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Thread: Crocodile Hunter Dies

  1. #1

    Default Crocodile Hunter Dies

    Reuters:

    "Crocodile Hunter" Irwin dies

    By Paul Tait

    SYDNEY (Reuters) - Steve Irwin, the quirky Australian naturalist who won worldwide acclaim, was killed by a stingray barb through the chest on Monday while diving off Australia's northeast coast, emergency officials and witnesses said.

    "Steve was hit by a stingray in the chest," said local diving operator Steve Edmondson, whose Poseidon boats were out on the Great Barrier Reef when the accident occurred.

    "He probably died from a cardiac arrest from the injury," he said.

    Police and ambulance officials later confirmed Irwin had died and said his family had been advised.

    Irwin, 44, was killed while filming an underwater documentary off Port Douglas.

    Irwin had been diving off his boat "Croc One" near Batt Reef northeast of Port Douglas. A helicopter had taken paramedics to nearby Low Isles where Irwin was taken for medical treatment but he was dead before they arrived, police said.

    Irwin won a global following for his dare-devil antics but also triggered outrage in 2004 by holding his then one-month-old baby while feeding a snapping crocodile at his Australian zoo.

    He made almost 50 of his "Crocodile Hunter" documentaries which appeared on cable TV channel Animal Planet and won a worldwide audience.

    The series ended after he was criticized for the incident with his young son and for disturbing whales, seals and penguins while filming in Antarctica.

    Khaki-clad Irwin became famous for his seemingly death-defying methods with wild animals, including crocodiles and snakes.

    He made a cameo appearance alongside Eddie Murphy in the 2001 Hollywood film Dr Dolittle 2 and appeared on U.S. television shows such as "The Tonight Show With Jay Leno" and on children's television alongside The Wiggles.

    Irwin was married with two children, Bindi Sue and Bob Clarence. His American-born wife Terri was his business partner and frequent on-screen collaborator.


  2. #2

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    I have been there myself. Cairns, Port Douglas - beautiful areas.

    Usually jellyfish are deadlier - the limp tentacles can sting you and cause a heart attack - especially the dreaded Box Jellyfish.

    But to be killed by a Stingray is extremely rare and I think has only happened 17 times in the whole world since 1969 - a lot more have died from shark attacks.

    You have a better chance being killed by a shark or a crocodile than dying this way. A much higher chance of being struck by lightning. And a much much higher chance of being killed in a motor vehicle accident.

    So Mr Irwin was very unlucky. I guess that it must have been quite a shock for him to suddenly get barbed through the chest!

    Much like seeing a ghost - this event would have caused Mr Irwin quite a startle! Like seeing a ghost! His own ghost! To get some idea of what he went through watch this video (WARNING: those with a weak heart do NOT watch): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=10ps_THx5AQ

    RIP Steve.
    Last edited by Gregory Tenenbaum; September 5th, 2006 at 06:14 AM.

  3. #3
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Steve Irwin was a force of nature ... I loved to watch this guy ... this is very sad for his family.



    Irwin shaped by his early life


    File pic / News Limited picture
    Passionate ... Steve Irwin died doing what he loved
    the most, raising awareness of Australia's unique wildlife.

    news.com.au
    By Lucy Bennett
    September 04, 2006

    Multimedia: Steve Irwin 1962-2006

    STEVE Irwin, one of Australia's most well-known and well-loved figures, has died at the age of 44.

    It is understood Irwin, a passionate conservationist and wildlife advocate, was killed when a stingray barb went through his chest.

    Irwin spent every day working with all manner of dangerous creatures - giant crocodiles, poisonous snakes, komodo dragons - but it was a less obvious hazard that claimed his life.

    Irwin had taken calculated risks with all sorts of wildlife for decades, relying on his knowledge of animal behaviour and personal experience to beat the odds.

    For someone who spent so much time around killer animals, Irwin seemed to leave a charmed life.

    So his demise was all the more shocking because it apparently involved a stingray, an animal regarded as dangerous but not as a killer.

    It is understood that Irwin was swimming off the Low Isles off Port Douglas filming a documentary, something he had done on countless occasions.

    Irwin, so careful around danger, was taken unawares when the stingray he was filming apparently struck out with its tail, the venomous barbs fatally embedding in his chest.

