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Thread: "Andy Warhol" -- Ric Burns Documentary

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    Default "Andy Warhol" -- Ric Burns Documentary

    Opens at The FILM FORUM on Friday September 1, 2006 ...



    Ric Burns’s Epic Portrait
    Explores the Life and Times
    of the Ground-breaking Artist


    Billy Name/OvoWorks, Inc

    Ric Burns’s 4-hour, epic ANDY WARHOL: A DOCUMENTARY FILM, is a portrait of one of the 20th century’s most influential, controversial, and paradoxically mystifying artists. Warhol, born in 1928, died in 1987 at age 58.

    As a newcomer to New York in the 1950s, he worked in fashion and advertising, illustrating shoes for I. Miller. His earliest paintings, inspired by advertising, reproduced Campbell soup cans, Coca-Cola bottles, Superman comics and other popular iconography. With peers Roy Lichtenstein, James Rosenquist and Claes Oldenburg, Warhol pioneered the Pop Art Movement, conflating high and low culture. As a painter, filmmaker, author, world-class shopper and pop world personality, his enigmatic, irreverent style embraced junkies and socialites, waifs and sirens, hustlers and movie stars alike. Andy Warhol was a master image-maker.

    So it is fitting that Ric Burns should draw extensively on rare archival materials, many of them shot by Warhol himself, from the heyday of his fame in the ’60s and ‘70s ...


    Hulton Archive/Getty Images
    Andy Warhol lights Edie Sedgwick's cigarette
    on the set of one of his films.

    2006 • 4 Hours • Steeplechase Films

    Each show will have one 15-minute intermission

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    "Andy Warhol" to premiere on American Masters

    September 20th and 21st, 2006 9pm EST.

    Check your local listings for local air times.

    ricburns.com




    PBS - American_Masters

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    A Portrait of an Artist Both Loved and Hated


    Gretchen Berg
    Andy Warhol, seen here in 1966, is the subject of a new documentary by Ric Burns,
    to be shown tonight and tomorrow night on PBS.

    NY TIMES
    By ROBIN POGREBIN
    September 20, 2006

    It turns out that Andy Warhol, whose Campbell’s Soup cans famously captured his fascination with the American marketplace, did not inspire a reciprocal reception among corporate donors when the filmmaker Ric Burns came knocking.

    “It has been the hardest, hardest sell,” Mr. Burns said about raising money for “Andy Warhol: A Documentary Film,” which will be shown tonight and tomorrow night on the PBS program “American Masters.”

    “I did have to prove to people he was a great artist,” said Mr. Burns, who still needs to raise $225,000 to finish paying for the $3.6 million, four-hour film, which had a two-week run at Film Forum this month.

    Mr. Burns, who has had success with his biographical documentaries about the playwright Eugene O’Neill and the photographer Ansel Adams, said that Warhol, who died in 1987 at 58, remains a divisive figure because some people do not consider his riffs on celebrity and commerce to be art.

    “People hate Andy and they love him,” Mr. Burns said in a recent interview at his Upper West Side office. “It’s incredible the ambivalence he generates.”
    Donald Rosenfeld, who produced the film with Daniel Wolf, suggested that not everyone sees beyond the surface of Warhol’s persona. “It’s the American dream, but in the minds of corporations it could be the American nightmare,” Mr. Rosenfeld said. “He’s peculiar looking, not of this world. They thought he was a little too transgressive, a little too out there.”

    Mr. Wolf said: “The difficulty raising money was a confirmation of why we needed to make this film. He was branded this gay, weird, partygoing genius and not the great artist he should have been known as.”

    It was getting at the man — and excavating his origins — that excited Mr. Burns and drew him to an artist he had previously hardly noticed. The film traces Warhol back to his beginnings in Pittsburgh, where he was poor and physically inhibited and wanted to be Shirley Temple. “The minute you walk into the story of his life ...,” Mr. Burns began, adding, “I love him so deeply now.”


    Librado Romero/The New York Times
    The filmmaker Ric Burns at the Chelsea Hotel in Manhattan.
    His “Andy Warhol: A Documentary Film” is being shown on PBS this week.

    The film reveals details that people outside the art world may not know. The artist’s last name was originally Warhola; a typesetter at a magazine where he was illustrating advertisements omitted the “A,” and Warhol did not bother to correct it. He had his nose reconstructed and his skin sanded when he was in his 20’s. His mother moved in with him in 1952 and stayed with him for 20 years. Because he delivered his early commercial artwork in brown paper bags, his colleagues nicknamed him Raggedy Andy.

    Most people mistakenly assume Warhol was the aloof poseur he appeared to be, Mr. Burns said. “His posterity is obscured by that image of Andy in the black leather jacket and the wig and the sunglasses,” he said. “Did they really think he was born that way?”

    While Warhol is closely associated with what was essentially a disguise, Mr. Burns said that he wore it lightly. In fact, he wanted to let people in, the filmmaker said, he wanted to be liked and to belong. The film tries to explore that vulnerable, childlike side.

