PDA

View Full Version : Toughest job in NYC



OmegaNYC
July 15th, 2006, 12:18 AM
I was wondering, what is the toughest job in NYC. To me, it has to be who ever has to change that red, blinking light on top of the Empire State Building. :D

stache
July 15th, 2006, 02:54 AM
I was thinking mucking around in the sewage mains -

OmegaNYC
July 15th, 2006, 03:12 AM
Mucking around in the sewage mains, in a city of over 8 million? Damn, that takes a big heart to do.

milleniumcab
July 16th, 2006, 09:36 PM
I'll have to say cab driving is up there among the top 10, if not top 5..

BrooklynRider
July 16th, 2006, 10:29 PM
No, the guy who cleans up the inside of a cab after a robber has blown the drivers brains out with a gun. THAT'S the toughest job in NYC.

Schadenfrau
July 16th, 2006, 10:39 PM
I'll toss the title of brain surgeon into the pot.

Try2Live4God
July 17th, 2006, 03:33 PM
How about the NYPD crime scene unit....having to deal with murders and homicides. Seeing dead people aren't exactly easy to digest....

OmegaNYC
July 18th, 2006, 12:27 AM
NYPD is a good choice. Also, I'll say FDNY. Another group I'll put in there, teachers. Now that is a tough job, too. Also, being mayor of the city. That has to be hard.

milleniumcab
July 18th, 2006, 01:04 AM
No, the guy who cleans up the inside of a cab after a robber has blown the drivers brains out with a gun. THAT'S the toughest job in NYC.
Nice going BR...:eek::eek::eek:...Is it safe to assume that you don't take cabs?...

Perhaps you ride the bus... Maybe, one day, that same robber will blow your bus driver's brains out in front of your eyes and you will have nightmares about it the rest of your life...if it is at all possible for your conscious to let you have a nightmare...:mad:...

It seems you have been a member of this forum for a long time but let me tell you this, I no longer wonder the reason for Edward not letting you become a moderator...

I would respectfully like to let you know that I will not respond to anything you might have to say... Ciao..

OmegaNYC
July 18th, 2006, 01:17 AM
How about the NYPD crime scene unit....having to deal with murders and homicides. Seeing dead people aren't exactly easy to digest....

Ummm, I don't mean to nitpick, but....ain't murders and homicides the samething?? :rolleyes:

STT757
July 18th, 2006, 01:20 AM
I was wondering, what is the toughest job in NYC. To me, it has to be who ever has to change that red, blinking light on top of the Empire State Building. :D

Substitute Teacher, Middle School (I.S.)

Hands down, no question.

Ninjahedge
July 18th, 2006, 08:37 AM
Substitute Teacher, Middle School (I.S.)

Hands down, no question.

5th and 8th grades are the worst (or whichever is the "top grade" for any particular school).

Some classes are great, but most try to get out of anything they can, and they have gotten worse and worse every year after they find out that the teachers are not allowed to really do anything about it... :(

stache
July 18th, 2006, 09:08 AM
We had a substitute teacher, I think it was 5th grade, and she had the misfortune to have to take over our class for the last part of our school year. On our final day she told us that we had made her decide that she no longer wanted to become a teacher.

Ninjahedge
July 18th, 2006, 10:15 AM
We had a substitute teacher, I think it was 5th grade, and she had the misfortune to have to take over our class for the last part of our school year. On our final day she told us that we had made her decide that she no longer wanted to become a teacher.


And then you get articles like the Front Page Sunday Record siting the "overpaid teachers that get Summers off and their powerfull Unions".

They fail to mention that most of the $$ is going to the administrative branch (Principal, VP, Superintendent), or the fact that teachers work ### undocumented hours (and unpaid) of OT each year.

