511/14172259034_f50dc26906_h.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/nAmwRG)129 (https://flic.kr/p/nAmwRG) by Nexis4Jersey09 (https://www.flickr.com/people/42178139@N06/), on Flickr

https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7413/13985576267_ef11acb0f6_h.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/niRJzi)130 (https://flic.kr/p/niRJzi) by Nexis4Jersey09 (https://www.flickr.com/people/42178139@N06/), on Flickr

EastMillinocket
May 13th, 2014, 12:39 AM
Wow, lots of TOD going up throughout the Northeast Corridor in NJ. Thanks for the pix, Nexis.