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Thread: Harlem Residential Development

  1. #106
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Very nice in the rendering, at least.


    The Lenox, 360 Lenox Avenue



    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2014/0...er_sponsor.php

  2. #107

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    Lenox Ave is very beautiful. However, the medians should be expanded and planted, and the sidewalks should be widened.
    Last edited by londonlawyer; January 5th, 2014 at 09:06 AM.

  3. #108
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    Lenox Ave has some of the widest sidewalks in the city. I'm working on a project there and the sidewalk is 30' wide.

  4. #109

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    My thought was to widen them to accommodate trees and flowers.

  5. #110
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
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    Does anyone know what they're building on the vacant lot at Lenox and 125th? This Daily News article says a Whole Foods and Burlington Coat Factory is going in there but no mention of anything above that.

    I can't imagine they'd just build a retail box (taxpayer) without a residential or office component at that location. I checked the DOB but it doesn't show any new NB permits for that location.

  6. #111
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    I never know if these links work, but here: http://a810-bisweb.nyc.gov/bisweb/Jo...ssdocnumber=01. It's for 6 story commercial building. Many of the lots on 125th are only getting commercial buildings (the new Joe's Crab Shack etc building) and not towers. This has to have something to do with wildly lame zoning. Anyway, the bin is 1089325.

  7. #112
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    Thanks, you're right. The zoning can be so fu*king stupid but then, we already know that.

  8. #113

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    Didn't know whether to post this in Harlem Renaissance or Development. Mods move if needed.

    East Harlem Community Board signs off on towers that would be tallest


    OKs parking waiver that will allow Continuum Co. to build 32-story complex that will include 682 apartments, 63,000 square feet of retail space.

    By Michael J. Feeney / NEW YORK DAILY NEWS




    ODA/ODA

    Rendering of 1800 Park Ave., the planned 32-story retail-residential complex that will be Harlem’s tallest structures.



    Build it and they will shop.
    An East Harlem community board voted unanimously Tuesday to approve a zoning variance that will allot more retail space and less parking to what could become Harlem’s tallest buildings.

    “We think the trade-off between parking and retail is beneficial to the neighborhood,” said George Sarkissian, district manager of Community Board 11, of the massive mixed-use project at 1800 Park Ave. at E. 125th St.


    The additional retail, which will be expanded to include 63,200 square-feet of ground floor and second-story space, will slash available parking to just 123 spots for 682 residential units at the 32-story complex, community board members said. Originally, 304 spaces were slated for residents at the two buildings.

    Under an original plan, the second floor would have been used as a parking garage for residents of the buildings.
    When they’re completed in 2017, the two buildings will stand as Harlem’s tallest structures, officials said.
    Whatever fears arise from the limited parking, community leaders cheered the potential for neighborhood employment.

    “Those additional jobs are important to a community that is struggling with 17% unemployment,” Sarkissian said.
    The existing zoning had mandated that building developer Continuum Co. provide parking spaces for 40% of all residential units. That means the developer would have made parking available in underground space and on the second floor.


    Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/...#ixzz2tlwEqPZN

  9. #114
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    HAP Investments Gives Locals a Say in New Project's Design

    Neighbors Upset With Balcony Colors Get Vote From Developer

    By Josh Barbanel


    East Harlem residents weren't happy about the pink-and-turquoise facade of a new building,
    above in a rendering, so the developer is giving them a vote. Karim Rashid


    Neighbors along a block of century-old buildings on Pleasant Avenue in East Harlem weren't pleased when a developer broke ground in April on a narrow concrete-and-glass building with eye-popping bright pink and turquoise balconies.

    Now the developer, HAP Investments LLC, is offering the disgruntled neighbors and architectural aficionados everywhere an opportunity to collaborate: They can vote to choose a new color scheme for the project.

    But even before the votes are counted, some neighbors still aren't happy.

    Eran Polack, chief executive of HAP, a development and investment group, promised to change the balcony colors of the 30-foot-wide building to the choice that gets the most votes in a poll conducted at the construction site and online.

    "I think it was the color that was giving people the impression that it is out of context," he said. "Maybe with a different color people will think it is part of the neighborhood."

    But neighbors say their objections to the eight-story building, sandwiched between a five-story walk-up and a three-story brownstone, both dating back to around 1900, go far beyond the choice of a palette.

