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Thread: Miami Condo and High-rise Photos Megga Thread

  1. #1

    Default Miami Condo and High-rise Photos Megga Thread

    Everyone knows Miami is on fire with new construciton. There are some beautiful new projects under development, and many that have been completed. Over the past few years I've photographed just about every building and here are some of my favorite building photos that show the beauty of this city.

    Post any questions you have about anything related to any of these photos, and you may find I have the answer.


    - Bryan Sereny

    Blue Condo near Miami Design District


    6000 Indian Creek in North Beach. Really strange new building!


    Blue Green Diamond in Miami Beach


    Ten Museum Park, a Chad Oppenheim loft skyscraper


    Marina Blue


    Downtown Miami



    Conrad on Brickell


    Tip of South Beach!



    Fontain Bleau Condo Hotel


    Brickell on Biscayne Bay


    Setai South Beach

  2. #2

    Default Miami Luxury Condos

    I guess no one really cares about the Miami Skyscrapers anymore.
    I think they are stunning!

  3. #3
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
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    Default

    Welcome and thanks for showing us just some of the things that are going up in Miami.

    Yes, Miami is sprouting beautiful modern towers all over the place.

    Isn't there suppose to be a proposal for a thousand-footer there also?

    As a New Yorker, I'm kinda envious.

  4. #4
    The Dude Abides
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    I'm pretty sure the bursting of the real-estate bubble put an end to many of the more ambitious proposals...

  5. #5

    Thumbs down I love skyscrapers, but not these

    Bryan, I know that you think that your sky scrapers are stunning, but not all people would agree. I think they are architectural eyesores and are ruining the appearance of that part of Miami.

  6. #6

    Default

    South Beach is wonderfully urban and walkable; it's also mostly small-scale and low-rise. And it's stylish.

    Suburban-style blockbusters threaten all that. They substitute towers-in-a-park for streetwall, garage ramps for shops, and humdrum familiarity for local color; and they offer nothing to the pedestrian.

    Why turn a great little city into just another beachfront resort in the endless sprawl of Suburbia?

  7. #7

    Default Miami

    I'm not sure about right in Miami, but we stay in Ft. Lauderdale every few months. It's very nice, but it can be dangerous. Not directly where we're staying, but down the street and into the side streets theres some freaky areas. It's like in the hotels and around is gorgeous, safe, and amazing. But a few blocks away and it's ridiculus. Miami ( and the surronding area) need to work on infostructure of there city before these massive hotels are built by forgien real estate moguls. Or else they could become the next detroit. Beautiful city, but terrible parts of it.

    Just my two cents.

  8. #8

    Default Teddygram alert!

    Quote Originally Posted by ablarc View Post
    . . .
    Why turn a great little city into just another beachfront resort in the endless sprawl of Suburbia?

  9. #9

    Default

    ^ Yeah sure, but my point was: why applaud it?

    Actually, most of Miami Beach is safe from high-rise exploitation; it's the country's biggest historic district (a square mile). That high-rise stuff only occurs around the perimeter, and it doesn't really wreck the ambience or views, though it clearly creates Autopia for its residents. (I'm sure they don't care; they think they're in Miami.)

  10. #10
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    How deep down into the sand do they sink the pilings for these big towers on the ocean down there in Florida?

  11. #11

    Default

    What provisions do the towers have for hurricanes and tidal waves?

    If there's a hurricane alert, are the residents supposed to evacuate? Or can they stay inside and watch it with that great view they have?

    What assurance is there that the towers can withstand a Class 5 hurricane?

  12. #12

    Default

    The quick answer is "not good enough". Hopefully they have learned something in the year since the article was printed.

    P.S. - While I might not like the buildings, I think the Photographs were very nice, thanks.



    Posted on Wed, Oct. 26, 2005
    Glass failure in high-rises shocks experts

    High-rise windows in Miami-Dade and Fort Lauderdale did not live up to safety expectations, leaving experts wondering what went wrong.

    BY CURTIS MORGAN AND MATTHEW HAGGMAN

    cmorgan@herald.com

    Wilma was the first real test in decades of how the glittering, fast-growing skylines of Miami and Fort Lauderdale would hold up in a hurricane. The result stunned and troubled emergency managers and building experts.
    Hundreds of windows blew out in dozens of high-rises, causing extensive and expensive damage to such centers of public life as the Broward County Courthouse and heralded new Miami landmarks such as the Espirito Santo Plaza and Four Seasons Tower.

    On Tuesday, panes were still falling from the posh Miami hotels, recently completed under the strictest building and wind codes. They posed such a public safety danger that Miami police closed five blocks of Brickell Avenue to traffic.

    ''This looks like Berlin after the war,'' said Miami Police Chief John Timoney, as he surveyed more than a half-dozen ravaged buildings on Brickell. ``I don't know what to make of it. These buildings are supposed to resist winds up to 150 miles per hour.''

    The destruction perplexed structural engineers and contractors as well, who were groping for causes that may not be pinpointed until inspectors and engineers examine each structure.
    Some pointed to one obvious suspect -- an assault of wind-driven debris, perhaps gravel from surrounding high-rise roofs or trash from surrounding construction sites -- but there were many possibilities.
    In older buildings, it could be as simple as glass never designed to withstand hurricane winds. In newer ones, it might be anything from poor construction techniques to faulty materials to specific designs of some buildings to the dynamic of wind moving among buildings and possibly ''tunneling,'' or multiplying, its force.

