PDA

View Full Version : The World Cup



milleniumcab
July 9th, 2006, 04:46 PM
Italy Wins The World Cup Soccer In Penalty Kicks. Italy 5 France 3

wonder
July 9th, 2006, 05:12 PM
Yeah I saw the match. I have always been a major football fan. I was disappointed early on in world cup but of course I kept watching them all till the very end. Honestly, Italy won but from where i was standing France was the better team. They had more energy and I honestly belive tehy could have won if Zidane had not been thrown out. Just my opinion but to the Italians congratulations(I love italian men so i can't stay upset for long). Ciao:)

lofter1
July 9th, 2006, 06:17 PM
gotta wonder what Materazzi said that got under Zidane's skin to make him whack out like that ...

arrivaderci!

http://images.chron.com/photos/2006/07/09/2798612/311xInlineGallery.jpg

lofter1
July 9th, 2006, 06:29 PM
Forza Italia !!!

Bravi Ragazzi!!

http://i.a.cnn.net/si/2006/soccer/specials/world_cup/2006/07/09/italy.france.final.ap/p1.cup.celebration.jpg
Sandra Behne/Getty Images

Italy not only won its fourth World Cup but also
stretched its unbeaten streak to 25.

lofter1
July 9th, 2006, 07:35 PM
Thrills in Rome and Paris, but Italians Get Final Cheer

http://graphics10.nytimes.com/images/2006/07/09/sports/09cnd-color1_600.jpg
Gregorio Borgia/Associated Press
Fans celebrate in Rome's Trevi Fountain after Italy's World Cup victory.

Copyright 2006 NY TIMES (http://www.nytimes.com/2006/07/09/sports/soccer/09cnd-color.html)

lofter1
July 9th, 2006, 07:53 PM
Italy Celebrates ...


Favola azzurra, esplode la festa in tutta Italia

Corriere della Sera / World Cup (http://www.corriere.it/Speciali/Extra/2006/Germania2006/pop_gallerie.shtml)

http://www.corriere.it/gallery/Extra/2006/germania06/germania06/germania06/28/01.jpg

Napoli (Ansa)

http://www.corriere.it/gallery/Extra/2006/germania06/germania06/germania06/28/02.jpg

Napoli (Ansa)

http://www.corriere.it/gallery/Extra/2006/germania06/germania06/germania06/28/03.jpg


Roma, Circo Massimo (Afp)

http://www.corriere.it/gallery/Extra/2006/germania06/germania06/germania06/28/04.jpg


(Ansa)

http://www.corriere.it/gallery/Extra/2006/germania06/germania06/germania06/28/05.jpg


(Benvegnù-Lannuti)

http://www.corriere.it/gallery/Extra/2006/germania06/germania06/germania06/28/06.jpg


(Benvegnù-Lannuti)

http://www.corriere.it/gallery/Extra/2006/germania06/germania06/germania06/28/07.jpg
(Ansa)




http://www.corriere.it/gallery/Extra/2006/germania06/germania06/germania06/28/08.jpg


Milano, Piazza Duomo (Ansa)

http://www.corriere.it/gallery/Extra/2006/germania06/germania06/germania06/28/11.jpg

Torino (Ap)

lofter1
July 9th, 2006, 08:01 PM
CAMPIONI DEL MONDO

http://www.repubblica.it/2006/07/ARCHIVE/homepage/images/speciale/mondiali/servizi/lippi-su-francia/lippi-su-francia_HM/reut_8496436_27290.jpg (http://www.repubblica.it/interstitial/interstitial600769.html)

http://www.repubblica.it/2006/07/speciale/mondiali/gallerie/cannavaro-coppa/cannavaro-coppa/afp84969691007000825_big.jpg

http://www.repubblica.it/2006/07/speciale/mondiali/gallerie/cannavaro-coppa/cannavaro-coppa/ansa84969361007000833_big.jpg

http://www.repubblica.it/

milleniumcab
July 9th, 2006, 08:30 PM
gotta wonder what Materazzi said that got under Zidane's skin to make him whack out like that ...

arrivaderci!

I am sure it wasn't a pleasant conversation but for a legend like Zidane to behave in such manner in his last game before he retires and leave his team a man short was inexcusable..

milleniumcab
July 9th, 2006, 08:45 PM
Yeah I saw the match. I have always been a major football fan. I was disappointed early on in world cup but of course I kept watching them all till the very end. Honestly, Italy won but from where i was standing France was the better team. They had more energy and I honestly belive tehy could have won if Zidane had not been thrown out. Just my opinion but to the Italians congratulations(I love italian men so i can't stay upset for long). Ciao:)
Officiating in the early going was terrible and the teams played not to make a mistake.. Most games that I watched, with exception of Ghana-Chech Republic, were not good matches for a neutral soccer fan to enjoy but both the officials and and the football got much better towards the end..

I wanted Italy to win an I am happy they did.. France was the better team but as they say " better luck next time"..:p.. I was disappointed with Italy's performance after the first half, as they did not have the resilience they showed against the Germans.. That would have made this Final one of the best ones in the history of the game...

pianoman11686
July 9th, 2006, 09:38 PM
Saw a lot of people celebrating the victory today in Manhattan. Many bars and restaurants had crowds overflowing into the streets just to catch a glimpse of the TV. The Italians were loud, ecstatic, and at least somewhat drunk, but nothing like what those pictures above show. Some of those scenes look positively satanic!

lofter1
July 9th, 2006, 10:26 PM
The pagan roots in Rome run very deep ...

nick-taylor
July 10th, 2006, 03:56 AM
gotta wonder what Materazzi said that got under Zidane's skin to make him whack out like that ...

arrivaderci!A racist slur possibly about Zidane's Algerian heritage: that could have been the only thing to make him snap. That wouldn't suprise me either considering the fact that Italian football is currently dominated (on the pitch, the boardroom and the stands) by racists, cheats and (once again) corrupt scum who destroy the beautiful game. You only have to look back to what happened to Dida in the CL Milano clash to see how bad Italian football has lowered to and will lower further after today.

