Page 4 of 20 FirstFirst 1234567814 ... LastLast
Results 46 to 60 of 293

Thread: St. Vincent's Hospital (7th Ave) - Redevelopment Plan

  1. #46
    The Dude Abides
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    NYC - Financial District
    Posts
    4,418

    Default

    Manhattan Developer for Hospital Site

    By MANHATTAN: DEVELOPER FOR HOSPITAL SITE
    Published: May 17, 2007

    The Rudin family has been selected as the developer for a site on Seventh Avenue owned and occupied by St. Vincentís Hospital, which is relocating, hospital officials announced yesterday. Under the plan, the hospital will move from its current location, on Seventh Avenue between 11th and 12th Streets, to Seventh Avenue between 12th and 13th Streets, said Michael Fagan, a hospital spokesman. He said a modern hospital would replace the current collection of buildings. Once the new building is open, the current site will be redeveloped and the Rudins will pay St. Vincentís an amount to be determined in part by the type of project approved by the city, Mr. Fagan said. He said the money would go toward the cost of the new hospital, estimated at $650 million.

    Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company

  2. #47
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    in Limbo
    Posts
    8,976

    Default

    Here's some more coverage from cityrealty.com on the subject.

    But you really need to check out what GVSHP has to say with respect to the hospital's plans:

    St. Vincent's Hospital selects Rudin family for redevelopment

    16-MAY-07

    The Saint Vincent Medical Centers announced today that they had selected the Rudin family as a development partner for a new hospital facility on the site of the Edward and Theresa O'Toole Medical Services Building on the northwest corner of 12th Street and Seventh Avenue.

    When the new facility is built, the hospital will vacate its properties on the east side of Seventh Avenue between 11th and 12th Streets and those sites will be developed by the Rudin family "primarily for residential use."
    The announcement said that the hospital will submit its plans for the Landmarks Preservation Commission and the City Planning Commission.

    Saint Vincent is the academic medical center of the New York Medical College and it is sponsored by the Roman Catholic Bishop of Brooklyn and the president of the Sisters of Charity of New York.

    The O'Toole building was built in 1964 as the National Maritime Union of America Building and was designed by Albert C. Ledner & Associates. It was described by Norval White and Elliot Willensky in their book, "The A. I. A. Guide to New York City, Third Edition," as a "double-dentured monument" and is notable for its nautical motif.

    In 1984, the hospital demolished its very handsome, Georgian-style Elizabeth Bayley Seton Building that had been designed by Schikel & Ditmars and replaced it with a brutalist structure designed by Ferrenz, Taylor, Clark & Associates. It also replaced the Loew's Sheridan movie theater, the major movie house in Greenwich Village, with a truck facility at the intersection of Seventh and Greenwich Avenues.

    William C. Rudin, a managing partner in the Rudin family holdings, said in the hospital's announcement that "Together we will help St. Vincent's Hospital build a new, 21st Street, environmentally friendly, state of the art, health care facility," adding that "This partnership allows the hospital to serve its ever-growing community and continue to fulfill its mission for the next 150 years."

    The announcement said the hospital "anticipates emerging from Bankruptcy court protection this summer with a healthy balance sheet and up-to-date financial systems and controls," adding that it "is filing a motion today that seeks authority from the Bankruptcy Court to enter into a memorandum of understanding with the Rudin family."

    The Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation sent the hospital a letter May 10 urging that there "should be no increase in overall density on the properties currently occupied by St. Vincents, and in fact a decrease in density would be desirable." It also said that the design of new developments should "be compatible in design and scale with the Greenwich Village Historic District," adding tht the "triangle bounded by Greenwich Avenue, West 12th Street and 7th Avenue should not be built upon."

    Copyright © 1994-2007 CITY REALTY.COM INC.

  3. #48
    The Dude Abides
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    NYC - Financial District
    Posts
    4,418

    Default

    ^Sweet.

  4. #49
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    in Limbo
    Posts
    8,976

    Default

    Now I know you are just being sarcastic pianoman, right?

  5. #50
    The Dude Abides
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    NYC - Financial District
    Posts
    4,418

    Default

    Let me put it this way: I wouldn't shed a tear if Andrew Berman and his crew at the society altogether packed up their bags and vacated the city.

  6. #51
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    in Limbo
    Posts
    8,976

    Default

    Whew! For moment there, I thought we had lost you over to the dark side...

