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Thread: High Line Area Development

  1. #106

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    Quote Originally Posted by kurokevin View Post
    According to today's NYPost article it will be 21 floors (roughly 230-250ft?) This is going to look stunning on the West Side Highway next to IAC and the upcoming Robert AM Stern building further South.
    Yup, 250' according to the permit.
    http://a810-bisweb.nyc.gov/bisweb/Jo...hous=&allstrt=

  2. #107
    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
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    Is that a housing project building on the left?

  3. #108
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Nope -- that's the Bayview Women's Correctional Facility.

  4. #109
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    Quote Originally Posted by Derek2k3 View Post
    It looks stunning.
    I agree. Nouvel is another reliably good one.

    There's always some creativity in his designs.

    And to think we could've had him for 5WTC instead that sorry Maki clown.

  5. #110
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    As far as I know, Nouvel was still the front runner to design 5WTC. Maki's always been the architect of 4WTC.

  6. #111
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    I meant to say 4WTC.

    Got my WTC numbers mixed up.

    He backed out and Silverstein brought in Maki instead.

    I don't think anyone's been announced for no. 5 yet.

  7. #112

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    Quote Originally Posted by Derek2k3 View Post
    It looks stunning.
    A. It wont really look like this when it's built, it will be much much darker. That rendering is inaccurate architecture porn.

    B. Would you really want to have your windows in your living room chopped up into 20 little windows with lots of framing to block your views?

    C. Would you want to have 4 different colored glasses in your windows, all in the yellow/amber range?

    D. I predict this will be value engineered to death. This is an amazingly expensive and fussy wall while there is a major backlog of curtainwalls in the US.

    E. Reference. If you are going for a modular cubist exploration, do it like this. Make the modular pieces spatial, referencing the interior, not just skin wrapped around dumb typical floor plates. Paul Rudolph was the master of this.



  8. #113
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    MODERN ART

    FAR WEST CHELSEA TURNS INTO CITY'S MOST EYE-CATCHING AREA


    By KATHERINE DYKSTRA

    January 11, 2007 -- BETWEEN the velvet ropes of the Meatpacking District and the landmark buildings in upper Chelsea, among the galleries and warehouses on the far West Side, something very big is happening on one very tiny block.

    West 19th Street between 10th Avenue and the West Side Highway has become a playground for a handful of the world’s most renowned architects.

    Welcome to the most architecturally avant-garde area in New York City.

    Facing the West Side Highway and serving as anchor for the area, is the billowing glass IAC/InterActiveCorp headquarters - the Pritzker Prize-winning Frank Gehry's first contribution to the Manhattan skyline. Next door, 520 West Chelsea, an 11-story condo by It architect Annabelle Selldorf, is under construction. And directly across the street from that, ground has been broken on a 21-story, 72-unit residential building designed by internationally acclaimed French architect Jean Nouvel.

    That's more starchitecture per square foot than anywhere else in Manhattan now, and - due to zoning -probably ever. And the creative spark is spreading. A residential project by 15 Central Park West designer Robert A.M. Stern is planned for 18th Street, across from the IAC building.

    To get an idea of the caliber of these projects and their proximity, imagine 40 Mercer (the Andres Balazs building that was Nouvel's first Manhattan project), Urban Glass House (Selldorf and Philip Johnson's Spring Street masterpiece) and 15 CPW rising simultaneously within a block of one another.

    "I think 19th Street will be the most architecturally distinct block in Manhattan," says Shaun Osher of Core Group Marketing, which is selling 520 West Chelsea.

    The 26 units there are 1,580 to 4,232 square feet and selling for $1.7 million to more than $8 million. That's comparable to other luxury buildings, but it's also a rarer buying opportunity. Most developers can only afford major architects when they stand to sell tons of units; 520 West Chelsea is a boutique building.

    A block away, Audrey Matlock's newest building, The Chelsea Modern (which has won the Excellence in Architecture Award), is rising on 18th Street between Ninth and 10th Avenues. Adjacent to it is the site of 459 West 18th St., a boutique condo by up-and-coming architectural firm DB, recently tapped by the Architectural League of New York for 2007's Emerging Voices series.

    That's a lot of new housing stock, but far West Chelsea seems ready and able to absorb it. (According to Related Companies Vice Chairman David Wine, The Caledonia, a new condo rising on 17th Street between Ninth and 10th avenues, has sold 75 percent of its 190 units, which start at 531 square feet and $720,000. The offering plan was just approved in August.)

    So why now? There are multiple reasons for Far West Chelsea's architectural rise.

    First, there's the artistic climate of the neighborhood. With more than 200 galleries, West Chelsea is one of the densest art communities in the world. And art begets creative architecture

    "This specific neighborhood has become the leading place in the world for modern art," says Robert Gladstone of Madison Equities, developer of the Chelsea Modern. "And we're embracing that movement."

    "We were inspired by the area ... . The residences are large and there are great walls for art collecting," says Sara Lopergolo, a partner at Selldorf Architects, which is responsible for the design of 520 West Chelsea as well as the Zwirner Gallery directly across the street. The fa‡ade of 520 West Chelsea unites modern-day and yesteryear with its bands of terracotta, popular in prewar structures.

