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Thread: Horizen Tower Hotel - West 23rd Street

  1. #1

    Default Horizen Tower Hotel - West 23rd Street

    I love this proposal so I gave it its own thread. I'm interpreting "dematerialize as it rises to the height of twenty-six stories" as it's about 260 feet tall since it clearly has about 21 floors.


    Horizen Condominiums / Horizen Tower
    39-41 West 23rd Street / 20 West 24th Street
    21 stories 117 feet (DOB); 260 feet
    Carlos Zapata Studio / Gruzen Samton, LLP
    Horizen Global Real Estate Development / 23rd Street Development LLC
    Mixed-Use Condominium
    71 units 90,670 Sq. Ft. / 103,000 gsf
    Proposed 2006-








    Carlos Zapata Studio


    HORIZEN MIXED-USE CONDOMINIUM DEVELOPMENT
    Horizen Global Real Estate Development

    The site is a beautifully articulated development that brings the mid-block of 23rd Street and 24th Street between Fifth and Sixth Avenues into the context of the beloved Flat Iron Building and the highly acclaimed MetLife Insurance Tower-both recognized as sculptural icons of the early twentieth century. This new building is a more modern expression yet attempts to become such an icon for its own generation, representing an optimistic view of the future and the culture of the time in which it was built. Its folded planes of glass define a slender tower that recedes from the street in a powerful urban gesture, respecting its context and allowing the tower to dematerialize as it rises to the height of twenty-six stories. The building will benefit from the exceptional views of the many areas and buildings that define New York as a "capital of the world." Ultimately, this is a building for New York City.

    Leading the design of this remarkable building is the acclaimed visionary architect Carlos Zapata of Carlos Zapata Studio; in concert with the eminent Peter Samton of New York City’s own industry leader Gruzen Samton, LLP serving as Architect of Record. Mr. Zapata’s visionary designs have graced the skylines of cities around the world and this project will add New York to that extraordinary résumé.



    Links:

    DOB Application

    Leslie E. Robertson Associates, R.L.L.P.
    Horizen Tower
    New York, NY
    Flatiron Condominium
    Client: Horizen Global
    Architect: Wood & Zapata
    Location: New York, NY
    Gross Floor Area: 103,000 gsf / 9,580 gsm
    Height: 22-stories

    This project consists of a new 22-story condominium with approximately
    100,000 gsf (9,300 gsm) above ground and three basements of approximately
    3,000 gsf (280 gsm).

    Barker Mohandas, LLC
    The Horizen 23rd Street Mixed-Use Condominium, NYC
    New Landmark Tower, Custom Machine Locations, Cantilevered Glass Elevator

    Sliver: Builders have basic instinct for waterfront
    The Villager

    By Lincoln Anderson

    Sliver Condominium on 23rd
    Triple Mint

    This rather striking tower is planned for a narrow property that goes through the block at 23rd Street between 5th and 6th Avenues. Real estate developer Horizen Global, responsible for the Hudson Blue condo in the West Village, plans this slender 26 story glass tower with folding planes that recede from the street as they rise. Located at 39-41 West 23rd Street, the building will have a pool, retail space at ground level, and a rear courtyard. No word yet on how many apartments are planned, or when construction will begin. You can view larger images, along with a sectional diagram, at the developer's web site linked below.


    By All That is Holy in SoFi
    Curbed

    Thursday, July 28, 2005, by Joey
    Triple Mint blesses us by leading the masses to this mixed-use condo development that's in the works for 23rd Street between Fifth and Sixth Avenues. Planned by developer Horizen Global—the clergy behind the West Village's glass-eyed Hudson Blue—this 26-story tower would have "folding planes that recede from the street as they rise," retail space at ground level and a courtyard. And while there's no information as to the number of apartments or even a construction date, we're absolutely sure we speak for all in the congregation when we say that finally, the Pope has come back to New York City. And guess what? This time there's a pool in his hat!


    Dog Bites Man
    Veritas et Venustas

    Thursday, July 28, 2005
    Horizen
    VIA Curbed and Triple Mint we have another exercise in graph-paper origami. Every other New York City building announced these days seems to be one of these "folded plane" glass-skinned things (Frank Gehry's Atlantic Yards, Gehry's InterActivCorp headquarters, David Childs' Freedom Tower, Childs's TimeWarner center, the Bank of America building, Bernard Tschumi's Blue, Christian de Portzamparc's 400 Park Avenue South, Zaha Hadid's Olympic Village...) but this won't stop New York Times architect's agent architecture critic Nicolia Ouroussoff from saying these buildings "aim to challenge the formal order that has ruled mainstream architecture for a century" — or something like that. Somehow we will understand that they are avant-garde and daring and socially revolutionary.
    Even though every architect is designing one of them and most people think they look like Houston on steroids. How revolutionary is that?
    And how revolutionary that they're designed to sell to Yuppies for $1,200 per square foot?