    The death brought to an end a career that began with his father's Sunshine Coast theme park and developed into an international empire in which Irwin was a globally recognised brand.

    Born at Essendon in Melbourne, it was a move to Queensland with his parents while a child that shaped Irwin's life, culminating in his fame as Australia's 'Crocodile Hunter'.

    Although his father Bob was officially a plumber, and his mother Lynn a maternity nurse, the family's consuming passion was rescuing and rehabilitating local wildlife.

    In 1970 the hobby became a full time operation when the Irwins opened the Beerwah Reptile Park.

    Irwin recalled how, even with the advent of a formal facility, the family home was itself a mini zoo and wildlife hospital, with makeshift marsupial "pouches" slung over the backs of chairs and snakes stashed everywhere.

    The young Irwin came to share his parents' obsession with wild creatures, and he soon displayed an uncanny rapport with them, able to sense their moods and preferences intuitively.

    This ability to second-guess animal behavior, coupled with his enthusiastic admiration of Bob Irwin's real life "action hero" escapades with crocs and venomous snakes, led the younger Irwin to try his own hand capturing the risky reptiles.

    Though initially alarmed, his father began tutoring him in crocodile capture.
    As a young man Steve put these skills to work in the rogue crocodile relocation project run by the Queensland government.

    Although he eventually claimed the title The Crocodile Hunter, Irwin's methods differed drastically to those of earlier hunters.

    Rather than ending up as table fare and handbags, the crocs bagged by Irwin were later released, unharmed, in a new home deeper in the wild - or at the Irwins' reptile park.

    In 1991, Irwin took over the running of the park, now renamed the Australia Zoo, and in 1992 met his future wife there.

    American Terri Raines was on a tour of Australia and met Irwin while visiting wildlife rehabilitation facilities.

    A whirlwind romance followed, and they were married on June 4, 1992.

    The footage, shot by John Stainton, of their crocodile-trapping honeymoon became the first episode of The Crocodile Hunter, which became wildly successful, especially in the US.

    In an interview before the birth of their second child, Terri Irwin had this to say about her marriage to Steve Irwin and working together:

    "We don't drink, we don't smoke, and we are actually in love and happily married. We love our little girl, we go home to each other at night, and we believe in what we are doing,"

    "Say my husband had a dangerous job and I wasn't with him, I don't know how you go, 'Oh honey, how was it with the police department today? You got all your fingers and toes today?' It would scare me. I'd have to become a police officer and work with him; I couldn't do it."

    The couple believed their love for wildlife and their dedication to spreading the conservation message was an around the clock duty.

    In 2001, Irwin appeared in a cameo role in the Eddie Murphy film Dr Dolittle 2. In 2002, his first feature film, The Crocodile Hunter: Collision Course, was released.

    Irwin went on to star in other Animal Planet documentaries, including The Croc Files, The Crocodile Hunter Diaries, and New Breed Vets.

    Under Irwin's leadership, his operations grew to include the zoo, the television series, The Steve Irwin Conservation Foundation (now renamed Wildlife Warriors Worldwide), and International Crocodile Rescue.

    The Irwins had two children: Bindi Sue Irwin, born on July 24, 1998, and Robert (Bob) Clarence Irwin, born on December 1, 2003.

    Irwin caused controversy during a public show on 2 January 2004, when he carried his then infant son in one arm while feeding a chicken carcass to a crocodile with the other hand.

    Bob was close to the crocodile, and comparisons were made in the press with singer Michael Jackson's dangling of his son outside a German apartment window.

    As well, child welfare groups, animal rights groups and many of Irwin's television viewers criticised his actions as being irresponsible and tantamount to child abuse.

    Irwin said any danger to his son was only a perceived danger and that he was in complete control of the situation.

    He never backed down over his actions despite considerable public outcry both in Australia and abroad.

    His defenders pointed to his several decades of hands-on experience and direct interaction with crocodiles.

    Terri Irwin said their child was in no more real danger than a child being taught to swim would be.

    In June 2004, Irwin again was the subject of controversy when allegations were made that he came too close to and disturbed some wildlife while filming a documentary in Antarctica.

