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Thread: Tribeca

  1. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1 View Post
    ... on July 16, less than a week after the billboard went up, the tops of all four trees were mysteriously lopped off.
    No witnesses, huh?

  2. #32
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    thank you for sharing this pics.

    great!

  3. #33

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    Franklin Pl, between Franklin St and White St.




    Staple St, between Jay St and Harrison St.


  4. #34
    King Omega XVI OmegaNYC's Avatar
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    Nice pics! Look down that street, makes me feel as if I took a step back in time. Very early 1900's feeling.

  5. #35

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    Atmospheric gloom.

  6. #36
    The Dude Abides
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZippyTheChimp View Post
    A local architect took a lot of heat for creating this monstrosity on West Broadway and Warren St. There was no hardship in developing the property that required the addition. It was dirty, but intact. There was always a retail presence on the ground floor, starting with an electronics store, the northern reaches of Radio Row.


    The same thing was done up the block at Church. The project was welcomed because it was to restore the streetwall to Church by incorporating several buildings that were falling apart. The result is horrible, and the Church St side doesn't look like the front.


    This led to the historic district being extended to the south, protecting midblock buildings such as this.
    On the same topic of rooftop additions comes this new proposal for 66 Reade Street. Zippy, would this one also fall into the historic district?

    From http://cityrealty.com/new_developments:

    "The spirit of invisibility" for roof-top additions in TriBeCa 15-SEP-06



    Roger Byrom, the co-chairman of the Landmarks Committee of Community Board 1, last night extolled the virtues of “the spirit of invisibility” at a presentation of plans to add three floors to a five-story building at 66 Reade Street in TriBeCa and convert it to 8 residential condominium apartments.

    David Prendergast of the firm of Prendergast Laurel Architects made a presentation of the plans of Jean Hieber, the building’s owner, to the committee and said that the proposal uses only 5,000 of the 6,000 available development rights for the site.

    Mr. Prendergast presented pictures that indicated that the slanted addition would not be visible from the street, but several members of the committee including Mr.Byrom were not convinced.

    Mr. Prendergast argued that by lowering the existing roof level by four feet and slanting the additional floors that the roof-top addition would not be visible from the street.

    The existing building has a 10-foot rear yard, but Mr. Prendergast indicated that the new top three floors would be setback 30 feet from the rear property line to comply with zoning regulations.

    The committee held off a vote on the application that goes before the Landmarks Preservation Commission next month so that it could further examine the visibility of the proposed addition.

    The building is between Church and Broadway.

    Many of the applications for certificate of appropriateness from the Landmarks Preservation Commission are for roof-top additions to buildings in historic districts and many such additions are relatively non-descript and bulky additions that are setback from the front of the building so as to be not visible from the street and the commission and preservation and civic groups have closely examined whether such additions are visible from many directions, but have not been too concerned with the architectural merits of the additions.

    Mr. Prendergast’s addition is a very dramatic cascading glass addition that while not stylistically related to the base of the building, or its immediate surroundings, is a dramatic and coherent architectural addition.

  7. #37
    The Dude Abides
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZippyTheChimp View Post
    116 Hudson St. They got this one right.
    This one was designed by BKSK Architects. They've done some good work, especially in Tribeca. Go to Work > Residential > Multi-Family.

  8. #38
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    A Glimpse of What SoHo Used to Be


    Left, MetroHistory.com; right, Don Hogan Charles/The New York Times
    A LONG-AGO QUIET The south side of White Street, looking east from
    Church Street toward Broadway, in 1940, and the same view today.

    NY TIMES
    By CHRISTOPHER GRAY
    March 18, 2007

    Streetscapes | White Street

    SOHO’S boom is history now, its narrow streets long since filled with fancy shops and crowds of tourists.

    If you want to experience the quality of the old SoHo these days, you have to venture south of Canal into TriBeCa, where blocks like White Street from Church Street to Broadway have that long-ago quiet.

    Start a walk on this block of White Street at Church. In the 1820s, the street was filled with little brick houses like the one at the northeast corner, No. 34, which in 1829 was occupied by Walter Heyer, a baker.

    Trade began arriving by the 1830s, and after the Civil War a building boom remade White, Walker and adjacent streets into a dry-goods center.

