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Thread: Harlem Residential Development

  1. #76
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Turning Old School Into New Condos

    By JOSH BARBANEL



    Only a few years ago, P.S. 90 on West 148th Street was a symbol of urban blight. The leaky shell of a school, which had trees growing out of the roof, sat in the center of a block of boarded-up tenements that the city had taken over because of unpaid taxes.

    But now West 148th Street has been reborn, with the help of city programs and government subsidies. And in the final test of the neighborhood's resurgence, the century-old gothic school building has been transformed into 75 condominiums, including 55 to be sold at competitive market rates.

    The new condominium development, known as PS90, is due to open its doors in the next few days, in the shell of a classic H-shaped public school designed by Charles B.J. Snyder, at the turn of the last century, when Harlem was a new, growing urban neighborhood. The city transferred title to the school in 2008.

    The elaborate stonework, gargoyles and bas-relief have been repaired and restored. The classrooms, with huge arched window and high ceilings have been turned into unusually spacious condominiums by L+M Development Partners, one of the companies that redeveloped much of the rest of block.



    PS90 has yet to pass its final exam: selling out. Ron Moelis, the head of L+M, said that even before the building went on the market last fall, he was forced to cut initial asking prices by as much as 20%, because of the eroding real-estate market.

    With the reduced prices, he said L+M may barely break even on what was to be the crown jewel of the redevelopment of West 148th Street between Frederick Douglass Boulevard and Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard.

    So far, he said, contracts have been signed for 14 of the project's 55 market rate apartments and 13 of 20 lower priced apartments, available only to buyers who meet strict income limitations.

    The prices work out to under $520 a square foot on most apartments, an unusually low figure even for the new condominium market in Harlem. But that is because the apartments had to be unusually large to fit into the contours of the school building.


    An interior view of P.S. 90 in Harlem before the old school, designed by Charles B.J. Snyder, was turned into condos.

    A typical one-bedroom on the fifth floor is listed at $625,000, but is 1,219 square feet, larger than some three-bedroom apartments elsewhere. A two-bedroom apartment down the hall is listed at $760,000, and includes 1,452 square feet of space. There are 12-foot ceilings in many apartments, with windows up to 10 feet high.

    The project, a block from an express subway stop, and 1½ blocks from Jackie Robinson Park, is at the upper edges of the band of new condominiums built in over the last few years.

    Stephen G. Kliegerman, the head of new development marketing at Halstead Property, which is selling the project, said the market-rate development was made possible, by the redevelopment of the rest of the block over many years. "It is the icing on the cake," he said.

    Before the redevelopment work began one decade ago, 17 of 19 residential buildings on the block had been taken over by the city for unpaid taxes, and many were vacant shells and rubble-strewn lots, according to the City's Department of Housing Preservation and Development.

    L+M, and another developer, BFC Partners, redeveloped the vacant properties into 187 rental and 103 cooperative apartments, as well as a tiny park at a cost of more than $42 million.

    Redevelopment of the school was delayed for a time as the Board of Education, considered whether to renovate the building and reuse it as a school again, Mr. Moelis said. During this period the roof deteriorated, causing extensive water damage requiring concrete columns and concrete floors to be replaced throughout the building, he said.

    The condominium development built another level on the roof including three penthouses with large terraces peeking out over the stone parapets. All three are now in contract.

    Along the original school corridors, the development kept decorative glass transoms and added new schoolhouse-style lamps. Huge coal boilers were removed and the space was turned into a bike room and space for a bike room, storage lockers, and fitness and media rooms.

    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000...rk_real_estate

  2. #77
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Brownstone Residents Oppose Construction of Affordable Housing on 123rd Street

    Some residents worry that a building will be out of character.

    by
    By Jeff Mays





    slide show

    HARLEM — A plan to build an 8-story affordable housing building on a parking lot on 123rd Street, between Adam Clayton Powell Jr. and Frederick Douglass boulevards, has divided a community.

    On one side are the residents of the brownstones that line 123rd Street, who say the building, to be built by the Abyssinian Development Corporation and used to relocate residents from the adjacent and decrepit low-rise Ennis Frances Houses, is out of character with their neighborhood.

    On the other side, literally on 124th Street, are Ennis Frances residents who say they deserve decent and affordable housing.

    Simmering beneath the surface is a resentment representative of the gentrification and class issues in Harlem where pricey brownstones and new construction stand next to public housing.

    That resentment finally exploded Wednesday night at a raucous Community Board 10 meeting where the two sides shouted at one another — and a few people almost came to blows — before the board overwhelmingly endorsed the plan with a 24 to 3 vote.

    "It's a class issue and it's a color issue: Green," said Kim Smith, a 17-year resident of Ennis Frances Houses. "They feel as if they have some money and their brownstones and we are poor, ignorant Negroes. We may not make $100,000, but we are decent people who want the best for our children."