    Animal Planet then released a Crocodile Hunter special called Crocodiles & Controversy, which attempted to explain both the "Baby Bob Incident" and the Antarctica incident.

    The special argued that Irwin's son was never in danger of being eaten by the crocodile and that Irwin could not have endangered animals in Antarctica.

    Eventually Animal Planet ended The Crocodile Hunter with a series finale entitled Steve's Last Adventure.

    The last Crocodile Hunter documentary went for three emotional hours with footage of Steve's across-the-world adventure, visiting locations like the Himalayas, the Yangtze River, Borneo, and the Kruger National Park.

    One of Irwin's last projects was for Discovery Kids, in which he developed a show for Bindi Sue.

    The show, Jungle Girl, was tipped to be similar to The Wiggles movies.

    A feature-length episode of The Wiggles entitled Wiggly Safari appeared dedicated to Irwin, and he featured in it heavily with his wife and daughter.

    Irwin will be remembered for his enthusiastic defence of all animals, his open mind and heart and his kindness.

    Copyright 2006 News Limited

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Witnesses tell of freak death of Steve Irwin


    News Limited newspapers
    Tragedy ...
    Steve Irwin - pictured here with his wife Terri - has died
    aged 44 in a horrific accident involving a stingray while
    filming an underwater documentary in Queensland.

    news.com.au
    By staff writers and wires
    September 04, 2006

    A DOCTOR and witnesses have told of the desperate efforts to save Australian icon Steve Irwin after the Crocodile Hunter was struck in the chest by a stingray barb today.

    Irwin, 44, died this morning after being fatally injured while filming a nature documentary off Queensland.

    The news has shocked the nation and prompted a rush of tributes from politicians and the public alike.

    Irwin's wife Terri was in Tasmania at the time of the tragedy and had to be contacted by police with the terrible news.

    The couple's daughter Bindi, 8, was with her father in north Queensland, Irwin's manager John Stainton said from Cairns.

    Choking back tears, Mr Stainton said Irwin had gone “over the top of a stingray and a stingray's barb went up and went into his chest and put a hole into his heart”.

    "He possibly died instantly when the barb hit him, and I don't think that he ... felt any pain.”

    Professional diver Pete West was on board a nearby boat and was asked by Irwin's team to call in the emergency.

    Asked on Channel 7 if Irwin was alive when they got him on his own boat, Mr West said: “I believe so.”

    "He was doing what he did best and unfortunately today he wasn't quick enough."

    Dr Ed O'Loughlin was aboard the Emergency Management Queensland Helicopter which was called from Cairns at 11.21am (AEST).



    Irwin was being given CPR at Low Isles, off Port Douglas, as the helicopter arrived less than one hour after the incident, but Dr O'Loughlin said nothing could be done to save him.

    "It became clear fairly soon that he had non-survivable injuries," Dr O'Loughlin said.

    "He had a penetrating injury to the left front of his chest. He had lost his pulse and wasn't breathing."

    Mr Stainton admitted he had always feared Irwin might meet his death while working with wildlife, but added that Irwin himself was never scared.

    "We've been in some pretty close shaves. (But) nothing would ever scare Steve or would worry him. He didn't have a fear of death at all.”

    Tragedy

    Father-of-two Irwin was swimming at Batt Reef, off the Low Isles, when the tragedy occurred.

    Tasmania Police this afternoon confirmed his wife Terri was travelling in the state at the time of the tragedy.

    A spokeswoman said police had made contact with Mrs Irwin and "passed on a message relating to the death of her husband".

    The Irwins have two children - Bindi and a three-year-old son, Robert (Bob) Clarence Irwin.

    John Weigel, of the Australian Reptile Park on Queensland's Sunshine Coast, said Irwin's death would be "devastating to a lot of people".

    "He walked into the room like someone had opened the window and let the light in.

    "He seemed invincible and it's a great shock that it could happen."

    Famed

    Steve Irwin - known worldwide as the Crocodile Hunter - was famous for his enthusiasm for wildlife and his catchcry "Crikey!".

    In an sad twist, it has been reported that his new documentary was aimed at demystifying the stingray. However Mr Stainton said Irwin was filming other footage for a program with Bindi at the time of the attack.

