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Thread: Proposed: World Trade Center Performing Arts Center - by Frank Gehry

  1. #196
    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
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    It won't be big enough for that.

  2. #197
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Default Sh!t Show at Ground Zero

    Gehry is left in the dark ...

    Reached by phone, Mr. Gehry said he had not been in touch with the arts center for some time. “Radio silence,” he said ...

    [Maggie Boepple, the Center's president] suggested that while she is a Gehry fan, the choice of architect could change. “He’s excellent at models,” she said. “We love his models ... So many mistakes are made when genius architects design a building and that comes before the workhorse of the building,” she added. “It’s not a comment on Gehry as an architect. It’s a different skill set.”

    And long-time WTC artistic "partner" the Joyce Theater has apparently been given the cold shoulder.

    What's outlined here is not an auspicious "new" beginning ...


    London Director to Draft Arts Vision for Ground Zero

    NY TIMES
    2/12/2014

    One concept for an arts center, with theaters on the second floor. Charcoalblue

    Executives developing a performing arts center at ground zero have hired a temporary artistic director from the Young Vic theater in London, one of a series of steps to be announced Thursday to advance a project that has long faced political and logistical hurdles.

    The new director, David Lan, who will continue as artistic director at the Young Vic, is part of a team recently brought in by the center as it refines its plans, which now include developing its own productions and revising the design for the building, by the architect Frank Gehry. Officials said that it had been a mistake to design the theater before the programming was determined and that they were essentially starting over.

    Officials are also still grappling with what is perhaps the most critical issue for the project — how to raise the construction money, several hundred million dollars, by most estimates — although they said they were optimistic about the prospects.

    “Realistically, we couldn’t start raising money until the programming was set,” said Julie Menin, a member of the institution’s board. “I believe very strongly we will be able to go out and raise funds for this in the private sector.”

    Maggie Boepple, the center’s president, and its seven-member board are now proposing to originate works of theater, music and dance in three small flexible theaters. These would replace a 1,000-seat house most recently envisaged for the Joyce Theater, a dance organization. The Joyce was chosen a decade ago as an anchor tenant through a public process and still hopes to have a programming role.

    Mr. Lan, who is expected to serve at least until September, traveling regularly to New York, was recruited in 2000 as artistic director for the Young Vic, which opened in 1970 as an offshoot of the Old Vic and is described by officials of the new arts center as a template for what they hope to accomplish. The Young Vic has become a hub of activity for young and diverse talent, offers low ticket prices and has a popular bar and restaurant, the Cut.

    “I see the theater in London as a dry run — what we can do on a much more ambitious scale in New York,” he said.

    While the center’s three theaters have shrunk under the latest iteration of the plan — to 550, 250 and 150 seats — the artistic aspirations seem lofty. Mr. Lan talked of a “world center for the performing arts” that would feature artists from all over the globe, drawing international tourists for culture and New York residents for coffee. “It will be home for the greatest artists of the age,” he said, “the first performance space for the 21st century.”

    The center has also hired two full-time staff members. Its new associate artistic director is Lucy Sexton, who has served since 2009 as the director of the New York Dance and Performance Awards, or the Bessies. David Langford is the new general manager and chief operating officer, having served as the chief financial officer for the National Sept. 11 Memorial and Museum.

    For the theaters’ design, the center is working with Andy Hayles, the managing partner of Charcoalblue, a British consultancy that has advised the National Theater in London and the Royal Shakespeare Company as well as clients like St. Ann’s Warehouse in Brooklyn and the Steppenwolf Theater Company in Chicago.

    Arts center officials said it was too early to say what construction might cost; original estimates put the price tag at $300 million to $700 million. Reached by phone, Mr. Gehry said he had not been in touch with the arts center for some time. “Radio silence,” he said. “I don’t know what their priorities are. They haven’t talked to me, so I don’t know.”

    Ms. Boepple said the center does not need a full-time artistic director for now because it is not expected to open until 2018 or 2019. Its site is occupied by a temporary PATH station pending completion of a new transportation hub in Lower Manhattan.

    The plans for the performing arts center were initially overseen by a foundation created in 2004 by the city and New York State to raise money for both the ground zero memorial and a cultural component, but the operations are now separate. A preliminary arts center board was named in 2011 as a prerequisite for tapping into $100 million in federal funds that the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation, which oversees the former World Trade Center site, had set aside for the center. Each of its members initially agreed to donate or raise $5 million.