    But it's not just about white people taking over the neighborhood — blacks and whites from 123rd Street oppose the plan.

    At the meeting they complained about drug sales and violence at Ennis Frances Houses as they fended off hecklers who criticized them for being newcomers to the neighborhood.

    That criticism prompted black 123rd Street homeowner Susan Myles to explain that she is a fourth generation Harlem resident whose grandmother worked on 125th Street when it was predominantly white.

    "I do understand the concerns," she said.

    The new 8-story, 60-unit building with 37 underground parking spaces will be built on the site of what is now a parking lot on 123rd street. After the building is completed in two years, residents from Ennis Frances will be relocated to the high-rise and Abyssinian would commence another 8-story 220-unit building on that site.

    123rd Street residents said they are concerned about the size of the building, the traffic it might bring and the possibility of the Ennis Frances Houses being left vacant while Abyssinian Development completes a plan to redevelop the building.

    "The scale of this project is found on the boulevard and not in the middle of a block full of brownstones," said 123rd Street resident Opal Lynton. "The proposed building is irresponsible and fails to show contextual respect for our neighborhood."

    Steven Whitter, president of the 124th Street Block Association said he was concerned about the density of the project.

    "If you look at the second and third phase of this project you are talking about double the number of residents," he said.

    Sheena Wright, Abyssinian Development's CEO, said the new building is desperately needed because of the crumbling conditions that Ennis Frances residents are living in.

    The new building is part of a three-part plan enacted when Abyssinian took over the building from the city in 2004. The first phase was the renovation of the 11-story Ennis Frances Tower on Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard.

    "The residents in the low-rises deserve a high-quality and standard of living...so they can enjoy the rebirth of Harlem," Wright said. "We want to make sure there is a balance. We all have to live in harmony."

    Wright said she said she expects construction on the site to be completed by 2014.
    Community Board 10 chair W. Franc Perry said he voted "yes" because of the strong support from Ennis Francis residents.

    Reaction on the street was mixed.

    "I hate it. The block is beautiful the way it is with all the brownstones," said Vesha Wright, 27, a dispatcher. "Harlem is changing. Everywhere you look there are 8 to 10 story buildings going up."

    However, Richard Burns said the development was just part of the neighborhood's growth.
    "Twenty years ago there were a whole lot of empty and abandoned buildings and now they're sold," said Burns, who has lived on the block for two decades. "This might be good."

    With the Community Board's approval, the project now goes to the City Planning Commission and the City Council for final approval.

    http://dnainfo.com/20100902/harlem/b...#ixzz0ySRVWBF9

  3. #78

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    Quote Originally Posted by Merry View Post
    Kim Smith, a 17-year resident of Ennis Frances Houses.
    I thought public housing was supposed to be temporary?

  4. #79
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
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    Those opposed to the project are idiots (and likely biased). Building on empty parking lots is a no-brainer. Nothing's getting torn down.

    8-stories is hardly that big anyway. This is New York, we have huge buildings butt up against three-story brownstones /tenements in many places and it works well.

    What they should be concerned about is the design of the building, not the size. The quality of the design and appearance will affect the character of the block more so than the size.

    Idiots.

  5. #80

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    Quote Originally Posted by antinimby View Post
    Those opposed to the project are idiots (and likely biased). Building on empty parking lots is a no-brainer. Nothing's getting torn down.
    Nothing, that is, other than the 'property value' of the brownstone residences. That 'type' of new building is not a 'value-added' addition to the neighborhood; some of those folks clearly recognize that and are 'understanably' opposed to the project. And the 'bias' part is true enough: many of the Brownstone residents just do not want that 'element' on-the-block. My guess is that the majority of the Brownstone owners are black; so it is not simply a racial bias issue.

    p.s. when I see line-up of posts from notables like antinimby, stroika, & merry - just makes me want to participate. Same 'general' idea at work on 123rd street.

  6. #81
    Forum Veteran Tectonic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stroika View Post
    I thought public housing was supposed to be temporary?
    Ha, unfortunately there are generations in public housing. Living the high life too.

  7. #82
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Gorgeous.