    Irwin's Crocodile Hunter program was first broadcast in 1992 and has been shown around the world on cable network Discovery.

    He has also starred in movies and has developed the Australia Zoo wildlife park, north of Brisbane, which was started by his parents Bob and Lyn Irwin.
    Tributes quickly poured in for the larger-than-life character.

    Prime Minister John Howard said Irwin was a typical Australian larrikin who brought joy to millions of people around the world. "I am quite shocked and distressed at Steve Irwin's sudden, untimely and freakish death," he said.
    "It's a huge loss to Australia."



    A Tourism Queensland spokeswoman said the death was shocking and paid tribute to Irwin's "enormous contribution" to his adopted state.

    "I don't think we could even estimate how much he brought us through his personality and his profile and his enthusiasm about Queensland," she said.

    - with AAP

    Copyright 2006 News Limited

  4. #4

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    You know what they say!... Only the good die young...

  5. #5
    King Omega XVI OmegaNYC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by milleniumcab
    You know what they say!... Only the good die young...

    Amen.... When I heard this news at 5 AM, I was hurt. I almost cried. I enjoyed the way he would jump into a lake, fright with a croc, and call it "Naughty!" Or how he would say "danger, danger, danger!", when a snake is near. Or who can ever forget "Crocky!!!" Man this is just a terrible lost for the whole world. It seems surreal that he would die because he got stabbed in the heart from a stingray. In the heart. Something this man had a lot of. R.I.P Steve. I'll miss you...

  6. #6

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    I hope that this doesn't start a backlash against stingrays - heres how you can help! http://www.bornfree.org.uk/dolphin/news060622.shtml

    Seriously, I just saw a Shark and Ray expert on Australian television say how this was a freak accident.

    He said that when a ray is threatened, 99% of the time it just swims (or is that glides?) away.

    If the ray does choose to attack, the expert said that it can cover several metres per second! There is no chance at all for the human swimmer/diver to ge away in that time.

    Of all the things that could have killed Steve Irwin, this was the least likely expected thing!
    But the expert left us with an ominous fact: Stingrays have been recorded killing KILLER WHALES!

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gregory Tenenbaum View Post
    Much like seeing a ghost - this event would have caused Mr Irwin quite a startle! Like seeing a ghost! His own ghost! To get some idea of what he went through watch this video (WARNING: those with a weak heart do NOT watch): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=10ps_THx5AQ

    RIP Steve.
    Dude, thats not even funny.

    RIP steve Irwin. A totally dedicated man to animals and conservation! Will be saddly missed.

  8. #8

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    Seriously, thats how it would have felt.

    He even pulled out the serrated barb before he died. Maybe that contributed to his death but the experts are saying that the barb has a venom (no known antidote) that affects the heart.

    The shock of it all!

    Yes he was a dedicated naturalist but do you think that he did it just for love, say like an ordinary environmentalist rescuing small animals like penguins (whom you never ever hear about) does?

    As a showman, he certainly took risks for publicity - but for more than just for the noble cause of "conservation". He in fact made a lot of money and was in fact making another documentary (for profit) when he died. That is not meant to be disrespectful to the late Mr Irwin - it's just the awful truth.

    As it happens the documentary that he was filming when he died was called "Deadly Sea Creatures". An apt title.
    Last edited by Gregory Tenenbaum; September 6th, 2006 at 02:44 AM. Reason: Awful Spelling Mistakes by Mr Tenenbaum

  9. #9

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    Shocking Account by Irwins Producer about How Irwin Died

    This story contains the interview:

    http://www.abc.net.au/lateline/conte...6/s1733866.htm

    You can watch the interview with the links on the right of the screen.

    Interview with Stingray/Shark Expert about the Dangers (Or Not) of Stingrays

    http://www.abc.net.au/lateline/conte...6/s1732844.htm

    You can watch the interview with the links on the right of the screen.

    Enjoy (Or Not) - its quite shocking.

    G.T.

  10. #10

    Unhappy

    If you think his death was terrible, have a look at what Germaine Greer had to say about his death!

    www.theage.com.au/news/World/Irwin-death-animal-world-revenge-Greer/2006/09/05/1157222109840.html

    And like Duracell, she just keeps on going! (Or was that energizer?)

    http://news.ninemsn.com.au/article.aspx?id=127478


  11. #11
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    I wonder how "distressed" she is.

