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Thread: Harlem Residential Development

  1. #31
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
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    At 564 ft. and only 39 floors, it's probably a commercial building.

  2. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by antinimby View Post
    At 564 ft. and only 39 floors, it's probably a commercial building.
    According to the application it'll be a residential building. The property is located right next to Mt. Sinai and is owned by Mt. Sinai according to the application. I'm interested to hear any more information for this site and future development...Derek?

  3. #33

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    I know for a while now SOM had schematic designs for a research tower for Mount Sinai School of Medicine. There are a few renderings on their site that have been updated once or twice.

    No clue about this new version with 39 floors and residential units but I bet this is some derivative of it. The owners still are Mount Sinai School of Medicine so maybe a mixed-use building with dorms? 81 units can't fill 444,980 Sq. Ft.

    The black tower that looms over Central Park is also designed by SOM for Mt. Sinai. That's 26 stories and 436' so a 564' tower will look enormous.






    SOM
    www.som.com


    Completed 2003

    The new Institute for Translational Research will enable the realization of Mount Sinai's translational medicine vision. Design in Collaboration with Zimmer Gunsul Frasca Partnership, the new facility is intended to create a research environment that unites clinicians, scientists, educators and their colleagues in a unique, collaborative way.

    In support of the Translational Research Mission the new building will:

    -Facilitate the close integration of basic scientists and clinicians

    -Expedite the translation of basic science discoveries into clinical applications and of clinical observations into basic science research

    -Act as a bridge between patient care, education and research

    -Allow for future expansion

    Building Type, Program, Location

    Located on the upper East Side if New York City, the new building is intended to facilitate interactions through the integration of three types of space:

    -Interactive Space, which provides the "Scientific Glue" for clinical investigators and basic scientists. It includes education spaces, lounges, informatics/ biostatistic computer facilities, as well as imaging and other core functions.

    -Basic Science Research Space, which incorporates wet bench research, animal facilities and dry bench, computer-supported research.

    -Clinical Research Space in an ambulatory setting, is including the General Clinical Research Center, clinical trials, outcomes research and policy studies.

    Issues and Constraints

    In order to fulfill these goals, translational research requires facilities for ambulatory research patients. Patient accessibility, orientation, entry sequence and amenities are essential design and site location requirements. In addition, accessibility to other clinical functions, future clinical expansion capability and eventual integration with other ambulatory care services are all significant factors in realizing the unique research and clinical goals for the new building.

    Design Approach

    The base of the building consists of all clinical patient-related functions. These services are linked by a multi-story lobby, providing a healing and accessible environment for patients. The innovative research tower is organized into a series of three-story "research neighborhoods", consisting of two wet lab and one dry lab floor. Linked by a three story interaction space, each neighborhood sponsors collaboration and spontaneous integration of clinical and basic science researchers, while providing efficient and flexible wet and dry laboratories.




    http://www.tradelineinc.com/go.cfm?i...4F3027C1ECDC78

    Mount Sinai Designs a Research Facility for the Future
    Subtitle: Strategic Planning Identifies Trends that Shape Building Features
    Published: 1.16.02
    Teaser: New York's Mount Sinai School of Medicine (MSSM) is about to begin schematic designs for a $400-million, 350,000-sf research building to fulfill three clearly articulated goals: support world class research programs, facilitate collaborative investigation, and respond to the ever-increasing pace of change in the methods and targets of scientific research.



    http://www.mssm.edu/

    New Facilities will support the creation of the new Institute for Translational Research and other facilities. Mount Sinai's focus on translational research will support the new Translational Research Building and other facilities. Mount Sinai's new emphasis on translational medicine coordinates basic research with clinical investigations, leading to the quick translation of new discoveries into improved patient care.



    Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Institute for Translational Research, New York, New York

    http://www.zgf.com/

    Located on Manhattan’s Upper East Side, Mount Sinai is challenged with expanding basic science and clinical research within a constrained urban site. ZGF, in association with SOM, has completed programming and conceptual design for a 350,000 GSF translational facility that expedites the application of research from the laboratory bench to the patient bedside. Since completing a preliminary site feasibility study of three prominent sites, the team is now doing conceptual studies and long-range planning for the $105-120 million building, which will include translational research functions, ambulatory care and potential underground parking.
    Last edited by Derek2k3; January 15th, 2007 at 10:56 PM.

  4. #34
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    That application ^^^ states:

    RESIDENTIAL APT HOUSE
    81 Units
    444,980 Sq. Ft

    Owner: MOUNT SINAI SCHOOL OF MEDICINE

    Seems like it could be a mixed use building (??)

    The lot seems very large: ~ 202' x 320'

  5. #35
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    Historic Harlem Ballroom To Get Makeover, Add Condos


    (photo from The Real Deal)

    By ELIOT BROWN
    Special to the Sun
    March 23, 2007

    A historic ballroom in central Harlem, once a cultural hub, will undergo a major makeover, as a nonprofit developer is breaking ground on a sizable mixed-use development Friday.

    Abyssinian Development Corp., which argued against landmark designation last month, will redo the long-vacant Renaissance Ballroom and Renaissance Casino on Adam Clayton Boulevard and 138th Street. After more than a decade of planning, the organization will gut the now-decaying insides of the two structures, tear down an adjacent YWCA, and erect a 19-story mixed-income condominium tower on the southern half of the complex, along with building cultural space and numerous retail storefronts.

    "We were always trying to develop a plan to bring the ballroom and the cultural space back to life," the president of Abyssinian, Sheena Wright, said.
    For years the finances didn't work out, Ms. Wright said, but the project became viable because of rising Harlem housing prices and a decision to incorporate the defunct YWCA site into the complex.

    Built in the 1920s, the Renaissance Ballroom, known as "Renny," and the adjacent Renaissance Casino are now boarded up with rotting plywood in place of their windows, and a giant rusty awning juts out over the sidewalk along Adam Clayton Boulevard.

    While the buildings have been vacant for about 30 years, Ms. Wright said, they once hosted social club events, dances, the jazz greats that characterized the Harlem Renaissance, and a basketball team.

    Ms. Wright said the development should be completed by late 2009. It will include 112 condos, along with 27,000 square feet of cultural and performance space, 10,000 square feet of commercial space, and 10,000 square feet of community space that could be used for meetings.

    Abyssinian, a Harlem developer, has completed numerous neighborhood projects, including an International House of Pancakes.

    A possible landmark designation had been sitting on the desk of the city's Landmarks Preservation Commission for more than a decade, but prohibitive landmark-designation restrictions would have prevented any developer from creating a feasible project, and thus the complex would just rot away, Abyssinian said.

    After hearing supportive testimony from community leaders such as Mayor Dinkins, who had his wedding reception in the ballroom, the LPC voted 6-1 last month to drop the complex from its agenda, allowing Abyssinian to proceed with its plans.

    However, while numerous community groups backed the general concept of the development, some say the building's historic value outweighs the development's benefits.

    "It's a great mistake to feel that modern development needs to crowd out the great history," a member of the Morningside Heights Historic District Committee, Carolyn Kent, said. Funds could eventually be raised to build in the existing structures, she added, and Abyssinian could find another space for development.

    © 2007 The New York Sun, One SL, LLC.

  6. #36
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    Here's a NY Times article about the Renaissance Ballroom from Feb.

    A Harlem Landmark in All but Name


    The Renaissance Theater and Casino in 1936, top. The complex now has the aspect of a romantic ruin.
    Plans call for replacing the theater with a 13-story apartment house, for saving the casino’s exterior and for
    expanding the casino and its ballroom into a larger community space.