  7. #52

    Default

    I stayed at st vincent's a few years back.. nothing serious i had foot reconstruction surgey and as a result of some minor post-op complications wound up staying there for about a week. I must say, the care was very good.

    Regardless of what happens to the buildings, I hope the medical needs of the community are not compromised as a result of moving to a "smaller more effifient" operation and tearing down the existing facility. Afterall the building'rs primary purpose is function not aesthetics.
    Last edited by eddhead; May 17th, 2007 at 02:26 PM.

  8. #53
    The Dude Abides
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    NYC - Financial District
    Posts
    4,418

    Default

    Critics have 2nd opinion on hospital’s building plan

    By Lincoln Anderson
    The Villager
    Volume 76, Number 53 | May 30 - June 5, 2007


    The 300,000-square-foot Coleman Pavilion,
    built in 1982, is part of the existing St.
    Vincent’s Hospital campus on Seventh
    Ave. S. that would be demolished under
    the hospital’s rebuilding plan. This
    property would be slated for private
    residential development by the Rudin
    Management Company.


    St. Vincent’s Hospital sees in its future a sleek, state-of-the-art hospital building with operating rooms spacious enough to accommodate robots and imaging machines and with wireless communications to automatically transmit patient information written on clipboards to central computers.

    But neighbors anxiously envision an enormous new hospital tower and private mega-development project that will dramatically transform Greenwich Village. In short, neighbors have a second opinion: They want St. Vincent’s to reconsider its plan.

    Two weeks ago, St. Vincent’s announced that it has selected Rudin Management Company as a development partner for its new hospital project.

    “St. Vincent’s chose the Rudin family because of its longstanding commitment to New York City,” said Alfred E. Smith, IV, chairperson of the board of directors of St. Vincent’s Catholic Medical Centers. “They are recognized as a responsible developer and outstanding corporate citizen. The partnership will provide us some of the needed resources to build a new St. Vincent’s for the next century.”

    St. Vincent’s hopes to emerge from bankruptcy this summer. While the development plan would help St. Vincent’s construct a new building and ensure the hospital’s long-term viability, it has no connection to the hospital’s emergence from bankruptcy, according to Michael Fagan, a hospital spokesperson.

    St. Vincent’s wants to build a new $600 million building on the site of its existing O’Toole Building — which would be demolished — on Seventh Ave. S. between 12th and 13th Sts. After the new facility is completed, St. Vincent’s would vacate its roughly 10 current hospital buildings on the east side of Seventh Ave. S. between 12th and 11th Sts. and the south side of 12th St. between Seventh Ave. S. and Sixth Ave. Then, in a demolition project of major proportions, these buildings all would be razed, after which the sites would be developed primarily for residential use. The plan allows the hospital to remain fully operational at all times.

    Renovating the existing buildings just isn’t feasible, according to the hospital.

    St. Vincent’s says the need for a new “hospital of the future” is made even more pressing by population growth in its West Side catchment area: Residential development is booming in West Chelsea, the far West Village and the Hudson Yards, meaning more patient visits.

    St. Vincent’s projects 10,000 more annual emergency-room patient visits in just a couple of years.

    Also, the possible loss of Cabrini Hospital on E. 19th St. and St. Vincent’s Midtown Hospital (the former St. Clare’s) on W. 51st St. has St. Vincent’s anticipating having to pick up the slack. At the end of last year, the Berger Commission — a state panel charged with making recommendations on hospital closures — recommended pulling the plug on both Cabrini and St. Vincent’s Midtown. That would make St. Vincent’s the only hospital on the West Side between Greenwich Village and W. 59th St.

    “We’re really at the very early stages of this project in determining how best to meet the healthcare needs of the people we serve Downtown and on the Lower West Side,” said Fagan. “We haven’t even engaged an architecture firm yet. This is a project where we’ve come to the community early. Being in the Village for 150 years, we’re really mindful about building a hospital that is consistent with the fabric of our historic neighborhood.”

    A St. Vincent’s Community Working Group has been meeting since January to discuss the project and make recommendations. The group includes representatives of neighboring residents, local politicians and the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, as well as other local healthcare organizations, like Village Care of New York and the L.G.B.T. Community Center.

    Too tall on O’Toole

    The sentiment in the working group’s first four meetings has been concern over what would happen if St. Vincent’s tries to mass all its hospital facilities on one small site, while opening up the area east of Seventh Ave. S. for private development.

