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Thread: Harlem Residential Development

  1. #91

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    Even with all this gentrification, there are still way too many abandoned/vacant buildings in Harlem. Most of them interspersed with habitable ones.

  2. #92
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    404-414 West 155th Street, 8/23/13

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  3. #93
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    That corrugated facade will catch all sorts of nasty bits in time to come.

  4. #94
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    What's "NoHa?" - Real estate buffs rebrand Central Harlem as housing prices soar


    Homeowners, who bought brownstones on the cheap during the 1980's and 1990's, snub offers to sell their digs

    By Simone Weichselbaum


    JR/New York Daily News; Photos by Richard Harbus, Mariela Lombard, Simone Weichselbaum and Douglas Elliman

    The longtime denizens of Manhattan’s latest real estate hotbed are staying put . . . for now.

    Graying homeowners — who scored one of Central Harlem’s coveted brownstones a generation ago — have become millionaires on paper, living under roofs that now boast handsome seven-figure price tags.

    These blue-collar retirees are watching their neighborhood, once crime-infested and poverty-stricken, being reborn and rechristened as money-hungry real estate investors mine for gold in the pocket between W. 125th St. and W. 150th St.

    Joseph Wardally, 60, a former data processor who paid $85,000 for his four-story brownstone on W. 127th St. in 1995, said he could now command a cool $1.8 million for it.

    “People knock on my door all the time asking, ‘Do you want to sell your home?’ said Wardally. “I say ‘no.’ I am not putting it on the market. I like it here. I am not moving.”

    Realtors have even given the neighborhood — already flush with historic pride and a reputation that’s known the world over — an ersatz, trying-to-be-hip moniker, “NoHa,” shorthand for North Harlem.

    “That’s a bunch of crap,” Wardally said. “We are not SoHo, NoHo. We should be who we are.

    These days, however, Harlem’s identity is undergoing a heck of a makeover.

    Three doors down from Wardally’s abode is one of Harlem’s swankiest condo buildings, 50 West, where two-bedroom flats sell for upwards of $1.1 million and rent for close to $4,000 a month.


    Douglas Elliman
    Fancy living room in a two bedroom apartment on W. 127 St. listed by Douglas Elliman agent Kathy Murray.
    It rents for $3,950 a month.

    A townhouse around the corner, on Fifth Ave., is going for close to $3.5 million. In Harlem’s northwestern corner, on Riverside Dr. near W. 150th St., a three-bedroom apartment is listed for just over $1 million.

    “There is a progression northwards; young families are being priced out,” said Daniel Dolgicer, a Douglas Elliman broker who is working to lure prospective homebuyers uptown.

    “South Harlem is almost as expensive as the upper West Side,” he said. “‘SoHa’ is a sexy term. Acronyms do well in New York City. SoHa gets people’s attention. NoHa is the natural addition.”

    The rebranding isn’t eradicating many of Harlem’s lingering troubles.


    One of three blighted homes on W. 137 St., near Adam Clayton Powell Blvd., where brownstones have sold for more than $2 million.

    Central Harlem is home to the city’s highest overall death rate due to drug addiction, cancer and obesity-related illnesses — 8.8 deaths per 1,000 people — according to the latest stats from the city Health Department. Despite the influx of affluent newcomers, 2011 U.S. Census figures listed per-capita income at just $22,139, about one-third less than the citywide figure.

    None of that, however, has stymied the skyrocketing cost for landing a home in the hood, where averge sale prices have doubled over the last decade, according to numbers crunched by a Douglas Elliman analyst.

    Transition is on prominent display across Central Harlem. Blocks that were blighted by bricked up buildings are being renovated.

    Daryl Bloodshaw, a 44-year-old advertising exec who owns a home on W. 137th St., said the number of shuttered buildings on his block — where brownstones are selling for upwards of $2 million — went down from six to three since he moved there seven years ago.

    Still, the juxtaposition of wealthy yuppies clamoring to live amid remaining pockets of decay is Harlem’s new normal.

    And so is carving up the neighborhood and rebranding it as a trendy, chic destination.