    By CHRISTOPHER GRAY
    Published: February 18, 2007

    THE two-story Renaissance Theater and Casino on Adam Clayton Powell Boulevard is architecturally unassuming but particularly significant, because unlike most of Harlem, it was built by blacks, not whites.

    But last week, the Abyssinian Development Corporation — whose 10-year-old plans to build apartments and restore the casino structure recently took on new urgency — successfully defeated landmark designation, which would have created intolerable delays, it said.

    Sheena Wright, the chief executive of the nonprofit development company, which is associated with the Abyssinian Baptist Church, contended that landmark designation would “basically kill the project.”

    The blocklong Renaissance complex dates to 1920. That’s when William H. Roach, an immigrant from Montserrat who owned a housecleaning service, bought the northeast corner of 137th Street and Seventh Avenue, now known as Adam Clayton Powell Boulevard.

    Property records are not explicit, but it appears that Mr. Roach, working chiefly in partnership with his countryman Joseph H. Sweeney and an Antiguan named Cleophus Charity, built the Renaissance Theater there in 1921.

    Two years later, the partners added the Renaissance Casino, with a second-floor ballroom, at the 138th Street corner of the block.

    The 900-seat theater first showed silent movies, apparently with stage acts, but was soon converted to talkies. The casino was used for public meetings, like a 1923 anti-lynching meeting held by the N.A.A.C.P., and it was also the home court of the Harlem Renaissance Big-Five, the black professional basketball team known as the Harlem Rens.

    The architect for the complex, Harry Creighton Ingalls, designed a deceptively simple work in tile and brick, “inspired by the Islamic architecture of North Africa,” according to the Landmarks Preservation Commission.

    The casino, at the north end, is slightly higher, with a second floor of large windows and an attic level of openings alternating with patterned squares of colored tiles. It is a sophisticated but rather mild work.

    There is no evidence that the Renaissance complex was meant to be anything but a simple business venture, but perhaps that was the point.
    According to Michael Henry Adams, the Harlem historian, articles in The New York Amsterdam News indicate that Mr. Roach and other principals were followers of Marcus Garvey, who promoted black self-sufficiency and business enterprise.

    In his book “When Harlem Was in Vogue” (Oxford, 1989), David Levering Lewis describes the Renaissance as one of the places where “the cream of Harlem would unlimber with the Charleston and Black Bottom.”

    The Renaissance closed in 1979, and the Abyssinian Development Corporation bought it in 1991.

    Four years later, the Rev. Calvin O. Butts III, the pastor of the church, told The New York Times that he expected to start the restoration of the ballroom by the end of 1995. “People have got to have a place to laugh, sing and dance,” he said.

    The Abyssinian Development Corporation’s plans did not come together until last year, but for them to go forward, it had to get the Landmarks Preservation Commission to retract a proposal, dating to 1991, to designate the Renaissance complex a landmark.

    The development corporation’s plans involve replacing the Renaissance Theater with a 13-story apartment house but saving the exterior of the northern part of the complex. This would be incorporated into a larger performance, ballroom and community space reaching all the way back to the church, to the east on 138th Street. The old Y.W.C.A. building between the two would be replaced.

    Abyssinian has secured important backers: David N. Dinkins, the former mayor; Scott M. Stringer, the Manhattan borough president; and the New York Landmarks Conservancy, one of the city’s major preservation organizations.

    The conservancy has endorsed the demolition of only the theater portion, but it is rare to have a preservation organization speak against any landmark proposal.

    For now, the Renaissance complex has the aspect of a romantic ruin. Perhaps half the tiles have fallen off, and the words “Chop Suey” are just visible on an old Chinese restaurant marquee projecting from the theater building.

    The soft tapestry-brick facade is so wet that fields of moss are growing straight up, like spring grass on the prairie.

    As the Renaissance project moves forward, no one has spoken up for the little Y.W.C.A. building on 138th Street, even though the shifting colors of its brick — orange, rust, yellow and purple — seem to warble like a bird’s song.