    Home Schooled at Harlem's P.S. 90

    Historic C.B.J. Snyder public school building reborn as Collegiate Gothic condos in model adaptive reuse

    Elizabeth A. Watson


    After sitting vacant for decades, the 104-year-old school has been returned to its former glory,
    with 75 condominiums artfully created within the structure's historic fabric.
    [Thomas H. Kieren / www.customcorpphotog.com]


    Adetail of new aluminum window profiles
    inserted within the restored facade.
    [courtesy L+M development]


    The landscaped rear courtyard features
    private terrace areas for surrounding units.
    [Thomas H. Kieren]

    As one of dozens of public schools closed during New York City’s financial woes in the 1970s, P.S. 90 has seen its share of hard times. Three decades of neglect brought perforated floors, a compromised rooftop, and a healthy resident pigeon population. The solid masonry construction, however, stood tall, and in 2008, L+M Development Partners acquired the five-story, 104,000-square-foot building for conversion into 75 condominiums—an ambitious undertaking that offers a model of adaptive reuse for Harlem.
    Constructed in 1906 on a midblock site on West 148th Street, P.S. 90 is one of several H-plan schools in Harlem designed by Charles B.J. Snyder, whose historically-inspired buildings remain neighborhood landmarks across the city. Working with Curtis + Ginsberg Architects, L+M directed significant effort to restoring a central source of the building’s appeal: a majestic, Collegiate Gothic–style facade composed of red brick and limestone, large windows, and terra-cotta detailing. To that end, according to L+M project manager Mentor Haxhija, the team mimicked historic window profiles with new aluminum frame windows, while also working to conceal rooftop penthouses from the street, sacrificing indoor square footage but creating spacious outdoor terraces.

    While the 16-inch-thick brick exterior was 99 percent intact, the interior structure was another story. Outdated in terms of today’s fire ratings, the original stairways were removed and the stairwells relocated. Most significantly, water damage had left Snyder’s efficient, patented floor system with disintegrated metal supports and eroded concrete. Modern concrete slabs completely replaced four floors and half of the first floor—all of which affected interior plans. Architect Mark Ginsberg noted that apartment layouts were already complicated by the school’s large original windows, which limited the placement of walls, while the H-plan presented “a number of dead corners that made it hard to divide into apartments.”


    To enhance accessibility, the main entrance was lowered one level, allowing for a lush, stepped garden
    in the forecourt and a double-height lobby space. [Thomas H. Kieren]

    Although L+M did not pursue a LEED rating, the building reuse incorporates sustainable features such as natural lighting, operable windows, and energy-efficient heat pumps. Light-colored paving materials are used on the rooftop and courtyards, the latter having drought-resistant gardens designed by Starr Whitehouse Landscape Architects. The development also strives to be socially sustainable, with 20 affordable units.

    With incentives still available for developing abandoned Harlem properties as condominiums, P.S. 90, with a total development cost of $40.5 million, might become something of a green pioneer. The owner of P.S. 186, another H-plan building just six blocks away, has plans to demolish the structure, but perhaps P.S. 90’s revival will prompt it to reconsider.

    http://www.archpaper.com/e-board_rev.asp?News_ID=4805

  8. #83
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Harlem Buildings Separated at Birth?

    October 13, 2010, by Joey Arak



    "Did someone move the Conrad one block from 110th to 109th and rename it the Pascal?" a tipster asks. "Am I crazy are do these buildings look identical?" You, sir, are not crazy. East Harlem's brand newish Conrad at 342 East 110th Street and brand new Pascal (launch party Sunday!) at 333 East 109th Street are both Hot Karl joints, which explains the similarity, though they're on opposite sides of the chess board. They're also the same size, developed by the same firm, and repped by the same broker. Two for the price of one! And these aren't the only lookalikes getting some attention uptown.



    Harlem Bespoke notes a new 8-story rental building at 525 West 133rd Street on the edge of Manhattanville and finds it strikingly similar to an older building two blocks away at 519 West 135th Street. Specially what's going on up at the top: "The penthouse glass arched roof looks kind of late 80's or early 90's to us and it seems a bit of a revival is at hand." If disco can have a comeback, we guess this can too. Doesn't mean we have to be happy about it.

    525 West 133rd Street Finishes Up [Harlem Bespoke]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2010/1...d_at_birth.php

  9. #84
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Yuck.

    the project nods to the surrounding terra-cotta rowhouses with its etched, slate-purple concrete cladding.


    Sweet Home for Adjaye on Harlem's Sugar Hill


    Construction set for the London architect's affordable housing and museum combo in historic Harlem neighborhood

    Julie V. Iovine


    While strikingly contemporary, the project nods to the surrounding terra-cotta rowhouses with its etched,
    slate-purple concrete cladding.


    If designing the African American Museum of History and Culture on the Washington Mall has brought national prestige to London-based architect David Adjaye, the more recent commission to design a new type of low-income housing for Harlem that incorporates a children’s museum, among other community-aimed offerings, will attract equal parts admiration and appreciation.

    Last month, the City Council unanimously approved the rezoning of the site—located on a high bluff at the northern edge of Sugar Hill, a landmarked district associated with the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s—from commercial to residential use, clearing the way for the $70 million plan to create 124 units of affordable housing within a 13-story building at 404-414 West 155th Street and St. Nicholas Avenue. A period garage with terra-cotta detailing will need to be demolished, but that does not appear to be unleashing preservationists’ protest, as the new project is so clearly needed to give the economically-stressed area a boost. The developer has also promised to photographically record anything of historical interest.