    Although the hospital would be reducing its total space by about 200,000 square feet, the new main hospital building would be significantly bigger than the existing O’Toole Building. A former maritime union hall with nautical-style porthole windows, O’Toole is only six stories tall, with about 175,000 square feet of space.

    Andrew Berman, director of G.V.S.H.P., said that if, as St. Vincent’s has stated at the working group meetings, it wants the new building to be 600,000 to 650,000 square feet, it would be an overly large tower that would stick out like a sore thumb.

    “In order to put 600,000 to 650,000 square feet on that [O’Toole] site, it would either have to be a 17-story building that rises straight up — which is huge — or, if it had setbacks, it would be even taller,” Berman said.

    Berman and residents of nearby buildings have organized a coalition on the St. Vincent’s project.

    “This coalition says that is too big,” the G.V.S.H.P. director said of the planned hospital tower.


    “We aren’t at the point where we can say it’s going to be a 17-story building going straight up on the O’Toole site,” Fagan said. “I think it would be premature for us to say exactly how tall the building would be. We need to do a bed-need analysis as well as programs and service analysis.”

    Fagan said there’s the possibility of putting some of the new building underground. But he said, at this point, he couldn’t specify how much of the building that might include.

    Berman and neighbors are also concerned about the new hospital building’s aesthetics in terms of fitting into the area, which is part of the landmarked Greenwich Village Historic District.

    “I am confident that they know that an undulating glass tower would not fly in this neighborhood,” Berman noted.


    Prescribing contextuality

    In fact, Fagan said, St. Vincent’s recently started meeting with architecture firms about the project, all of whom have shown sensitivity to the neighborhood and have stressed that the new building must be contextual with its surroundings.

    “We will choose, ultimately, a firm that is most sensitive to the community,” Fagan assured. “This is what we’ve conveyed to them.”

    The project would have to undergo a review by the city’s Landmarks Preservation Commission.

    St. Vincent’s also would need to rezone the O’Toole site and do a large-scale development plan for the sites east of Seventh Ave. S. A large-scale development plan allows zoning bulk to be shifted among nonadjacent lots within the development site. All these changes would need to be approved by the Department of City Planning and undergo the city’s uniform land-use review procedure, which would include a public review by Community Board 2.

    As for why a brand-new hospital building is needed, Dr. George Neuman, St. Vincent’s medical director of perioperative services and chief of anesthesiology, said changes in healthcare demand it.

    “There have been tremendous advances in technology and in how a hospital should operate and in the actual environment of a hospital,” said Neuman, who oversees all St. Vincent’s operating rooms.

    For example, he said, new surgical techniques — like robots and imaging machines — have been introduced in the last 25 to 30 years, requiring 50 percent larger operating rooms.

    The hospital also wants to make all its patient rooms single bed as opposed to double bed. It would try to put in as many so-called universal rooms as possible; these rooms have special equipment that folds out and folds away, allowing a patient to spend his or her whole stay in one room, rather than being shuffled about. Keeping stays to one room improves efficiency, cuts down on length of stays and makes it less confusing for family visitors, Neuman said.

    Also, there are stricter standards on the number of air changes per minute throughout the whole hospital, which the new building would meet, Neuman added. Water quality also would be improved, enhancing the ability to quickly heat up water to where bacteria is killed. The building would have more natural light. Materials — furniture, fixtures, new flooring and wall treatments — that prevent growth of bacteria would be installed, Neuman said.

    In addition, the new hospital building would have wireless communications, linking doctors’ and nurses’ clipboards to a central data bank.

    “The public deserves this,” Neuman said. “They deserve state-of-the-art care and to have this in their neighborhood.”

    Keep hospital healthy

    Maria Passannante Derr, C.B. 2 chairperson, agreed better hospital facilities are needed. She noted that Coleman, St. Vincent’s main building on Seventh Ave. S., was built in 1982.

    “The city is in desperate need of a state-of-the-art hospital,” Derr said. “This facility, as a Level 1 trauma facility, is critical to the rest of the city.” St. Vincent’s is one of only two Level 1 trauma facilities in the city, Derr said.

    On a personal note, Derr said the hospital should also upgrade another one of its facilities.

    “I would like to see as a giveback to the community the St. Vincent’s Garden,” she said. “It should really be an A-1 community-friendly community garden for people to enjoy. Right now, it’s a hill with a fence around it.”

    At C.B. 2’s meeting last Thursday night, Bernadette Kingham, the hospital’s senior vice president, acknowledged the garden has been part of the working group’s discussions.

