View Poll Results: Which of these smaller museums have you visited? Check all that you’ve personally bee

Voters
30. You may not vote on this poll
  • Guggenheim Museum

    27 90.00%
  • Whitney Museum

    20 66.67%
  • The Cloisters

    21 70.00%
  • Frick Collection

    10 33.33%
  • Morgan Library

    12 40.00%
  • New York Historical Society

    13 43.33%
  • Museum of the City of New York

    17 56.67%
  • Cooper Hewitt Museum of Design

    14 46.67%
  • Skyscraper Museum

    10 33.33%
  • Museum of the American Indian

    12 40.00%
Multiple Choice Poll.
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Thread: Manhattan Museums

  1. #16
    The Dude Abides
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    Thanks, although I was hoping you had taken some pictures of it.

    Good to see that they found another use for a great building.

  2. #17

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    I'm hoping for a Beaux-Arts Revival.

  3. #18
    The Dude Abides
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    But where will they find people to sculpt?

  4. #19

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    ^ Why New York of course. All those artists and potential artists...

    Up on 111th Street they recruited kids right off the streets of Harlem.

  5. #20

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    Oh, another small museum (quite small) which really deserves a viewing: the Forbes Foundation has a small museum of toy soldiers and toy battleships. Unique in its kind, very ver nice. I highly recommend it.

  6. #21

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    For what it's worth: after twenty responses, the poll shows the average Wired New York poll respondent has visited 5.2 of the ten museums on the poll.

  7. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by BPC View Post
    you're not missing much
    I suspected as much.

    I'm glad the Frick Collection is not at the bottom, or top, of the list.

  8. #23

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    26 respondents have checked 129 museum visits. The average forumer has visited 5 out of 10 museums on this list.

  9. #24
    The Dude Abides
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    Well, I finally managed to visit the Frick Collection over the holiday weekend. A true New York gem-of-a-building, with some very impressive artwork. Think of a sample of the best works from the Met's European collection - El Greco, Titian, Rembrant, Vermeer, Renoir, Bellini, Degas, Monet - and more. Definitely worth a stop, if not for the artwork, then at least to see how a true "robber baron" lived in the early 20th century.

    So, can I change my vote now?

  10. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by pianoman11686 View Post
    Well, I finally managed to visit the Frick Collection over the holiday weekend. A true New York gem-of-a-building, with some very impressive artwork. Think of a sample of the best works from the Met's European collection - El Greco, Titian, Rembrant, Vermeer, Renoir, Bellini, Degas, Monet - and more. Definitely worth a stop, if not for the artwork, then at least to see how a true "robber baron" lived in the early 20th century.
    The art in the Frick is so good that if you selected its twenty best paintings and did the same for the Metropolitan, an art historian would be hard pressed to declare a winner. The Met has thousands more lesser paintings, however.

  11. #26

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    A great site to look at paintings in detail.




    ART PROJECT

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    Explore museums from around the world, discover and view hundreds of artworks at incredible zoom levels, and even create and share your own collection of masterpieces.


    http://www.googleartproject.com/

  12. #27
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Not sure where else to put this.

    ...likely most valuable as a development site in which a buyer would demolish the existing structure...
    Surely not? . It's beautiful.


    Rubin Museum to sell property for big bucks

    The building on West 17th Street could go for more than $60 million.


    By Daniel Geiger
    May 29, 2014


    The Rubin Museum is selling 115 Seventh Ave. It could sell for more than $60 million.
    Photo: CoStar Group
    (click for bigger)

    The Rubin Museum is putting a valuable residential development site it owns on the market in what could potentially be a more than $60 million sale.

    The museum, which displays Himalayan art and historic artifacts, has put a seven-story building it owns at 115 Seventh Ave., on the corner of West 17th Street, on the auction block and has hired the brokerage firm Jones Lang LaSalle to shop the property and handle the sale.

    Glenn Tolchin, a broker at Jones Lang LaSalle who is part of the team that is handling the sale, said that it is likely most valuable as a development site in which a buyer would demolish the existing structure and build an up to 70,000-square-foot condo building there.

    The property is close to other very successful recent residential developments, including Walker Tower and Greenwich Lane, which have so far averaged healthy sales of over $3,000 per square foot.

    "We believe it's a premiere site and that it will trade at a premium," Mr. Tolchin said. "It's a corner site right at the point where some of the best neighborhoods in the city, the Flatiron District, Union Square, Chelsea and Greenwich Village all converge."

    The Rubin Museum purchased the site as part of a collection of properties on the block it bought years ago. In the early 2000s it built a museum next door. Mr. Tolchin said that 115 Seventh Ave. was never part of the museum's plans for a new headquarters, but as an investment that it would sell for a profit. Now that plan appears close to fruition as the price for residential development sites in prime areas has skyrocketed to record heights.

    The building is also next to a planned Barney's department store that Mr. Tolchin said also enhances the prospects of building retail space at the base of the tower.

    "The retail space you can build here makes this site even more valuable," Mr. Tolchin said.

    http://www.crainsnewyork.com/article...-for-big-bucks

  13. #28

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    Yep, I also saw that - and was also upset to read it. Whenever something like this happens, it seems like it's always too late for a landmarking push (i.e., the deal's already done). The most you can hope for is neighbors ... who never care about architecture or a building's historical value, but the threat of "shadows! shadows!"