    Built in 1931 and designed by Joannes & Marlow, it is a perfect little gem of side-street architecture, all the more so because there is little in Harlem like it.

    The lower section, with its faceted bays weaving in and out, shows a clear awareness of German and Dutch Expressionist architecture. The parapet is a double row of bricks set in soldier courses, with the long side oriented up and down. The bricks are laid on intermittent, undulating mounds, and thus look like a marching column going up and down a hilly landscape.

    This is the one building whose demolition was never in doubt.

    Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company

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    Condo Boomlet Blurs Northern Borders

    Uptown has had buzz for a long time, but a glut of new condo developments north of 96th Street may finally mark the end of its lukewarm real-estate reputation—and a spike in rent and gentrification


    by Tom Acitelli
    Published: May 15, 2007



    Nearly half of all new Manhattan condo projects proposed by developers so far in 2007 have been for above 86th Street. And the vast majority of those are planned for north of 96th Street—not too long ago the bedrock southern border of much of Harlem.

    Developers must submit all condo plans to the State Attorney General’s office for approval. An analysis by The Observer of all plans submitted from Jan. 1 through May 7 shows that 46 percent of the 65 condo projects up for approval (and most of them will be approved) are planned for above 86th Street. Of those, 90 percent will go up north of 96th Street—and, of those 27 projects, 19 are slated for above 110th Street.

    It’s probably fair to say at this point that new condo developments spell the future for “hot” neighborhoods in New York now. Buyers who can afford the average Manhattan condo sales price of $1,100-plus per square foot move in; their presence spurs changes in retail, much of it street-level; that change fuels fluctuations in market-rate rentals in the area; people move out, and others move in; and the area—gradually, subtly, inexorably—changes.

    “You just didn’t go above 86th Street,” a top-producing broker at a top residential brokerage once told this reporter. Why not? “It was hard to get people to buy up there.”

    No longer. These lifestyle totems, bathed in antique-sounding marketing—Get every thing you could ever want without even leaving the building!—have drawn buyers to places where the neighborhood might not have been a draw before, and so now they are pulling them north.

    A duplex penthouse at the still-under-construction 111 Central Park North—a moniker made for marketers; you know the street better as plain old 110th Street—sold for a Harlem single-residence record of over $12 million in late 2006, according to the New York Post.

    And developers have confidence in continued buyer interest uptown, especially on the East Side.

    The traditional southern edges of Harlem on the West Side have morphed in recent years, with 125th Street abdicating its border status to the northward encroachment of Morningside Heights, the neighborhood around Columbia University that’s heavily influenced (and largely owned outright) by the Ivy League school. Even Manhattan Valley, a densely populated collection of blocks east of Amsterdam Avenue from roughly 96th to 110th streets, has seen itself subsumed into either the Heights or the Upper West Side, depending on whom you ask.

    For the East Side, however, a hilly, heavily trafficked 96th Street remains the palpable border between the Upper East Side and East Harlem.

    North of that border creeps a sizable amount of likely condo development, much of it luxury, though amenities and marketing have rendered that adjective impotent in the Gotham real-estate universe. With this creep comes all the socioeconomic implications for current residents, and perhaps for New York City as a whole, where prices are unabashedly high and many who buy here live merely part-time.

    Much of the proposed uptown development remains on the smaller side, measured by the dozens (or much less) rather than by the hundreds, like condo projects south of 86th Street and in western Brooklyn. Still, the amounts matter less than the reality.

    A conversion of a walk-up at 104 East 98th Street would create 10 condos for what’s dubbed Park 98 Condominium. The Aura condo at 328-330 East 109th Street will create from scratch 28 units, according to a plan filed with the State Attorney General’s office. A conversion at 668 Riverside Drive will create a 64-unit condo, one of the biggest projects filed for approval.

