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Thread: Historic Maps of NYC

  1. #1
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Default Historic Maps of NYC

    I keep coming across terrific maps of NYC past.

    Here are a few ... feel free to post what other maps you might find.

    The Great Fire of 1776:




    Manhattan Places of Worship 1797:




    Lower Manhattan 1842:




    Manhattan Ward 2 1857:




    Lower Manhattan 1916:


  2. #2
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    A few more:

    Street Art in and around SoHo by wk (interactive site with enlargeable images at the link):




    New York 1695:




    The Plan of the City of New York 1776:




    Map of the City of New York ... for New York As It Is in 1835:




    IRT Map and Guide 1906:


  3. #3

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    Check out all the Jersey ferry crossings on that last map.

    And note how the Second Avenue line shifts to First Avenue at 23rd Street. The currently-planned line should swing east into East Village, Alphabet City, the Lower East Side and South Street --with plenty of stops along the way.

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    I like how the Lexington line used to turn west at 42nd Street before heading north under Broadway. The 42nd Street part today is the shuttle.

  5. #5

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    They should run an 86th Street crosstown line under Central Park.

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    Or extend the 2nd Ave line under 125th to the west side.

  7. #7

    Default Old NYC Maps

    I found this link - these old maps are incredible;

    http://contueor.com/baedeker/unitedstates/index2.htm

  8. #8

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    I am mostly interested in mid 19th to mid 20th century New York (with a focus on Lower Manhattan), and thus have stockpiled what I believe is a pretty impressive collection of maps.

    I will hopefully post some soon.

    And yes, Baedeker's maps are extraordinary. Be sure to review London.

  9. #9

    Default I agree...

    Quote Originally Posted by ablarc View Post
    They should run an 86th Street crosstown line under Central Park.
    I thought that in another thread, but didn't post. Connecting the 1, B&C, Museum of Natural History, Metropolitan Museum, 4,5&6 and Q-T lines would be a worthy project. My friend from Jersey says it'll never happen. One can hope.

  10. #10
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    It probably will never happen. Even setting aside the funding issues that many ANY crosstown lines in the near future highly unlikely, the crosstown 86th Street bus is actually efficient and relatively quick at moving people along 86th (unlike, say the 14th or 23rd Street buses). This is because the bus can drive along the transverse through Central Park without a single bus stop or traffic light. Sure, a subway would be somewhat of an improvement, but given the ridiculous costs of building a subway, the fact that the current solution is manageable dooms any subway plans. It would probably save people 5 minutes, 10 minutes max at the height of rush hour. I'd love to see an 86th Street crosstown, but Central Park pretty much dooms any crosstowns between 60th and 110th.

    Sander did mention a 125th Street crosstown in his speech, though. That would make a little more sense, especially is 125th Street becomes much denser as envisioned under the current rezoning, which would probably lead to the buses becoming even pokier along this stretch.
    Last edited by Hamilton; March 22nd, 2008 at 03:05 PM.

  11. #11

    Default Old Maps

    If you want to buy detailed maps.

    http://digitalgallery.nypl.org/nypld...=12&snum=&pNum=

  12. #12
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Default Exhibition - New York Public Library - Opens September 25th

    Mapping the Big Apple

    A coming exhibit tracks New York history through maps

    By CANDACE JACKSON

    New York City was once home to piers stacked with horse manure, urban canals, and reefs with oysters the size of dinner plates.


    A 19th century reproduction of Dutch-controlled Lower Manhattan’s land plots in 1642. 1. This Dutch fort was built to protect the city from invaders. The English tore it down when they took over the city shortly thereafter. 2. “The Common Ditch” was a waterway that allowed ships to come into the heart of the city. The Stock Exchange stands along its path today. 3. Dutch City Hall, which was originally a tavern.


    This detail of an 1817 map is significant because it’s one of the first to show house numbers in New York City. 4. Battery Park has since grown to encompass a much larger area, as development has expanded Manhattan’s shoreline. 5. Wall Street, where it still remains today. 6. One of several steamboat ferries to Brooklyn, before bridges were constructed from Manhattan.

    A coming exhibition at the New York Public Library illustrates historical nuggets like these from the city's 400-year history through images of its evolving shoreline. "Mapping New York's Shoreline, 1609-2009," which opens Sept. 25, features about 200 maps, prints and atlases mostly from the library's collection. The show is one of many cultural events this year marking the 400th anniversary of Dutch explorer Henry Hudson's arrival in what is now Manhattan.

    "So often, people look at the land side, not the water," says Alice C. Hudson (no relation to Henry), the exhibit's curator. Some of the library's maps date back to the 1600s; some current landscapes will be displayed for contrast using Google Earth animation.

    The area that is today home to the densely packed East Village neighborhood, in the 18th century was home to Rutgers Farm. The 100-acre plot also included a brewery—a valuable business in a city that didn't yet have a public water supply.

    Oysters, now long gone because of industrial pollution, were once a large part of the city's history. In the 19th century, oyster stands were as common as the hot dog stands of today, Ms. Hudson says. Pearl Street, which runs through the neighborhood that is today Chinatown, was named for the oyster shells that were once used to pave it.

    Many of the more recent maps in the exhibit were created to document neighborhoods for insurance purposes after fire wiped out parts of Manhattan in 1835. Ms. Hudson says each map takes hours of prep work before it is ready to display, including hand-cleaning the surface with a dry powder. "A map show is very visual, it's not just literature in a book," Ms. Hudson says.

    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000...305587638.html

  13. #13
    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hamilton View Post

    Sander did mention a 125th Street crosstown in his speech, though.
    I read somewhere that this is the long term plan.

  14. #14
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Map Nerds Rejoice: NYPL Launches Interactive Site



    This morning we looked at the Croton Reservoir, where the New York Public Library's main branch now sits. In the time that it's been there—since the early 1900s—the surface of New York City has continued to change. Luckily, the library is home to a massive collection of maps, which chart the changes of this city as well as other areas—and this week they've officially launched maps.nypl.org. The site also hosts "a powerful set of tools designed to significantly enhance the way we access and use maps and the cartographic information they contain." Click! Zoom! Pan!

    So learn more about the georectification, or “warping" process (tutorial after the jump) and make some cool maps! Anyone can participate by creating an account on the site.

    NYPL Map Warper How-to

    http://gothamist.com/2010/02/04/nypl_maps_launches.php

  15. #15
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    New Website Combines Old Photos With Google Maps



    Earlier this month the New York Public Library launched their interactive map site, which allows users to bring the old city landscape together with the current one. Now the folks at SepiaTown are zooming in a little bit closer. The site, which just launched, "lets people experience the past through a large and growing collection of user-submitted, mapped historical images."

    Currently there are around 400 images on the site, and a cumbersome looking map with thumbnails of those images. If all goes as planned, the site will be adding new features and growing in the next few months—when they promise "a mobile version, filtering by date and media type, film and audio upload, plus individualized pages for registered users."

    Hopefully they'll also include more information with each image uploaded. For example, the picture above is just captioned: "222 Columbia Heights. 1936." Through the Google machine, one can find a little bit more information at the Museum of the City of New York, where they note that the home pictured was built in 1865 for the Cornell Family, and "although Brooklyn Heights was designated a historic district in 1965, the Cornell mansion was torn down and replaced in 1982 with a small apartment house. To meet landmark regulations, the apartment house conformed to the shape of the original mansion."

    http://gothamist.com/2010/02/22/new_...photos_wit.php

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