    “Andy wasn’t hiding anything,” Mr. Burns said. “He was a rule-breaking, paradigm-shifting artist who loved to play possum. He loved to pretend there was no meaning there.”

    The challenge in making the film was to create a piece of media about such a consummate creature of the media. Mr. Burns said he realized right away that he should not even attempt a stylized approach, or a Warhol-caliber cool. In fact, he said, he went in the opposite direction: “to do it in the most conventional way possible.”

    “I think it’s as conventional a film as I’ve done,” he said. “It’s the one that goes back to the beginning and goes through to the end.”

    Mr. Burns sought out people who could speak to the quality of Warhol’s art, as well as to his cult of personality, among them the art dealer Irving Blum, the museum curator Donna De Salvo, the Warhol biographer Wayne Koestenbaum and one of the artist’s brothers, John Warhola. “I didn’t want to interview anybody hip or because they were a famous hanger-on,” Mr. Burns said.

    As a result his research consisted of “diving into the archive and coming up before you drowned, and finding people who could speak to his seriousness as an artist,” Mr. Burns said. “That’s why it’s really a nerd film.”

    The Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh has an extensive archive of the artist’s professional and personal output, including time capsules he kept for 30 years holding fan mail, business correspondence, telephone messages, dinner invitations and other memorabilia.

    “He was like a one-man Collyer brothers,” Mr. Burns said.

    Warhol was also obsessively prolific, producing more in a year than some artists produce in a lifetime. “He was intentionally, deliberately competing with Picasso, and would ask, ‘How many paintings did Picasso produce in a day?’ ” Mr. Burns said.

    As he worked on the film, Mr. Burns said, he became a fan of Warhol’s art, particularly his shadow and oxidation paintings. “Every time I thought I was getting tired of Andy, I would go back and look at the art.”

    He also came to respect Warhol’s films as much as he did his paintings. A 21st-century viewer may find it difficult to appreciate the leisurely examinations of life’s minutiae that make up so much of Warhol’s film work: a haircut, a kiss, a man sleeping, eight hours of the Empire State Building.

    “Andy was all about watching something for a very long time and watching something change,” Mr. Burns said. “You’re going to watch a person the way a painter watches a person — deeply looking at what’s happening — and Andy’s movies are an open license to watch. You’re a great voyeur. You’re spying on them and they know it.”


    Hutton Archive/Getty Images
    Andy Warhol on the set of “Chelsea Girls” (1966), with Mario Montez.

    Mr. Burns’s documentary does not make it easy to love Warhol. He is inscrutable and — the few times he speaks — frustratingly reticent. One could come away partly repelled by Warhol’s inertia as so many of his friends and colleagues, among them the young actress Edie Sedgwick, disintegrate. This is a reaction expressed by several people in the film.

    “Andy put you in a complicated position; that was the price of his passivity, that he was a person who did not feel he could intervene,” Mr. Burns said. “He loved being close, but on some level he was not available for the basic things people needed.”

    While exploring Warhol’s underside, however, the documentary is also an unabashed celebration of the artist, frequently referring to him as a genius and among the most important art figures of the late 20th century. “When you come across an example of the real thing, you just want to get up on your chair and cheer,” Mr. Burns said.

    “Andy is a precious, rare commodity, one of the great artists thrown up by a commercial democracy,” he added. “You want people to celebrate — not uncritically; by all means hypercritically — one deep, complicated, unbelievably gifted man whose achievement we’re going to continue to measure for a long time.”

    Copyright 2006 The New York Times Company

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    Warhol's Candid Camera

    Drugs, Speedos, horrifying hair (we're looking at you, Dianne Brill)!
    Andy's famous friends are caught with their guards down in a new collection of his snapshots


    radaronline.com
    By Michael Musto
    September 21, 2006

    In 1968, a girl who looked like Lili Taylor shot Andy Warhol at close range in the lobby of his Factory. Miraculously, he survived, wig slightly askew. Almost 20 years later, his worst fear was more fully realized when he succumbed to tragically mundane complications of gallbladder surgery. But even that event could only be called death in the most literal, physical sense, what with his work and his overwhelming impact on pop culture—not to mention the legions of people who to this day pleadingly screech, "I knew Andy Warhol!"

    Now he's more alive than he's been in years, thanks to Ric Burns's four-hour Andy Warhol: A Documentary Film airing on PBS ("Wow," the artist would have deadpanned), and Warhol's World (Hauser & Wirth/Steidl), a tubby little book featuring snapshots of his countless acquaintances, all taken by the alleged social-phobe himself. I'm in there, in various states of overdress and undress—the best proof I've seen of my own existence. (The only previous evidence was my brief appearances on pages 753 and 792 of the Warhol Diaries.) And what grand (Guignol) company to be in! When Andy lifted his camera and gently clicked, face set in a bemused smile, he nabbed bonafide candids—Stallone in a thong, Spielberg relaxing, Lagerfeld thinking. Using his uncanny power over people, the unkillable Warhol landed shots both purposely banal and wildly trenchant, and all are worth more than 15 minutes.