    Onward and Upward?
    New York Magazine

    November 7, 2005

    PShark Report

    Berzon Development Database
    Horizen Condominiums
    Last edited by Derek2k3; July 28th, 2006 at 02:14 AM.

  2. #2
    The Dude Abides
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    Wow, I'm really impressed with this one. The architects knew what they were doing when they first set out to design this building. It's undeniably modern and eye-catching, yet it holds the streetwall and cornice line beautifully with the older buildings on either side. No bulky, fortress-like base. Clean and simple at ground level, and then it blooms when it rises into the sky. This is what we should be striving for with any new mid-block building.

    Thank you Derek!

  3. #3
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    I'm crazy for this one ...

    However, note that the initial DOB Application for a "New Building" was DISAPPROVED on 4.26.06 and no further action is seen at DOB since then

    The list of Items Required for this Application is extensive ... in fact not ONE required item appears to have been submitted.

    Any news as to how this one is moving forward would be appreciated ...

  4. #4
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    Default

    Not bad, but the building name is already taken.

  5. #5
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    That one is Horizon Condominium; this one seems it will be called Horizon Tower.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Derek2k3
    It looks like a baby blob reaching out for mommy.

  7. #7
    The Dude Abides
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    From http://cityrealty.com/new_developments:

    Whittled tower near Madison Square Park encounters objections 07-SEP-06



    The land-use and zoning committee of Community Board 5 voted last night, 6 to 4, to recommend that the City Planning Commission disapprove the granting of a special permit to allow residential development and a waiver of height, setback and rear-yard requirements for a very unusually shaped, 21-story residential tower at 39 West 23rd Street in the Ladies’ Mile Historic District planned by Horizen Global LLC, of which Michael Yanko is chief executive officer.

    The development’s design by Carlos Zapata Studio and Gruzen Samton LLP has been approved by the Landmarks Preservation Commission, but is now in the city’s Uniform Land Use Preview Process (ULURP). The commission requested that the design be modified by reducing its height by a few stories and it required the developer to restore and promise to retain the facades of the existing low-rise residential building at 37 West 23rd Street.

    The design calls for a white-glass-clad, narrow tower that not only slants to the north above its-low rise base on 23rd Street, but also cantilevers over its rear yard and also slightly over an adjoining low-rise residential building that is part of its zoning lot to the east at 37 West 23rd Street.

    The “whittled” design is not simple and there are a variety of other facets, and a few notches, to its facades.

    The project would have retail on the ground floor and residential condominium apartments above. Mr. Zapata told the committee last night that the number of units has not yet been finally determined and would be between about 44 and 76 although as-of-right zoning for the site permits about 110.

    The site runs through to 24th Street where a three-and-a-half-story, single-family townhouse would be erected as part of the development.

    The project’s chamfered design also is somewhat similar in concept to One Bryant Park, the much larger skyscraper being erected now on the northwest corner of 42nd Street and the Avenue of the Americas.

    Mr. Zapata’s and Mr. Samton’s design, however, follows the strange logic of the city’s zoning and building regulations and, as a result, represents an extremely intriguing and formidably sculptural form, especially for New York above the clean-cut lines of its low-rise base.

    The committee had some trouble grappling with the project’s design complexities, leading Meile Rockefeller, co-chairperson of the committee, to gently ask Frank Angelino, a spokesman for the developer, “Can you give a compelling reason why you want to do this?”

    Mr. Zapata explained that this design seeks to “maximize air and light” and that a taller building that conformed to existing regulations would provide less usable square footage and cast longer shadows.

    The tower of the mid-block building would be quite narrow with only about 3,500 square feet on a floor. It would be a few stories higher than the tall buildings at either end of the block but its slanted design would more views of the Metropolitan Life clocktower building on Madison Avenue as seen from the Avenue of the Americas than a sheer tower, Mr. Zapata said.

    The top of the low-rise base on 23rd Streets projects out about 22 inches to “look like a cornice,” he said.

    The building would replace a 96-car parking lot.

    Several members of the committee expressed concerns that this relatively small project could be “the tipping point” that could “become the underlying justification” for a residential rezoning of the neighborhood, noting that many of the commercial buildings around Madison Square Park to the east are being converted to residential uses at the same time as new residential construction is transforming the former flower district along the Avenue of the Americas.

    “We’re trying to stem the pressure of residential development,” one committee member said.

    Horizen Global’s other Manhattan projects include Hudson Blue at 423 West Street.

  8. #8
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
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    Stuff like this just drives me nuts.

    The ignorance among these community boards are just incredible. These people have absolutely no clue (not even a smidgen) of the most simple principle of economics of supply and demand.