    The fund-raising challenge appears daunting, particularly in light of potential competition from other projects, like a planned Culture Shed on the Far West Side of Manhattan that will feature visual and performing arts.

    The city’s artistic landscape has shifted since the performing arts center was introduced as part of the ground zero master plan. New York City Opera has been disbanded, making the David H. Koch Theater at Lincoln Center available for more dance performances; Culture Shed is scheduled to open in 2017. The Park Avenue Armory has become the site of innovative cultural events, and the Theater for a New Audience recently opened a home in Brooklyn with a 299-seat flexible stage.

    “Whether it will be seen as a unique venue and different from all other places is going to be their challenge,” Karen Brooks Hopkins, president of the Brooklyn Academy of Music, said of the performing arts center. “They’ll be competing with everybody for everything.”

    Ms. Boepple, who recently added the director Stephen Daldry as a seventh trustee, said that part of her fund-raising strategy would be expanding the center’s board to about 30 members, and that she was confident about securing donations. “There is still a lot of money in this town,” she said.

    She also suggested that while she is a Gehry fan, the choice of architect could change. “He’s excellent at models,” she said. “We love his models.” The problem with settling on a design so early, she said, is that the performing arts center had only a hazy idea of what it would present. “So many mistakes are made when genius architects design a building and that comes before the workhorse of the building,” she added. “It’s not a comment on Gehry as an architect. It’s a different skill set.”

    Linda Shelton, the executive director of the Joyce, said she was still in wait-and-see mode. “I have all assurances that the Joyce will be a partner with the PAC, and that we’re the only partner they’re speaking to in this regard,” she said. But she added, “I don’t really know what partner means at this point.”

    Ms. Sexton sounded somewhat less certain. “We certainly hope the Joyce is one of the main partners,” she said.

    And Mr. Lan, who is currently planning a coproduction for the Joyce and the Young Vic, said he did not envision “a programming role” for the Joyce.


  3. #198
    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
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    In other words, they're still dithering.

  4. #199
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    And the crew in charge is lacking class. You don't just drop those who've been key players for years without at least a courtesy call. Boepple announced over a month ago that her new team was in place (although she refused to name the participants). Since the core of performance is communication with the audience, you'd think the Boeppletons would have some communication with those outside her new inner circle, particularly when those are linked to the project in the eyes of the public. This is not the way to engender either trust or support.

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  6. #201
    Forum Veteran Tectonic's Avatar
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    Wait for it:


  7. #202
    Fearless Photog RoldanTTLB's Avatar
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    Only the top of the box will be blue like that. Bottom will be clear glass all the way around.

  8. #203

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    Curbed
    January 13, 2015

    Design-less WTC Arts Center Still Searching for an Architect

    By Evan Bindelglass



    The World Trade Center Performing Arts Center officially scrapped Frank Gehry's design for the venue, stalling the already stalled project. Little has happened since then, but on Monday, officials from the center told Community Board 1's Planning Committee that they are close to being able to move forward again, having narrowed the search for a new architect to three firms.

    Maggie Boepple, president of the WTC Performing Arts Center, made clear that the split from Gehry and his controversial design was "amicable." She only said that no contract could be reached. In terms of a new design team, they have narrowed the prospective firms from 50 to three, and the board will make a decision "soon" and choose an executive architect to oversee the project.

    Boepple also said that project is now known as "PAC WTC," with PAC pronounced like "pack." This is less wordy (and less stuffy) than "The World Center for the Performing Arts," but they are open to offers to buy the naming rights, so the name could change again.


    Maggie Boepple addresses Community Board 1's Planning Committee. Photograph by Evan Bindelglass.

    While a building can't be built without a design, below grade design work has been completed, and construction will actually begin soon. The temporary PATH station currently occupies the site of the arts center, so significant work can't being until that's out of the way. Currently, Boepple projects a 2018 or 2019 opening for the center, though productions would be staged elsewhere prior to that to "whet whistles."

    Lucy Sexton, the associate artistic director, gave details about the theater space, which she said she hoped would be a "theater of the world." She wants it to be a "producing house" because New York City can make its own great works, but also collaborate with world artists. There will be three theaters which she envisions being used for theater, musical theater, dance, and new opera. They will have 550, 350, and 150 seats each, but will be combinable for any number of experiences. Sexton wants it to be an "immersive theater."

    David Lan, artistic director at the Young Vic in London (where he sells 96 percent of his tickets), will run things at PAC WTC, where Sexton said programming will be "artistically adventurous" and open to co-producing with other theaters, such as the Apollo. Lan has already done work across the East River at BAM.