France were the better side during the game, but Zidane being sent off and Henry, Ribery and Viera off seriously cut down the side. I was amazed how they even managed to hold on, but it was clear without their four top players - France weren't going to win when it came to the shoot-out. Italy unfortunately again showed why they are frowned upon in international football....to fall to the floor and try and get a free kick or penalty is bad enough as it is. To fall down, roll around as if you're guts had just imploded and sprayed across half the pitch and cry in a manner as if you were about to be executed...to go off and then come running back on as if nothing had happened makes me sick. The flow of the game was just harmed and for that reason the Wimbledon Mens Final was far superior for action and thrills.

The Zidane incident was bad, but playacting is a far more troubling issue within football and totally cuts off true fans like myself who play it and follow it day in day out. Playacting, corruptio and diving are as bad as drugs in my opinion.

I'm just thankful that the Premiership starts in just over a months time. Finally a good decent flow of games in the world's greatest league. My only worry is how much more Mr Abromovich will be spending on ensuring his Chelsea asset ensures more success!

In conclusion, this entire tournament has been messed up by cheats, divers and horrific refereeing. It started off great in the group stages and could have ended up to be the best tournament in living memory, but it ended up going in the wrong direction and has possibly ended up being one of the worst tournaments ever broadcast. The continual exception however has being the great hospitality and the real winners of this tournament are the German people.

TREPYE
July 10th, 2006, 08:07 AM
It seemed that throughout the second half of the game France attacked a lot more than Italy. I was surprised because I didn't think that Italy would play for penalty kicks like that. Nonetheless, Italy won the game outright but the question in my head still resonates....

What the hell was Zidane thinking!? He is the captain, orchestrator,and glue of his team why the .... would you get yourself kicked out like that and do that to your team/country? That was pretty dumb. :rolleyes:

wonder
July 10th, 2006, 04:16 PM
It seemed that throughout the second half of the game France attacked a lot more than Italy. I was surprised because I didn't think that Italy would play for penalty kicks like that. Nonetheless, Italy won the game outright but the question in my head still resonates....

What the hell was Zidane thinking!? He is the captain, orchestrator,and glue of his team why the .... would you get yourself kicked out like that and do that to your team/country? That was pretty dumb. :rolleyes:


I know what he did was and is inexcusable but i believe that it was a comment that really hit him hard, something racist along the lines of his northern african roots. Zizou is an extraordinary player of high class and this act was anything but. But if you were watching the same game that I was you would have seen this coming. the italians marked him the entire game and the ref. never fouled them. Every shot he was in someone was holding his shirt, knocking him down or doing something else to agravate him. I know it was an aggressive game its the world cup of course each side wants to win but it seemed like they were really attacking him inparticular and sometimes he didn't even have the ball when he was being harrased. Honestly I have to ask myself if i were in his position and i was being constantly harassed by this idiot would I have done the same thing. I don't condone it but depending on the circumstances i think that i could understand it.

wonder
July 10th, 2006, 04:27 PM
Might explain things
Remember I don't think what Zidane did was right but it is understandable. Read it

The Zidane mystery

What set off France's captain during the key moment?


BERLIN (AP) -- Was it something he said?
With France and Italy level in extra time of Sunday's World Cup final, Zinedine Zidane head-butted Marco Materazzi in the chest and was sent off. France went on to lose on penalty kicks.
The day after, still no one knew what the Italian defender might have said to the French captain.
"The Italians did everything they could do to provoke Zidane," France defender William Gallas said.
Seconds before, Materazzi had wrapped his arm around Zidane just as a French attack on goal passed harmlessly by. The two exchanged words as they walked back up the field, well behind the play. Then, without warning, Zidane spun around, lowered his head and rammed Materazzi, knocking him to the ground.
The Paris-based anti-racism advocacy group SOS-Racism issued a statement Monday quoting "several very well informed sources from the world of football" as saying Materazzi called Zidane a "dirty terrorist." It demanded that FIFA investigate and take any appropriate action.
FIFA, which reviews all red cards at the World Cup, would not comment on the specifics.
"This is a disciplinary matter now. I can't give any statements now," FIFA spokesman Markus Siegler said.
Materazzi, meanwhile, was quoted as denying the terrorist comment.
"It is absolutely not true, I didn't call him a terrorist, I don't know anything about that," the Italian news agency ANSA quoted Materazzi as saying when he arrived with his team at an Italian military airfield.
"What happened is what all the world saw live on TV," the Italian player said, referring to the head-butting.
Zidane's agent, Alain Migliaccio, was quoted by the BBC as saying the France captain told him the Italian "said something very serious to him, but he wouldn't tell me what."
Whatever it was, it was enough to infuriate Zidane.
"Zizou is someone who reacts to things," said Aime Jacquet, Zidane's coach at the 1998 World Cup. "Unfortunately he could not control himself. It's terrible to see him leave this way."
Even with the ejection, Zidane still won the Golden Ball as the World Cup's best player.
Zidane, who came out of retirement to help France qualify for the World Cup and said he would quit soccer completely after the tournament, got 2,012 points in the vote by journalists covering the tournament. The three-time player of the year beat Fabio Cannavaro (1,977) and Andrea Pirlo (715), both of Italy.
Zidane's red card was anything but unusual. He was sent off 14 times in his career at the club and international level.
At the 1998 World Cup, he stomped on a Saudi Arabian opponent. Sitting out a two-match ban, he came back to score two goals against Brazil in the final.
Five years ago with Juventus, he head-butted an opponent in a Champions League match against Hamburger SV after being tackled from behind.
The reaction to Sunday's outburst was mixed in France. President Jacques Chirac called Zidane "a genius of world football," and former Sports Minister Marie-George Buffet said Zidane's aggressive act was unforgivable for its effect on children watching the game.
"This morning, Zinedine, what do we tell our children, and all those for whom you were the living role model for all times?" French sports daily L'Equipe wrote.
Zidane, whose parents emigrated to France from Algeria, became a proud symbol of a multicultural France and is adored in Algeria.
In the mountains where Zidane's parents grew up, Atmanne Chelouah carried off a life-size cardboard cutout of the player at "Cafe Zizou" after the red card.
"We are very disappointed," Chelouah said. "He should have kept his cool."
But lashing out is nothing new to Zidane, who grew up playing on concrete in an impoverished immigrant neighborhood of Marseille, where fouls and insults are met with instant retribution.
Perhaps he could never shake off that you-or-me mentality.
"You can take the man out of the rough neighborhood, but you can't take the rough neighborhood out of the man," striker Thierry Henry said Sunday.
At this year's World Cup, where Zidane sat out one match for getting two yellow cards in the first round, he sent a message to his teammates. In a rare television interview, he said, "We die together."
They were ready to go as far as they could for him, yet he punished them.
"He'll carry that weight for a long time," France coach Raymond Domenech said of Zidane's latest red card.
Zidane nearly won the match with a late header after giving France an early lead with a penalty, taking two steps forward to slowly chip the ball into the air while goalkeeper Gianluigi Buffon dived to his right.
It was his third goal of the tournament and sixth in the last 10 major tournament matches. He scored three at the 2004 European Championship.
Zidane's teammates had all wanted to help him to one last trophy. Failing that, they refused to kick him when he was down.
"For all that Zidane has done for the national team, you have to say 'Thank you and well done,"' said striker David Trezeguet, the only player to miss his penalty kick in the shootout.