    They say the design of the market-rate rental building is an intrusion on the block, mostly because the developer decided to set the front entrance 28 feet back from the sidewalk, thrusting the bulk of the structure back toward the backyards of 10 smaller buildings.

    "They should pick it up and move it to Mars," said Laurena Torres, a commercial real-estate broker who lives around the corner on East 118th Street. "There it would be contextual."

    The building was created by Karim Rashid, an Egyptian-born industrial designer based in New York, who says he has designed more than 3,000 products, from luxury goods to soap bottles to manhole covers. Many have bright colors, and pink is a favorite.

    On Pleasant Avenue, angled walls on the balconies create an S-shape pattern going up the building front. A 6-foot-high digital ceramic mosaic mural will extend along a 28-foot wall in the entrance plaza.


    An apartment building going up at 329 Pleasant Ave. was designed to have bright
    pink-and-turquoise balconies; now, though, the East Harlem community is getting
    to weigh in on the project's color scheme. Peter J. Smith for The Wall Street Journal


    Voters will be able to choose from a version of the current colors to some more soothing combinations such as white with magenta trim that gets lighter toward the top of the building.

    The online survey will be available until Oct. 3. On-site voting at 329 Pleasant Ave. will take place on Oct. 2 from 4 to 7 p.m. and Oct. 3 from 8 to 11 a.m.

    Preservationists say this modern building on a street of older homes raises questions about how much new design should respect or reflect the traditional values of a neighborhood.
    Peg Breen, president of the New York Landmarks Conservancy, said the building "looks like it belongs in Miami Beach" rather than East Harlem.

    "This building is totally out of context," she said. "It doesn't matter what the color is. It doesn't show any respect for the neighborhood. I don't think saying you are going to be cutting- edge gets you a free pass."

    But Mr. Rashid said he doesn't believe architects have to "marry or reflect existing surroundings."

    "A building should evolve and push the neighborhood to change and speak of the time in which we live," he said. "What makes cities beautiful is the collage of periods, growth and diversity."

    Still, Mr. Rashid said he believed his building has some neighborhood context that was set by building codes and zoning codes rules, with their many requirements for setbacks and lighting. He calls his building a form of "affordable luxury."

    The building is going up—foundation work began a few weeks ago—on a lot that is 143 feet deep, much deeper than the typical 100-feet-deep Manhattan lot.

    The deep lot allowed HAP to move the building toward the rear, angering neighbors. Since the spring, they—along with local elected officials—have been trying to get the developers to line up the front of the building with other buildings on the street.

    Mr. Polack said the front setback was required by zoning rules, but Assemblyman Robert J. Rodriguez, who represents the area, disputed that.

    "We hate the color, we think it is ridiculous," Mr. Rodriguez said. "But that is the most minor issue they could address. They have bigger issues."

    Mr. Rashid's design for HAP 5, the 20-unit rental building on Pleasant Avenue, is one of four designs for buildings in East Harlem he has developed for HAP. Another has a seven-story wall of irregular triangles of glass panes fitted together.

    Mr. Polack said he is working closely with the neighbors, who are worried about losing light and views of an empty lot that will soon provide much-needed housing in the city.
    "That is the nature of cities," he said.

    http://online.wsj.com/articles/hap-i...rk_real_estate

  10. #115
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    Archicritic Likens Sugar Hill Apts To an Unprepared 'A' Student

    by Zoe Rosenberg


    [Images via Evan Reeves's "Previewing Harlem's Controversial, Cantilevered Gray Building."]

    Harlem's new cantilevering, gray affordable housing complex Sugar Hill doesn't hide in a crowd. In fact, its design is so focused on its exterior, that New York Times archicritic Michael Kimmelman has been driven to bemoan the new structure containing 124 affordable apartments, a ground-floor pre-school, and community activity space/children's art museum,"Sugar Hill turns out to be like an A student who crams for the big test and then forgets to bring a pencil." That pencil turns out to be the apartments themselves, which Kimmelman describes as "awkward, with angled walls, quirky layouts that tenants may find hard to furnish, and deep-set, weirdly placed windows of various sizes." The point, however, is not lost that the building will still provide affordable homes for the lucky few who are chosen from the lottery (there were over 50,000 applicants, and only .25 percent will be accepted.)



