Page 5 of 23 FirstFirst 12345678915 ... LastLast
Results 61 to 75 of 341

Thread: Broadway Boulevard : Street Reclamation - Expanded Pedestrian Areas

  1. #61
    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Nairobi Hilton
    Posts
    8,511

    Default

    I wonder what the snowplows will do with all of this.

  2. #62

    Default

    It's really a traffic study, and has to be easily dismantled if it doesn't work out.

    They could have just cordoned off the lanes, and conducted a traffic study, but this way, they get public participation and possible support for something permanent.

  3. #63
    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Nairobi Hilton
    Posts
    8,511

    Default

    I'm all for that!

  4. #64
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Rutherford
    Posts
    12,773

    Default

    Suggetsions:

    Move the green lane back out next to traffic. Prohibit parking and standing of ANY sort on that side of the street (get aggressive with the ticketing).

    SOLID curbs and "benches" (crash barriers with seats) between the "waiting at the corner to cross" nubs they have lined out now.

    That is about it. The plants are nice, but unless you find a way to get some trees out there, I don't know how long they will last w/o disney-like care and attension.

    Hmmm.....Disney.........

  5. #65
    Moderator NYatKNIGHT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Manhattan - South Village
    Posts
    4,240

    Default

    February 25, 2009

    Mayor Plans to Close Parts of Broadway to Traffic


    By WILLIAM NEUMAN and MICHAEL BARBARO


    The city plans to close several blocks of Broadway to vehicle traffic through Times Square and Herald Square, an experiment that would turn swaths of the Great White Way into pedestrian malls and continue Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg’s effort to reduce traffic congestion in Midtown.


    The New York Times
    Broadway traffic would also be barred in Herald Square.

    Although it seems counterintuitive, officials believe the move will actually improve the overall flow of traffic, because the diagonal path of Broadway tends to disrupt traffic where it intersects with other streets.

    The city plans to introduce the changes as early as May and keep them in effect through the end of the year. If the experiment works, they could become permanent. The plan was described by several people who were briefed on it this week.

    Mr. Bloomberg was expected to announce the plan Thursday.

    A City Hall spokesman declined comment in advance of the announcement.
    The plan calls for Broadway to be closed to vehicles from 47th Street to 42nd Street. Traffic would continue to flow through on crossing streets, but the areas between the streets would become pedestrian malls, with chairs, benches and cafe tables with umbrellas.

    Seventh Avenue would be widened slightly within Times Square to accommodate the extra traffic diverted from Broadway.

    Below 42nd Street, Broadway would be open to traffic, but then would shut down again at Herald Square, from 35th Street to 33rd Street. Then, below 33rd, it would open again.

    The plan is the latest move by Mr. Bloomberg to change the way the city thinks of its streets, making them more friendly to pedestrians and cyclists and chipping away at the dominance of the automobile.

    Once the changes are in effect, a large stretch of Broadway in the heart of Midtown would be radically changed.

    Last summer, the city narrowed Broadway from 42nd Street to 35th Street by setting aside two lanes on the east side of the street for a bike lane and promenade with tables, chairs and planters.

    That project, called Broadway Boulevard, met with some skepticism at first but quickly became a popular lunch spot for office workers and tourists. Under the new plan, officials are considering creating a similar promenade from 47th Street north to the vicinity of Columbus Circle.

    A theater industry executive who was briefed on the plan this week said the reaction among Times Square business leaders was largely favorable.

    “I think it potentially could be a big plus if it speeds up traffic flow through the Times Square area,” said the executive, who spoke on condition of anonymity because the briefing was considered confidential until the mayor announces his plan. “If you have a major pedestrian area, that actually could be something welcoming and lovely.”

    Cora Cahan, president of the New 42nd Street, a nonprofit group that oversees seven historic theaters, said she was not briefed on the latest plan but had seen preliminary proposals last year.
    “I think it’s very worth trying,” she said, adding that Times Square badly needs more room for pedestrians.

    The plan has some risks, especially if it does not deliver on the promise of decreasing congestion.

    New York drivers, including cabbies and truck drivers, can be zealous in defending their use of the city’s streets. Their passion helped doom Mr. Bloomberg’s congestion-pricing proposal last year to charge drivers to use the most heavily traveled streets of Manhattan.

    Some may also question the timing, now that the city is struggling with a recession. The theater executive who was briefed on the plan said one worry was whether taxis and other vehicles would have difficulty leaving people in front of theaters.

    Jeffrey Zupan, a senior fellow for transportation for the Regional Plan Association, an independent organization, said planners had been calling for similar changes for years.

    He said Broadway tended to foul up traffic at each intersection with an avenue. To allow for green lights on Broadway, the duration of the green lights on the avenues and cross streets had to be shortened, backing up traffic.