    Also at last Thursday’s C.B. 2 meeting, John Gilbert, Rudin’s chief operations officer, pledged the developer will work with the community.

    “To do it with a conversation — that’s the beginning — and to do it with the community,” he said of their intentions. In response to a C.B. 2 member’s question on whether the St. Vincent’s Nurses’ Residence on 12th St. would be knocked down, Gilbert said he couldn’t say yet.

    Brad Hoylman, who will succeed Derr as C.B. 2 chairperson in June, said: “There seems to be widespread agreement that the hospital’s mission is very important to the local community. While it is still very early in the planning process, I think the new community board administration anticipates helping find a way that the reorganization plans will benefit both St. Vincent’s and the neighborhood.”

    The new hospital building would also be a green building.

    Said St. Vincent’s Fagan: “We’re looking at ways we can better conserve water and energy and reduce carbon emissions. It’s something we can give back to the Village.”

    Best Rx for community

    But Berman and the hospital’s neighbors think the best giveback to the community would be for St. Vincent’s to promise not to increase the overall bulk on its current sites and not to put all its hospital facilities on the O’Toole site, but instead to keep some of its hospital uses on the east side of Seventh Ave. S.

    Michael Anastasio, a board member of The Cambridge apartment building, at 175 W. 13th St., is one of the residents working to build a coalition to address St. Vincent’s plans. He admitted it was buildings like his own — 20 stories tall and built in the 1960s — that helped create the Greenwich Village Historic District in 1969.

    Anastasio said he not only fears a too-tall new hospital tower but “two walls” — one on the south side of 12th St. and the other on the east side of Seventh Ave. S. — if the development plan goes through. He thinks the hospital just should renovate its existing buildings.

    “What they propose to do is entirely to their own benefit,” said Anastasio, who has been attending the working group meetings. “They said they couldn’t sell O’Toole to a developer — it wouldn’t yield enough. It’s all about money. They said they need $350 million to renovate the hospital.”

    Anastasio said neighbors watched with interest what happened with the General Theological Seminary’s plans on Ninth Ave., where staunch community opposition recently led the seminary to reduce a planned 17-story tower to seven stories.

    “The Theological Seminary in Chelsea — it gave us hope,” he said.

    G.V.S.H.P.’s Berman stressed this is a project the likes of which the Greenwich Village Historic District never has seen before.

    “Whatever the results are, we’re going to be living with them the rest of our lifetimes and our children will be living with them the rest of their lifetimes, as well,” he said. “Two city blocks in the heart of Greenwich Village. I don’t think any of us contemplated seeing that kind of development in Greenwich Village. This is huge in every respect.”

    Fagan agreed the project’s impact will be far-reaching.

    “We’re talking about creating a healthcare facility that will treat us and our children — for two generations at least,” he said.

    © 2007 Community Media, LLC

  9. #54

    Default

    These doomsday arguments are getting so tired and the press just seems to love reporting this garbage.

  10. #55

    Default

    Berman is obviously in bed with the owners of the Villager. Why are his opinions presented as the "community" opinions? His organization (GVSHP) is a one-man organization, except for some paid interns. It doesn't represent the West Village any more then any other group. Berman has no connection with mainstream preservation organizations (Municipal Arts Society, etc.) In fact, he is a joke to some in the preservation community (at least to friends of mine with Masters in Historic Preservation).

    Why does nobody have the courage to ignore his rantings? I think it's because of money. GHVSP is a very wealthy organization, as they are funded by some of the wealthiest residents of the West Village. Essentially Berman is a paid attack-dog against those that "threaten" the interests of his benefactors.

    I would like to know who owns the Villager and whether they have links to Berman and his benefactors. I would guess that they are very closely linked, as he is front-and-center in at least one article in basically every weekly edition.

    The West Village will be a much better place when Berman and his supporters tire of these games and retire to wherever bitter NIMBYs eventually go. Hopefully far from NYC!

  11. #56

    Default

    I think I'm going to contact the author (Lincoln Anderson) and ask him why this one individual is the focus of every weekly issue. I would like to hear an honest response, though I'm likely dreaming. If he has any journalistic integrity, Anderson will at least acknowledge the connections between Berman and the Villager.

  12. #57

    Default

    ^^Attempted character assassination, consisting of gossip, hearsay accusations and guesses, and, probably, outright lies, floating on a sea of bile. No one has to like the GVSHP or Andrew Berman, but feces throwing is no substitute for reasoned analysis and criticism.