Any person that thinks that a teachers day ends at 3 has never been a teacher. :P

kliq6
July 18th, 2006, 10:21 AM
hands down Steel Erectors

milleniumcab
July 19th, 2006, 01:45 AM
hands down Steel Erectors

Steel erectors? Now that's a real job and it got my vote...:D

OmegaNYC
July 19th, 2006, 09:44 PM
How about working in the subways? Especially cleaning them.

milleniumcab
July 19th, 2006, 11:57 PM
How about working in the subways? Especially cleaning them.

I think cleaning the Subway tracks is a little more challenging, rats can be as large as cats...:eek: :D

milleniumcab
July 20th, 2006, 12:01 AM
NYPD and FDNY, two of the toughest jobs in NYC...My hat's off to all of them...

OmegaNYC
July 20th, 2006, 05:34 PM
I got one...Hot Dog Venders. :)

shocka
July 21st, 2006, 11:33 AM
I will give it to Teachers, who def have one of the most stressfull jobs in NYC..

some notable mentions

Window Cleaners
NYPD FDNY
Furniture Delivery Drivers... imagine getting suckered into getting that large leather cough up to someonse 5th floor walkup while u have to double park your truck!

jobs I have no sympathy for..
that 21 yr old Investment Banker who complains they works too many hours
real estate agents - it ur job to show me apts til i am happy
cab drivers - only thanks to those who refuse to take me into Queens because they dont get a fair back into manhattan this happens way to often nowadays

milleniumcab
July 21st, 2006, 11:51 PM
cab drivers - only thanks to those who refuse to take me into Queens because they dont get a fair back into manhattan this happens way to often nowadays
I have no idea how old you are and how long you have been living in the city but I've been told by cab drivers who have been driving for a long time that it was not only possible to get a fare in outer boroughs, gypsies did not have the nerve to try to get street fares, going back 25- 30 years...I have been driving for only about 9 years and I'll have hard time getting a fare in Brooklyn, Queens and the Bronx.. even in Manhattan we'll be getting cheated by the hustlers..The passenger have the right to go to any destination within NYC but at the same time yellow cab drivers have the EXCLUSIVE right to pick up street hails in all the boroughs in NYC..

Your rights have been protected by the city but cab drivers' rights have been long forgotten... It is safe for me to assume that you are white because you did not bring up the race issue and it is not a race issue. It is all about finance and you did mention that in your post...

Hey listen, I do not like it when a cab driver refuses to take you to your destination but I must say, I symphatize with them. Because in the end you are taking him/her to a part of NYC where his rights are not protected..

So until that's fixed, do not expect anything different from your cabbie.. unless your cabbie is the milleniumcab...:D :D :D

OmegaNYC
July 22nd, 2006, 12:56 AM
What? The Hotdog Vendor, or the guy who change the blinking, red light on top of the Empire State Building, don't get any love? Geez! You people are mean! :D

shocka
July 23rd, 2006, 11:25 PM
I have no idea how old you are and how long you have been living in the city but I've been told by cab drivers who have been driving for a long time that it was not only possible to get a fare in outer boroughs, gypsies did not have the nerve to try to get street fares, going back 25- 30 years...I have been driving for only about 9 years and I'll have hard time getting a fare in Brooklyn, Queens and the Bronx.. even in Manhattan we'll be getting cheated by the hustlers..The passenger have the right to go to any destination within NYC but at the same time yellow cab drivers have the EXCLUSIVE right to pick up street hails in all the boroughs in NYC..

Your rights have been protected by the city but cab drivers' rights have been long forgotten... It is safe for me to assume that you are white because you did not bring up the race issue and it is not a race issue. It is all about finance and you did mention that in your post...

Hey listen, I do not like it when a cab driver refuses to take you to your destination but I must say, I symphatize with them. Because in the end you are taking him/her to a part of NYC where his rights are not protected..

So until that's fixed, do not expect anything different from your cabbie.. unless your cabbie is the milleniumcab...:D :D :D

not to get off topic.. but .. been living in Queens 20+ years.. to be honest I realize the issues with cabs only over the last year. Previously I was not a person who would cab it back to often, cuz i lived further into queens..