  12. #12

    Default Irwin Interfered with Nature, says Costeau

    From: Sydney Morning Herald 20 September 2006



    Irwin interfered with nature, says Cousteau

    Marine explorer Jean-Michel Cousteau says that, while he mourns the recent death of Crocodile Hunter Steve Irwin, he disagrees with Irwin's hands-on approach to nature television.
    While promoting his new two-part TV special, Jean-Michel Cousteau: Ocean Adventures - America's Underwater Treasures, Cousteau called Irwin's death "very, very unfortunate".
    Cousteau, son of the famed ocean explorer Jacques Cousteau, said he had "a lot of respect" for Irwin, whom he did not know personally, and for his "environmental message".
    But, he added, Irwin would "interfere with nature, jump on animals, grab them, hold them, and have this very, very spectacular, dramatic way of presenting things".
    "Of course, it goes very well on television. It sells, it appeals to a lot people, but I think it's very misleading.
    "You don't touch nature, you just look at it. And that's why I'm still alive. I've been diving for over 61 years - a lot more years than he's been alive - and I don't mess with nature."
    Irwin died on September 4 when a stingray's barb pieced his chest while he was filming an underwater sequence at the Great Barrier Reef. Irwin was 44.

    http://www.smh.com.au/news/world/irw...431752163.html

  13. #13
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    I'm writing this with tears streaming down my face, having just witnessed Steve's daughter Bindi farewelling her dad in front of a large audience. I can vividly imagine Steve's beaming pride.

    Rest in peace, Steve, and good on ya mate, you've left us with an inspirational successor to carry on your wonderful work.

  14. #14

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    But, he added, Irwin would "interfere with nature, jump on animals, grab them, hold them, and have this very, very spectacular, dramatic way of presenting things".
    "Of course, it goes very well on television. It sells, it appeals to a lot people, but I think it's very misleading.
    Cousteau makes a good point.

    The Natural World is not Sea World.

  15. #15

    Default Foreboding Interview with Conan - Steve Jokes about Death

    Quote Originally Posted by Merry View Post
    I'm writing this with tears streaming down my face, having just witnessed Steve's daughter Bindi farewelling her dad in front of a large audience. I can vividly imagine Steve's beaming pride.

    Rest in peace, Steve, and good on ya mate, you've left us with an inspirational successor to carry on your wonderful work.
    Sorry to hear that you've been so affected. Yes it's tragic that he left his wife and children behind, without a father, but with a lot of cashiola thats for sure. But he did understand the risks.

    Did you know him? You sound like you've really been affected by this.

    Here's my take:

    He did a lot of dangerous things for good, just like the 1000s of volunteers who clean up oil from birds in dangerous and toxic conditions or who rescue animals/seals in dangerous conditions etc

    He got a lot of publicity because of the nature of the animals that he knew a lot about (reptiles), unlike the 1000s of volunteers who clean up oil from birds in dangerous and toxic conditions or who rescue animals/seals in dangerous conditions etc

    He made a lot of ca$hiola because of the nature of the way that he filmed and staged certain events, unlike the 1000s of volunteers who clean up oil from birds in dangerous and toxic conditions or who rescue animals/seals in dangerous conditions etc

    The ca$hiola that he made was potentially all or mostly tax free, including most likely all of his salary, his crews salary, and anything else related to his zoo and cause, unlike the 1000s of volunteers who clean up oil from birds in dangerous and toxic conditions or who rescue animals/seals in dangerous conditions who go to work monday to friday to pay their federal taxes and who donate to such charities

    Do I have any sympathy for him? No. Greer was correct. And so is Cousteau.

    Would I try to wrangle crocodiles to set up a tax free empire? No thanks. I'll stick to my 9-5 life.

    Heres steve joking with Conan OBrien about being around dangerous creatures, a person dying from being bitten by a snake and generally about dying from being around dangerous critters - FOREBODING

    http://video.google.com/videoplay?do...278575&q=irwin
    Last edited by Gregory Tenenbaum; September 30th, 2006 at 08:49 AM.

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