    Sexton wants it to be the "most digitally advances space in the countries" so it can connect with and display new work from the best artists.

    Sexton sees the theater as a "connecting node" in the World Trade Center campus, and wants PAC WTC to be a "building that's alive all day." It will be open from 8 a.m. to 1 a.m. and have breakfast, lunch, and coffee options. Sexton sees it as a "place to land" and have a drink at the bar after the show or after work next door at One World Trade Center.

    Boepple wants an audience that represents the community and said they will be sensitive to the nearby 9/11 Memorial, but she said, "The memorial is about what happened. We're about the future."

    © 2015 Vox Media Inc.

  9. #204
    Forum Veteran TREPYE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigMac View Post
    Curbed
    January 13, 2015

    Design-less WTC Arts Center Still Searching for an Architect

    By Evan Bindelglass


    Maggie Boepple addresses Community Board 1's Planning Committee. Photograph by Evan Bindelglass.



    © 2015 Vox Media Inc.
    Meanwhile in Paris...



    http://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/14/ar...-stories-below

    A Concert Hall in Paris Aims to Bridge Divides

    By DOREEN CARVAJALJAN. 13, 2015
    Inside

    Photo

    Construction of the Philharmonie de Paris, designed by Jean Nouvel, was mired in years of political wrangling, cost overruns and work stoppages. Credit Guia Besana for The New York Times


    PARIS — The new concert hall here, the Philharmonie de Paris, rises like a flight of doves, its sprawling waves of concrete and steel designed by the star architect Jean Nouvel to symbolize the end of the “eternal ostracism” of the struggling neighborhoods nearby.
    After seven years and long delays, the 386 million euro ($455 million) hall — clad in 340,000 interlocking gray, cream, pearl and ivory cast-aluminum birds on the wing — finally opens on Wednesday. President François Hollande of France will inaugurate the hall, and the Orchestre de Paris will play the Requiem by the French composer Gabriel Fauré in a memorial tribute to victims of last week’s terrorist attacks here.
    The lingering question about the Philharmonie — after years of political wrangling, infighting, cost overruns and work stoppages — is whether it can truly emerge as a temple of sound that brings egalité to classical music. The hall is on the edge of the Parc de la Villette, in the 19th Arrondissement in northeast Paris, just inside the ring road that symbolizes the divide between the wealthy center of Paris and the working-class and poor suburbs outside of it. The challenge is to still attract aging concertgoers from the center, where most of the city’s established cultural institutions are, but also to reach new generations in the suburbs, or banlieues, long scorned by the City of Light.
    Photo