Copyright 2006 Associated Press (http://www.wirednewyork.com/interactive_legal.html#AP). All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

milleniumcab
July 10th, 2006, 10:28 PM
^ I heard the same thing..

wonder
July 11th, 2006, 09:35 AM
Materazzi denies terrorist insult

http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/41872000/jpg/_41872616_zidaneb203.jpg Zidane reacted to Materazzi's insult by headbutting the defender

Italy defender Marco Materazzi says he did insult France's Zinedine Zidane during the World Cup final, just before Zidane was sent off for a headbutt. But Materazzi denied reports he called Zidane a "terrorist" or used insulting language towards Zidane's mother.
"It was the kind of insult you will hear dozens of times and just slips out of the ground," Materazzi is quoted in Italian paper La Gazetta dello Sport.
"I didn't call Zidane a terrorist and certainly didn't mention his mother."
http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/shared/img/o.gif Zidane looked at me with super arrogance... it's true I shot back with an insult


Marco Materazzi


Zidane, who was born and grew up in Marseille, is the son of Algerian immigrants and has suffered taunts about his heritage throughout his football career.
But Materazzi added: "I am ignorant, I don't even know what an Islamic terrorist is; my only terrorist is her," he said pointing to his 10-month-old daughter.
"I did not bring up Zidane's mother; for me a mother is sacred."
Materazzi and Zidane became involved in a verbal spat with 10 minutes to go in extra-time with France and Italy drawing 1-1 in the World Cup final.
After Materazzi's insult Zidane shoved his head into the Italian's chest and was sent off, with Italy going on to win the match 5-3 on penalties.
"I held his shirt, for only a few seconds," said Materazzi, who had scored Italy's equaliser after Zidane put France ahead from the penalty spot.
"He turned towards me and scoffed at me, looking at me with super arrogance, up and down.
"He said 'if you really want my shirt, you can have it later.'
"It's true, I shot back with an insult."
http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/41873000/jpg/_41873010_zidane_materazzi203x270.jpg Just what did Materazzi say to provoke this reaction from Zidane?


Media organisations across Europe have been trying to decipher what Materazzi said to provoke such an extreme reaction from Zidane.
But it remains unclear exactly what was said and the BBC has broadcast two different versions.
BBC Radio Five Live asked for help from a deaf lip reader, Jessica Rees, who read the words phonetically to an Italian translator.
She deciphered the insult as being "you're the son of a terrorist whore" - a translation also carried by many national newspapers in Britain on Tuesday.
The BBC's Ten O'Clock News also called in experts to study the television footage of the incident and determined the following:
Materazzi's first word to Zidane was "no" before he then told him to "calm down".
He then accused him of being a "liar" and wished "an ugly death to you and your family" on the day the Frenchman's mother had been taken to hospital ill. This was followed by "Go f*** yourself".
Zidane's agent, Alain Migliaccio, has hinted that Zidane will soon reveal exactly what was said by Materazzi.
Piara Powar, national co-ordinator for the anti-racism group Kick It Out told Five Live, said: "If there was a racial slur then Fifa needs to act."
Keith Hackett, head of referees in England, said that if it can be proved that Matterazzi racially abused the Frenchman, then Fifa should take retrospective action for "the good of the game."

Luca
July 11th, 2006, 09:50 AM
A racist slur possibly about Zidane's Algerian heritage: that could have been the only thing to make him snap.

a) how can you possibly presume to know?
b) I cannot count the number of times that I've heard 'good natured' references to organized crime. I don't go around head-butting people, though. Zidane's a great player. A man of 34 should control his emotions better, though.



That wouldn't suprise me either considering the fact that Italian football is currently dominated (on the pitch, the boardroom and the stands) by racists, cheats and (once again) corrupt scum who destroy the beautiful game. You only have to look back to what happened to Dida in the CL Milano clash to see how bad Italian football has lowered to and will lower further after today.

They're all scum, racists and corrupt? Do you have any idea what you're talking about? Or are you just pissed off 'cause your team never amounted to much? Your comments border on the racist and are indefensible. Frankly, they deserve a banning. Sad, sad, sore loser.

BrooklynRider
July 11th, 2006, 10:38 AM
I don't think he needs to be banned for the comments, just confronted. You did a nice job at that. As a person of Italian heritage, thanks...

nick-taylor
July 11th, 2006, 04:31 PM
a) how can you possibly presume to know?
b) I cannot count the number of times that I've heard 'good natured' references to organized crime. I don't go around head-butting people, though. Zidane's a great player. A man of 34 should control his emotions better, though.