    Click here to view the Eyewitness Gallery (Great fotos there)

    © Copyright 2006, Radar Magazine


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    WARHOL'S THE EXPLODING PLASTIC INEVITABLE


    The Dom had been a Polish dance hall called Stanley’s the Dom (Polsky Dom Narodny - the word “Dom” being Polish for home). The two people who had rented it from the owners did “sculpture with light” but were not ready to use the space until May. So Andy rented it during April to present the Plastic Inevitable. Entry was $6 and it was a success, making $18,000 in the first week.
    Sterling Morrison: "But our actual salary from Paul Morrissey, who handled the business side for Andy, was five dollars a day, for cheese or beer at the Blarney Stone. He had a ledger that listed everything, including drug purchases - $5 for heroin. When the accountant saw it, he said 'What the hell is this?':"
    According to Gerard Malanga and Victor Bockris, all the people contributing to the show were paid the same amount - Lou Reed got the same for playing as Gerard did for dancing or Danny Williams for doing the lights: "On an average night at the Dom they would be paid a hundred dollars apiece".

    During the first week that the Dom was open, it took in $18,000.00.



    © 1966-2005 Ronald Nameth, All rights Reserved
    Gerard Malanga dancing at Warhol's Expoding Plastic Inevitable,
    filmed by Ronald Nameth

    "Andy Warhol's hellish sensorium, the Exploding Plastic Inevitable, was, while it lasted, the most unique and effective discotheque environment prior to the Fillmore/Electric Circus era, and it is safe to say that the EPI has never been equaled. Similarly, Ronald Nameth's cinematic homage to the EPI stands as a paragon of excellence in the kinetic rock-show genre. Nameth, a colleague of John Cage in several mixed-media environments at the University of Illinois, managed to transform his film into something far more than a mere record of an event. Like Warhol's show, Nameth's EPI is an experience, not an idea.

    In fact, the ethos of the entire pop life-style seems to be synthesized in Nameth's dazzling kinaesthetic masterpiece? It's as though the film itself has exploded and reassembled in a jumble of shards and prisms. Gerard Malanga and Ingrid Superstar dance frenetically to the music of the Velvet Underground, while their ghost images writhe in Warhol's Vinyl projected on a screen behind. There's a spectacular sense of frantic uncontrollable energy, communicated almost entirely by Nameth's exquisite manipulation of the medium.

    Watching the film is like dancing in a strobe room: time stops, motion retards, the body seems separate from the mind. Flak bursts of fiery color explode with slow fury. Staccato strobe guns stitch galaxies of silverfish over slow-motion, stop-motion close-ups of the dancers' dazed ecstatic faces. Nameth does with cinema what the Beatles do with music: his film is dense, compact, yet somehow fluid and light. It is extremely heavy, extremely fast, yet airy and poetic, a mosaic, a tapestry, a mandala that sucks you into its whirling maelstrom.

    The final shots of Gerard Melanga tossing his head in slow motion and freezing in several positions create a ghostlike atmosphere, a timeless and ethereal mood that lingers and haunts long after the images fade. Using essentially graphic materials, Nameth rises above a mere graphic exercise: he makes kinetic empathy a new kind of poetry." - Gene Youngblood, Expanded Cinema, 1970.

    With: Nico & The Velvet Underground. Show Coordinator: Paul Morrissey. Lights: Dan Williams. The Velvet Underground: Vocals and Organ: John Cale.* Rhythm Guitar: Sterling Morrison. Bass Guitar: Mo Tucker. Drums: Angus McLeiss. Nico sings: "I'll be Your Mirror." "It Was a Pleasure Then."* Dancers: Gerard Malanga, Ingrid Superstar. With: Susan Pile, Edward Walsh.

    * The on-screen credits that appear above refer to a 21-minute version of this film. For the 12-minute version, The Velvet Underground vocals are by Lou Reed and the song "It Was a Pleasure Then" is not included.


    © Steve Shapiro
    Andy Warhols Exploding Plastic Inevitable:
    Multi-Screen-Environment mit den Velvet Underground; New York 1967

    While performing at the Dom, Lou Reed's Gretch guitar and record collection was stolen.


    Danny Williams, who did the lights/sound for The Exploding Plastic Inevitable, would later mysteriously disappear in 1967 "off the coast of Cape Cod leaving his clothes by the side of his car." Although his body was never found, it is presumed to be a suicide.
    Sterling Morrison: "It was at this time that The Velvets started wearing dark glasses on stage, not through trying to be cool but because the light-show could be blinding at times."
    The final performance of The Exploding Plastic Inevitable at the Dom took place on April 30, 1966.

    MAY 3 - 18, 1966: THE VELVETS PLAY THE TRIP.