    Developers won’t build all of these condos, but the plans filed with the attorney general display a barometer of confidence in the vibrancy of the uptown market—a vibrancy on keen display throughout the rest of Manhattan. In 2006, more than 4,100 condos changed hands in the borough, according to the appraisal firm Miller Samuel; in the first quarter of 2007, 1,703 condos sold—a quarterly high going back to at least 1988.

    Uptown sales figures for condos alone weren’t available, but sales have been brisk as of late among condos and co-ops taken together.

    In the first quarter of 2007, 148 condos and co-ops traded hands uptown (meaning north of 116th Street on the West Side, and north of 96th Street on the East Side), according to Miller Samuel. That’s the second-highest quarterly total since at least the 1980’s; the fourth quarter before was the third-highest such total.

    Originally published in The New York Observer newspaper on 5/20/2007.

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    From http://cityrealty.com/new_developments:

    Third Gryzwinksi Pons design for Upper Manhattan 10-MAY-07



    Gryzwinksi Pons, the architects of THOR (The Hotel on Rivington), the prominent Lower East Side skyscraper hotel, has designed its third residential condominium project in Upper Manhattan at 408 East 118th Street.

    Construction contracts are now going out to bid for the 12-story 118th Street project, which will contain 26 apartments, Matthew Gryzwinksi told Cityrealty.com today. The project is shown at the right and is located between First Avenue and Pleasant Avenue. It has a distinctive facade that is asymmetrical with a strong vertical emphasis.

    Three blocks to the south at 411 East 115th Street, it is building a 33-unit condominium apartment building for Rudd Realty. That building extends through to 116th Street where floors 3 through 7 are supported by pilotis and connected by a skybridge to the 115th Street wing.

    At 306-8 West 11th Street in Harlem between Frederick Douglass Boulevard and Manhattan Avenue it has designed a building that will have a bright white facade of a concrete aggregate with titanium dioxide that is reputed to be self-cleaning.

    Mr. Gryzwinski told CityRealty.com that the project is moving forward and that facade material was employed by Richard Meier in his design of the Jubilee Church in Rome, but, to his knowledge, has not previously been used in this country.

    The building will have 15 residential condominium apartments including a three-bedroom duplex garden apartment and a three-bedroom duplex penthouse and two one-bedroom units. The remainder of the apartments will be two-bedroom units with about 1,000 square feet each.

    The building will have an asymmetrical facade that will have an open shaftway behind part of it that will create a strong sense of depth and screening. The rear of the building will have balconies.

    The developer of the 116th Street building is the NCC Corporation.

    Gryzwinski Pons is the architect also for 115-119 Norfolk Street, a 7-story building with 24 apartments that is being developed by Zeyad Aly. 115 Norfolk Street will be distinguished by an open-top atrium entrance and by its random design of fretted glass windows. The atrium is slightly off-center to the south of the building's frontage on Norfolk Street. The atrium will be enclosed in glass on Norfolk Street but its west wall is angled upwards and towards the west and rises a bit above the roofline. The atrium's top is open to the sky and the angled west wall is somewhat reminiscent of the Austrian Cultural Institute at 11 East 52nd Street designed by Raimund Abraham and opened in 2000.

    Apartments that overlook the atrium will have the same fretted glass windows as the Norfolk Street facade. Mr. Grzywinksi said that these windows will have random "cloud" shapes in angled fretted designs. This decorative touch is somewhat reminiscent of Lindy Roy's sinuously-shaped balcony "amoeba-shaped" scrims for a new project now under construction at 519 West 23rd Street known as Highline 519.

    It is one of three new projects on that Norfolk Street block that are quite radical and are likely to make it an important "destination" street for lovers of contemporary architecture. The most advanced project is the "Switch" building at 109 Norfolk Street, a 7-story building designed by Narchitects. Its zig-zag facade of angled floors facing Norfolk Street is now nearing completion. The largest of the three new projects is "Blue" at 105 Norfolk Street, a 16-story building, designed by Bernard Tschumi, that has an angled facade of different shades of blue glass.