They're all scum, racists and corrupt? Do you have any idea what you're talking about? Or are you just pissed off 'cause your team never amounted to much? Your comments border on the racist and are indefensible. Frankly, they deserve a banning. Sad, sad, sore loser.I said that it was most likely a racist slur and by the looks of it I have been proven correct:

"you're the son of a terrorist whore"

If that isn't connected to him being of Algerian descent then be my guest, but it was an assumption that I've been proven right in.

Depends really how long the abuse, ridiculous holding onto and fouling of myself lasted. I suspect most would snap at one point.


If you're going to quote my posts, the least you could do is read them before rushing in with condemnation. If you had read my post, you would have noted that I did not use the word all but the word dominated; which it is. Four of the top teams of the Serie A including the top two teams are under serious investigation for extensive corruption. The corruption has also tarnished European football (as technically Juventus, AC Milan, etc... may not have been where they are had they not bribed officials) and there is the possibility that this corruption filtered through from Serie A to the Italian teams in the Champions League and UEFA Cup. The corruption could even have penetrated FIFA and this World Cup. Its not to hard to suspect these things because they've happened in the past and Italian is routinely surrounded in a quagmire of corruption. The mess-up now means that the Inter-Toto Cup has been thrown into dispute

What is even more worrying is that only in the 80's two of the same teams (AC Milan and Lazio) were relegated for similar corrupt practices. Two years before, the Juventus doctor was sent to jail for illegal drug usage (and probable administration to players). Do I need to remind you of the Inter Milan-AC Milan derby in the last Champions League game which was abandoned because of unplayable conditions and players hit by thrown obstacles...you do recall Dida getting hit on the head by a flare and the roar of laughter by Inter fans. If you don't (and others are interested in the state of Italian football that proves my point), look here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BTpW5a65bQs&search=Champions%20League%20AC%20Milan%20Dida

There is a reason why most continental football stadiums have cages and nets around the pitch: to stop spectators running onto the pitch and attack players and to try and stop as many obstacles from being thrown onto the pitch. It rarely works, but it shows how bad the situation really is in some places.

Using the argument that I'm somehow a sore loser because my team didn't win the WC is rubbish and deflects the attention away from the two facts:
- Italy won the WC
- There is high-levels of corruption within Italian football

Frankly I've been talking about this problem on SSC before the knock out stages even began. Let us not even forget to mention the problem of ULTRAS - the worst hooligans of any EU nation (only pipped in Europe by the Turkish) somehow being allowed to stay and again tarnish European football.

To suggest that I need a banning and that I'm racist is almost laughable especially as you were incapable of reading my original post and then failing to construct an argument that has denounced me in any way.

Jasonik
July 12th, 2006, 01:02 PM
http://www.mofaha.com/b3ta/zidaneheadoff.gif

lofter1
July 12th, 2006, 04:27 PM
Materazzi insulted mother and sister: Zidane

Reuters (http://today.reuters.com/news/newsarticle.aspx?type=worldNews&storyid=2006-07-12T182703Z_01_L12760960_RTRUKOC_0_US-SOCCER-WORLD-ZIDANE.xml&src=rss&rpc=22)
By Pierre Serisier
July 12, 2006

PARIS (Reuters) - Zinedine Zidane said on Wednesday that Italian defender Marco Materazzi insulted his mother and his sister during the World Cup final against Italy.

The French captain reacted to the insult by head-butting Materazzi's chest in the second period of extra time of the match. He was sent off.

"He (Materazzi) pronounced very tough words about my mother and my sister. I tried not to listen to him but he kept repeating them," Zidane said in a live interview on French television channel Canal Plus.

Zidane offered an apology to all children and to all fans for his behavior but he said he did not regret it.

"This was not something to do. I want to make it clear because it was watched by two billion people and by millions of kids," Zidane said.

"I want to apologize to them but I can't regret what I did because it would mean that he (Materazzi) was right to say what he said."

Playing the last game of his career, Zinedine was shown a red card, leaving his team mates to finish the match without him. France lost on penalties.

Zidane denied Materazzi called him an Islamic "terrorist", as was reported by a Paris-based anti-racism group.

Zidane is of Algerian origin, his parents being born in the village of Aguemone in the Kabylie region.

FIFA decided on Tuesday to open a disciplinary investigation to clarify the circumstances surrounding the incident and Sepp Blatter, the chairman of the soccer's ruling body, hinted that Zidane could be stripped of the tournament's best player award.

© Reuters 2006. All Rights Reserved

wonder
July 12th, 2006, 06:00 PM
I'm sorry but no regrets - Zidane

http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/41880000/jpg/_41880216_zztv270.jpg Zidane has spoken about his sending-off for the first time

Zinedine Zidane has apologised for his headbutt on Italian defender Marco Materazzi in Sunday's World Cup final. But the French legend does not regret his actions, alleging on television that Materazzi provoked him by insulting both his mother and sister.
"It was inexcusable. I apologise," said the 34-year-old Zidane. "But I can't regret what I did because it would mean that he was right to say all that."
Materazzi responded by denying he said anything about Zidane's mother.

"I didn't mention anything about religion, politics or racism," said the Italian on Wednesday.
http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/shared/img/o.gif 606 VIEW
Well done Zidane for apologising, it was the least you could have done (http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/mb606/F4441083?thread=3247956&skip=20&show=20)


FN

606: Have your say (http://www.bbc.co.uk/606/)

"I didn't insult his mother. I lost my mother when I was 15 years old and still get emotional when I talk about it.
"Naturally, I didn't know that his mother was in hospital but I wish her all the best.
"Zidane is my hero and I have always admired him a lot."
Zidane was sent off for headbutting Materazzi in the chest in the second period of extra-time in the final in Berlin.
The Frenchman claimed he had been provoked by the Italian and appeared on French TV station Canal Plus on Wednesday to explain his actions.
http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/shared/img/o.gif Zidane explains: Read a transcript of the interview (http://www.wirednewyork.com/sport2/hi/football/world_cup_2006/teams/france/5174758.stm)