    Inside the Philharmonie de Paris. Credit Guia Besana for The New York Times “There is nothing else like this until now,” said Laurent Bayle, the Philharmonie’s president. “This is the first signature, cultural building of grand Paris in this area. Before, the Seine River has always defined the axis of other cultural institutions,” like the Louvre, Musée d’Orsay and Opéra Bastille.
    Pantin, a dense and diverse town of 50,000 residents and historically a home to waves of immigrants, lies just across the ring road from the Philharmonie. Reporters flocked there last week after the Charlie Hebdo massacre to seek the Muslim view of events at a mosque so crowded that worshipers spilled out onto the sidewalk. The police also searched an apartment in Pantin, their first stop in the rush to track the Charlie Hebdo attackers. Les Courtillières, a serpentine collection of public housing towers in the town, draws filmmakers exploring the dark side of poverty.
    With the average age of Paris concertgoers hovering around 60, the hall’s programming, design and location are aimed at reaching out to the residents of Pantin and the four million people in the neighboring suburbs in the department of Seine-St.-Denis to the north and east, which were rocked by riots in 2005.
    Top tickets for the opening gala concert have been reduced by about 30 percent, to €40 ($47), for places in the concert hall, which seats 2,400 and is the first part of the complex to open to the public. (The project includes rehearsal, exhibition and educational space.) The Orchestre de Paris and Ensemble Intercontemporain, a major international contemporary music group, will take up permanent residence. Two other orchestras and Les Arts Florissants, the Baroque vocal and instrumental ensemble, will perform there regularly.
    The hall also promises “eclectic programming,” including world music, jazz, hip-hop and electro-pop. Tickets for weekend family concerts in the morning will be €12 ($14). Musical outreach programs are being developed in Pantin and other suburbs.
    “We want to change the way people think about music in their leisure time,” said Marie-Hélène Serra, who leads the Philharmonie’s educational program, “so you can attend a rehearsal, stay for lunch after the concert, talk about it at a special discussion afterward. Now there is a tendency toward an aging audience of older people, more women than men. We think we have to give access to classical music very early in life.”
    The state-owned Salle Pleyel, an Art Deco hall near the Champs-Élysées that has been home to the Orchestre de Paris, will no longer host classical music concerts, at the behest of the Philharmonie’s managers.
    More than 11,000 people have signed a petition organized by the municipal authorities of the nearby 17th Arrondissement to demand classical music remain there. “This economic logic is now killing a Parisian treasure, which is a national landmark,” said Brigitte Kuster, the mayor of that arrondissement.
    Critics complain that the Philharmonie is difficult to reach by public transportation and expensive by taxi, although supporters counter that the subway trip from the city’s Gare du Nord train station to the hall takes only 11 minutes.
    “I and many other people don’t like the idea of schlepping out to the edge of Paris,” said Michael Saklad, an American business strategist living in the city who signed the petition. “What we resent is a government institution turning a deaf ear.”
    On the other side of the Périphérique, or ring road, there is also wariness. Some Pantin residents never stray past the border to visit the Louvre, said the town’s mayor, Bertrand Kern, who calls the Philharmonie “good news,” but notes that fostering a taste for classical music “is a long learning process that will take time to attract people.”
    Trica Danielle Keaton, a Vanderbilt University associate professor in African-American studies who wrote a book about Muslim girls in Pantin, recalls taking residents to the Eiffel Tower for their first visit. “People in such neighborhoods are still not considered French — something racial profiling and the existence of the outer cities exemplify,” she said. “Yes, there are barriers.”
    Paavo Jarvi, music director of the Orchestre de Paris, noted that the ensemble’s subscription base is strong in the middle of Paris and acknowledged that it may face difficulties keeping some of its audience. “Sometimes it is hard to convince people to take the leap because it is inconvenient,” he said. “But on the other hand, it will be a magnificent hall and, in a way, a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.”
    William Christie, the founder and conductor of Les Arts Florissants, said that he has also fielded complaints. But he insisted the move was worth it.
    “In this wretched world that we live in, especially now, there are so many social and economic issues that create disputes,” he said. “So this is quite wonderful.” He added: “A grand new cultural entity is being put up. It’s a very nice and brave thing in spite of enormous opposition.”







  10. #205
    Forum Veteran TREPYE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tectonic View Post
    Wait for it:

    Yes, here it comes...

    To be fair, with that momentous architectural-glory of a train station next door anything we get in here is gravy.
    Last edited by TREPYE; January 14th, 2015 at 09:54 AM.

  11. #206

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigMac View Post

    Sexton wants it to be the "most digitally advances space in the countries" so it can connect with and display new work from the best artists.

    Sexton sees the theater as a "connecting node" in the World Trade Center campus, and wants PAC WTC to be a "building that's alive all day." It will be open from 8 a.m. to 1 a.m. and have breakfast, lunch, and coffee options. Sexton sees it as a "place to land" and have a drink at the bar after the show or after work next door at One World Trade Center.
    From 1500 seat concert hall to 500 seat shoebox theaters. Soon it will be just a Cinebistro or Cinema Cafe type venu where they can just stream live events from the MET via Fathom Events.

    #cynical

  12. #207

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    New York Times
    July 23, 2015

    Ground Zero Arts Center to Shrink Further

    By Robin Pogrebin


    The site, now occupied by a temporary PATH station, is to be the home of the Performing Arts Center.

    THE Performing Arts Center planned for the former World Trade Center site was dealt a serious blow on Thursday when the corporation in charge of downtown redevelopment insisted that the project come in at no more than $200 million — about half the original estimated cost.

    The Lower Manhattan Development Corporation, which oversees the former World Trade Center site, made it clear at a board meeting that the $99 million in federal funds committed to the project was contingent on the arts center’s leaders’ producing an affordable design and a viable plan for raising the remaining money from private sources.

    The ultimatum is another setback for a project conceived more than a decade ago as an important cultural hub to help rejuvenate an area once known as ground zero. The arts center — which originally was to contain the Signature Theater and the Joyce Theater — has been curtailed and delayed.

    “After a review of finances, we believe the project should be scaled down,” said David Emil, president of the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation, adding, “We are looking forward to seeing whether this can be brought to a successful conclusion.”


