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metisles16
June 13th, 2006, 10:43 AM
I'm new to the Murray Hill area and looking to find a fun local (aka not Starbucks!) coffee joint to chill in on weekends - a great place where people may know your name, and is great to go to on a rainy day/read your Sunday Times.

Plenty of such places on the UES, but I can't find anything around my area.

Any suggestions?

MrSpice
June 13th, 2006, 10:50 AM
I'm new to the Murray Hill area and looking to find a fun local (aka not Starbucks!) coffee joint to chill in on weekends - a great place where people may know your name, and is great to go to on a rainy day/read your Sunday Times.

Plenty of such places on the UES, but I can't find anything around my area.

Any suggestions?

Can you tell us about your favorite coffee shops on UES? I live on UES and don't know that many good local coffee shops.

Schadenfrau
June 13th, 2006, 11:02 AM
This isn't exactly Murray Hill, but it's close:

http://www.irvingfarm.com/index.cfm?c=3&s=1&pg=irvingplace.cfm

I really don't see too many independent coffee shops in NYC. The Friends lifestyle seems to be not much more than a myth, thankfully.

ryan
June 13th, 2006, 11:53 AM
It doesn't help metisles16, but Brooklyn's got a bit of coffee culture. Tea Lounge in Park Slope, Read in Williamsburg - low margin businesses need cheap rent...

ablarc
June 13th, 2006, 02:05 PM
Why is Murray Hill so dull? Does anybody know?

Schadenfrau
June 13th, 2006, 02:30 PM
Real estate agents promote it to recent grads like it was the second coming. The recent grads believe the hype and move in, paying out the ass for their apartments. Thus, you have Murray Hill.

metisles16
June 13th, 2006, 02:41 PM
There's a very small, but cute spot called "Java Girl" - 348 E. 66th St. It's small, not much seating, but very cute and in the realm of what I'm looking for down in the midtown area.

Schadenfrau
June 13th, 2006, 03:31 PM
Here's a list of all the coffee shops in the NYC area, about 98% of which are Starbucks:

http://newyork.citysearch.com/yellowpages/results/New_York_NY/page1.html?flavor_id=2&order=cw1&cw1=106

It doesn't look like there are any in Murray Hill. Maybe you could find a bar you like?

ablarc
June 13th, 2006, 07:15 PM
Real estate agents promote it to recent grads like it was the second coming. The recent grads believe the hype and move in, paying out the ass for their apartments. Thus, you have Murray Hill.
So, the recent grads make it dull?

But how do they actually do it?

Schadenfrau
June 14th, 2006, 01:05 AM
No, the sort of people who are duped by realtor hype make the area dull.

milleniumcab
June 14th, 2006, 01:09 AM
Why is Murray Hill so dull? Does anybody know?
I think Murray Hill Neighborhood Association is fighting the developers better than any other neighborhood. Whatever the raeson is, I don't see much construction that part of town..That alone will keep new stores from opening up..There is less commercial space...

ablarc
June 14th, 2006, 06:49 AM
I think Murray Hill Neighborhood Association is fighting the developers better than any other neighborhood. Whatever the raeson is, I don't see much construction that part of town..That alone will keep new stores from opening up..There is less commercial space...
I guess the dull need a place too.

You could think of New York as a collection of city-states, like ancient Greece. A New York neighborhood might have about the population of Athens, Sparta or Corinth --and Greece as a whole might have harbored about as many souls as New York City.

Each city-state had its own character as an outcome of who was attracted to it and how they raised their children. Thus Athens contained more than its share of intellectuals and dreamers; Corinth was known for its materialists, worldliness and fleshpots; and Sparta was a refuge for militarists and proto-Nazis. I don't know which city was known for its appeal to dullards, but I'm sure there was one.

With their neighborhood associations and community boards, New York neighborhoods enjoy a degree of autonomy and self-government somewhat comparable to a city-state in the Delian League. I guess each neighborhood attracts the folks it deserves and reinforces its identity by a kind of direct participatory democracy or at least obeisance to tyranny.

The only thing missing is the Peloponnesian War.

.

NYgirl3
June 14th, 2006, 10:03 AM
I'd recommend looking up coffee shops in that area on neighborwork.com... They have lists of restaurants/bars and you can specify which area you're looking for in particular. Or, you could just look up the Murray Hill zipcode and ask members who belong to that site. I've found it pretty helpful when I'm looking to find restaurants in certain areas... Hope this helps!

capoeta cypher
June 14th, 2006, 10:50 AM
Murray Hill in Manhattan, or the one in Queens?

milleniumcab
June 14th, 2006, 10:58 AM
Murray Hill in Manhattan, or the one in Queens?

Where is it in Queens?

capoeta cypher
June 14th, 2006, 10:59 AM
There's a Murray Hill in Downtown Flushing.

ablarc
June 14th, 2006, 06:24 PM
There's a Murray Hill in Downtown Flushing.
Even sleepier:

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9807EFD71231F930A15750C0A9659C8B 63

TranspoMan
June 19th, 2006, 08:11 PM
There is a place called Brasil Coffee House on Lexington Avenue and 30th Street next to the Ramada Inn.

ablarc
July 2nd, 2006, 09:10 AM
I guess the dull need a place too.

Each city-state had its own character as an outcome of who was attracted to it and how they raised their children. Thus Athens contained more than its share of intellectuals and dreamers; Corinth was known for its materialists, worldliness and fleshpots; and Sparta was a refuge for militarists and proto-Nazis. I don't know which city was known for its appeal to dullards, but I'm sure there was one.
Boetia. It was known for its stupid people.

Mentioned in this article: http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?t=9836