"It was seen by two or three billion people on television and millions and millions of children were watching," he said.
"It was an inexcusable gesture and to them, and the people in education whose job it is to show children what they should and shouldn't do, I want to apologise."
Asked what had caused to react so violently, he said Materazzi had directed some "very hard words" at him.
"You hear them once and you try to move away. But then you hear them twice, and then a third time," said Zidane.
"I am a man and some words are harder to hear than actions. I would rather have taken a blow to the face than hear that."
http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/shared/img/o.gif WHAT WAS SAID?
BBC Radio Five Live asked a deaf lip reader to read Materazzi's words phonetically to an Italian translator:
She deciphered the insult as being "you're the son of a terrorist whore"

The BBC's Ten O'Clock News called in experts to study the television footage who said:
Materazzi told Zidane to "calm down" before accusing him of being a "liar" and wished "an ugly death to you and your family". This was followed by "Go f*** yourself"


Zidane, who retired from football after Sunday's final, also called for Materazzi to be punished for his part in the incident.
"We always talk about the reaction, and obviously it must be punished. But if there is no provocation, there is no need to react," said the former Real Madrid and Juventus player.
"Above all it was a very serious provocation. It was an inexcusable gesture but the real culprit is the person who provoked it.
"Do you imagine that in a World Cup final like that with just 10 minutes to go to the end of my career, I am going to do something like that because it gives me pleasure?"
Since the incident, rumours have run rife about what Materazzi said to get such a reaction from the Frenchman.
There were claims the Italian had called Zidane a "terrorist", but in Tuesday's edition of the Italian newspaper La Gazetta dello Sport, Materazzi said: "It was the kind of insult you will hear dozens of times and just slips out on the field.
"I didn't call Zidane a terrorist and certainly didn't mention his mother. I did not bring up Zidane's mother; for me a mother is sacred."
http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/41874000/jpg/_41874388_redcard203.jpg Zinedine Zidane's last professional game ended with a red card

Zidane, who was born and grew up in Marseille, is the son of Algerian immigrants and has suffered taunts about his heritage throughout his football career.
The two players initially clashed in the Italian penalty area before words were exchanged.
Materazzi said: "I held his shirt, for only a few seconds. He turned towards me and scoffed at me, looking at me with super arrogance, up and down.
"He said 'if you really want my shirt, you can have it later'. It's true, I shot back with an insult."
Fifa is to investigate Zidane's sending-off and president Sepp Blatter has hinted the France star could be stripped of the Golden Ball award he won after being voted the best player in the World Cup by journalists.
Zidane said he planned to defend himself in the Fifa investigation into his sending off.
He also confirmed that he would not go back on his decision to quit the game.
"This is a decision I have made and I will not go back on it," he said. "This is definite. I will not play again."

Luca
July 13th, 2006, 02:38 AM
Yeah. The racist-baiting seems to be shrinking into the background now. Seems like he only called his girlfriend’s “honor" into question.

I do actually feel sorry for Zidane; he just lost it. Apparently he does have a temper but, still, what a player.

As for Nick-Taylor: I think you should recognize that your original post was more of a rant/screed than a balanced comment. No one would deny there are many corrupt individuals in Italian football (and unfortunately, not just football). That's no excuse for tarring the whole enterprise with one brush. Especially as this time around (as opposed to the 80s scandal) no one is alleging that players are involved. Claiming that Italian football I, somehow, particularly racist is egregious. Italian society is generally less PC, in terms of superficial treatment of race issues: that’s partly due to the fact that Italy does not have a history of profiting from slavery and a very limited (though shameful enough) history of colonial oppression.

Living in London, I've had my fill of whingeing about 'cheating Portuguese' and 'cynical football' after England loses, from the local dumbass, sub-literate tabloid press. When England wins, it's a beautiful game being played at its top global level, a triumph, when they lose it's all "where have the school-field values gone??" with a quivering upper lip and signed ‘Disgusted from Tunbridge Wells”.

TREPYE
July 13th, 2006, 02:53 AM
The Globalisthttp://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/section/timesselect/ts_icon.gif Camus and Zidane Offer Views on How Things End




By ROGER COHEN
International Herald Tribune (http://www.iht.com/)
Published: July 12, 2006
http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2006/07/11/world/globalist.190.jpg

BERLIN In "The Stranger," the existentialist novel by Albert Camus, an alienated French-Algerian man, Meursault, kills an Arab on the beach in the glare of the sunlight. It is a senseless act, as senseless as the way he fires one deadly shot, and then four more into the prone body.

[/URL]

Zinédine Zidane, a Frenchman born to Algerian parents in Marseille, did not kill anyone in the glare of the floodlights of Berlin's Olympic Stadium. His senseless act, beneath the gaze of a billion people, merely knocked an Italian off his feet. All that Zidane killed was a certain narrative of his life.


As he awaits his execution, Meursault reflects on his deed: "As if that blind rage had washed me clean, rid me of hope, for the first time, in that night alive with signs and stars, I opened myself to the gentle indifference of the world. Finding it so like myself - so like a brother, really - I felt that I had been happy and was happy again."

A man about to be executed should not be happy. Or so we believe. A footballer, the greatest of his generation, captaining France (http://worldcup.blogs.nytimes.com/) in the last match of his career, should not drive a head butt into the chest of an opponent. But Zidane, raised in the harsh Marseille suburb of La Castellane, told the world what he thought of happy endings.

Camus, writing during World War II, the son of a man killed in World War I, captured a 20th-century senselessness in his story of a man driven to an irrational act for which he feels no remorse, for which in fact he feels nothing. The story of Zidane in the World Cup final is also a story of his age.
Of all the planetary audience for the final, the only ones who did not know what had happened were those in the stadium. Because the defining act of the match, and perhaps the tournament, took place far from the ball, only those with access to television replays could see Zidane down Marco Materazzi.

As a result, tens of thousands of spectators, those actually watching the game in real life, had to resort to calling or texting friends, often in faraway places like the United States or Japan, to find out what was happening in Berlin. Why was Zidane, the resurgent French hero, walking with a bowed head from the field?