    For instance, 39 White Street, a Greek Revival house, was occupied in the 1840s by Seth Grosvenor, a merchant who died in 1857. In 1861, his estate added two floors, keeping the narrow three-abreast windows. More typical were entirely new structures, like the one his heirs built eight years later at 64-66 White, its cornice emblazoned with the Grosvenor name.

    An 1863 advertisement in The Brooklyn Daily Eagle by Stevens & Carples, a military goods supplier in the newly rebuilt Grosvenor house, was revealing of the Civil War-era White Street: “Operators wanted with their own machines — good operators can make from $7 to $10 per week.”

    Although SoHo is known for its cast iron, builders on White Street used masonry more often than not — like the marble front of No. 40, which is Italianate in style with an unusual frieze of three swags at the top, surmounted by the simple carved year, “1866.”

    The Italianate-style facade of No. 44 White, built in 1868, has lovely khaki-colored Nova Scotia stone, the kind used on the Dakota. It seems to have been cleaned recently and is now nearly luminous.

    Across the street, an unusual marble structure, at 43-45, is being advertised as “Luxury Loft Rentals.” In 1868, when the craze for mansard roofs was white-hot, an unidentified architect went all out with an imposing colonnaded facade, leading to a frieze of swags at the top of the fifth floor, itself topped by a three-part mansard roof with a pair of oculi.

    In 1872, a committee of the Board of Underwriters condemned the widespread use of these wood-framed roofs, specifically noting their concentration on White Street. The New York Times reported that there were at least 150 of these roofs downtown and quoted the Board of Underwriters as calling them “huge tinderboxes.”

    Across the street are the ambitious Wood’s Mercantile Buildings, at 46 and 48-50. The first five floors are strictly ho-hum, but they are set off by a broad marble cornice all across the top proclaiming, in raised letters, “18 — Wood’s Mercantile Buildings — 65.”


    Don Hogan Charles/The New York Times
    The Wood’s Mercantile Buildings at
    46 and 48-50 White are united
    by a marble cornice.

    Although these old lofts have a secondhand look now, the prominent label gives an idea of the importance — or at least the pretensions — of the building’s investors, Abraham and Samuel Wood.

    Peaceful as it is now, when operating at full tilt White Street was an unforgiving machine. In 1904, The Times reported on a Children’s Court hearing involving Louis Deimstein, who was 14 and worked for an unidentified firm in the Wood’s Mercantile Buildings.

    He did not know where his parents were and wanted only to be left alone so he could look after his 11-year-old brother, with whom he lived at the Newsboys’ Lodging House, a well-known charitable enterprise. “I earn $4 a week, and that is enough to keep my brother and myself,” he told the court.
    Nevertheless, a guardian was assigned to look after the boys “until their parents can be found and compelled to support them,” The Times reported.

    Little changed on the street until 1965, when the Civic Center Synagogue, at No. 47, was built for worshipers from local businesses still in the neighborhood. Designed by William Breger, with a giant, pillowy curve, its recessed facade cannot be seen from either end of the block, but it is astonishing when suddenly revealed.

    The cast-iron loft at No. 55, with a second exposure on Franklin Place, a tiny alley, is the most architecturally imposing work on the block. It was designed by John Kellum and built in 1861 as an investment by John and Samuel Condict, two saddlers. The high arcades and intricate detail were cast by Daniel Badger, although much of the present ornamentation is replacement work.


    Don Hogan Charles/The New York Times
    The arcaded 55 White was built
    in 1861 at Franklin Place

    As the industrial centers of Manhattan began to decline in the 1950s, residential tenants moved to White Street, along with some “downtown” type enterprises: Let There Be Neon, at 38; the Flea Theater, at 41; and the Manhattan Children’s Theater, at 52.

    Among the conversion projects now under way is the western portion of the Wood’s Mercantile complex. Yet despite these, White Street has not followed SoHo’s lead. It can be empty on weekends.

    Edward I. Mills, an architect who has worked in 48-50 White Street for 17 years, said that when he moved in, the residential invasion of the street’s upper floors was well under way, although most of the ground-floor spaces still held fabric warehouses.