    The very concern they have:
    Several members of the committee expressed concerns that this relatively small project could be “the tipping point” that could “become the underlying justification” for a residential rezoning of the neighborhood, noting that many of the commercial buildings around Madison Square Park to the east are being converted to residential uses at the same time as new residential construction is transforming the former flower district along the Avenue of the Americas.
    ...will only be exacerbated by their attempts to stifle residential development.

    IF THE DEMAND FOR RESIDENTIALS (i.e. condos, rentals, etc.) CAN'T BE MET THROUGH NEW DEVELOPMENTS, THE PRESSURE WILL BE PLACED ON TURNING MORE, NOT LESS COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS INTO RESIDENTIALS.

    It's a god-damn parking lot right now for heaven's sake!
    No one's gonna come in and put up a commercial building.
    Complete fools.

  9. #9

    Default

    That's BS. This buildings is awesome. Why don't these wangs make themselves useful and save the stables on 13th St., St. Brigets, etc.?

  10. #10

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    Antinimby:

    "The ignorance among these community boards are just incredible. These people have absolutely no clue (not even a smidgen) of the most simple principle of economics of supply and demand."

    Beg to differ: It is these community boards that worked to create the Ladies Mile Historic district in the first place.

    They saw the "supply", magnificent historic buildings that had been considered run-down white-elephants by the 1970´s....and created the "demand" by having the area landmarked.

    Do you honestly think a building of this high architectural quality would ever have been proposed here years ago?

  11. #11

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    ^ So what's your point, Fabrizio? The group did something useful years ago, so it should be allowed to have its way with this project?

  12. #12

    Default

    Can the board kill this project?

  13. #13

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    Ablarc: Not at all. Re-read the quote I´m responding to.

    So what should we do? Do away with these community boards.... not listen to them at all? Funny, considering that they´re the one who fought for the historic district in the first place. ( actually community groups had a huge hand in creating the Landmarks commision).

    Furthermore: the recomendation to "required the developer to restore and promise to retain the facades of the existing low-rise residential building at 37 West 23rd Street" might well be a very interesting one.

  14. #14
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    It seems what we have going on here (and at other Community Boards) is the conflict between the desire to protect some existing businesses in current commercial buildings while at the same time allowing for the construction of more residential in an attempt to deal with the incredible shortage of housing in NYC.

    When almost every scheme presented for the conversion from commercial to residential involves "luxury" housing starting at $1 Million + one does have to consider how, beyond increasing the tax base, this serves the community at large.

    And when those same "luxury" housing schemes supplant existing businesses that employ x numbers of citizens (often residents of the area covered by the Community Board) the conflict only increases.

    On the other hand this appears to be a brilliant design and it will be a shame if it is shot down.

    And the comments from some of the CB members as reported does seem to indicate that their thinking is a bit too boxed in.

    PS: Frank Angelino, the lawyer for the developer as mentioned in that article, is also the lawyer for my Landlord in regards to Landmark / DOB issues -- he's a very savvy guy and seems to be able to make things move through the city bureaucracy.
    Last edited by lofter1; September 8th, 2006 at 04:12 PM. Reason: correction

  15. #15

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    Fabrizio:

    Sometimes linguistic precision can yield great benefits and excessive enlargement of a word's meaning can do great harm.

    We all know the damage done years ago by the Census Bureau's failure to distinguish between "urban" and "suburban." The public's belief in the oxymoronic unicorn of "urban sprawl" can be traced to this semantic sloppiness.

    Even as genuinely urban America was dissolving like Alka Seltzer, the census folks declared each year that the country was rapidly urbanizing. So since the country was "urbanizing" and the precious countryside was disappearing fast, it was clear to the unwashed that the culprit was "urban sprawl." This fueled American's hatred of the city, which grew to mythic proportions; all things bad were called "urban".

    When the Census Bureau repented its usage and started to distinguish between urban and suburban, the unwashed discovered that all along it was the suburb that had been devouring both the countryside and the city. Linguistic usage kept that from being evident for decades while the problem raged.

    The meaning of the word "notoriety" is currently in process of evolving toward synonymity with "fame" due to misuse by the unwashed. When most people think notoriety means fame, we'll have to devise a new word for notoriety; the concept requires a word. Ill-repute?

    Just so, Fabrizio, I propose a precise distinction between constructive obstruction of development and harmful obstruction. We could call folks who indulge in the former "preservationists", and practitioners of the latter "NIMBYs." It would make conversation easier (skip all that correcting of misunderstandings), but much more importantly it would promote clear thinking.

    The folks opposing this building are acting as preservationists when they call for keeping those facades, and they're being NIMBYs when they kneejerk demand that the new building be shortened.

    Actually, I'm not sure those facades are worth preserving, so maybe they're being NIMBYs about both issues.

    See the dialectical value of making this distinction?


    * * *

    Incidentally, should someone correct the spelling of "Horizon" in the title of this thread? Or is that the way the owner spells it?

    .
    Last edited by ablarc; September 8th, 2006 at 10:40 AM.

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