    I guess the Rubin collects Asian art but is happy to see American art and history go to the dustbin

  14. #29
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    The Rubin is a vital Manhattan institution, with possibly fragile finances - their permanent collection of Himalayan Buddhist art is an invaluable resource, and their special exhibitions offer topics and experiences that no other museum in this city can focus on. It's an extraordinary and very special place. If that old Barney's store on the 7th Ave. frontage was "special", I might take your side. But it's chunky and matter-of-fact and I don't see that the city loses much (hope - good developer architecture?), and stands to gain a lot if it means safe-guarding a good institution. Perhaps the nearby success of Walker Tower would bring out, if not altruism in a developer, at least mercenary munificence?

  15. #30
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    That 'Temporary' Frick Garden -- It Was Created to Be Permanent

    by Charles A. Birnbaum

    In a bit of revisionist history, the garden at the Frick Collection designed by the world-famous British landscape architect Russell Page (1906-1985) and once hailed by the New York Times as one of his "most important works," has been downgraded by museum officials to nothing more than an interim land use. The garden occupies space the museum wants for a proposed addition.

    Consequently, in order to demolish it, Frick officials seek to diminish it saying the garden "has always been inaccessible to the public" (despite photos of parties held there and the fact that it was purpose built as a viewing garden) and was "temporary." This "temporary" idea is an important talking point in the Frick's justification; the garden's supposed planned obsolescence is foundational to their argument. There's only one problem -- the Frick created this verdant oasis as "a permanent garden" -- at least that's what the museum's own February 4, 1977 press release about it states. An anonymous source recently sent me the seven page release (with a note saying "This document is on file at the Frick Art Reference Library") and directed me to the fourth paragraph on page six -- there it is, plain as day: "a permanent garden."


    Russell Page garden at the Frick Collection. Photograph by Michael Dunn via Flickr.


    So what's going on here? The genesis of this Edenic spot grew out of a controversial Frick expansion plan in the early 1970s. As contemporary news reports and the museum's 1977 press release note, since 1940 Frick trustees had been setting aside funds to purchase three adjacent properties on East 70th Street. The last, Number 5, the former home of arts patron George Widener, was acquired in 1972. Following several contentious months involving the Frick, its neighbors and municipal officials, on July 6, 1973, New York City's Landmarks Preservation Commission acceded to the museum's request to raze the 1909 Louis XV-style Widener building and create a temporary garden that ultimately would be replaced a decade or two later by an addition.

    Within a few months, however, the expansion plan was shelved due to high costs. As the New York Times' Glenn Fowler reported on November 28, 1973: "The Frick Collection has abandoned its plan for eventual construction of a wing to the east of its museum site at Fifth Avenue and 70th Street, and instead will create a permanent garden and terrace on the space earmarked for the wing." New York Post reporter Roberta Gratz, quoted the Frick's then director Everett Fahy as saying the museum planned a "permanent" garden for the site.


    Aerial view of the Russell Page garden at the Frick Collection. Photograph from The Gardens of Russell Page.

    This was further explained in the museum's 1977 press release:

    "[B]ecause of the high estimates received on the cost of the temporary garden, it was decided instead to reduce the size of the projected wing and to erect a small one-story pavilion and a permanent garden. These revised plans were accepted by the Landmarks Commission on May 23, 1974, and construction began in May of 1975."

    Along with characterizing the garden as temporary, Frick director Ian Wardropper has sought to minimize the garden's importance in other ways telling New York Press' Gabrielle Alfiero: "From our point of view, the garden is not in any way original to either the 1914 house or the 1935 house. I just feel the greater good is to use the space that was always intended for the needs of the institution." As we've already established, this was not what "the space was always intended for." Moreover, the museum's 1977 press release explains that significant efforts were made to integrate and harmonize the garden with the overall complex:

    "The limestone for the pavilion's exterior and for the garden walls came from the same Indiana quarries as did that used in the original building and in the additions made to it when the residence was converted into a museum in the early 1930s. The garden walls incorporate carved stone reliefs taken from the east wall of the original house at the time of the conversion, and the iron gates that once stood at the entrance drive to the house have been re-erected in the front of the garden, flanked by a wrought iron fence made to match the earlier fence around the main building."

    Page's creation at the Frick is an elegant, nuanced work of art that was realized over the space of ten years. As I have written before, a museum's designed landscapes should be afforded the same degree of importance and curatorial care as their buildings and other parts of their collection. That certainly applies here.


    Russell Page garden at the Frick Collection. Photograph by Henk van der Eijk via Flickr.

    It's also important to consider the context under which Page accepted this commission. According to Nancy Berner and Susan Lowry's Garden Guide: New York City (W. W. Norton & Company, 2010), the Frick "is one of a number of public projects the English designer undertook at the end of his life, hoping to preserve his reputation for posterity." The final chapter of The Gardens of Russell Page (Frances Lincoln, 2008) added a poignant note: "Toward the end of his long career Page was keenly aware that of the hundreds of gardens he had designed, many had disappeared.

    He hoped the ones he was doing in the public sector might find permanence."

    Let's hope the Frick can honor its commitment to Page and to us.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/charle...b_5711097.html

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