    Mr. Mills said that because retail rents had not risen as much as residential rents, most of the ground-floor spaces on White were now occupied by residential tenants. He put the value of residential lofts in TriBeCa at $1,000 to $1,500 per square foot.

    Mr. Mills is working on a building renovation at 408 Broadway, near Walker Street, and he believes that SoHo retailers are poised to jump the Canal Street barrier. When that happens, he said, “everything south of Canal will start changing.”

    Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company

  9. #39

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    Update:

    Development came slow on the blocks between Church and Broadway, especially south of Chambers. Many of the old buildings remained in disrepair, while others throughout the neighborhood were renovated.

    24-26 Warren was typical.


    Scaffolding now covers the building.


    The building is being converted from commercial use to a one family dwelling. The street is not landmarked, so don't know if the entire facade is coming down.

    Further down the street at 8-10 Warren, the Trinity-Stewart buildings (1860) were restored, with a well designed addition added on the roof.


    New construction at 16 Warren, the Tribeca Town Homes.



    http://www.tribecatownhomes.com/

  10. #40

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    Tiffany's of Tribeca

    By Michael J. Burlingham
    POSTED NOVEMBER 2, 2007

    I moved to Duane Street in 1977, lured by the diamond-pattern, no-skid loading docks, the basement vaults lit by glass disks embedded in the sidewalk, the spacious cast-iron loft buildings and, most of all, the cheap rent.
    One hundred and forty years earlier, even before these industrial elements of old New York had become part of the local landscape, my great-great grandfather moved to the same neighborhood, opening a “fancy goods” shop at 259 Broadway at Warren Street. Lacking the capital to set up among the posh stores farther down Broadway, he, too, was drawn here by the area’s affordable rents.
    He was Charles Lewis Tiffany, and the shop he and his partner founded in this neighborhood in 1837 went on to become the premier jewelry and silver house in the world, its flagship at Fifth Avenue and 57th Street one of the city’s iconic attractions to generations of shoppers and curiosity seekers. Last month, Tiffany & Company returned to Lower Manhattan, to 37 Wall Street. This time to cater to a new, upscale breed of Downtown dweller.

    A Connecticut Yankee, born and bred, Charles Tiffany at 15 was running his father’s company store in Brooklyn, Conn., and facing a seemingly bright future as co-partner in Comfort Tiffany & Son, a water-powered textile mill that his father had established on the banks of the Quinebaug River.
    Instead, he and John Young, the son of a competing mill owner from the opposite bank of the Quinebaug, decided to open a shop in Manhattan, then a boomtown of over 200,000 inhabitants. Though the Broadway and Warren Street location was considered too far uptown, it was directly opposite City Hall. And City Hall Park was a popular promenade for residents.
    For their money, Tiffany & Young, as the first shop was called, got 15 feet of Broadway frontage in an “old fashioned double-dwelling” with two stores. A four-story, brick A-frame, it was rated “third class” for insurance purposes. Here on Sept. 18, 1837, Tiffany & Young opened its doors, selling Japanese fans, Chinese umbrellas, lacquered furniture, papier-mâché and terra-cotta wares, porcelain vases, walking canes, and stationery, among other offerings.
    For 16 years the Tiffany store remained within what is now Tribeca, charting steady growth while establishing its hallmarks in quality, service, and honesty in trade. In 1841, the partners took over the shop on the corner, which provided more frontage on Broadway and, for the first time, a show window on Warren Street. In 1847 they consolidated operations in a newer, larger building at 271 Broadway, on the southwest corner of Chambers Street, where they remained until 1853.