    “NoHa is ridiculous,” Bloodsaw said. “They want to soften Harlem’s image. With Harlem, you have to take the good, the bad, and the indifferent.”

    http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/...icle-1.1433239

  5. #95
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    Let's hope it's an improvement on the original design.


    Towers would be Harlem’s tallest


    By Lois Weiss


    Original design
    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2013/0...est_towers.php

    A major Harlem site opposite the Metro-North station is about to get the neighborhood’s tallest building.

    At 320 feet, 1800 Park Ave. between 124th and 125th streets will soon host 650,000 square-foot twin residential towers that will include 70,000 square feet of retail.

    “We can build 320 feet with views of the river and views of the park and it will be extraordinary for the neighborhood,” said Ian Bruce Eichner of Continuum Cos. at a Young Mens’/Womens’ Real Estate Association meeting.

    Under the 80/20 program, the development will include about 120 affordable units and roughly 380 market-rate apartments that will rent at about $60 per square foot. Many apartments also will have balconies.

    Eichner has hired ODA-Architecture which is known for the quirky cantilevered 100 Norfolk and 15 Union Square West. “The ODA firm has done some interesting stuff,” he said. “This is a 37,000 square-foot footprint right next to Metro-North and it will have two very large towers.”

    Despite other air rights available on the block, an area height limit prevents him from adding to the project.

    Vornado Realty Trust had held the property, purchased from the New York College of Podiatric Medicine, for a future office tower but demand in the area has not made it cost-effective.
    As The Post first reported in April, Eichner picked up the site for $65 million.

    “We have the right acquisition numbers and Harlem has had no major development ever,” Eichner said.

    http://nypost.com/2013/09/11/harlem-...hoods-tallest/

  6. #96
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    "...and Harlem has had no major development ever,” Eichner said.

    What a stupid thing to say.

  7. #97

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    Re: "Towers would be Harlem’s tallest"

    his is great. Every time my train passes that crappy lot, I look forward to its redevelopment. It would be nice if Eichner acquires the junky College of Orthropedics building next to the lot.

  8. #98

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gulcrapek View Post
    404-414 West 155th Street, 8/23/13

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    According an article in DNAinfo, these buildings have spawned a modest amount of neighborly vituperation.

    http://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/2013...ks-controversy

  9. #99
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Pre-Punched Fedders Holes!!

  10. #100
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    This city does not have much character anymore. Lets hope it tips over before anyone moves in.

  11. #101
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    Tossed up whether to put this in the Lost & Threatened Treasures thread, but I guess, although it's far from ideal, at least something's happening to it.


    Makeover, Weird Addition Planned For Vacant Harlem Building

    December 23, 2013, by Jessica Dailey



    The burnt out prewar building at 92 Morningside Avenue has sat vacant for more than a decade. A 2002 fire ravaged the interior and displaced the former tenants, and over the last ten years, the boarded up building has fallen further into disrepair, attracting graffiti artists and squatters, even as the neighbors started to see new development. Two addition fires tore through the building in March 2012, then in May of this year, owner and notorious landlord Baruch Singer sold the crumbling property for $18 million to Renaissance Realty Group. The developer plans to rehab the seven-story rental building, which features a highly decorative brick and stone facade, and add some modern penthouse additions, which look like they were accidentally placed on the wrong project. Harlem Bespoke spotted the rendering on the construction fencing, noting that they're happy that renovations are underway but "we would have liked a more traditional update that would haver restored the lost cornice."


    Photo via DNAinfo

    REVIVE: Cathedral Additions at 92 Morningside [Harlem Bespoke]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2013/1...m_building.php

  12. #102
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Well that's awkward.

  13. #103

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    If they use nice materials that could turn out well. If not it will look like a terrible joke.

  14. #104

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    They need to put back the cornice. That should be the numero uno exterior priority of the rehab.
    Dummies with bad taste.

  15. #105

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    That's not exactly refined or sophisticated design work; but definitely is 'nice looking enough' in my opinion. When I see a building like that with a fair amount of masonry, varied colors/textures along with some classical details: it is architectural eye candy enough for me....

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