    Charlie Rothschild booked Warhol and the EXPLODING PLASTIC INEVITABLE (consisting of fourteen Factory regulars) to play at the Trip in Los Angeles. The Mothers of Invention featuring Frank Zappa opened for them and were cheered by the L.A. crowd. The Velvet Underground were greeted with boos. (UT65)
    Lou Reed on Frank Zappa: "He's probably the single most untalented person I've heard in my life. He's a two-bit pretentious academic, and he can't play rock'n'roll, because he's a loser. And that's why he dresses up funny. He's not happy with himself and I think he's right."(UT65)
    Amongst the celebrities attending the opening night were JOHN PHILLIPS of the MAMAS AND THE PAPAS, RYAN O'NEAL, JIM MORRISON (who was a film student at UCLA) and CHER who commented that the Velvet's music would replace nothing, except perhaps suicide. (LR133) The reviews were terrible and on the third night the sheriff’s office shut the club down for disturbing the peace. They stayed in LA as Union rules stated that in order to be paid, they had to remain in Los Angeles, even if they didn't perform.

    Warhol and most of his entourage stayed in the Castle in Los Angeles - "a large imitation-medieval stone structure ... where many rock stars put up their entourages at $500 a week." (LD250) Bob Dylan had just stayed there with Edie Sedgwick. Photographer Nat Finkelstein and Velvet road manager Faison both stayed at the Tropicana instead of the Castle. Sterling Morrison joined them there after a week and a half in the Castle.

    While in L.A. The Velvet Underground met Steve Sesnick who would become their manager in 1967. According to Sesnick, it was himself who originally came up with the concept for the Exploding Plastic Inevitable. He also said that it was himself who arranged for The Velvets to perform at the Fillmore on May 26 and 27. However, this contradicted Andy Warhol who, in Popism, said that Bill Graham kept calling Paul Morrissey to set up the date.

    MAY 26, 1966: THE EPI PLAYS SAN FRANCISCO



    The EPI arrived in San Francisco to play for two nights at Bill Graham's Fillmore Ball Room with the MOTHERS OF INVENTION and the early JEFFERSON AIRPLANE. The Warhol crowd hated the hippie culture of San Francisco. Bill Graham pulled the plug on the Velvets the second night when the band left the stage after leaning their instruments against the amplifiers creating a "barrage of sonic feedback".
    Lou Reed: "We had vast objections to the whole San Francisco scene. It's just tedious, a lie and untalented. They can't play and they certainly can't write ... You know, people like Jefferson Airplane, Grateful Dead are just the most untalented bores that ever came up. Just look at them physically, I mean, can you take Grace Slick seriously? It's a joke! It's a joke! The kids are being hyped."
    While in San Francisco, the poet/playwright MICHAEL MCCLURE refused to sign a release for a film that Andy Warhol had made of McClure's controversial play 'The Beard'. (Warhol's film of the play starred Gerard Malanga and Mary Woronov).

    After the second night in San Francisco Gerard Malanga was arrested in an all night cafeteria in North Beach for carrying an offensive weapon (his whip) and spent the night in jail. He had gone to the diner with Lou Reed and Nancy Worthington Fish, a friend of Warhol who was performing with The Committee.

    While In San Francisco, Lou Reed shot up some bad speed causing his joints to seize up and he was incorrectly diagnosed as having a terminal case of lupus.

    Upon their return to New York, Lou Reed checked into Beth Israel hospital with a serious case of hepatitis and had a six week course of treatment. Nico left for Ibiza while the rest of the Velvets started rehearsing for an upcoming June booking in Chicago - a one week stint at Poor Richard's. Angus MacLise returned as drummer and Maureen Tucker switched to playing bass.
    Gerard Malanga: "Just before the Chicago gig, Andy, Angus MacLise and I went to visit Lou in the hospital, because Angus was going to play with the group in Chicago. I distinctly remember Lou telling Angus, 'Just remember you're only coming back for two weeks. You're on a temporary basis. I don't want you to get any idea that you're coming back into the group again."
    SEPT. 3 - 4, 1966: THE EPI GOES TO PROVINCETOWN


    The Exploding Plastic Inevitable played the Chrysler Art Museum in Provincetown, Massachusetts. Steve Sesnick, who would later become the manager of The Velvet Underground after they were dropped by Warhol in 1967, arranged the dates. In addition to The Velvet Underground (consisting of Maureen Tucker, John Cale, Lou Reed and Sterling Morrison) and EPI regulars Gerard Malanga, Ronnie Cutrone, Mary Woronov, road manager Faison, Warhol assistant Paul Morrissey and Andy Warhol, the group also now included Susan Bottomly (aka International Velvet), her boyfriend, fashion illustrator David Croland - and Eric Emerson who stayed with Nico in Provincetown.

    The police interrupted one of the performances and untied Eric Emerson from a post (which he was strapped to in preparation for being whipped by Mary Woronov) in order to retrieve some belts and whips that were stolen from a leather store in Provincetown.

    There was also a problem with the landlord of the house that Warhol's entourage had rented in Provincetown. The toilets in the house had stopped up and Warhol's stars were throwing shit out the window.

    And Eric Emerson stole a work of Art from the town's museum "just to see if he could get away with it. Paul Morrissey had to act as a liaison between Eric and the Museum, restoring the painting in order to avoid having charges pressed."

