Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 45

Thread: Myspace & Facebook.

  1. #1
    King Omega XVI OmegaNYC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Clifton, NJ
    Posts
    1,442

    Default Myspace.

    Anyone have this? What do you guys think of myspace?
    Last edited by Punzie; July 24th, 2007 at 09:12 PM. Reason: Added "Facebook" to thread title.

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Mieres, Asturias, Spain
    Posts
    67

    Default

    i have and i really use it.
    good way to meet ppl and keep in touch with them.
    i dont know why but is kinda addicted

  3. #3

    Default

    I also use it almost every day. I really like that community.

    But unfortunately this website has sometimes really problems. Sometimes the chat doesn´t work or is too slowly. Another day you have problems with sending or receiving messages and so on... Everyday a new problem...

    greetings
    LadyLiberty

  4. #4

    Default

    Myspace is now awash with advertising. Try City Bitty.

  5. #5
    King Omega XVI OmegaNYC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Clifton, NJ
    Posts
    1,442

    Default

    what is that? I couldn't find it on google

  6. #6

    Default

    My error.

    City Bity.

    http://citybity.com/

    "People" are "saying" that it's going to be the next "Big Thing".

  7. #7

    Default

    I never went on myspace until I started following the journey of Ryan running across the country from New York to LA

    http://blog.myspace.com/index.cfm?fu...endID=83830290

    By the way, he's in Denver now.

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gregory Tenenbaum View Post
    My error.

    City Bity.

    http://citybity.com/

    "People" are "saying" that it's going to be the next "Big Thing".
    haha how many more of these sites do we need

    Friendster, Hi5, Facebook, Linkedin, Okrut, MSN Spaces, and i am sure there are bunch more I am unaware about..

    I admit it.. ima myspace addict!

  9. #9

    Default

    I only used it at first to tell people to stop hotlinking to images on my webpage.

    Now I use it to keep up with my nieces and nephews. Good thing too, some of them don't have enough sense not to list their cellphone number on their page.

  10. #10

    Thumbs down MySpace

    So many hundreds of people I know have pages on MySpace that I was practically forced to join. I put in the minimum amount of info and time to keep my account active.

    Despite the large publicity on MySpace child predators, I know many young kids who use it anyway. (They lie and say they are age 14, the minimum age, when they sign up.) The girls' attitude is, "It won't happen to me because I'm smart and careful." The boys' attitude is, "It only happens to girls."

    If I turned the kids in, they would just cut communication off with me completely and start a new account. So I make the (controversial) judgement call of not turning them in; instead, I get them to tone down their pages and to very carefully screen "new friends."

  11. #11
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Rutherford
    Posts
    12,781

    Default

    Or you just track down information about them, find their real name and call their parents/IP company.

    You also help on the other end by teaching them how to avoid and screen. You can never be too careful with things like that.

  12. #12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ninjahedge View Post
    Or you just track down information about them, find their real name and call their parents/IP company.

    You also help on the other end by teaching them how to avoid and screen. You can never be too careful with things like that.
    I have a lot of information about the kids with whom I communicate online. You are assuming that these kids have parents who are "fit" to be parents. In my opinion, their parents are unfit -- in this regard. A phone call to them would be either ineffectual or worse than nothing.

    What can one do, have social services intervene in all these cases? Have all these kids taken away from their parents? Do you have any idea how many kids abuse MySpace?

    That's why I make the judgement call to educate the kids I know who are using MySpace. You suggested that I teach them how to avoid and screen. That's exactly what I do.

  13. #13

    Default

    Newsday, 11/26/06, p.C9:

    Suits invade MySpace

    By Glenn Gamboa

    Let's say you like Jay-Z and you're on MySpace.

    You're excited about H.O.V.A.'s return and you add his single to your page so that "Show Me What You Got" plays whenever someone visits your profile. You add the video to your page so that you and your friends can watch it easily.

    Do these actions make you a fan or a thief?