  9. #39
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    Rental project planned for vacant Harlem lot


    By David Jones
    Updated On 01/31/08 at 04:42PM

    Jonathan Rose Cos. and Urban Builders Collaborative said they expect to break ground this summer on an environmentally friendly mixed-income project called Kingsgate House, a 185-unit rental building at a long vacant site at Second Avenue and 124th Street.

    The developers urged the City Planning Commission to approve to rezone the East Harlem site to allow for denser development. The site includes a mix of private and city-owned land that has been a vacant for more than 20 years.

    The property lies just outside the 125th Street district that the city plans to rezone.

    Paul Freitag, development studio director for Jonathan Rose, said the developer includes affordable units in "almost all of our properties."

    Kingsgate House would be developed under the city 50/30/20 affordable housing program. The Housing Preservation Development Department program helps finance buildings that offer 50 percent of their units at market rate, while 30 percent are reserved for middle-income tenants and 20 percent for low-income.

    The Bloomberg administration has worked to sell or transfer city-owned property, like the East Harlem site, to developers as a way of creating affordable housing.

    "One of the ways we can subsidize is not through transfer of funds but transfer of a piece of land," said HPD spokesman Seth Donlin.

    The project would be financed with $65 million in tax exempt bonds, low-income housing tax credits and incentives from the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority.

    Kingsgate House will include 8,000 square feet of retail space and 120 underground parking spots. Amenities would include a doorman, concierge and children's room.

    The building's environmentally-friendly features would include renewable building materials, energy-efficient mechanical and water systems, high-quality air filtration and green roofs.

    Community Board 11 has demanded several of these environmental features as part of any zoning changes in East Harlem. In a 2006 statement, the board called for any new project to include underground parking, appropriate air filtration and green open space.

    Kingsgate House will aim for silver Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) rating from the U.S. Green Building Council.

    © 2008 The Real Deal

  10. #40

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    does anyone know when the market on 116th between Fifth and Lenox will be knocked down to build new condos, co-ops, luxury rentals?
    This was supposed to have happened already, but the market is still there

  11. #41

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    Yeah, I walk past it regularly. There never seems to be any customers, just stallkeepers.

  12. #42

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    exactly! I used to see customers only on early Sunday mornings - a couple of buses of European tourists. Those buses are gone and now I never see any customers at all , no matter what time of day. It is a waste of space. That market needs to be demolished and luxury development so that 116th street can be completely out of view of those damn projects on 115th.

  13. #43
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    Syncopation on Adam Clayton Powell Boulevard




    08-FEB-08

    A six-story, 35-unit residential condominium is under construction at 2201 Adam Clayton Powell Boulevard at 130th Street in Harlem.

    The building's facades of concrete, glass and brick mesh is intended to create, according to the developers, WA Design and Development of which Trevor Whittingham and David Atkinson are the principals, "a Mondrian-like effect."

    While the inspiration might be Mondrian's famous "Boogie-Woogie" painting, the overall design is more three-dimensional because of its irregular fenestration in which many windows are slightly protruded but there is little doubt that the building's aesthetic is jazzy and syncopated.

    Marc B. Spector of the Spector Group of North Hills, N.Y., is the architect.

    The development received a building permit December 24.

    The building has a boldly colored, asymmetrical design with some protruding windows. It has a fitness center with a swimming pool surrounded by a terrace and a rooftop running track. It also has a conference room, 24-hour doorman service, live-in superintendent and a garage.

    Apartments range from studios to three-bedroom units and ceilings are 13 to 15 feet high. The building has video security surveillance and mounted safes for valuables.

    Copyright © 1994-2008 CITY REALTY.COM INC.

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    Everything looks fine except for the small windows. That ruined the whole design.

  15. #45
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    That market you guys are talking about can be partially seen here, next to the Kalahari:



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