    In those days, high quality meant imported goods, and the partners devoted themselves to renewing their stock via overseas suppliers. The infusion of capital from a third partner, Charles’s cousin Jabez L. Ellis, made it possible for John Young to travel abroad each year on a buying trip, giving Tiffany, Young & Ellis a leg-up on the competition.
    The firm’s first offering in jewelry was a line of French paste called “Palais Royal,” which featured glass jewels in gold-plate settings. It was quite tasteful and relatively inexpensive, yet within a few years Tiffany, Young & Ellis abandoned costume jewelry for the real thing.
    The importance of the Tribeca years to Tiffany’s, in particular, and to American jewelry and silver, in general, rests on the firm’s turn to manufacturing and subsequent establishment of internationally competitive benchmarks. Jewelry making commenced with the move to Chambers Street, and silverware followed within three or four years.
    Tiffany married his partner’s sister Harriet in 1841, and of three children born in these years, two survived—Annie Olivia and Louis Comfort. Louis, who went on to achieve prominence as a painter, interior designer, and glassmaker, was born on February 18, 1848, four days before the event that did much to elevate Tiffany, Young & Ellis’s emporium to the front rank of diamond merchants—the outbreak of revolution in France. By coincidence, John Young had just landed in Paris on his annual buying trip and invested his entire capital on steeply discounted gems, purchased from an aristocracy fleeing the mob.
    Altogether, the Tiffany family lived at three Tribeca addresses, all within a single block and all shared by John B. Young and his wife. In 1846 they moved from 124 Chambers Street across the street to No. 125. Following the death of Charles Lewis Jr., the first-born child, the Tiffanys moved to a higher-grade residence at 57 Warren Street, a “first class” masonry structure with a frame porch and a yard in back, on the south side of Warren between Church Street and College Place (the former name of West Broadway south of Chambers Street, as it approached Columbia College).

    By mid-century the neighborhood around Tiffany’s was bustling. The Hudson River Railroad established a passenger station at Hudson Street between Chambers and Warren in 1851, cater-corner from the Fredrick Hotel– one of the few extant buildings from that era and still a hotel, the Cosmopolitan. West of West Broadway/College Place, between Reade and Vesey Streets, were various industrial concerns, including a “candy sugar” refinery, a coal yard, and a tobacco factory. To the east were banks, hotels, and churches.
    Fifteen years after establishing themselves on Chambers Street, in 1852, the Tiffanys headed uptown to East 10th Street near St. Marks-in-the-Bowerie, where they lived for 10 years. And the next year Tiffany bought out his partners and reorganized at 550 Broadway, between Prince and Spring Streets, under the name Tiffany & Company.
    The Tribeca years were over. It is not accurate, however, to say that the Tiffanys never looked back.
    During the mid-1870s, young Louis Comfort, then still exclusively a fine artist, returned to paint his boyhood haunts, which had fallen on hard times in the wake of the so called Uptown Movement. One of these views, depicting a group of tumbledown buildings, is said to have anticipated the work of the Ashcan School in its unfiltered view of urban slums. Now in the Brooklyn Museum, it is titled Duane Street. Since those days, of course, the fortunes of Duane Street and its environs have brightened considerably—to the point where it seems almost fitting that the House of Tiffany would decide to establish a beachhead near the founders’ original turf.
    EDITOR’S NOTE: This article, updated here, first appeared in the September, 1995 issue of The Tribeca Trib.

  11. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by ZippyTheChimp View Post
    Update:

    Development came slow on the blocks between Church and Broadway, especially south of Chambers. Many of the old buildings remained in disrepair, while others throughout the neighborhood were renovated.

    24-26 Warren was typical.


    Scaffolding now covers the building.














    Designed by David Turner Architect
    http://a810-bisweb.nyc.gov/bisweb/Jo...ssdocnumber=01

  12. #42
    Forum Veteran Tectonic's Avatar
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    Saw this lovely little building over the summer thoughts I'd share.
    Simple yet beautiful, 81 Hudson Street:

    Last edited by Tectonic; November 24th, 2009 at 07:32 AM. Reason: typo

  13. #43

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    There were plans to add a one story addition and convert the building into a single family residence by 1100 Architect. Perhaps the addition was canceled but the upper floors seem to have already been converted; judging by those matching curtains.

    http://a810-bisweb.nyc.gov/bisweb/Jo...allnumbhous=81


    Those few blocks in Tribeca are my favorite in the city. Even all the new stuff look good.

  14. #44
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    The applications for the 4th Floor enlargement shown at DOB are recent, but no images of the plan are seen at the architect's website:

    1100 architect

  15. #45
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    In late 1978 I got my first answering machine. That very night I was in Puffy's and spent the whole night using the pay phone to see if I got any calls. My answering machine message? "Hanging on the Telephone" by Blondie, of course.

    First thing that came to my mind when I saw the pic.

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