  13. #58
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    As you describe Berman (if your assertion is indeed correct): How is he any different than any other well financed PR person / lawyer or other mouthpiece hired by the wealthy of NYC and who are quoted in the press ad infinitum (Howard Rubinstein would be Exhibit #1)?

  14. #59

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ManhattanKnight View Post
    ^^Attempted character assassination, consisting of gossip, hearsay accusations and guesses, and, probably, outright lies, floating on a sea of bile. No one has to like the GVSHP or Andrew Berman, but feces throwing is no substitute for reasoned analysis and criticism.
    Where exactly is your "reasoned analysis and criticism"? Pot, meet kettle!

    I think you're just angry that your fellow forumers actually have opinions that differ from yours. The horror! Maybe next time I will blindly accept everything in the media so you won't be so offended.

    One of our current interns at my job worked under Berman two years ago. I know all about the man and his "organization". Please explain how he represents the West Village, or general citywide historical preservation interests? He has no background in historic preservation and his "organization" has no other workers besides interns.

    Moreover, I am professionally and personally aquainted with one of his benefactors, who lives (quite well) on Jane Street, near the river. A wonderful and successful man, though he and his partner help fund the GVSHP. Their original reasoning was to keep their water views. So far, their "investment" has been a roaring success. No matter that their relatively new building is exactly the type of building they are attempting to prevent others from constructing.

    Now that I have disproven your claims of "hearsay, lies and bile" (well, I'll give you the bile. I love this town and I don't want Berman to do more damage to one of its most special corners), please explain how Berman represents the opinions of West Villager moreso than any other resident??

    As an aside, many of their lawsuits are funded by big-time players with different axes to grind. They have even enlisted the United Auto Workers to sue NYU (the suit was immediately thrown out). The UAW wanted to "punish" NYU for refusing to recognize their union on campus. Of course, I'm sure you will ignore all this and just consider this "hearsay, lies and bile". Carry on, no sense in questioning what you're told. I'm sure the UAW really just cares about historic preservation, just like Berman, his "society" and his peerless supporters.

  15. #60

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1 View Post
    As you describe Berman (if your assertion is indeed correct): How is he any different than any other well financed PR person / lawyer or other mouthpiece hired by the wealthy of NYC and who are quoted in the press ad infinitum (Howard Rubinstein would be Exhibit #1)?
    Well, yes, given what I have been told (and I certainly don't know everything about the man) Berman is no different than any other hired gun.

    I'm not claiming he's engaging in criminal, or even necessarily unethical, behavior. I just wonder why 1. He is front and center in every issue of the Villager and 2. He is considered the public "voice" of the West Village on all matters relating to development.

    After all, there are many prominent and media-savvy people in the Village. Why does Berman dominate every issue and why is he always portrayed as the voice of the "community"? The fact that he is smart, well-funded and media savvy isn't enough. Certainly nobody claims that Donald Trump is the voice of the community. Why does the Villager consistently annoint Berman as the community's voice? Why not at least go to an elected head, such as the city councilperson? Wouldn't that be closer to a community representative?

    Similarly, there are many Manhattan organizations that are active in land-use planning issues. Why are downtown planning issues always ending up with commentary or involvement from Berman, rather than commentary or involvement from more established groups? When's the last time MAS was quoted in the Villager?

    I will contact the Villager and see if I get a response.

Page 4 of 20 FirstFirst 1234567814 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Transit Plan for Lower Manhattan
    By amigo32 in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 51
    Last Post: March 21st, 2008, 01:24 PM
  2. Coney Island Redevelopment
    By billyblancoNYC in forum Brooklyn, Queens, Bronx, and SI Real Estate
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: October 2nd, 2005, 11:10 PM
  3. Downtown Brooklyn, the Plan
    By Kris in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 31
    Last Post: July 3rd, 2004, 09:01 PM
  4. Financing Plan Adds Complexity to Remaking of West Side
    By Fabb in forum New York Real Estate
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: March 11th, 2003, 05:55 AM
  5. Officials Plan New WTC '93 Memorial
    By amigo32 in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: February 27th, 2003, 04:51 AM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Google+ - Facebook - Twitter - Meetup

Edward's photos on Flickr - Wired New York on Flickr - In Queens - In Red Hook - Bryant Park - SQL Backup Software