    Gerard Malanga expressed his displeasure with direction that the EPI show was taking in a pseudo-letter to Warhol that he wrote in his diary, but never sent.

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    Yet another building that I am sad we lost in the last couple of years is the Warhol Factory at 33nd and Madison - The T shaped site going to 32nd st..

    It was an old Con Ed building and I had the privilidge to tour it a couple of years ago. It was amazing inside (and the facade on 3 streets was great too).

    It was mostly empty and kept thinking that it would make a great Andy Warhol Museum (like they have in Pittsburgh).

    What happened? It sold to developers who promptly tour the building down - I am sure to stop any preservationists. They announced "Sundari Lofts" to be built.

    What happened next? They cancelled the project. and put the land back up for sale.

    In the future, our era will be judged for things we lost. I am pro development. But this was such a waste.

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    The Selling of St. Andy


    Peter Scanlan for The New York Times

    nytimes.com
    By RUTH LA FERLA
    October 26, 2006

    IN 1968 Andy Warhol placed an advertisement in The Village Voice: “I’ll endorse with my name any of the following: clothing, AC-DC, cigarettes, small tapes, sound equipment, ROCK ’N’ ROLL RECORDS, anything, film and film equipment, Food, Helium, Whips, MONEY!! love and kisses ANDY WARHOL. EL 5-9941.”

    Warhol was not being coy. He was firming up his position as a sociocultural commercial institution, an artist who churned out silk-screen prints with assembly-line efficiency, a magazine publisher, a television personality, a filmmaker, social gadabout and self-styled prophet, who saw the erosion of the line between art and commerce. He was intent on turning his name and mystique into a brand.

    “Being good in business,” he wrote in “The Philosophy of Andy Warhol (From A to B and Back Again),” newly republished by Harcourt, is “the most fascinating kind of art.”

    But even the seer in Warhol could not have envisioned the degree to which he has become commercialized. In time for the holiday season, nearly 20 years after his death in February 1987, the marketing of Andy Warhol is in full flood. “We’re seeing Warhol energy peeking out from everywhere,” said Robert Lee Morris, the jewelry designer and a former member of the artist’s circle, who has brought out a line of jewelry with Warhol motifs like the dollar sign and the Brillo logo. “We are witnessing all the ways that his reach has extended into the moment.”


    Tony Cenicola/The New York Times
    A Warhol pendant by
    Robert Lee Morris.

    Warhol’s mercantile essence, both high and low, is distilled in carpets and coffee mugs, calendars and greeting cards, T-shirts, tote bags and a style of Levi’s wax-coated jeans called Warhol Factory X, for $185. To judge by all the merchandise, Warhol is being positioned as the next Hello Kitty. There will even be a Warhol Pez dispenser. Imagine his jaw popping open to disgorge a mint.

    Levi’s Warhol jeans.

    It is “the fulfillment of Andy’s fantasy about business art” said Jeffrey Deitch, the art dealer and former Warhol associate. “I think he would have been amazed to see what has developed.”

    Warhol-inspired wares are being sold in stores like Macy’s and Nordstrom and in youth-oriented chains like Urban Outfitters and high-end fashion boutiques like Fred Segal in Los Angeles. This month Barneys New York will roll out a holiday marketing campaign around the artist, including shopping bags with Warhol-like doodles, four store windows and a limited edition of Campbell’s soup cans.

    “It’s a good moment for Andy Warhol,” said Charlotte Abbott, a senior editor at Publishers Weekly, noting the many recent Warhol books. “Culturally, he is still on top,” she said. “There is more of a rebellious New Yorky underground feeling coming back into the zeitgeist — or maybe it’s just a nostalgia for all that.”


    Andrea Mohin/The New York Times
    Simon Doonan, the creative director at Barneys with a Warhol window display.

    Warholiana is being pitched ever younger. People in their late teens and early 20’s are apt to identify not just with the cool, affectless Warhol persona, said Irma Zandl, a youth trend forecaster, but also with Warhol the entrepreneurial go-getter.

    Among the new books are “Edie Factory Girl” (VH1 Press), a photo chronicle of the artist’s relationship with his socialite muse Edie Sedgwick, and “The Day the Factory Died” (Empire), pictures from Warhol’s memorial service at St. Patrick’s Cathedral by Christophe von Hohenberg, with text on the Warhol circle by Charlie Scheips. There is also “Andy Warhol ‘Giant’ Size” (Phaidon), a coffee-table tribute to the artist, packed scrapbook style with 2,000 images and documents.

    Why Warhol, and why now? Those thrusting him back to the cultural and commercial forefront — if he ever left it — offer several explanations. “There is a longing for that era in Manhattan of self-invention and discovery, of cultural questioning,” said Simon Doonan, the creative director of Barneys, who is orchestrating the store’s many-pronged Warhol holiday marketing.

    He described the present moment as one of “trompe l’oeil grooviness, all ironed blond hair and girls wearing Blahniks.”