    Despite its awkward interior layouts, Sugar Hill's contribution to the community is not null and void. After all, it is community and neighborliness that the building promotes, from its ground-floor pre-school and museum to the way the building is run. In its six other projects across the city, developer Broadway Housing Communities employs about one quarter of its tenants to manage the buildings' front desk throughout the day. It's an act that promotes "trust and investment, like in a town." As a result, the buildings are "among the safest and most admired projects of their type" in the city. The long and short of it, Sugar Hill is both a failure and a triumph. While much of its success hinges on the programming the children's museum will offer after it is completed next spring, Sugar Hill still brings the valuable commodity of affordable housing to the neighborhood. And the building is distinctive to boot.

    Building Hope and Nurturing Into Housing [NYT]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2014/1..._a_student.php

  11. #116
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    Phew!


    Quieter Hues Follow Outcry Over East Harlem Building

    Majority of Neighbors Vote for White Balconies Trimmed in Magenta

    By Josh Barbanel

    A lot of people in East Harlem, a tough neighborhood undergoing gentrification, said no to green and turquoise balconies planned for a new apartment building.


    A rendering of 329 Pleasant Ave.’s new color scheme.
    Century-old buildings on either side aren’t detailed. Karim Rashid

    But, they are OK with white balconies trimmed in magenta.

    Following complaints, a developer for the project at 329 Pleasant Ave. gave the neighborhood a chance to vote on the color scheme for an eight-story, modernist project going up between two century-old buildings, a brownstone and a five-story walk-up.

    The vote count came in Monday, and the original plan for balconies finished with alternating panels of angled green and turquoise glass was soundly defeated.

    With 297 votes counted, the winner was the most restrained of all color combinations on the ballot: white balconies with magenta trim that become less and less intense toward the top of the building.

    “Going forward we will be using the preferred color scheme in our development,” said Eran Polack, chief executive of HAP Investments LLC, the company developing the site.

    The winning color choice was identified as “Translucent Cirrus with graduated Magenta balcony trim.”

    The original scheme, “Stratos Blue/Cosmos with Ocean balcony trim,” placed third out of five combinations, with 46 votes.

    Beside the modernist design and vibrant colors, neighbors objected to the plan to erect the bulk of the Hap building back from the street.


    A rendering of new building at 329 Pleasant Avenue near East 118th Street. Karim Rashid

    Laurena Torres, a commercial real-estate broker who lives nearby and gathered petition signatures from neighbors who want to stop the building, refused to vote on the choice of a color scheme.

    “I have 1,143 people who say they don’t want this building to be here, period,” Ms. Torres said. “Forget about the colors and the 300 votes for pink, green or smoke. The bottom line is all of them are ridiculous because the property is totally incongruous.”

    All five choices of colors in the poll were created by Karim Rashid, who designed the building.

    “The facade will have a beautiful warm feeling like a sunset,” he said. “White glass always looks so elegant, the purity and cleanliness contrasting with the graduating pink hues running up the building.”

    http://online.wsj.com/articles/quiet...ing-1412647320

  12. #117
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    Broadway at 148 St., a few days ago


  13. #118
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    Wow!


    This Is What's Rising On Central Park's Northwest Corner

    by Jessica Dailey


    Rendering via Harlem Gal

    Where there once was a BP gas station, there will soon be a curved, glassy apartment building. Last December, it was revealed that a mixed-use building would replace a gas station on Central Park's northwest corner at 2040 Frederick Douglass Boulevard, and now Harlem Gal has the first rendering of the building, showing a 12-story building with multiple setbacks. The curved facade is mostly glass and dominated by floor-to-ceiling windows, but the side will be clad in grey brick. FXFOWLE designed the structure, and permits filed with the Department of Buildings show that it will measure 87,776 square feet and hold 50 units. Artimus Construction is the developer, and Harlem Gal notes that the construction fence sign says it will be complete by winter 2017.

    View rendering of new Harlem condo going up on 110th and Central Park North [Harlem Gal]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2014/1...est_corner.php

  14. #119
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    That's how you take advantage of being on a roundabout. FXFOWLE got it but apparently Robert Stern didn't on the other side of Central Park North with his condo/museum.

  15. #120
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    What is this building on the corner of Park & 125th Street?


    Harlem Rising
    by Nexis4Jersey09, on Flickr

    Whats going up here?

    Harlem Construction Mess by Nexis4Jersey09, on Flickr

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