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Thread: St. Vincent's Hospital (7th Ave) - Redevelopment Plan

  1. #226
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    LPC Approves Plans for Ol’ O’Toole

    by Tom Stoelker


    The latest renderings show restored executive offices with the cantilevered form below.
    (Courtesy Perkins Eastman)

    After a protracted land use review with vitriolic community meetings that disquieted even battle-hardened presenters, the Landmarks Preservation Commission finally approved plans by the Rudin development family and North Shore Long Island Jewish Medical to renovate the St. Vincent’s O’Toole building in Manhattan’s West Village. As of Tuesday, the former Maritime Union headquarters is set to become a comprehensive health care facility with emergency services.


    The walk-in emergency entrance on Seventh Ave., with an unobstructed site
    line beneath the northernmost cantilever.
    Reduced signage also helped push the proposal through LPC.


    “Today’s vote is further recognition that the North Shore-LIJ Comprehensive Care Center is not only the best plan to bring health care back to the West Side, but the right one for the neighborhood,” Rudin Management CEO Bill Rudin said in a statement.

    Renovations by Perkins Eastman will preserve much of the original design by architect Albert C. Ledner. “The interesting point is that we are adaptively reusing a 1960′s building and turning it into a 21st century medical facility,” said Frank Gunther, principal at Perkins Eastman. “We’re fitting a square into a circle.”

    The final proposal also addressed concerns by commissioners and several preservationists that the cantilevered overhang not be undermined. Original designs included a ground floor glass wall that practically merged with the overhang on the building’s west side. The approved design pulls the glass wall back away from the second floor while gently curving toward the north entrance, which will be used for the medical offices.

    The south side of the building will be carved out to provide privacy for the ambulance entrance, while the east side of the building facing Seventh Avenue will remain largely unchanged with new glass block replacing the old, aiding the illusion of a substantial rectangular mass floating above a glass base. Atop the building, a large modernist turret and old executive office space will be restored and converted into medical offices.


    The carved out entrance for ambulances shield patients from the street.

    Perhaps the most substantial change will be the removal of the tiny-tile cladding, which was added by the client shortly after the building was completed in 1963. The new façade will sport a fresh coat of white paint the color of vanilla ice cream, as Ledner had always intended.

    “It was an ill fated application,” Gunther, said of the tiles. “We plan to restore it to the original concrete finish, similar to what they did at the Guggenheim a few years ago.”
    Gunther said the firm received Ledner’s blessing on the restoration after extensive consultations with the architect. The team even made a pilgrimage to visit the 87-year-old Ledner who accompanied them to his archives at Tulane University.

    http://blog.archpaper.com/wordpress/archives/21191

  2. #227

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    One of the negative consequences of the closing of St. Vincent's was that this building wasn't demoed. I was dearly hoping the original plan was going to happen, and this building would be demoed to use as the site for the new hospital. This building is really ugly.
    Last edited by BBMW; September 13th, 2011 at 12:37 AM.

  3. #228
    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
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    It's hot mid sixties.

  4. #229

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    I absolutely hate the O'Toole building - I don't understand how people concerned with the aesthetic of this neighborhood can possibly be for saving this crap. I hope to see this and other 1960s garbage built in this city get periodically torn down during my lifetime. Hopefully it will get replaced with some that's superior.

  5. #230
    Forum Veteran MidtownGuy's Avatar
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    The O'Toole building is terrific. I'm so happy to see that it wasn't senselessly destroyed, as a lot of shortsighted people with no taste or sense of style would have liked.

  6. #231
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    ^ Thank you. It's not 'old timey' enough for these people.

  7. #232
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    I like its quirkiness. Its squat countenance could benefit, perhaps, with something appropriate built on top of it?

  8. #233

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    That was a looong time ago.

    Quote Originally Posted by stache View Post
    It's hot mid sixties.

  9. #234

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    Oh, come on, it just really fugly.

    Quote Originally Posted by MidtownGuy View Post
    The O'Toole building is terrific. I'm so happy to see that it wasn't senselessly destroyed, as a lot of shortsighted people with no taste or sense of style would have liked.

  10. #235

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    How Blissful.

  11. #236
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    Quote Originally Posted by BBMW View Post
    That was a looong time ago.
    So was Second Empire. Let's tear down all those fugly townhouses.

  12. #237

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    ^
    I meant it was a long time since that design could have been considered hot.

  13. #238
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    A Vanished Row of Unusual Grace in the West Village

    By CHRISTOPHER GRAY

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/11/re...ref=realestate
    Last edited by Edward; February 15th, 2012 at 04:57 PM. Reason: Full text by Christopher Gray deleted

  14. #239

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    Village Gateway

    St. Vincent's facility island to become a park.


    A hospital maintenance block could give way to green space.
    Courtesy Bing

    Just below 14th Street on Seventh Avenue where the streets begin to twist, sits a triangular plot of land. The slightly elevated gated tract contains a former material handling facility for St. Vincent’s hospital in the middle and a small nondescript building holding oxygen tanks at the westernmost edge. It’s the kind of quirky space that distinguishes the Village as unique. The property belonged to the now defunct St. Vincent’s Hospital and stayed in play while the Rudin Development family shuffled air rights between the various properties on the former medical campus. The latest, and perhaps last, round of the Universal Land Use Review Procedure (ULURP) proceedings began in September and a good portion of open air and public space requirements are being fulfilled on the site, thus creating a new park which could serve as a green gateway to the Village.