There 2 situations that annoy me (one partly being my fault i admit)
1) Cabs from LGA who complain and grumble on the ride from LGA to astoria because they would make more going to manhattan. This happens to me EVERY week i come back into NY

2) The cab who picks me up (due to experience I do not say my destination til i get into the cab) and then kicks me out.. now i admit perhaps i should announce my desitintation before but i rather not..

btw..i am not white.. but i never play the race card when it comes to cabs.. i completly understand why they do not like going to queens but unfortunatly its one of the downfalls of the job.. we all have em. Hey least i only take em to astoria on 21st st... not flushing or bayside!

I have encountered many cabbies who have been glad to take me to astoria and made an entertaining trip..

shocka
July 23rd, 2006, 11:26 PM
the guy who change the blinking, red light on top of the Empire State Building, =

Anyone know this person.. I know of one of the head janitors but he does not change that light..

milleniumcab
July 24th, 2006, 12:11 AM
not to get off topic.. but .. been living in Queens 20+ years.. to be honest I realize the issues with cabs only over the last year. Previously I was not a person who would cab it back to often, cuz i lived further into queens..

There 2 situations that annoy me (one partly being my fault i admit)
1) Cabs from LGA who complain and grumble on the ride from LGA to astoria because they would make more going to manhattan. This happens to me EVERY week i come back into NY
They shouldn't. They get a shortie ticket that allows them to cut to the front of the line. No excuse for that...:o


2) The cab who picks me up (due to experience I do not say my destination til i get into the cab) and then kicks me out.. now i admit perhaps i should announce my desitintation before but i rather not..

You don't have to give your destination before seated in the cab but maybe you should, just to avoid getting kicked out..;)


btw..i am not white.. but i never play the race card when it comes to cabs.. i completly understand why they do not like going to queens but unfortunatly its one of the downfalls of the job.. we all have em. Hey least i only take em to astoria on 21st st... not flushing or bayside!
It's good that you don't play the race card because it isn't about race, it is about finance.. And I wish somebody would take me to Bayside or Flushing everyday, hey it is a nice fare..:)


I have encountered many cabbies who have been glad to take me to astoria and made an entertaining trip..

You must have been in my cab, on your way home..:D

virtualchoirboy
July 24th, 2006, 01:06 AM
My mother works for housing. For one mother's day, my brother and I decided we would go to work with my mother and do the work for her. Everything was cool until we found the used condoms in the stairway and the human feces, and toilet paper, they used to wipe their buts in the halls. Tampons, diapers, and all types of filth.

Today, I worked with her again and while we were cleaning the lawn...some woman threw her blood stained draws out the window...narrowly missing me, my mom, and my sister.

I think this is the toughest job in the city.

Ninjahedge
July 24th, 2006, 09:04 AM
Did you see the window?

Find teh address, take the drawers, put them in an envelope with a little message entitled "You lose these" and mail them back to her.

They will go right back out the window, but the 15 seconds of shock and disgust would probably be worth it. ;)

OmegaNYC
July 30th, 2006, 02:51 AM
Did you see the window?

Find teh address, take the drawers, put them in an envelope with a little message entitled "You lose these" and mail them back to her.

They will go right back out the window, but the 15 seconds of shock and disgust would probably be worth it. ;)

lmao, damn, I've forgot about this post. Yeah, that would be a hoot!

LeCom
July 30th, 2006, 03:30 PM
We had a substitute teacher, I think it was 5th grade, and she had the misfortune to have to take over our class for the last part of our school year. On our final day she told us that we had made her decide that she no longer wanted to become a teacher.
In our school in Brooklyn it got tp a point when a teacher had to run and kick a student's desk because that's how much they pissed him off.

Also, we used to throw papers and stuff around so much that they hit the teacher's face and he didn't even care. He just sat there, crying.

OmegaNYC
July 30th, 2006, 04:48 PM
In our school in Brooklyn it got tp a point when a teacher had to run and kick a student's desk because that's how much they pissed him off.