    Maggie Boepple

    Maggie Boepple, president of the Performing Arts Center, having been prepared for this development, sounded undeterred at the meeting, saying she already had renderings of a scaled-down design by a new architect.

    “We can do a great building for $200 million — it has to be built,” she said. “It will be smaller; there may be things that you might have liked to see, but that’s how it is.”

    Ms. Boepple also told the corporation that the arts center was starting to raise money, though later she said she was not ready to announce donor commitments.

    The cultural landscape has changed since the announcement in 2003 of Daniel Libeskind’s master plan for ground zero. The arts center, which was initially to have three stages, one with 1,000 seats — would still be only the second large space of its kind in the financial district, along with the Schimmel Center at Pace University.

    But two other major venues in Manhattan have recently been announced. One is Culture Shed, a $400 million performance and exhibition space underway in Hudson Yards. The other is the $130 million park on Pier 55 near 14th Street, underwritten by the billionaire Barry Diller, which includes three outdoor stages.

    Work on the center cannot begin until its site — bounded by Fulton, Greenwich, Vesey and Washington Streets — is made available. It is occupied by a temporary PATH station.

    Ms. Boepple did not identify the new architect at the meeting but said later that one had been selected in a competition.

    “In my bag is already the second reiteration for this new building,” she told the board. “We will be done in eight weeks.”

    Last fall, the arts center leaders unexpectedly shelved Frank Gehry’s original design — a cascade of rectangular forms, like boxes piled atop one another.

    Even with a reduced budget, the building would still have three stages — and occupy the same footprint — though it would not be as tall, Ms. Boepple said.

    “Our building will be beautiful, because it has to be,” she said. “It will be starkly simple and meaningful.”

    The project has gone from the home of four cultural organizations to a dance center to a multidisciplinary space. At one point, there was suggestion of moving it off ground zero to the nearby site Deutsche Bank building site, and if the arts center scaled-back proposal fails to satisfy the development corporation, the project could ultimately be replaced by something else.

    The center also now has a construction project manager: David Belt of DBI Projects, Ms. Boepple said. Last year, the center hired David Lan, the artistic director of the Young Vic theater in London, as its temporary artistic director (Ms. Boepple said he has been spending one week a month in New York); Lucy Sexton as the associate artistic director; and David Langford as the general manager and chief operating officer.

    The center has so far been operating with a very small board, but Ms. Boepple said she was adding new members — most recently Susan Stroman, the director and choreographer, and Dominic Casserley, chairman of Willis Group, an insurance broker. She said she had also added Jenny Gersten — formerly of Williamstown Theater Festival and the High Line — as producer.

    The development corporation on Thursday awarded an additional $70,000 for the project’s planning design and development; it has already budgeted a separate $40 million for construction below ground.

    Joseph Chan, the development corporation’s chairman, said his board would work over the next two months to help the center solidify a more modest proposal and define “the private sector fund-raising plan.”

    Ms. Boepple said she was optimistic about obtaining donations. “There’s plenty of money around,” she said.

    Construction costs for cultural buildings can vary widely. The Studio Museum in Harlem recently announced plans to build an entire new home for $122 million, while the cost to renovate the interior of Avery Fisher Hall at Lincoln Center is projected to reach $500 million.

    Mr. Chan said the center would report on its progress at the corporation’s next meeting in the fall.

    Thomas S. Johnson, a corporation board member who lost a son in the Sept. 11 attacks, said at the meeting that $200 million “is a very large amount of money, especially when you realize it’s being put into a building that is on free land.”

    Judy Rapfogel, the longtime chief of staff for the New York Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver, said of the center, “This has been a promise to us.” She added, “I look forward to putting a shovel in the ground.”

    In the interview, Ms. Boepple said she was discouraged but felt she had no choice but to adjust to the more circumscribed budget.

    “This was the only way to get this done,” she said. “I want to get this done.”

    Copyright 2015 The New York Times Company

  13. #208
    Forum Veteran Tectonic's Avatar
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    Where's Trepye? Wait for it...

  14. #209
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    Ha.... Actually this doesn't surprise me in any way, this project is gravy and if its great yay if it sucks, hey its the trend these days with the way things are going....

    What I will say about above mentioned scale-down is that whether beautiful, ugly or bland this thing may just end up involuting into a restroom structure in the middle of a quaint little urban park.

  15. #210

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    Guys, I found an exclusive rendering of the proposed new WTC performing arts center: http://i.imgur.com/5ZeIHbi.jpg
    Please keep this hush hush until the official release.

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