Because the fourth official had, according to FIFA, seen Zidane do what he did. Not on video, FIFA insists, but in real life. It is then a fact that in the 110th minute, Zidane - in reality, and not merely in virtual reality - knocked Materazzi off his feet. Provoked, somehow, he acted with what looked like blind rage.

Zidane chose his fate. We all do, or so Camus believed. Zidane chose his moment, 10 minutes before the end of his career. What he could not determine was what would happen afterward in the age of the global conversation.

Already, theories are swirling, a planetary fog of electronic opinion arising from an act virtually nobody who was there saw. Lip-readers and others claim to know what Materazzi said. Zidane's agent is promising a revelation.
Some defend Zidane, or even perceive a certain elegance in his head butt. Others recoil in horror or anger. One or two hail Zidane's cosmic joke. Jacques Chirac (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/c/jacques_chirac/index.html?inline=nyt-per), the French president, thanks Zidane for what he has done for France and for showing "the greatest human qualities." Zizou wins the Golden Ball award for best player.

On my World Cup blog ([URL="http://blogs.iht.com/worldcupcohen"]blogs.iht.com/worldcupcohen (http://blogs.iht.com/worldcupcohen)), I have been deluged with mail about the incident. Jessica Torres wrote from Dallas, Texas: "Two minutes before his fall from grace I was sure he was going to go down in history as a man full of honor, grace and control and take his place with the greats. And then he re-wrote his own destiny. But his actions also made me love him more. Before he was a god. But then he showed us all that he was just a man. A man with weakness and hate."
She concluded: "I am much more affected by him than I would have been had things gone as I hoped. But, my Lord, was that head butt sexy."

Another correspondent, writing from Oakland, California, said: "I think Zidane's performance has always been about controlling rage and focusing it, in one way or another. It was, most of the time, a beautiful thing to behold."
The comment continued: "The zone out of which Zidane's football brilliance came was likely some kind of deeply personal state that he indulged and called upon. Zidane believed that he could do impossible things, or that impossible things could flow out of him if he gave himself over to this state."
Certainly, Zidane was in a place denied most mortals during the French victory over Brazil. His smile was that of a man seeing things others could not. And it is true that he could give the impression that the ball was propelled not precisely by him, but by some force emanating from him.
Camus was averse to judgment. Acts themselves, explicable or not, were all that we could know existed. Meursault felt nothing at his mother's funeral and he killed the Arab in the stunning sunlight. We may wish that the story had been otherwise - as we may wish that love not be close to hate - but the story was what it was.

Zidane, it seems, lost his head. Or perhaps he kept his head and chose to write a coda to his story that would have all the complexity of a great novel. Perhaps he sought an almost unseen act of anger that would prompt a global, virtual argument about the merits or demerits of a gesture without sense.

I do not know. Nor do I believe we will ever know. Whatever comes out will remain inconsequential beside the act itself, this violence in a 21st- century glare, this strange and stimulating ending.

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/section/timesselect/ts_icon.gif E-mail: rocohen@nytimes.com (http://nytimes.com/)

nick-taylor
July 13th, 2006, 06:16 AM
Yeah. The racist-baiting seems to be shrinking into the background now. Seems like he only called his girlfriend’s “honor" into question.

I do actually feel sorry for Zidane; he just lost it. Apparently he does have a temper but, still, what a player.

As for Nick-Taylor: I think you should recognize that your original post was more of a rant/screed than a balanced comment. No one would deny there are many corrupt individuals in Italian football (and unfortunately, not just football). That's no excuse for tarring the whole enterprise with one brush. Especially as this time around (as opposed to the 80s scandal) no one is alleging that players are involved. Claiming that Italian football I, somehow, particularly racist is egregious. Italian society is generally less PC, in terms of superficial treatment of race issues: that’s partly due to the fact that Italy does not have a history of profiting from slavery and a very limited (though shameful enough) history of colonial oppression.

Living in London, I've had my fill of whingeing about 'cheating Portuguese' and 'cynical football' after England loses, from the local dumbass, sub-literate tabloid press. When England wins, it's a beautiful game being played at its top global level, a triumph, when they lose it's all "where have the school-field values gone??" with a quivering upper lip and signed ‘Disgusted from Tunbridge Wells”.Again I never said the entire Italian football system was corrupt, I just said that it was dominated by corruption which are two different things.

How do we not know that players were involved? This scandal is larger than the last and it could be years until we know the full operations of what was going on. We quite simply have to assume the worst because I find it totally inconceivable that players were somehow blind or ignorant to eveything going on around them.

Oh and Dida was the only target of flares and him being of Brazilian origin was what - coincidence? Granted, the Italian leagues aren't as bad as the horrific Spanish leagues, but they are poor especially compared to the French, German and English leagues.

Luca
July 13th, 2006, 06:39 AM
Again I never said the entire Italian football system was corrupt, I just said that it was dominated by corruption which are two different things.



That Jesuitical distinction borders on prevarication.


If Italian football was dominated by (i.e. mostly about) corruption as opposed to performance, it would not be producing the fantastic show that we got and winning world cups, would it? Or did they buy the Germans, Ukrainians, Czechs and French off, too?





How do we not know that players were involved? This scandal is larger than the last and it could be years until we know the full operations of what was going on. We quite simply have to assume the worst because I find it totally inconceivable that players were somehow blind or ignorant to everything going on around them.






Wow! We have to assume the players knew!?!? You're the Judge Dredd of soccer!




Oh and Dida was the only target of flares and him being of Brazilian origin was what - coincidence? Granted, the Italian leagues aren't as bad as the horrific Spanish leagues, but they are poor especially compared to the French, German and English leagues.



The fact that some hooligans intone racist slogans doesn't mean the players, the managers, most fans, etc. are racists. In Britain people have been prosecuted in criminal court for using a racial epithet; Italy is not at that big stretch.

nick-taylor
July 17th, 2006, 06:59 PM
That Jesuitical distinction borders on prevarication.

If Italian football was dominated by (i.e. mostly about) corruption as opposed to performance, it would not be producing the fantastic show that we got and winning world cups, would it? Or did they buy the Germans, Ukrainians, Czechs and French off, too?