    This is not the first proposal for green space at the site; a 2009 plan that made it through ULURP opened up the garden and provided seating. The new proposal eliminates the material handling facility, adding about 6,500 square feet, bringing the total to more than 15,000 feet of park space. The utilitarian brown brick building storing oxygen will remain, though there is intense pressure to move it closer to the old O’Toole building where North Shore Long Island Jewish Medical Services (NSLIJ) is planning to set up shop. More than 150,000 feet of development rights at the site are to be eliminated. But with more square footage transferred into public space comes more debate.

    The latest design by M. Paul Friedberg and Partners for Rudin includes 31 trees and nearly 5,000 square feet of plantings that incorporate rosebushes already on the site. With the removal of the handling facility and old flowerbeds, the park could be brought to grade. Street-level vistas that have been blocked for decades would open up once the garage is removed, including a view of the south face of the former O’Toole building by Albert C. Ledner.

    When M. Paul Friedberg’s managing principal Rick Parisi presented the Rudin plan at a series of community board meetings during September, the community reaction was tepid. “This park is the ambassador of the West Village,” said Janet Capron. “It has to in some way characterize what we are.” Capron added that a “generic looking pocket park that could appear on the Upper East Side” didn’t fit the bill.

    The plan also explored the potential for incorporating a memorial into the design through text on the pavers, thus opening up yet another debate. Parisi’s presentation mentioned three groups affiliated with St. Vincent’s that could be honored as part of a memorial, including the Sisters of Mercy, AIDS patients, and World Trade victims. Queer History Alliance was on hand at all the meetings to call for an international design competition for an AIDS memorial.

    Representatives from the Rudin organization politely listened to the group’s presentation, knowing full well that the land, privately owned, was part of a much bigger ULURP package. The land usage at the park remains intertwined with that of the O’Toole building and the proposed condominium complex across the street. The ULURP process is underway and will need to be completed in seven months. The community board will vote on a resolution on October 20.

    Tom Stoelker

    Copyright © 2003-2011 | The Architect's Newspaper, LLC

  15. #240
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    Architectural Record and Architizer Team Up with AIDS Memorial Park Group for Design Competition in NYC

    By Jenna M. McKnight

    Photo © 2011 Google
    Entries are now being accepted for a competition to create a memorial and park across from the now-shuttered St. Vincent’s Hospital in the West Village.



    Photo © Helene Silverman
    The project’s proposed location is Triangle Park,
    a roughly 16,000-square-foot patch of land bordered by
    Seventh Avenue, 12th Street, and Greenwich Avenue.

    AIDS Memorial Park, a coalition of individuals and groups committed to recognizing the ongoing AIDS crisis, has teamed up with Architectural Record and Architizer to host a design competition for a park, memorial, and small educational center in New York City’s West Village, across from the now-shuttered St. Vincent’s Hospital. Entries will be accepted today through midnight on January 21, with winners being announced on February 1.

    A 10-member jury of esteemed architects, critics, artists, activists, and others will evaluate the submissions. The first place winner will receive $5,000, and a runner-up will receive $2,000. The coalition aims to complete construction by World AIDS Day on December 1, 2014. Entries can be submitted through the Architizer website.

    The project’s proposed location is Triangle Park, a roughly 16,000-square-foot patch of land bordered by Seventh Avenue, 12th Street, and Greenwich Avenue. The neglected pocket park is across from the former St. Vincent’s, which was closed in 2010 due to financial woes. Founded in 1849, the well-known medical facility was at the epicenter of New York’s AIDS epidemic and housed one of the nation’s oldest and most acclaimed HIV treatment programs.

    “We envision AIDS Memorial Park as a vital community park that integrates green public space with a living memorial,” says Keith Fox, president of McGraw-Hill Construction and chairman of AIDS Memorial Park’s executive committee. “We believe that our design process will engage the best architects, as well as landscape and urban designers, to propose inspirational, imaginative, and thoughtful alternative solutions for the park and underground space.”

    The hospital and park are now owned by Rudin Management, which plans to construct residential towers and townhouses on the property, as well as convert the park into a privately owned public space. Earlier this year, a group called Queer History Alliance proposed transforming the park into a memorial to the countless AIDs patients who were treated at St. Vincent’s. The group also hopes to create a 10,000-square-foot educational space below ground, according to a recent article in The New York Times.

    Design competition organizers say the project aims to not only commemorate the more than 100,000 New Yorkers who have died from AIDS, but also to celebrate the efforts of caregivers and activists involved in this ongoing health crisis.

    Jury chair Michael Arad, designer of the The National September 11 Memorial, says he is honored to be involved. “The redesign of the grounds of the old St. Vincent’s hospital has afforded a unique opportunity to create a meaningful public space,” he says. “My fellow jurors and I are looking forward to reviewing proposals that imagine both a neighborhood park that will serve the surrounding community, and a significant memorial that can serve as a symbolic touchstone as we commemorate 30 years of the AIDS epidemic.”

    Jurors for AIDS Memorial Park Design Competition

    * Chair: Michael Arad, designer of The National September 11 Memorial
    * Kurt Andersen, novelist and journalist
    * Barry Bergdoll, chief curator of architecture and design at the Museum of Modern Art and
    architectural history professor at Columbia University
    * Elizabeth Diller, founding Partner of Diller Scofidio + Renfro and architecture professor at Princeton University
    * Robert Hammond, co-founder and executive director of Friends of the High Line
    * Dr. Marjorie Hill, CEO of Gay Men’s Health Crisis
    * Bill T. Jones, artistic director, choreographer, and dancer
    * Richard Meier, managing partner at Richard Meier & Partners Architects
    * Ken Smith, landscape architect
    * Suzanne Stephens, deputy editor at Architectural Record

    http://archrecord.construction.com/n...orial-Park.asp

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