    “But Andy wasn’t pseudohip,” Mr. Doonan said. “He is the primordial mulch from which all cool in Manhattan sprang.”

    In a celebrity-fixated society, which often equates style with substance, Warhol’s canny exploitation of fame and image are particularly resonant. “He understood celebrity and branding,” said Tobias Meyer, the worldwide head of contemporary art at Sotheby’s. “He came from a commercial world and made it part of his art. That is why he is so relevant.”

    Warhol is also the subject of “Andy Warhol: A Documentary Film” by Ric Burns, an exploration of the artist’s life broadcast on PBS last month. He is a looming presence in “Factory Girl,” the much anticipated Miramax film starring Sienna Miller as Ms. Sedgwick, which is expected in theaters next spring.

    It is hardly surprising that Warhol, a graphic artist who first drew notice for his wispy illustrations of rose-color court shoes and who worked as a window dresser for Bonwit Teller in Manhattan, is the inspiration as well for a proliferation of fashions and accessory lines. Besides the Levi’s jeans, which are printed or embroidered with famous Warhol art images, they include shoes by Royal Elastic and a collection of plastic Day-Glo colored watches by Seiko.

    The candy-color Warhol aesthetic has spawned a makeup collection by MAC. Introduced last August, it is inspired by Ms. Sedgwick, whose gamine look was defined by spiky lashes, white lids, pink lips and translucent skin.


    A MAC makeup line is inspired
    by Edie Sedgwick.

    The artist’s hold on the popular imagination also stems partly from his carefully cultivated bad boy pose. Gaunt and chalky, he disdained the wholesomely conventional, not troubling to hide his pursuit of young men, persistent club-crawling or pill-popping. “He was subversive, the real thing,” Mr. Doonan said, adding, “Subversive now is to be a hedge fund manager who owns a Warhol.”

    Mr. Doonan professes a special affinity with the artist, whom he calls “the patron saint of retail,” a name that finds its way into the Barneys holiday catalog, “Happy Andy Warholidays.” The store’s Warhol-theme holiday marketing includes shopping bags covered in Warhol-like doodles of shoes, doves and tree ornaments.

    “This is a huge deal for us,” Mr. Doonan said, pointing to a series of Warhol windows being mocked up last week at a studio in Midtown. They depicted periods in the artist’s life: his fashion illustrator years, the Factory period with Ms. Sedgwick, Warhol as social butterfly in the 1970’s and 80’s — “from Liza to Basquiat,” as Mr. Doonan put it, “and from Studio 54 to Area.”

    Warhol’s compulsive collecting is represented by an enormous shelving unit in the shape of his head. “It will be packed with the detritus of his extreme hunting and gathering,” Mr. Doonan said. “Everything from button-filled jars to soup cans.”

    Barneys wares, licensed by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, include a denim trucker jacket with a Warhol portrait on the back ($275), a hooded sweatshirt with a banana print ($176) and limited edition Campbell’s soup cans with reproductions of Warhol labels.

    Joel Wachs, the president of the foundation, said revenues from some 40 licensees have quadrupled in the last five years, generating about $2.25 million in royalties in the current fiscal year. Proceeds go to the Warhol endowment, which supports the arts.

    Retail sales of licensed merchandise in the United states are between $40 million and $50 million, said Michael Stone, the chief executive of the Beanstalk Group, the licensing agency for the Warhol Foundation.

    Tricked out in a silver wig and signature red-rim glasses, Warhol turned himself into a recognizable product, paving the way for other artist brands. Art world figures like Mr. Deitch point to the success of Damien Hirst, whose London restaurant Pharmacy reproduced his well-known installation of the same name, and on a populist level to Thomas Kinkade, whose charm bracelets, candles, gaudy greeting cards and calendars are sought as collectibles.

    But Warhol’s chameleon personality may well make him the ideal candidate for branding. “Licensing is all about creating a perception and leveraging that,” said Martin Brochstein, who writes The Licensing Letter, a trade publication.

    In Warhol’s case, there is so much to chose from. “Some people see a silver-haired guy, others the Campbell’s soup can or Andy the bon vivant,” Mr. Brochstein said. “If you play into enough of those facets, then there is a market.”

    Warhol also speaks to a new generation of artists, who invoke his spirit, marketing raincoats and sneakers as artworks. Those in Mr. Deitch’s stable, for instance, sell skateboards, wallpaper and figurines, most tagged at under $100.

    Last June, Mr. Stone of the Beanstalk Group attended a licensing trade show in New York. Some 300 artists were represented, he recalled. “I guess there are a lot of people looking for that pot at the end of the rainbow.”