Also, we used to throw papers and stuff around so much that they hit the teacher's face and he didn't even care. He just sat there, crying.

lol, sounds like when I was back in High School. :D

lofter1
July 30th, 2006, 06:44 PM
And how old were you ^^ then?

OmegaNYC
July 31st, 2006, 02:37 AM
And how old were you ^^ then?

Like around 15 or 16. But I didn't throw things at my teacher. I wasn't a bad student. It's just the HS I went to was bad as hell. But I did cut class from time to time. :p

OmegaNYC
August 14th, 2006, 06:06 PM
I've got it. The ultimate tough job in the city. I thought long and hard on this one (maybe about 5 minuets) and then it hit me.


Bike Messengers!


Yup. That's the toughest job in the city if you ask me. :)

Ninjahedge
August 15th, 2006, 08:51 AM
Nah, looking behind the counter at some of these poorly air-conditioned deli's and pizzareas, I would have to say that some of those guys have it rougher than the messengers.

Also, the guys that drag all the garbage out from the cellars of all the buisnesses around town. While these jobs may not be the most stressful or difficult in some ways, they are arguably some of the most backbreaking labor in the city.

bubdanose
August 15th, 2006, 09:17 AM
Dealing with teens is a little bit more taxing then being a bike messenger or working behind a deli counter....just an observation though....

Even if you are joking, it is nothing to laugh about....our schools have been in a downward trend forever....does anyone listen to the educators or parents?....nooooooooooooooooooooo.... people whine about the lack of knowledge our children have acquired during their educational training....children are being left behind all the time....school programs have been cut to the bone....but we can support a war, that we are losing??....go figure....

Leno, likes to show the general public how ignorant we are....he goes out on the streets, during his nationally aired television program, and ask history questions of our citizens....then shakes his head, in disbelief, at how stupid we americans are....just my opinion....maybe he is shaking his head for a different reason....

Police, firefighters and schoolteachers are underpayed, for the jobs they do....but we will pay sports figures obscene salaries....this is stupidity at its highest....

respectfully submitted:D

Edward
August 15th, 2006, 09:30 AM
Doorman.

Try standing next to a door for hours. Not everyone can do it. I would rather be bike messenger.

OmegaNYC
August 15th, 2006, 03:02 PM
Edward wins if you ask me. :)

Ninjahedge
August 15th, 2006, 03:51 PM
Police are not underpaid.

Trust me.

One woman in Hoboken was just let go after she was sited no several counts of misbehavior, not walking her beat (as required of a Captain) and other dereliction of duty, and overall being a very nasty woman.

Her salary, sans OT at the time, was $125K a year.

As "punishment" she has gotten early retirement with no health care, but a pension of, I believe, 50% of her annual salary.

You wonder where the budgets go?

(Now, I am not saying that there are other cases, such as the starting salary for NYC cops, which are just the opposite, but we have to be careful when we make blanket statements...)

OmegaNYC
February 6th, 2007, 02:54 PM
Well, it's been a while. But I say being a rookie cop is the toughest job in the city. This column from Michael Daly of the NY Daily News, sums it up:



Duty first for officers


Forsake that snug bed tonight and try walking a dark and arctic stretch of pavement, as 22-year-old Police Officer Patrick Lynch did in Queens from Sunday night into early yesterday morning.

Stay out for one hour and then another and another while your toes go numb and your ears burn and your fingers turn icy despite your gloves. Fight the temptation offered by each doorway to duck out of the piercing wind.
Imagine yourself a rookie cop, but not in balmy Los Angeles with a starting pay of $52,000 and a $5,000 signing bonus.

Imagine yourself in suddenly frigid New York, just seven weeks out of the academy, your pitiful $25,100 starting pay now up to a barely adequate $32,100. You certainly are not here for the money.
You are assigned to work a shift starting at 9:30 p.m. in Corona as part of the "high-impact" strategy in which areas with spiking violent crime rates are flooded with rookie foot cops.

