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Thread: High Line Area Development

  1. #61
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Info on the mural on the south wall of Bayview Correctional Facility, seen in the attached photo from HERE :

    VENUS
    Outdoor painting 12 stories tall on
    the west side of Manhattan, New York

    In the work of Knox Martin -

    "... the images have gotten richer and the philosophy of painting deeper, and the experience of constituting the works through close visual reading is as rewarding as contemporary art provides. The process of seeking to rationalize forms with one another, as well as with surface, space, image, color and pattern, is what I mean by adventures in pictorial reason."

    -Arthur C. Danto (1998)

    "In 1970, prior to the rejuvenation of the district, Bayview's entire south wall was decorated with a red and pink abstract painting, called "Venus" by artist Knox Martin. The mural, conspicuous for its size and beauty, has often been used on post cards. It is also conspicuous - in a culture that regards large, exposed surface as prime advertising space - for not being a billboard. Not surprisingly, advertisers call from time to time with proposals to lease the wall for commercial messages, but Bayview doesn't want its beautiful Venus covered over with a beer or jeans ad.
    Besides, it's state property."

    - DOCS TODAY (November 2001)
    Copyright (c) 2005 Knox Martin

    ***

    "Venus" by Knox Martin in Chelsea


    © Copyright 2006 Jack Szwergold.

    A shot of " VENUS " by artist Knox Martin in Chelsea.

    Photo taken on September 17, 2005

  2. #62
    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
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    Cool

    I always wondered about that -

  3. #63

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    This reminds me of the Zinc down in TriBeCa. It's funny how the building that will be demolished for this is also one of the newest buildings on the block.

    345 West 14th Street
    11 stories
    Morris Adjmi Architects
    Multi-Family, 62,000 sq ft 50+ units
    Proposed Spring 2008




    Morris Adjmi Architects
    http://www.ma.com/projects/345-w-14-st/


    345 West 14 Street
    Multi-Family, 62,000 sq ft
    New York, NY
    Spring 2008

    345 West 14th Street is located at the northeastern corner of Manhattan’s Meat Packing District in Greenwich Village. The eleven-story glass and metal paneled building will have externally mounted movable shutters. Residents of the 50+ luxury condominiums will be able to move the shutters via an automated system to allow for more privacy or reduced sun exposure. The 9’ tall shutters are made of Prodema slats mounted on steel angles. The rail and guide system of the shutters is concealed within the spandrel panels located above and underneath. The building will provide an ever-changing facade, a dynamic blend of technology and history.
    Last edited by Derek2k3; October 23rd, 2006 at 06:24 PM.

  4. #64
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Derek2k3 View Post
    It's funny how the building that will be demolished for this is also one of the newest buildings on the block.
    ...but is it ugly? Does it deserve to meet the wrecking ball?

  5. #65

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    It's nothing special and by new I mean 1970's.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  6. #66
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
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    Oh I see . . . in that case, by all means bring that sucker down.

  7. #67

    Default Everything's Up to Date in Chelsea (NY Sun 10/24/06)

    Few areas of Manhattan have changed as swiftly or as radically in recent years as 24th Street between Tenth and Eleventh Avenues. Today, it is a very different place from what it was just 12 months ago, let alone five years ago.
    If Chelsea is the universal center of contemporary art, this is the center of Chelsea, its Gold Coast. Among its stars are blue-chip venues like the museumsized Gagosian Gallery, as well as three others, Luhring Ausustine, Andrea Rosen, and Marianne Boesky, that in the past month have opened dazzlingly redesigned spaces.
    And then there are the three huge residential structures that have been completed in the past year: the Tate, Chelsea Condos, and Vesta 24.
    True, the first two are through-block buildings whose main entrances are on 23rd Street, a major cross-town thoroughfare. But even if West 23rd Street's fortunes have improved along with the rest of Chelsea, one suspects that the monied purchasers of these condos really want to look down on 24th Street, on the artists, critics, and dealers, as well as that swelling bevy of their hangers-on, who pound these pavements with a vengeance.
    But how strange it must be to live here. Consider that not a scrap of anything edible can be purchased from one end of it to the other. And though everything here is for sale, none of it will be had for much less than $100,000. Meanwhile this street is hemmed in by the ever-charming West Side Highway to the west and by the rotting, rusting High Line to the east.
    Already several one- or two-story structures that house car-repair shops are deserted, and the rest are being eyed by developers. Consider that, when the 22 units in Vesta 24 went on sale, long before they were ever built, and even though they ranged in price between $1.6 million to $3.5 million, it took all of 36 hours to sell every last one of them
    The two biggest residential buildings on the block, the Tate and Chelsea Studios, have already been discussed in this column in the past year. They are largely undistinguished brick-faced structures with a few vernacular adornments, though they are doubtless pleasant enough to inhabit. The 14-story Vesta 24, however, at 231 Tenth Ave., exhibits a bit more effort and invention. Designed by Garett Gourlay Architect, it is a collage of a tower, the sort of politely deconstructed composite that architects were designing five years ago: Most of the lower level, up to the 10th floor, is daringly clad in fancy wood facing, while the irregularly massed top and sides are covered in a shimmering white metal.