    Copyright 2006 The New York Times Company

  8. #8

    Default

    I recently found what appears to be an original screen print poster from this event. Printed on a heavy weight paper in metallic silver, purple & green inks, the design is identical to the Chrysler Museum event poster. I'd like to find out the value of this print & what may be an appropriate venue to list it should I decide to sell it. Thanks for any advice, Lori


    The Dom had been a Polish dance hall called Stanley’s the Dom (Polsky Dom Narodny - the word “Dom” being Polish for home). The two people who had rented it from the owners did “sculpture with light” but were not ready to use the space until May. So Andy rented it during April to present the Plastic Inevitable. Entry was $6 and it was a success, making $18,000 in the first week.
    Sterling Morrison: "But our actual salary from Paul Morrissey, who handled the business side for Andy, was five dollars a day, for cheese or beer at the Blarney Stone. He had a ledger that listed everything, including drug purchases - $5 for heroin. When the accountant saw it, he said 'What the hell is this?':"
    According to Gerard Malanga and Victor Bockris, all the people contributing to the show were paid the same amount - Lou Reed got the same for playing as Gerard did for dancing or Danny Williams for doing the lights: "On an average night at the Dom they would be paid a hundred dollars apiece".

    During the first week that the Dom was open, it took in $18,000.00.



    © 1966-2005 Ronald Nameth, All rights Reserved
    Gerard Malanga dancing at Warhol's Expoding Plastic Inevitable,
    filmed by Ronald Nameth

    "Andy Warhol's hellish sensorium, the Exploding Plastic Inevitable, was, while it lasted, the most unique and effective discotheque environment prior to the Fillmore/Electric Circus era, and it is safe to say that the EPI has never been equaled. Similarly, Ronald Nameth's cinematic homage to the EPI stands as a paragon of excellence in the kinetic rock-show genre. Nameth, a colleague of John Cage in several mixed-media environments at the University of Illinois, managed to transform his film into something far more than a mere record of an event. Like Warhol's show, Nameth's EPI is an experience, not an idea.

    In fact, the ethos of the entire pop life-style seems to be synthesized in Nameth's dazzling kinaesthetic masterpiece? It's as though the film itself has exploded and reassembled in a jumble of shards and prisms. Gerard Malanga and Ingrid Superstar dance frenetically to the music of the Velvet Underground, while their ghost images writhe in Warhol's Vinyl projected on a screen behind. There's a spectacular sense of frantic uncontrollable energy, communicated almost entirely by Nameth's exquisite manipulation of the medium.

    Watching the film is like dancing in a strobe room: time stops, motion retards, the body seems separate from the mind. Flak bursts of fiery color explode with slow fury. Staccato strobe guns stitch galaxies of silverfish over slow-motion, stop-motion close-ups of the dancers' dazed ecstatic faces. Nameth does with cinema what the Beatles do with music: his film is dense, compact, yet somehow fluid and light. It is extremely heavy, extremely fast, yet airy and poetic, a mosaic, a tapestry, a mandala that sucks you into its whirling maelstrom.

    The final shots of Gerard Melanga tossing his head in slow motion and freezing in several positions create a ghostlike atmosphere, a timeless and ethereal mood that lingers and haunts long after the images fade. Using essentially graphic materials, Nameth rises above a mere graphic exercise: he makes kinetic empathy a new kind of poetry." - Gene Youngblood, Expanded Cinema, 1970.

    With: Nico & The Velvet Underground. Show Coordinator: Paul Morrissey. Lights: Dan Williams. The Velvet Underground: Vocals and Organ: John Cale.* Rhythm Guitar: Sterling Morrison. Bass Guitar: Mo Tucker. Drums: Angus McLeiss. Nico sings: "I'll be Your Mirror." "It Was a Pleasure Then."* Dancers: Gerard Malanga, Ingrid Superstar. With: Susan Pile, Edward Walsh.

    * The on-screen credits that appear above refer to a 21-minute version of this film. For the 12-minute version, The Velvet Underground vocals are by Lou Reed and the song "It Was a Pleasure Then" is not included.


    © Steve Shapiro
    Andy Warhols Exploding Plastic Inevitable:
    Multi-Screen-Environment mit den Velvet Underground; New York 1967

    While performing at the Dom, Lou Reed's Gretch guitar and record collection was stolen.


    Danny Williams, who did the lights/sound for The Exploding Plastic Inevitable, would later mysteriously disappear in 1967 "off the coast of Cape Cod leaving his clothes by the side of his car." Although his body was never found, it is presumed to be a suicide.
    Sterling Morrison: "It was at this time that The Velvets started wearing dark glasses on stage, not through trying to be cool but because the light-show could be blinding at times."
    The final performance of The Exploding Plastic Inevitable at the Dom took place on April 30, 1966.

    MAY 3 - 18, 1966: THE VELVETS PLAY THE TRIP.