    “The lower the volume is on Broadway — or if you eliminate it altogether — then traffic is going to move better,” Mr. Zupan said. “That’s one of the positive things that’s going to come out of this. The win-win is that the space that you’re freeing up will be used by pedestrians.”


    Copyright 2009 The New York Times Company

    http://www.nytimes.com/2009/02/26/ny...dway.html?_r=1


  6. #66
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Rutherford
    Posts
    12,773

    Question

    It sounds good, but Broadway is not a small area. It is not like closing Mott street in Chinatown. I wonder if they could really do sonething like that on ALL the major intersections with broadway, from maybe the Park down to City Hall?

    Are there areas where a pedestrian mall would just be a waste? Some areas would be great to have some seating, but others would front things that had no real need or desire for it (office buildings?)

  7. #67
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    Mayor Mike: You can do this to Broadway in my neighborhood anyday.

    Fat chance. it would be like trying to divert the Hudson.

  8. #68

    Default

    I think this idea is pretty bad. Anyone who has walked down the stretch of Broadway between Macy's and Time Square can tell you a-that the design with the yellowish gravel like surface cover is ugly and belongs in Florida not New York City and b-that the area is dead and almost depressing.

    Better squares and focused public spaces are great, but a narrow long stretch isn't what we need. I hope this plan is rejected by years end.

  9. #69

    Default


    Photo: Carol Rosegg

  10. #70

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ninjahedge View Post
    It soundsI wonder if they could really do sonething like that on ALL the major intersections with broadway, from maybe the Park down to City Hall?
    Above 14th St, Broadway meanders across several of the north-south avenues.

    Below 16th St, Broadway itself becomes a major route. In the Village area, it's 6th Ave (northbound) and Broadway (southbound).

  11. #71
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    If only Robert Moses had succeeded in cutting Fifth Avenue through the middle of Washington Square Park all Broadway traffic problems would be solved.

    It's never too late to dream

  12. #72

    Default

    I like it.


    curbed.com

  13. #73

    Default

    Funny how the difference is magnified by arranging the traffic in an orderly formation.

  14. #74
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default Green Light for Midtown


    Broadway traffic plan could create pedestrian oases in sea of congestion


    By Heather Murray

    A new city plan to close Broadway to vehicles at Times and Herald Squares could make streets safer for pedestrians and ease Midtown traffic congestion, Mayor Michael Bloomberg and Department of Transportation Commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan announced at a press conference for the new pilot program late last month.

    The DOT program “Green Light for Midtown,” which will launch on Memorial Day weekend, will divert traffic from Broadway between 47th and 42nd Sts. and between 35th and 33rd Sts.

    The department expects the modifications to give drivers up to a 66 percent increase in green lights at Herald Square alone, as well as reduce accidents.

    Midtown traffic along Sixth and Seventh Ave. currently crawls at about only 5 miles per hour, according to DOT statistics, with the slowest speeds at the gridlocked Times and Herald Squares. The department expects the initiative to decrease travel times from 59th to 23rd Sts. by up to 17 percent on Seventh Ave. and by 37 percent on Sixth Ave.

    The 356,000-plus people who visit Times Square each day will benefit from over 2.5 acres of open space added to the area through new pedestrian plazas built between late May and September along Broadway as part of the $1.5 million project.

    Esplanades will also be created on Broadway from Columbus Circle to 47th St., and from 33rd to 26th Sts.

    “By making targeted adjustments at Broadway’s two main pinch points, we believe we can ease traffic congestion throughout the Midtown grid,” Bloomberg said at the Feb. 27 press conference. He indicated that the pilot program, which is set to run through December, could be extended beyond the trial period if it has the positive impacts on traffic that the DOT has predicted.

    “We’re going to the heart of the matter and piloting a simple solution to a complex problem,” Sadik-Khan added. “The ‘Green Light for Midtown’ plan will work with the grid instead of against it, correcting the complicated intersections that create traffic congestion, while creating enough space to enhance safety.”

    A DOT online presentation on the program shows that Broadway at Times Square has, on average, 137 percent more pedestrian crashes than at other avenues in the area.

    The city already claimed two Broadway traffic lanes from vehicles between 42nd and 35th Sts. last summer, turning them into a bike lane and a promenade with seating and green space. The DOT found that those improvements cut traffic-related injuries in half.

    Christine Berthet, co-chairperson of Community Board 4’s Transportation Planning Committee and co-founder of the Clinton Hell’s Kitchen Coalition for Pedestrian Safety, has long advocated for the city to make streets safer for pedestrians. Berthet said that she planned to attend an open house and community board presentations on the plan to learn more about its specifics and hear community feedback. Generally, any plan that would give pedestrians more space and make streets safer would be “very, very attractive for us,” she said. “At this point, I feel we need to focus much more on the pedestrian than on the traffic.”