This puts you at the corner of 103rd St. and 39th Ave., 50 minutes into your fourth freezing hour on duty. Your new leather gun belt would tell anybody with street smarts that you are a rookie. But few people with any kind of smarts are out this hour in such weather unless they have to be.
You chance to peer a block down to 102nd St., to a patch of sidewalk buckled by the gnarled root of a starkly bare tree. You see a figure with a baseball bat in his right hand. The left hand is grabbing something from a second figure who is sprawled on the pavement.

You decide this must be a robbery. You start running down 39th Ave. The standing figure sees you and flees up a double long block of 102nd St.
The other figure is still sprawled on the pavement. You see it is a fellow rookie cop from your academy class, 30-year-old Police Officer Joseph Cho. He is bleeding so badly from the head you think he had been shot. You note that his gun is missing.

You give chase up the dark block, dashing along a row of two-story brick houses as you radio a 10-13, meaning an officer needs assistance. You know the figure ahead has not just a bat, but at least one gun, your comrade's 9-mm. automatic.
But however mortal the danger, you are running toward it as fast as you can. However desperate the figure may be to get away, you are that much more determined to catch him.

You then see another academy classmate, Police Officer Christine Schmidt, racing from the other end of 102nd St., just as determined. You know the fleeing figure is trapped. He knows it, too. And he has that gun.
You charge on after him, in hot pursuit on a frigid night after someone who has already left one cop bleeding on the pavement. Schmidt keeps closing in from the other side. Neither she nor you fires at this man with a gun who could at any instant make that instant your very last.

Suddenly, you are on him, an eternity becoming no time at all as your training takes over. You and Schmidt cuff 21-year-old Danny Fernandez. You recover the gun, which Fernandez will say he stole hoping to use it for robberies. You also recover Cho's handcuffs, along with the bat. Other cops arrive in radio cars, veteran cops who no doubt worry that the pitiful starting salary will not attract the caliber of people the NYPD needs. You and Schmidt stand as proof the job still draws some of our finest young people, so fine as to disgrace those who would pay them less than they are worth.

Your fellow rookie Cho is taken to Elmhurst Hospital Center, where the doctors report he was not shot, but struck in the head with the bat. He has a fractured skull. Back at the scene, the spot where Cho was attacked is marked off with yellow crime scene tape that comes down sometime after dawn. A fragment tied to a chain-link fence flutters in a wind that has the people of the neighborhood hunched as they troop past. The brittle sunshine offers no warmth.
The place where you made the arrest is not marked at all, it being just another routine instance of police restraint, not excess. You may not be back out there tonight. But you certainly will the next night or maybe the next, standing post in the cold while the rest of us are home snug in our beds.

Originally published on February 6, 2007

Ninjahedge
February 6th, 2007, 03:26 PM
311 operator.

undertoes
February 6th, 2007, 03:58 PM
The chinese girl (with the choppy english) taking food orders in her chinese fast food resturant in the ghetto.

NoyokA
February 6th, 2007, 04:16 PM
Wired New York moderator.

NoyokA
February 6th, 2007, 04:19 PM
Seriously though I would have to guess the homeless disabled have the toughest job in NYC, they have to endure the elements and have to struggle for handouts in order to have a miserable existance.

Punzie
February 7th, 2007, 04:06 AM
Street prostitute.

ManhattanKnight
February 7th, 2007, 08:40 AM
NYT restaurant critic: Giving Luxury the Thrill of Danger (http://events.nytimes.com/2007/02/07/dining/reviews/07rest.html?ref=dining)

Bob
February 8th, 2007, 04:44 PM
Maybe not the toughest job in NYC, but challenging nonetheless (weak of heart need not apply): air traffic control in the NY area. Controllers at JFK, LGA, EWR, TEB, HPN, New York TRACON, and New York Center routinely handle millions of flight operations over your heads in the most complex airspace in the world, as closely as 500 feet apart vertically or 2.5 miles horizontally. Nobody spins the plates as successfully as these folks without breaking something.