    Charlie Rothschild booked Warhol and the EXPLODING PLASTIC INEVITABLE (consisting of fourteen Factory regulars) to play at the Trip in Los Angeles. The Mothers of Invention featuring Frank Zappa opened for them and were cheered by the L.A. crowd. The Velvet Underground were greeted with boos. (UT65)
    Lou Reed on Frank Zappa: "He's probably the single most untalented person I've heard in my life. He's a two-bit pretentious academic, and he can't play rock'n'roll, because he's a loser. And that's why he dresses up funny. He's not happy with himself and I think he's right."(UT65)
    Amongst the celebrities attending the opening night were JOHN PHILLIPS of the MAMAS AND THE PAPAS, RYAN O'NEAL, JIM MORRISON (who was a film student at UCLA) and CHER who commented that the Velvet's music would replace nothing, except perhaps suicide. (LR133) The reviews were terrible and on the third night the sheriff’s office shut the club down for disturbing the peace. They stayed in LA as Union rules stated that in order to be paid, they had to remain in Los Angeles, even if they didn't perform.

    Warhol and most of his entourage stayed in the Castle in Los Angeles - "a large imitation-medieval stone structure ... where many rock stars put up their entourages at $500 a week." (LD250) Bob Dylan had just stayed there with Edie Sedgwick. Photographer Nat Finkelstein and Velvet road manager Faison both stayed at the Tropicana instead of the Castle. Sterling Morrison joined them there after a week and a half in the Castle.

    While in L.A. The Velvet Underground met Steve Sesnick who would become their manager in 1967. According to Sesnick, it was himself who originally came up with the concept for the Exploding Plastic Inevitable. He also said that it was himself who arranged for The Velvets to perform at the Fillmore on May 26 and 27. However, this contradicted Andy Warhol who, in Popism, said that Bill Graham kept calling Paul Morrissey to set up the date.

    MAY 26, 1966: THE EPI PLAYS SAN FRANCISCO



    The EPI arrived in San Francisco to play for two nights at Bill Graham's Fillmore Ball Room with the MOTHERS OF INVENTION and the early JEFFERSON AIRPLANE. The Warhol crowd hated the hippie culture of San Francisco. Bill Graham pulled the plug on the Velvets the second night when the band left the stage after leaning their instruments against the amplifiers creating a "barrage of sonic feedback".
    Lou Reed: "We had vast objections to the whole San Francisco scene. It's just tedious, a lie and untalented. They can't play and they certainly can't write ... You know, people like Jefferson Airplane, Grateful Dead are just the most untalented bores that ever came up. Just look at them physically, I mean, can you take Grace Slick seriously? It's a joke! It's a joke! The kids are being hyped."
    While in San Francisco, the poet/playwright MICHAEL MCCLURE refused to sign a release for a film that Andy Warhol had made of McClure's controversial play 'The Beard'. (Warhol's film of the play starred Gerard Malanga and Mary Woronov).

    After the second night in San Francisco Gerard Malanga was arrested in an all night cafeteria in North Beach for carrying an offensive weapon (his whip) and spent the night in jail. He had gone to the diner with Lou Reed and Nancy Worthington Fish, a friend of Warhol who was performing with The Committee.

    While In San Francisco, Lou Reed shot up some bad speed causing his joints to seize up and he was incorrectly diagnosed as having a terminal case of lupus.

    Upon their return to New York, Lou Reed checked into Beth Israel hospital with a serious case of hepatitis and had a six week course of treatment. Nico left for Ibiza while the rest of the Velvets started rehearsing for an upcoming June booking in Chicago - a one week stint at Poor Richard's. Angus MacLise returned as drummer and Maureen Tucker switched to playing bass.
    Gerard Malanga: "Just before the Chicago gig, Andy, Angus MacLise and I went to visit Lou in the hospital, because Angus was going to play with the group in Chicago. I distinctly remember Lou telling Angus, 'Just remember you're only coming back for two weeks. You're on a temporary basis. I don't want you to get any idea that you're coming back into the group again."
    SEPT. 3 - 4, 1966: THE EPI GOES TO PROVINCETOWN


    The Exploding Plastic Inevitable played the Chrysler Art Museum in Provincetown, Massachusetts. Steve Sesnick, who would later become the manager of The Velvet Underground after they were dropped by Warhol in 1967, arranged the dates. In addition to The Velvet Underground (consisting of Maureen Tucker, John Cale, Lou Reed and Sterling Morrison) and EPI regulars Gerard Malanga, Ronnie Cutrone, Mary Woronov, road manager Faison, Warhol assistant Paul Morrissey and Andy Warhol, the group also now included Susan Bottomly (aka International Velvet), her boyfriend, fashion illustrator David Croland - and Eric Emerson who stayed with Nico in Provincetown.

    The police interrupted one of the performances and untied Eric Emerson from a post (which he was strapped to in preparation for being whipped by Mary Woronov) in order to retrieve some belts and whips that were stolen from a leather store in Provincetown.

    There was also a problem with the landlord of the house that Warhol's entourage had rented in Provincetown. The toilets in the house had stopped up and Warhol's stars were throwing shit out the window.

    And Eric Emerson stole a work of Art from the town's museum "just to see if he could get away with it. Paul Morrissey had to act as a liaison between Eric and the Museum, restoring the painting in order to avoid having charges pressed."

    Gerard Malanga expressed his displeasure with direction that the EPI show was taking in a pseudo-letter to Warhol that he wrote in his diary, but never sent.
    [/QUOTE]

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