    Then there's the city's support of the redevelopment of the High Line and the bestowing of the project on acclaimed architecture firmField Operations.

    "At the same time Field Operations won the competition for the design of the High Line, [IAC CEO] Barry Diller chose Frank Gehry for his building," says Amanda Burden, who oversaw the rezoning of Chelsea. "Suddenly every great designer wanted to build there."

    And most of this area's projects have been inspired by the modernity and creativity of one another.

    "We thought our choice of architect was appropriate, given the location," says Alf Naman, a developer of the Jean Nouvel project, a mix of one-, two- and three-bedrooms due at the end of 2008, with sales starting in two to three months. "The building was designed with the Gehry building in mind."

    While the area has inspired the tried and true of the architecture world, it's also fertile ground for innovative up-and-comers.

    "We're not altering the skyline, but it's a building in a location where people who appreciate art and architecture will see it," says Jared Della Valle of DB Architects, designer and developer of 459 West 18th St. "There's Frank Gehry, Annabelle Selldorf, Jean Nouvel and then, there'll be us. We're hoping to get discovered like a new artist would."

    All of this would never have been possible without Chelsea's rezoning. Until two years ago, the area was zoned for manufacturing, but in order to protect the gallery district, preserve the High Line and allow for housing on 10th and 11th avenues, a mix of industrial and residential buildings was approved. One change was the allowance of mid-block housing on streets like this stretch of 19th Street, where developers have already grabbed almost every available site.

    "This untapped pocket feels the way SoHo felt before it really took off, the way TriBeCa felt before it took off," Osher says.

    Adding to the residential feel is the fact that car traffic is sparse, despite the proximity of Chelsea Market, Chelsea Piers and the Meatpacking district. Residents can, at least for the time being, live quietly and have hot spots like Lotus and Del Posto a short walk away.

    This part of 19th Street is becoming "one of those streets like you see on West 12th or off Fifth Avenue," says Louise Phillips Forbes, senior vice president at Halstead Property. "All beautifully appointed buildings with the potential to have an elite address."

    Link to article and slideshow

    Copyright 2007 NYP Holdings, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. #114
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    From Jean Nouvel's website:

    "The Exception to Prove the Rule

    This Manhattan quarter nearby the meat market, along Hudson River, is crossed by what remains of an old railway and old metal bridges across the 12th and the 13th streets, a few steps from Washington Street.
    The building site is crossed by the rails. The realism incites to build a massive block above the rails. The analysis of the site characteristics, in a neighborhood where the inhabitants are willing to keep the meat market and what remains of the past, leads me to construct around the rails by maintaining bridges and tracks, by creating an urban terrace, a public terrace for bars and restaurants. This leads to the construction of three buildings above three tiny places: two triangles and one trapezoid. Shops are under the tracks in the continuation of the sidewalks of Washington Street.
    A thin tower rises up in the sky, an industrial like tower above a proportion of a harbor chimney. It contains large apartments with quadrate views over the "land-marks" of Manhattan, and over the fabulous light of the Hudson sunset, through all kinds of windows, small or large. This explains the atypical façades, the light effects being accentuated by the use of different materials, the steel becoming shimmering above the rails :
    - to diffract the rising and setting suns and create light gaps against the sunlight
    - to assert the exception of an arrow of shade and light rising up in the middle of warehouses."

    - Jean Nouvel

    Note about the attached images: the website says this design dates back from 2001, so it might have been updated since then.
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  10. #115
    Forum Veteran krulltime's Avatar
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    Incredible height for the area! The facade looks really good. But I don't like the idea of a flat roof.

  11. #116

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    That's the never built project for 848 Washington Street. It was slated to rise nearly 500' but Berman & co killed it a few years ago. It's now the site of the Standard Hotel.

  12. #117

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    Also coming to the West Chelsea are projects by Architectonics, Rogers and another building by Gehry. There's also another 11 story building to be developed between the IAC building and 520 West 19th. NB permit filed at 524 West 19th. It's the little white building in the lower right.


    Here are a few more images of 100 Eleventh Avenue from the facade contractor, CCA Facade Technology, LLC.




    There are more images of this and other projects such as Asymptote's 166 Perry and the Rogers building on 21st from the façade consultants Front Inc.
    http://www.frontinc.com/co_archit_100_11th_avenu.html

    The second attatchment is a detail of the previously mentioned Annabelle Seldorf project at 200 11th Avenue. (18 stories)
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    Last edited by Derek2k3; January 12th, 2007 at 10:31 PM.

  13. #118

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    I attatched the Rogers building and Architectonics building. They'll be across the street from each other. So...Rogers on 21st then Architectonics, then Nouvel, then Gehry's IAC, then Robert AM Stern's huge development between 18th and 17th. New York is not just architectural backwater anymore.
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  14. #119
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    I had a feeling that Nouvel building had been a different one. Although, it seems he's kept to a similar facade design.

  15. #120

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    All fantastic projects. And to think the High Line faced demolition at one point...good thing that didn't happen.

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