Wow! We have to assume the players knew!?!? You're the Judge Dredd of soccer!

The fact that some hooligans intone racist slogans doesn't mean the players, the managers, most fans, etc. are racists. In Britain people have been prosecuted in criminal court for using a racial epithet; Italy is not at that big stretch.I think you might not realise how big this thing is - clubs began to actually compete with each other in the hope of actually cancelling the bribery of opposition officials bribery. It was a circus, a game dominated not by talent, but by horendous corruption that is the biggest of its type in living memory of football!

Although AC Milan, Juventus, Lazio and Fiorentina were named, they were named because they were to play in Europe next season. Another 5 teams in Serie A are under investigation (Seina, Reggina, Messina and Lecce). Thats 9 out of the 20 teams of Serie A, or nearly half of the entire league involved in corruption. Yet it doesn't even stop there, because Arezzo in Serie B are under investigation also!

I'd consider 45% of the primary Italian league being involved in corruption as being pretty dominant.

Also how do you not know if there wasn't any peculiar decisions, this could be a Nottingham Forest-Anderlect situation where it won't be until later that officials come out and freely admit.

Face it - corruption has tainted Italian football throughout its life and the chances of it being connected to Europe and the World Cup are more likely than any other nation simply because so many clubs thought they could get away with it.

And the players wouldn't think that anything dodgy was happening on the pitch in their favour? I somehow doubt they would come out with comments like the referee is on their side because that would probably have exposed this scandal far earlier.

No, not everyone, but quite a few are. Comments by influential members of Italian society commenting that the reason France lost was because it "sacrificed its identity by fielding a team of blacks, Islamists and communists" kind of hit the jail on the head - such comments like that are an arrestable offence in Britain because its flatly wrong and practically giving resolution to the likes of Mussolini.

Fact is, in Britain, if you hurl racist abuse, you'll not only be arrested, fined and possibly be given a sentence, but you'll also risk being banned either for several years or life from watching any live league or international games and to top it off be put on a hooligan black list meaning you can't leave the country during international sporting events. Its an unfortunate situation, but the result is good: racism has been all but eliminated from the stands. Thats probably why the Premiership is by far and away the most popular league: its more about the game on the pitch rather than the presidential elections and racism of Spain or the corruption of Italy.

The sad thing is, Italy might have won the World Cup, but its entire domestic league system has been crippled and to be honest like I keep mentioning - something was likely to happen. I thought it would be the backlash by FIFA and UEFA against the Ultras but clearly that is another problem that will have to be sorted out. Although a few of the stars will stay, most will leave for Spain (the climate) or England (the game), especially in regards to Juve.

Fabrizio
July 18th, 2006, 02:37 AM
Ah...those English fans...

http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2006/06/24/sportsline/main1749335.shtml

Luca
July 18th, 2006, 02:58 AM
No, Fabrizio, c'mon, there are NO hooligans in the UK. No racism (heh). No corruption (well, you can buy yourself a title but, hey, when was it ever not so?)

:p :eek: :rolleyes:

On a serious note. I hope all those responsible get nailed (which doesn't always happen...), but nothing that happened at the commercial level erases the splendid achievement of the boys in blue.

nick-taylor
July 18th, 2006, 06:33 AM
Where did I say that somehow there wasn't any hooliganism, racism or corruption? Fact of the matter it isn't anyway near as extensive as it is in other countries and especially Italy. It once was a major endemic problem but its been culled.

Now considering after the German fans, the English were the dominant visiting fan base I'm pretty pleased with how everything turned out. Factor in the number of arrests and the actual number of fans and it is far less troublesome. Note also the only foreign police officers working on the ground in connection with the Bundespolizei were British Police.

Yet interestingly England is the only country that will take action against those that were arrested and those that did cause trouble will be banned from going abroad during England internationals or watching their team play. Its harsh, but the improvement since the 70's is something more countries should try to follow.

Fabrizio
July 18th, 2006, 07:31 AM
Nick WHAT are you babbling about?

"Yet interestingly England is the only country that will take action against those that were arrested and those that did cause trouble will be banned from going abroad during England internationals or watching their team play."

Italy also has zero tolerence for such things. Remember too Italian soccer violence is pretty much kept at home.... the English have famously brought their drunken violence to other countries.... making them Europes MOST feared.


http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/7489120/

nick-taylor
July 18th, 2006, 09:10 AM
Nick WHAT are you babbling about?

"Yet interestingly England is the only country that will take action against those that were arrested and those that did cause trouble will be banned from going abroad during England internationals or watching their team play."

Italy also has zero tolerence for such things. Remember too Italian soccer violence is pretty much kept at home.... the English have famously brought their drunken violence to other countries.... making them Europes MOST feared.


http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/7489120/And the only reason that came into force was because it was a CL game being broadcast around the world.

Interestingly enough when it came to the Roma-Middlesbrough UEFA Cup game back in March of this year; the violence was still there:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/tees/4808246.stm

"...at one point a lighted flare was thrown into a bar where Middlesbrough fans, some in family groups, were drinking."

"A group in excess of 30 Italian youths, described as Italian Ultras, came into the square. They were a clearly well-organised group."

"They had an identified leader at their head - a gentleman who has been described to me as wearing a silver or shiny fireman's-type helmet and a bandana across his face with only his eyes visible."

"These people were carrying sticks, they had axes, we later discovered they had knives, they had firecrackers and paper firebombs.

Clearly all words to appease UEFA and FIFA.

Most feared of the 1970's. Not now because hooliganism has been mostly broken down and the majority of fans that go around the world are family groups. The evidence above illustrates this, but they are still targetted as if they are 1970's England football hooligans.