    Berthet added that she had heard rumors that the project could slow traffic along Ninth Ave., citing a recent news report, but noted, “It’d be hard to make traffic worse. It is already impossible to go through there. Who in their right mind would use Ninth Avenue to avoid traffic?”

    She explained that drivers on Broadway have different destinations in mind than those using avenues farther west. The traffic on Ninth Ave. is exacerbated by drivers heading for the Lincoln Tunnel, and Berthet is looking forward to a DOT study on the tunnel’s traffic flow to be released later this spring.

    Wiley Norvell, communications director for Transportation Alternatives—an advocacy group for bicycling, walking and public transportation—sat through a DOT presentation on the proposed project, which predicted that some cars normally traveling on Broadway would instead opt to use Ninth Ave.

    “I feel that’s not really what we’re going to be seeing,” Norvell said. He feels the model was built on the conservative assumption that all drivers who currently travel along Broadway between Times Square and Herald Square will choose to continue taking a similar route after the closure.

    “Some feel that traffic is just like water,” he added. “You change it a little and it pops out somewhere else. There is a bit more give to our streets than you might otherwise think.”

    Norvell thinks that many drivers will instead use mass transit to get around the city, which would in turn ease congestion even further.

    “The solution is to give less of our limited street space to traffic,” he said.

    Transportation Alternatives has big hopes for the project, seeing it as “the start of something big,” Norvell noted. “This could prove to New Yorkers that streets don’t have to be all car all the time.

    “For us, this is one of the most iconic stretches of street in the world,” he continued, painting a picture of Thanksgiving celebrations at Herald Square and New Year’s Eve at Time Square. “This will really give the space back to pedestrians.”

    Fifteen-year taxi driver Javaid Tariq, who co-founded the New York Taxi Workers Alliance and serves as an organizing committee member, also thinks the plan has merit.

    "We are not completely against the plan,” he said, citing pedestrian safety as an issue his members care about. He explained that there isn’t currently enough public space at Times Square for the many tourists and New Yorkers who flood the area.

    But, “It’s going to create a lot of traffic,” Tariq said emphatically of the pilot program.

    He envisioned major problems with Broadway’s closing before and after evening theater performances.

    “How can we drop off an elderly person or someone who’s disabled blocks away from the theater?” he said. Theatergoers likely won’t want to trudge through the snow or rain after paying to take a cab to their performances, Tariq noted, and he suggested that one lane remain open for taxis heading to Broadway shows each evening. He would also like an area to be designated for pick-ups and drop-offs at the Herald Square Macy’s.

    Taxis would benefit if they were allowed to use bus lanes for pick-ups and drop-offs and as an express lane, Tariq said.

    Bill Lindauer, Taxi Workers Alliance campaigns coordinator, who worked as a taxi driver for 30 years, said workers met with the DOT last week to discuss the plan.

    “They were very agreeable to our suggestions,” he said.
    Lindauer added that his organization proposed allowing drivers to drop patrons off at theaters on 45th St. They also don’t want to be ticketed for dropping off and picking up passengers in designated bike lanes, such as the one by Macy’s, and want the city to put in a green-arrow left turn onto Seventh Ave. from 57th St.

    “We don’t know whether it’s a brilliant idea or a hair-brained idea,” he said. “I called for an independent review after the test period … We’re willing to keep an open mind, but we have our doubts.”

    The DOT will be making presentations on the proposal at meetings of Boards 5 and 4 on March 16 and 18, respectively.

    http://www.chelseanow.com/cn_123/broadwaytraffic.html

  15. #75

    Default

    I can't wait to see what these esplanades will do to Midtown traffic.

    The ripple effect will probably spread out all the way to The Bronx.

    Anyway, it's a really good idea to reclaim some of Gotham's asphalt for those on foot, especially around Times Sq and Herald Sq.

Page 5 of 23 FirstFirst 12345678915 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Woolworth Building - 233 Broadway - by Cass Gilbert
    By bak in forum New York Skyscrapers and Architecture
    Replies: 214
    Last Post: April 15th, 2015, 05:23 AM
  2. 4 Times Square a.k.a. Conde Nast Building - 42nd Street & Broadway - by Fox & Fowle
    By ddny in forum New York Skyscrapers and Architecture
    Replies: 416
    Last Post: January 2nd, 2014, 06:18 PM
  3. 165 Charles Street @ West Street - by Richard Meier
    By ASchwarz in forum New York Skyscrapers and Architecture
    Replies: 104
    Last Post: June 8th, 2010, 05:36 PM
  4. Clean Sweep at 1515 Broadway
    By BrooklynRider in forum New York Real Estate
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: September 17th, 2008, 05:51 PM
  5. Broadway Musicians Considering Union Strike
    By Agglomeration in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: November 12th, 2007, 09:20 AM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Google+ - Facebook - Twitter - Meetup

Edward's photos on Flickr - Wired New York on Flickr - In Queens - In Red Hook - Bryant Park - SQL Backup Software