    Occupying the lot immediately to the north is a car wash brazenly advertising its services. The effect is oddly reminiscent of Las Vegas, as if this were some artful reconstruction of a mythic, honky-tonk New York City rising out of the sands of Nevada. Doubtless, the developer and the inhabitants love that clash. Doubtless, too, that car wash is not long for this world.
    Just across the way, on the north side of 24th Street, is the spanking new Marianne Boesky Gallery, which opened earlier this month. What distinguishes its exterior, designed by Deborah Berke & Partners, is the emphasis with which its disjointed sequence of glazed white brick, corrugated steel, and customized concrete block sums up all the aspirations and pretensions of contemporary Chelsea.
    In the crisp angularity of its sundry parts, it, like so many other galleries on this street, is resolutely neo-modernist. But it makes obvious the implicit historicism in this modernist revival. Indeed, its bare-bones vocabulary is almost commonplace at this point. The façade is dominated by a squarish block of white brick — with a two-story mullioned window set into its mass — that seems to come crashing down on the horizontal metal strip that is the entrance. It is as aggressively modernist as the overrated High Line across the street.
    As for the corrugated steel and the concrete blocks that flank the white brick center, they not only recall some of the more functional buildings down the street, but suggest the sturdy integrity that the art world, and so much of the art they traffic in, are pleased to imagine they embody. Whatever one thinks of these pretensions, however, the façade of the new Boesky Gallery at least has the virtue of harmoniousness.
    On the same side of the street, a few doors west, is a single structure that houses two galleries — Luhring Augustine and Andrea Rosen — that have been improbably joined at the hip for much of their careers. Its expansive wooden façade has been painted brilliant forest green and is surrounded by red brick. This is the work of Gluckman Mayner Architects, a firm that, you could be excused for thinking, is responsible for half of the upscale galleries in Manhattan, including the hangar-like Gagosian Gallery down the street and the recently renovated fifthfloor galleries at the Whitney. This most recent labor, with Elizabeth Rexrode as project architect, is unexpectedly vernacular in such details as the patterning of the green façade, the fin-desiecle metalwork above it, and the raw, unfinished wooden accents that define the interior.
    The massive infusion of money into this formerly industrialized zone — so unimaginable a mere 10 years ago—has fundamentally altered the spirit of the neighborhood. Though many of the new galleries aspire to the proletarian contextualism of the Marianne Boesky Gallery, the new arrivals are ultimately irreconcilable with the auto-shops to which they imagine they are paying tribute. A spurious equilibrium between them, which appeared to hold up for a few years, has finally broken down, as a deluge of conspicuous consumption takes all before it.
    jgardner@nysun.com
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    </SPAN>

  8. #68
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    NOVEMBER 2: HIGH LINE DESIGN TALK AND RECEPTION WITH THE TRANSIT MUSEUM

    Friends of the High Line

    Join FHL and the New York City Transit Museum for a presentation on the High Line's history and preliminary designs for its reuse. The design talk, by industrial archeologist Tom Flagg and FHL Special Projects Manager Meredith Taylor, will be followed by a reception.

    Tickets are $5 for members of the Transit Museum, and $8 for the general public.

    Thursday, November 2, 6:00 PM
    Hudson Guild's Dan Carpenter Room
    441 West 26th Street (between 9th & 10th Avenues)
    RSVP to the Transit Museum: (718) 694-1867

  9. #69
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    CONSTRUCTION UPDATE: SITE PREPARATION BEGINS


    A new phase of construction has begun on the High Line. This new phase—Site Preparation—will ready the structure for the installation of the new park landscape. The current work includes steel and concrete repair; sandblasting and repainting of all steel surfaces; bird deterrents; and the installation of a new underside drainage system. During sandblasting, the High Line structure will be wrapped with a containment unit to protect workers and adjacent areas (see photo above).



    A front-end loader is lifted onto the High Line for the beginning of Site Preparation


    Site Preparation follows the timely completion of the Removals phase, which cleared tracks, ballast, and debris from the elevated rail bed. (The tracks have been tagged and stored, so that many of them can be reinstalled into the future park landscape.) Site Preparation will wind down in summer 2007, paving the way for the installation of the new High Line access systems, pathways, plantings, and lighting, now being designed by the team led by Field Operations and Diller Scofidio + Renfro.

    View Construction Photos



    Vegetation remaining on the High Line, over the Chelsea Car Wash, prior to removals



    Soil and gravel ballast, after rails have been removed at 14th Street



    All rail sections have been mapped and tagged prior to removal



    After removals, looking South from 17th Street



    Looking North from 17th Street




    Frank Gehry's IAC Headquarters, under construction on 19th Street






  10. #70
    Forum Veteran TREPYE's Avatar
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    ^^ What a great view of the Gehry building!

  11. #71

    Default Highline - Steel Restoration

    The renovations on the steel structure has begun on 21st street. After the old paint and rust is removed a primer is applied. The final color will be a dark green, almost black.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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  12. #72
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Moderators: It seems that this thread and the one entitled The High Line: elevated railroad in Chelsea are now covering the same territory.

    Should they be combined into one thread?

  13. #73

    Default Activity on 11th Ave btw 23rd & 24th Sts

    There appears to be a good amount of activity including closed taxi garages, and the strip bar "Priveldge" is padlocked. Does anyone know what's going on?

  14. #74
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pioneer View Post
    There appears to be a good amount of activity including closed taxi garages, and the strip bar "Priveldge" is padlocked. Does anyone know what's going on?
    You a regular?

    This looks neat! A little freaky though. Kind of hard to realize that this is all up in the air, you know? I hope it will not cost too much to keep it up. I would hate to see them build a nice park and just have it get run down (if there is a market crash) and turn into low-life central....

  15. #75
    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
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    Cool

    The best thing about this neighborhood was that it was low life central.

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