    Broadway Housing Communities (BHC), a nonprofit developer of supportive housing with a long track record for serving the neediest in Washington Heights and West Harlem, found a forward-thinking partner in Adjaye, whose career-long experience with innovative design programs is evident in his “Idea Store” libraries in London. With a brief to design something modern but complementary to the surrounding Gothic revival rowhouses, Adjaye presented a dark slab above a 76-foot glass-and-terrazzo base that steps back to create a ten-foot terrace and cantilever on opposite sides. Saw-toothed fenestration fans across both facades in oblique reference to the bay windows common in the area, but also provides views of the Hudson River and the new Yankee Stadium. The concrete cladding, tinted a dark slate-purple, will be etched with a rose pattern pre-cast in concrete panels.

    “David took the idea from the terra-cotta buildings in the neighborhood,” said Saky Yakas, the partner in charge at SLCE Architects, the project’s architect of record. “Quite a few neighborhood buildings have various plant and sunflower motifs decorating them. He wanted to relate to them.” The apartment units will accommodate 51 single adults and 73 families with a range of economic needs, from homeless individuals to those earning near median income for the area.

    The building base houses the 18,036-square-foot Faith Ringgold Children’s Museum of Art & Storytelling, named for and initiated by the distinguished artist and Sugar Hill native Faith Ringgold, known for her storytelling quilts. The museum’s ground-floor interactive exhibition and performance spaces are by Lee H. Skolnick Architecture + Design Partnership; a 12,196-square-foot daycare center and offices for BHC are on the second floor, while terraces open up on the third and ninth floors and the roof.

    To allow for a safer experience for children, residents, and community visitors entering from the steep and busy St. Nicholas Avenue, BHC exchanged easements with the NYC Department of Environmental Protection, the adjacent property owner, to allow for an outdoor plaza with hardscaping that will indicate in stone where the Old Croton Aqueduct still lies below. With the rezoning passed and the design complete, BHC expects to break ground on the project by the beginning of next year and complete it by 2012.

    http://www.archpaper.com/e-board_rev.asp?News_ID=4994

  10. #85
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Oh, dear .


    Fifth Avenue Facelift Revealed in Harlem

    by Dave Hogarty





    Photos from Harlem + Bespoke

    The total transformation of the facade at 2066 Fifth Avenue has been revealed via Harlem + Bespoke. Ten months ago we learned that "demolish 3rd, 4th floor and roof and build new 3rd, 4th floor and roof" meant practically the same as "remove the entire front of a building" in permit-speak. Now that the netting is off, we can see that the emphasis on windows remains, but in a totally new form with what looked like sash windows replaced with casements or sealed panes. All of the ornamentation has been replaced with flat brick, with a varied pattern breaking up the monotony.

    REVIVE: New 2066 Fifth Avenue Revealed [H+B]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2012/0..._in_harlem.php

  11. #86

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    Well, at least they kept the streetwall in place.

  12. #87
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    It's just so wrong. The owner & architect should be ashamed. And shamed ...

    DOB shows Owner as:

    2066 5th Avenue LLC / Rashid Elayyan / Munzer Elayyan

    Address:

    1028 40th Street Brooklyn NY 11219

    Architect (and Developer?):

    Van J Brody / Van Brody Architects

  13. #88

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    Shouldn't this fall on the city to prevent such crimes? The city should give a damn to prevent such nonsense rather than expecting a developer or architect to always care about the aesthetics of a street or restoration. I'm ashamed that the city government are such a bunch of do nothing philistines. They could do so much to protect their heritage yet they don't. The laws allow it, you can't really complain about the architect or client IMO. The blame is squarely on the city as for as I'm concerned.

  14. #89

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    More overstment...

    The city government is not responsible for architectural taste nor is big enough to handle the responsibility of maintaiing the aethetics of every facade in the city. The DOB gets hundreds of applications every week.

    A better question would be why this frontage wasn't landmarked.

  15. #90

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    In cities like London or Paris, you don't see this. NYC should have protected this building and others like it in general. Landmarked, protected district, design oversight planning board or something that would prevent such crimes.....that is the cities responsibility in the end, which was my point. Of course NYC is not really the same, is it? Nope, I guess I expect a little too much in comparison with our European friends. Given your harsh response, I don't think you understood properly my meaning, which is difficult sometimes online.

    Please, your first line was uncalled for and I felt it was a bit patronizing. Please don't jump down my throat when I express an opinion just because it isn't perfectly correct in every way. Oh, and if you are going to attack someone, make sure you can avoid typos, just saying...
    Last edited by futurecity; February 1st, 2012 at 01:26 PM.

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