    It depends on who you ask.

    According to a lawsuit filed earlier this month by the Universal Music Group - home to U2, Mariah Carey, Jay-Z and hundreds of other artists - you, and millions like you, are thieves, helping MySpace make money through "user-stolen" content instead of "user-generated" content.

    The questions Universal is asking are good ones. Is playing people your favorite song or showing them your favorite video a crime? If MySpace benefits from the illegal actions of its members, should they be held accountable?

    If Universal's lawsuit against MySpace would lead to getting some concrete answers to these questions from a federal court, the company would be doing a great service. Of course, hardly anyone thinks it will get that far.

    After all, Universal only filed the lawsuit after talks between the companies broke down over how much My-Space should pay it as a licensing fee for the videos. Universal had a similar beef with YouTube, calling the site and its users "copyright infringers" that owe them "tens of millions of dollars," but those taunts went away after they signed an agreement for payment.

    Funny how that works, right?

    See, here's the problem. The major music companies don't want those key questions answered. They would never say it (for legal reasons, as well as tactical business ones), but they want to have it both ways.

    Secretly, they almost always love it when people add their artists' music and videos to their MySpace or YouTube profiles because it spreads the word about those artists - and it doesn't cost the companies one cent in promotion. They even contract with these Web sites to help promote new - or in the case of Diddy, not so new - artists. Unfortunately, music companies must vigorously pursue copyright infringement of all sorts, because, under current copyright law, if they don't, they could lose that copyright in court.

    If these issues were settled, the music companies couldn't use the threat of lawsuits in their negotiations with MySpace, YouTube or whomever. And since all these technological developments land smack-dab in the middle of legal gray areas, no one is really sure what the courts may decide and no one wants to risk billions of dollars in potential revenue on an issue that is essentially a 50-50 gamble.

    The music companies can argue that these Web companies are making significant profits as a result of the copyright infringement of its members. The Web companies can argue that they try to enforce copyrights and shouldn't be held liable for the actions of its members. They can argue it would be like going after the phone companies because phones were used by con men in a scam.

    "It's unfortunate they decided to file this unnecessary and meritless litigation," MySpace said in a statement. "We provide users with tools to share their own work - we do not induce, encourage or condone copyright violation in any way."

    The music companies may have a better case against individuals who post the songs or the videos, though that's also far from a legal slam dunk. And they don't really want to start filing lawsuits against millions of Justin Timberlake fans who want to bring "SexyBack" to their profiles. Besides, those fans don't have the cash to make it worthwhile anyway. (In its lawsuit, Universal wants MySpace to pay $150,000 for every song or video improperly used on the site.)

    At this point, music companies don't like any of the real answers.

    So they're just going to keep asking these questions.

    Copyright 2006 Newsday Inc.

    http://www.newsday.com/entertainment...sic-columnists

  14. #14

    Default

    On October 21, 2006, MySpace put on "Rock for Darfur," which was fundraiser involving... well... a web page can be 1000 words:

    http://www.myspace.com/rockfordarfur

    Many people have conflicted emotions about this. On the one hand, it is a wonderful cause, and MySpace can educate the most number of young people about it. On the other hand, MySpace has been lax about the security of its young members; it needs to put a "Rock for Darfur" amount of money into extra patrolling of its site and a mass campaign for computer security awareness.

    Ideally, MySpace should have implemented all of the above, but they obviously preferred to have higher profit margins.

  15. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Liverpool UK
    Posts
    264

    Default

    in the UK myspace is the medium throught which new bands get their music "out" and build a wider audience. In fact, it is the defacto route abnds now take. They have bypassed the record companies

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Wired New York on Facebook
    By Edward in forum Social Club
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: July 7th, 2009, 01:21 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Google+ - Facebook - Twitter - Meetup

Edward's photos on Flickr - Wired New York on Flickr - In Queens - In Red Hook - Bryant Park - SQL Backup Software