Zerlina
July 18th, 2006, 12:46 PM
I'm happy to see that some of you wanted Italy to win the world soccer cup! What a crazy crazy night it has been! But I have to admit that I would see no more violence or racism in sport... will it be possible, one day?:o

Zerlina
July 18th, 2006, 12:47 PM
Oh... after all... WE ARE THE CHAMPIONS!!!:D :D :D :D

ablarc
July 18th, 2006, 07:25 PM
Oh... after all... WE ARE THE CHAMPIONS!!!:D :D :D :D
...and all's well with the world. :)

lofter1
July 21st, 2006, 09:20 AM
Fifa hits Materazzi hard

Italian defender banned for two games for "provocation"

Guardian (http://football.guardian.co.uk/News_Story/0,,1825192,00.html)
Rob Smyth
Thursday July 20, 2006

The sanitation of football continues apace: now, it seems, even verbal provocation is unacceptable, after Fifa today banned Marco Materazzi for two matches for his part in Zinedine Zidane's infamous sending-off during the World Cup final.

Zidane's violent conduct inevitably produced a three-match suspension, which will come into effect should he come out of retirement, while he was also fined 7500 Swiss francs (£3260). Materazzi is 5000 Swiss francs (£2170) worse off.

While Materazzi admitted abusing Zidane, who retaliated with a vicious chestbutt, his suspension sets a dangerous precedent with regard to verbal provocation, which has hitherto been perceived as part and parcel of a man's game.

"In both of the players statements, the two players expressed regret over the incidents and presented their excuses to Fifa and the football community over what had happened," said the spokesman Andreas Herren. "They both stressed in statements that the verbal provocation was of an insulting nature but not - and I stress - of any racist nature."

In punishing Materazzi so strictly for the mundane sporting offence of "insulting" comments, Fifa has defenestrated norms and mores that have been part of football's fabric since time immemorial. And in doing so, they would appear to have opened a Pandora's Box: is sledging now banned? If not, what did Materazzi say that was so insulting as to demand punishment? Where is the line drawn? How can a line be drawn in an area that intrinsically produces the greyest shades?

Materazzi may be piqued at the decision, or he may see it as a blessing in disguise: depending on any unscheduled friendlies, it means he may miss the rematch between France and Italy in Paris on September 6.

Zidane, for his part, will not be stripped of the Golden Ball he was awarded as the player of the tournament. "It was not even discussed," said Herren, with a forthrightness that could easily be construed as confirming Fifa's subscription to the prevalent mood of Zidane's victimhood. In doing so, and in hitting Materazzi so hard, Fifa has tweaked the footballing landscape in a way that could have significant repercussions.




Guardian Unlimited © Guardian Newspapers Limited 2006

Luca
July 21st, 2006, 11:51 AM
I find this ridiculous on several levels.

1. In any civilized country that I know of, you may be, perhaps, fiend or whatever for insulting someone (it appears he did not resort to a racial epithet, which is indeed illegal in some countries), but that is not considered an excuse for assault. I don't see why football has to be different.

2. The similarity (same order of magnitude) of the ex-post penalty and the lack of further consequences for Zidane suggest that verbal insults and physical assault are comparable which, again, goes against natural law, etc.

3. Zidane (or, more appropriately, his apologists) has been successful in playing the victim card. At a time when many deadly enemies of the West cloak themselves in this nonsense (we rioted because the nasty French don't understand us, sniff, sniff, it's not our fault...) no organization should cater to that.

4. If Zidane had been a lesser player, there would have been none of this nonsense. Effectively, there seems to be a double standard that a superstar like Zizou CAN'T be misbehaving, he MUST have been provoked intolerably.

Rubbish.

lofter1
July 24th, 2006, 10:27 PM
NYC World Cup photos here: http://www.zumschneider.com/worldcup2006/index.html (http://www.zumschneider.com/worldcup2006/index.html)

http://www.zumschneider.com/worldcup2006/photos/italy_france/ItalyFranceWorldCupFinalat/images/MVI_0901%20(27).jpg

http://www.zumschneider.com/worldcup2006/photos/italy_france/ItalyFranceWorldCupFinalat/images/IMG_0885.jpg

lofter1
September 26th, 2006, 12:03 AM
Soccer and Tolerance (http://time.blogs.com/daily_dish/2006/09/soccer_and_tole.html)

Andrew Sullivan
25 Sep 2006

http://images.gay.it/foto_articoli/originali/gi/gilardinoBASE.jpg (http://javascript<b></b>: window.close())

Signs of progress (http://www.globalfutbol.com/story/2006/9/24/182619/228#231) ...

8 September 2006

http://www.farenet.org/images/spacer.gif"I don't deny that I was delighted to read in the papers that I've become a sex symbol for both women and homosexual men." Disproving the traditional image of the male footballer, Alberto Gilardino agreed to give gay.it an interview. He is thus the first professional footballer to consider the delicate subject of homosexuality in a gay newspaper. He speaks as a heterosexual, but without prejudice. He is happy to have become a symbol for the Italian gay community, who voted for him not only for his goals but also for his looks.

http://www.1101.com/francorossi/IMAGES/050404-gilardino1.jpg

"Yes, I'm pleased, but I also realise that as people we are a focus of public interest and that our image is often overemphasised", said the AC Milan striker. "The Italian team that played in Berlin really have won everyone over, irrespective of their political, religious or sexual orientation". Yet in the world of football the road to equality of treatment is still a long one: "The ability of the footballer not to allow himself to be put under pressure by his choice or natural inclination is decisive. But it could be that society is not yet mature enough to respect the individual's decision." A maturity that is also lacking when it comes to subjects such as the adoption of children by gay couples. Gilardino seems more optimistic as far as civil partnerships are concerned: "I base my view on a basic principle of our country, i.e. that we are all equal and all have the same rights and obligations. It is up to the government to come up with a solution by way of mediation. But I think it's going to be a long and difficult road."

http://www.netglimse.com/images/celebs/bio//sn_Alberto-Gilardino.jpg

In conclusion Gilardino quotes Voltaire: "I may not agree with what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it. This sentence corresponds to my way of thinking and lifestyle." Coming as it does a few days after Manchester City opened themselves up to the city's gay community, this interview represents another small symbol of tolerance in the world of football.

http://images.gay.it/foto_articoli/originali/gi/gilardinoF1.jpg (http://javascript<b></b>: window.close())

(Source: Repubblica, 8 September 2006 – article by Mattia Chiusano)