    `DUMBFOUNDED'
    No less of a construction authority than Herb Saffir, a Coral Gables structural engineer who co-developed the Saffir-Simpson scale used to rate hurricane intensity, pronounced himself ''dumbfounded'' by the widespread window losses -- particularly to newer downtown Miami buildings such as the JW Marriott hotel, constructed after Miami-Dade beefed up its building codes following Hurricane Andrew in 1992.

    Wilma, Saffir pointed out, wasn't even a major hurricane when it hit the Southeast coast, but a Category 2 or even 1. The highest reported gusts in downtown Fort Lauderdale barely topped 100 mph. Downtown Miami got off even lighter.
    '
    'Even if it had been the pre-Andrew code, I think those windows should have stayed in place,'' he said.
    Most of the damage in Miami-Dade and Broward was the familiar kind -- damaged house and condo roof or tiles, downed trees, felled fences -- but few expected so many high-rise blowouts.

    NOT ISOLATED CASES
    In Miami, in addition to the newer JW Marriott, Four Seasons and Espirito Santo Plaza, there were dozens of other buildings that lost windows. The most notable damage: The southern side of the Colonial Bank building at 1200 Brickell was punched out, as were windows on the southern side of the Greenberg Traurig building at 1221 Brickell across the street.
    In North Bay Village, Wilma blew through dozens of units at the Grand View Palace apartments, and the unoccupied South Shore Hospital in Miami Beach lost more than 100 panes.

    While some of the newest apartments and condos seemed to survive intact, many of the tallest buildings in downtown Fort Lauderdale had damage.
    Among the worst-hit were the Broward Financial Center, at U.S. 1 and Broward Boulevard, and the school district headquarters on Southeast Third Avenue at Southeast Sixth Street. Nearly all of the windows were blown out on the west faces of both buildings.

    The Broward County Courthouse also suffered severe damage, as did one of the New River Village apartment buildings on Sixth Street west of U.S. 1. The Bank of America building, at Broward Boulevard and Northeast Third Avenue, had a large hole halfway up the south face.

    The way many high-rises are built, with windows affixed to a strong building skeleton in what archtitects call ''a curtain wall,'' experts say window blowouts don't typically threaten the stability of building. But window failures can gut offices or living spaces and put them out of commission for months.
    Before Andrew, Saffir said, a building's ''cladding,'' or outer shell, fell into a poorly regulated gray area. After Andrew, Miami-Dade and Broward adopted a tougher building code, adopted statewide for coastal areas in 2001.
    Under that code, high-rises' windows are supposed to withstand not only the higher pressure of more powerful upper-level winds but some debris as well.
    Like home windows, they also are supposed to withstand impact tests, including the two-by-four fired from a cannon. But windows above 60 feet are supposed to be designed to withstand small debris flying at Category 3 levels, or around 120 mph.

    Still, because of the wide amount of damage to old and new buildings, several experts say some sort of debris remains the most plausible explanation.

    Scott Schiff, a professor of civil engineering at Clemson University, said his chief suspect would be gravel used on some -- particularly older -- high-rise roofing systems. The rock, applied atop tar and paper to protect the waterproofing, can be easily blown off a roof into that building or surrounding ones.

    GRAVEL SENT ALOFT?
    Roof gravel did extensive damage in downtown Houston during Hurricane Alicia in 1983, he said, and blew out windows in Cutler Ridge and at the Homestead Air Force Base during Andrew as well.
    On the base, he said, ''it was like someone went around for 36 hours with a shotgun and shot every single building,'' he said.
    Once a window breaks, the flying shards can become missiles themselves, he said, and also expose other windows to internal pressure blowouts as hurricane winds howl inside.

    Tom Murphy, Jr., president of Coastal Construction in Miami, who was out of town and had not seen the damaged buildings, wondered if debris from the many condos under construction got caught up in the wind and damaged the buildings.

    'Debris is the likely culprit, but I would not know without seeing it,'' he said.
    But Murphy added that, despite wind tests and careful design, how high-rise buildings respond to hurricane-force winds remains -- as a practical matter -- uncertain.
    ''There is a big difference between wind that is 30 feet off the ground and wind that is 130 feet off the ground.'' said Murphy, whose company has a host of high-rise towers under construction.

    Tim Reinhold, vice president of engineering for the insurance-industrysupported Institute for Business and Home Safety in Tampa, suspected debris was largely to blame as well. But he said it was critical for the state to determine what failed and why -- particularly with the newer structures because South Florida's condo boom is putting more people in similar high-rises in a hurricane zone.

    ''There is going to be a need to go through and evaluate what were the forces and failures, the designs of the buildings, the codes,'' he said. ``If they were built right and still failed, then we've got some real trouble. We might need to seriously reevaluate our standards.''

    Herald staff writers Andres Viglucci, Amy Sherman and Sara Olkon contributed to this report.

  13. #13

    Wink

    Quote Originally Posted by antinimby View Post
    Welcome and thanks for showing us just some of the things that are going up in Miami.

    Yes, Miami is sprouting beautiful modern towers all over the place.

    Isn't there suppose to be a proposal for a thousand-footer there also?

    As a New Yorker, I'm kinda envious.
    There was a proposed 110 story condo tower but the FAA has blocked the approval. If the developer ever gets past this, they will have to wait 4-8 years for the market to recover from the "bubble bursting".

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rapunzel View Post
    Bryan, I know that you think that your sky scrapers are stunning, but not all people would agree. I think they are architectural eyesores and are ruining the appearance of that part of Miami.
    I agree, not all towers in Miami are nice, however there are some that in recent years have won National Architectural Awards!

  15. #15
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    What provisions do the towers have for hurricanes and tidal waves?
    With global warming and ocean levels rising this area will become extremely vulnerable to hurricane storm surges. I wouldn't buy here.

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